A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that occurs in water, sewage, soil, meat, hospital environments, and on the skin and in the intestinal tract of man and animals as a commensal.
A dilated cavity extended caudally from the hindgut. In adult birds, reptiles, amphibians, and many fishes but few mammals, cloaca is a common chamber into which the digestive, urinary and reproductive tracts discharge their contents. In most mammals, cloaca gives rise to LARGE INTESTINE; URINARY BLADDER; and GENITALIA.
Gram-negative gas-producing rods found in feces of humans and other animals, sewage, soil, water, and dairy products.
Infections with bacteria of the family ENTEROBACTERIACEAE.
A family of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that do not form endospores. Its organisms are distributed worldwide with some being saprophytes and others being plant and animal parasites. Many species are of considerable economic importance due to their pathogenic effects on agriculture and livestock.
Enzymes found in many bacteria which catalyze the hydrolysis of the amide bond in the beta-lactam ring. Well known antibiotics destroyed by these enzymes are penicillins and cephalosporins.
Any tests that demonstrate the relative efficacy of different chemotherapeutic agents against specific microorganisms (i.e., bacteria, fungi, viruses).
A genus of destructive root-parasitic OOMYCETES in the family Pythiaceae, order Peronosporales, commonly found in cultivated soils all over the world. Differentiation of zoospores takes place in a vesicle.
A group of broad-spectrum antibiotics first isolated from the Mediterranean fungus ACREMONIUM. They contain the beta-lactam moiety thia-azabicyclo-octenecarboxylic acid also called 7-aminocephalosporanic acid.
Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.
A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria found in humans and other animals including MAMMALS; BIRDS; REPTILES; and AMPHIBIANS. It has also been isolated from SOIL and WATER as well as from clinical specimens such as URINE; THROAT; SPUTUM; BLOOD; and wound swabs as an opportunistic pathogen.
Four-membered cyclic AMIDES, best known for the PENICILLINS based on a bicyclo-thiazolidine, as well as the CEPHALOSPORINS based on a bicyclo-thiazine, and including monocyclic MONOBACTAMS. The BETA-LACTAMASES hydrolyze the beta lactam ring, accounting for BETA-LACTAM RESISTANCE of infective bacteria.
Cephalosporinase is an enzyme produced by certain bacteria that can hydrolyze and confer resistance to cephalosporin antibiotics.
Gram-negative, capsulated, gas-producing rods found widely in nature. Both motile and non-motile strains exist. The species is closely related to KLEBSIELLA PNEUMONIAE and is frequently associated with nosocomial infections
Non-susceptibility of an organism to the action of the cephalosporins.
Semisynthetic, broad-spectrum antibacterial derived from CEPHALORIDINE and used especially for Pseudomonas and other gram-negative infections in debilitated patients.
Bacteria which lose crystal violet stain but are stained pink when treated by Gram's method.
The ability of microorganisms, especially bacteria, to resist or to become tolerant to chemotherapeutic agents, antimicrobial agents, or antibiotics. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).
A group of beta-lactam antibiotics in which the sulfur atom in the thiazolidine ring of the penicillin molecule is replaced by a carbon atom. THIENAMYCINS are a subgroup of carbapenems which have a sulfur atom as the first constituent of the side chain.
A congenital abnormality characterized by the persistence of the anal membrane, resulting in a thin membrane covering the normal ANAL CANAL. Imperforation is not always complete and is treated by surgery in infancy. This defect is often associated with NEURAL TUBE DEFECTS; MENTAL RETARDATION; and DOWN SYNDROME.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.
Congenital structural abnormalities of the UROGENITAL SYSTEM in either the male or the female.
A creeping annual plant species of the CUCURBITACEAE family. It has a rough succulent, trailing stem and hairy leaves with three to five pointed lobes.
Bis(nitrato-O)dioxouranium. A compound used in photography and the porcelain industry. It causes severe renal insufficiency and renal tubular necrosis in mammals and is an effective lymphocyte mitogen.
Extrachromosomal, usually CIRCULAR DNA molecules that are self-replicating and transferable from one organism to another. They are found in a variety of bacterial, archaeal, fungal, algal, and plant species. They are used in GENETIC ENGINEERING as CLONING VECTORS.
Gram-negative, non-motile, capsulated, gas-producing rods found widely in nature and associated with urinary and respiratory infections in humans.
One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.
The ability of bacteria to resist or to become tolerant to chemotherapeutic agents, antimicrobial agents, or antibiotics. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).
Semisynthetic thienamycin that has a wide spectrum of antibacterial activity against gram-negative and gram-positive aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, including many multiresistant strains. It is stable to beta-lactamases. Clinical studies have demonstrated high efficacy in the treatment of infections of various body systems. Its effectiveness is enhanced when it is administered in combination with CILASTATIN, a renal dipeptidase inhibitor.
Semisynthetic broad-spectrum cephalosporin.
A semisynthetic cephalosporin antibiotic which can be administered intravenously or by suppository. The drug is highly resistant to a broad spectrum of beta-lactamases and is active against a wide range of both aerobic and anaerobic gram-positive and gram-negative organisms. It has few side effects and is reported to be safe and effective in aged patients and in patients with hematologic disorders.
A fluid-filled VAGINA that is obstructed.
Proteins found in any species of bacterium.
The functional hereditary units of BACTERIA.
A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria found in soil, water, food, and clinical specimens. It is a prominent opportunistic pathogen for hospitalized patients.
A natural association between organisms that is detrimental to at least one of them. This often refers to the production of chemicals by one microorganism that is harmful to another.
A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.
Enzymes which reduce nitro groups (NITRO COMPOUNDS) and other nitrogenous compounds.
A birth defect in which the URINARY BLADDER is malformed and exposed, inside out, and protruded through the ABDOMINAL WALL. It is caused by closure defects involving the top front surface of the bladder, as well as the lower abdominal wall; SKIN; MUSCLES; and the pubic bone.
A group of derivatives of naphthyridine carboxylic acid, quinoline carboxylic acid, or NALIDIXIC ACID.
Nonsusceptibility of bacteria to the action of the beta-lactam antibiotics. Mechanisms responsible for beta-lactam resistance may be degradation of antibiotics by BETA-LACTAMASES, failure of antibiotics to penetrate, or low-affinity binding of antibiotics to targets.
Infections with bacteria of the genus SERRATIA.
A genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria whose organisms arrange singly, in pairs, or short chains. This genus is commonly found in the intestinal tract and is an opportunistic pathogen that can give rise to bacteremia, pneumonia, urinary tract and several other types of human infection.
A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
Any infection which a patient contracts in a health-care institution.
A building block of penicillin, devoid of significant antibacterial activity. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)
A country in northern Africa bordering the Mediterranean Sea, between MOROCCO and TUNISIA. Its capital is Algiers.
Beta-lactam antibiotics that differ from PENICILLINS in having the thiazolidine sulfur atom replaced by carbon, the sulfur then becoming the first atom in the side chain. They are unstable chemically, but have a very broad antibacterial spectrum. Thienamycin and its more stable derivatives are proposed for use in combinations with enzyme inhibitors.

Fluid secretion by the malpighian tubules of the tsetse fly Glossina morsitans: the effects of ouabain, ethacrynic acid and amiloride. (1/251)

The effects of three inhibitors of sodium transport on the secretion of fluid by the Malpighian tubules of Glossina morsitans have been observed. The cardiac glycoside, ouabain, affects neither the rate of secretion nor the sodium concentration of the fluid secreted when isolated tubules are bathed by solutions containing a range of sodium and potassium concentrations. Secretion is inhibited, however, by ethacrynic acid and amiloride. The results confirm that fluid secretion by the Malpighian tubules of this insect is dependent on the active transport of sodium ions and show that Na+/k+ exchange pumps are not involved in this process.  (+info)

Sodefrin: a novel sex pheromone in a newt. (2/251)

The abdominal gland in the male red-bellied newt, Cynops pyrrhogaster, is the source of a female-attracting pheromone. An attempt was made to isolate and characterize the female-attracting pheromone in the abdominal glands of male newts. The active substance, named sodefrin (from the Japanese 'sodefuri' which means 'soliciting') has been isolated and shown to be a novel decapeptide with the sequence, Ser-Ile-Pro-Ser-Lys-Asp-Ala-Leu-Leu-Lys. Its minimum effective concentration in water is 0.1-1.0 pmol 1-1. Synthetic sodefrin shows a female-attracting activity similar to that of the native peptide, and acts through the olfactory organ of female newts. Electrophysiological studies reveal that sodefrin evokes a marked electroolfactogram response in the vomeronasal epithelium in sexually mature females and in ovariectomized females treated with prolactin and oestrogen. The pheromonal activity of sodefrin appears to be species-specific since it does not attract females of a congeneric species, the sword-tailed newt C. ensicauda. However, C. ensicauda has a variant of sodefrin differing from that in C. pyrrhogaster by substitutions of Leu for Pro at position 3 and Gln for Leu at position 8. The C. ensicauda variant sodefrin does not attract C. pyrrhogaster females. Genes encoding the sodefrin precursor protein have been cloned in both C. pyrrhogaster and C. ensicauda. Immunostaining of the abdominal gland using the antiserum against sodefrin shows that sodefrin occurs in the epithelial cells, predominantly within the secretory granules. Sodefrin content, detected by immunoassay, in C. pyrrhogaster males decreases after castration and hypophysectomy and increases markedly in the castrated and hypophysectomized newts after treatment with androgen and prolactin. This combination of hormones also enhances sodefrin mRNA content in the abdominal gland as assessed by northern blot analysis using sodefrin cDNA.  (+info)

Chick Barx2b, a marker for myogenic cells also expressed in branchial arches and neural structures. (3/251)

We have isolated a new chicken gene, cBarx2b, which is related to mBarx2 in sequence, although the expression patterns of the two genes are quite different from one another. The cBarx2b gene is expressed in craniofacial structures, regions of the neural tube, and muscle groups in the limb, neck and cloaca. Perturbation of anterior muscle pattern by application of Sonic Hedgehog protein results in a posteriorization of cBarx2b expression.  (+info)

Ortho- and paramyxoviruses from migrating feral ducks: characterization of a new group of influenza A viruses. (4/251)

Ortho- and parainfluenza viruses isolated from the cloacas of migrating feral ducks shot on the Mississippi flyway included three strains of influenza. A virus (Hav6 Nav1, Hav6 Nl, Hav7 Neq2) as well as Newcastle disease virus. One influenza virus, A/duck/Memphis/546/74, possessed Hav3 haemagglutinin, but the neuraminidase was not inhibited by any of the known influenza reference antisera. The neuraminidase on this virus was related to the neuraminidases on A/duck/GDR/72 (H2 N?), A/turkey/Ontario/7732/66 (Hav 5 N?), A/duck/Ukraine/1/60 (Hav3 N?) and A/turkey/Wisconsin/68. We therefore propose that the neuraminidase on this group of influenza viruses be designated Nav6. The A/duck/Memphis/546/74 influenza virus caused an ocular discharge in 1 of 5 ducks and was shed in faeces for 10 days; it was stable in faecal samples for up to 3 days at 20 degrees C. These results suggest that ecological studies on influenza in avian species should include attempts to isolate virus from faeces. Faecal-oral transmission is an attractive explanation for the spread of influenza virus from feral birds to other animals.  (+info)

Innervation of NADPH diaphorase-containing neurons correlated with acetylcholinesterase, tyrosine hydroxylase, and neuropeptides in the pigeon cloaca. (5/251)

The motility of the avian cloaca is under neural control, but little is known about the neural network that accomplishes this function. This present study was designed to determine the distribution of nitric oxide-synthesising neurons in the pigeon cloaca by enzyme histochemistry for reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-diaphorase (NADPH-d). NADPH-d-positive staining was seen in the neurons and fibres in the cloaca. The highest density of nerve fibres was noted in the coprodeum and the lowest in the proctodeum. In the coprodeum, NADPH-d neurons were found singly, formed small groups of 2-10 neurons, or were seen in plexuses in the muscle layer, lamina propria, or around the arterioles. Several NADPH-d-positive neurons were also observed in the ganglia of the cloaca. NADPH-d fibres ran in the muscle layer, lamina muscularis mucosae and lamina propria, or surrounded blood vessels. The distribution pattern of acetylcholinesterase (AChE)-stained neurons and fibres in the cloaca was similar to that of NADPH-d. Double staining for NADPH-d and AChE showed colocalisation of the 2 enzymes in many neurons of the cloaca. Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-immunoreactive nerve fibres originating outside the cloaca were also noted. In the urodeum and proctodeum, neurons or fibres positive for NADPH-d, AChE or TH were scattered in the lamina propria. Nerve fibres immunoreactive for calcitonin-gene related peptide, galanin, methionine-enkephalin, substance P, and vasoactive intestinal peptide were found sparsely in the cloaca. Our results demonstrate that nitrergic neurons constitute a subpopulation which is closely associated with the cholinergic system in the pigeon cloaca.  (+info)

Anorectal malformations caused by defects in sonic hedgehog signaling. (6/251)

Anorectal malformations are a common clinical problem affecting the development of the distal hindgut in infants. The spectrum of anorectal malformations ranges from the mildly stenotic anus to imperforate anus with a fistula between the urinary and intestinal tracts to the most severe form, persistent cloaca. The etiology, embryology, and pathogenesis of anorectal malformations are poorly understood and controversial. Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is an endoderm-derived signaling molecule that induces mesodermal gene expression in the chick hindgut. However, the role of Shh signaling in mammalian hindgut development is unknown. Here, we show that mutant mice with various defects in the Shh signaling pathway exhibit a spectrum of distal hindgut defects mimicking human anorectal malformations. Shh null-mutant mice display persistent cloaca. Mutant mice lacking Gli2 or Gli3, two zinc finger transcription factors involved in Shh signaling, respectively, exhibit imperforate anus with recto-urethral fistula and anal stenosis. Furthermore, persistent cloaca is also observed in Gli2(-/-);Gli3(+/-), Gli2(+/-);Gli3(-/-), and Gli2(-/-);Gli3(-/-) mice demonstrating a gene dose-dependent effect. Therefore, Shh signaling is essential for normal development of the distal hindgut in mice and mutations affecting Shh signaling produce a spectrum of anorectal malformations that may reveal new insights into their human disease equivalents.  (+info)

Excretory role of the midgut in larvae of the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta (L.). (7/251)

Caterpillars of Manduca sexta use two distinct transport mechanisms for the excretion of dyes. One pump (Type A) has a high affinity for acid (anionic) dyes and occurs in the midgut and medial Malpighian tubules. Acid dyes accumulate rapidly in the lumen of the midgut while the Malpighian tubules appear to play only a minor role in the excretion of these dyes. The other pump (Type B) excretes basic (cationic) dyes and is located primarily in the proximal Malpighian tubules. Evidence is presented that hippuric acid competes with acid dyes for excretion by both midgut and Malpighian tubules. After the final-instar larva purges its gut the ability of the midgut and Malpighian tubules to excrete dyes gradually decreases. Sixty hours after the purge only the Malpighian tubules retain some dye excreting activity.  (+info)

The removal of sulphate by the excretory apparatus of the blowfly Calliphora vomitoria. (8/251)

The excretion of sulphate by the isolated Malpighian tubules of Calliphora vomitoria has been investigated. Contrary to expectation, it was found that the isolated tubules are freely permeable to sulphate. The rate of sulphate secretion is comparable to the rates of secretion of both phosphate and chloride. The excretion of sulphate by the intact fly has also been verified.  (+info)

'Enterobacter cloacae' is a species of Gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that are commonly found in the environment, including in soil, water, and the gastrointestinal tracts of humans and animals. They are part of the family Enterobacteriaceae and can cause various types of infections in humans, particularly in individuals with weakened immune systems or underlying medical conditions.

E. cloacae is known to be an opportunistic pathogen, which means that it typically does not cause disease in healthy people but can take advantage of a weakened host to cause infection. It can cause a range of infections, including urinary tract infections, pneumonia, bacteremia (bloodstream infections), and wound infections.

E. cloacae is often resistant to multiple antibiotics, which can make treatment challenging. In recent years, there has been an increase in the number of E. cloacae isolates that are resistant to carbapenems, a class of antibiotics that are typically reserved for treating serious infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria. This has led to concerns about the potential for untreatable infections caused by this organism.

A cloaca is a common cavity or channel in some animals, including many birds and reptiles, that serves as the combined endpoint for the digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. Feces, urine, and in some cases, eggs are all expelled through this single opening. In humans and other mammals, these systems have separate openings. Anatomical anomalies can result in a human born with a cloaca, which is very rare and typically requires surgical correction.

Enterobacter is a genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that are commonly found in the environment, including in soil, water, and the gastrointestinal tracts of humans and animals. These bacteria are members of the family Enterobacteriaceae and are known to cause a variety of infections in humans, particularly in healthcare settings.

Enterobacter species are capable of causing a range of infections, including urinary tract infections, pneumonia, bacteremia, and wound infections. They are often resistant to multiple antibiotics, which can make treatment challenging. Infections with Enterobacter are typically treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics that are effective against gram-negative bacteria.

It's worth noting that while Enterobacter species can cause infections, they are also a normal part of the microbiota found in the human gut and usually do not cause harm in healthy individuals. However, if the bacterium enters the bloodstream or other sterile sites in the body, it can cause infection and illness.

Enterobacteriaceae are a large family of gram-negative bacteria that are commonly found in the human gut and surrounding environment. Infections caused by Enterobacteriaceae can occur when these bacteria enter parts of the body where they are not normally present, such as the bloodstream, urinary tract, or abdominal cavity.

Enterobacteriaceae infections can cause a range of symptoms depending on the site of infection. For example:

* Urinary tract infections (UTIs) caused by Enterobacteriaceae may cause symptoms such as frequent urination, pain or burning during urination, and lower abdominal pain.
* Bloodstream infections (bacteremia) caused by Enterobacteriaceae can cause fever, chills, and sepsis, a potentially life-threatening condition characterized by a whole-body inflammatory response to infection.
* Pneumonia caused by Enterobacteriaceae may cause cough, chest pain, and difficulty breathing.
* Intra-abdominal infections (such as appendicitis or diverticulitis) caused by Enterobacteriaceae can cause abdominal pain, fever, and changes in bowel habits.

Enterobacteriaceae infections are typically treated with antibiotics, but the increasing prevalence of antibiotic-resistant strains of these bacteria has made treatment more challenging in recent years. Preventing the spread of Enterobacteriaceae in healthcare settings and promoting good hygiene practices can help reduce the risk of infection.

Enterobacteriaceae is a family of gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria that are commonly found in the intestines of humans and animals. Many species within this family are capable of causing various types of infections, particularly in individuals with weakened immune systems. Some common examples of Enterobacteriaceae include Escherichia coli (E. coli), Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, and Salmonella enterica.

These bacteria are typically characterized by their ability to ferment various sugars and produce acid and gas as byproducts. They can also be distinguished by their biochemical reactions, such as their ability to produce certain enzymes or resist specific antibiotics. Infections caused by Enterobacteriaceae can range from mild to severe, depending on the species involved and the overall health of the infected individual.

Some infections caused by Enterobacteriaceae include urinary tract infections, pneumonia, bloodstream infections, and foodborne illnesses. Proper hygiene, such as handwashing and safe food handling practices, can help prevent the spread of these bacteria and reduce the risk of infection.

Beta-lactamases are enzymes produced by certain bacteria that can break down and inactivate beta-lactam antibiotics, such as penicillins, cephalosporins, and carbapenems. This enzymatic activity makes the bacteria resistant to these antibiotics, limiting their effectiveness in treating infections caused by these organisms.

Beta-lactamases work by hydrolyzing the beta-lactam ring, a structural component of these antibiotics that is essential for their antimicrobial activity. By breaking down this ring, the enzyme renders the antibiotic ineffective against the bacterium, allowing it to continue growing and potentially causing harm.

There are different classes of beta-lactamases (e.g., Ambler Class A, B, C, and D), each with distinct characteristics and mechanisms for breaking down various beta-lactam antibiotics. The emergence and spread of bacteria producing these enzymes have contributed to the growing problem of antibiotic resistance, making it increasingly challenging to treat infections caused by these organisms.

To overcome this issue, researchers have developed beta-lactamase inhibitors, which are drugs that can bind to and inhibit the activity of these enzymes, thus restoring the effectiveness of certain beta-lactam antibiotics. Examples of such combinations include amoxicillin/clavulanate (Augmentin) and piperacillin/tazobactam (Zosyn).

Microbial sensitivity tests, also known as antibiotic susceptibility tests (ASTs) or bacterial susceptibility tests, are laboratory procedures used to determine the effectiveness of various antimicrobial agents against specific microorganisms isolated from a patient's infection. These tests help healthcare providers identify which antibiotics will be most effective in treating an infection and which ones should be avoided due to resistance. The results of these tests can guide appropriate antibiotic therapy, minimize the potential for antibiotic resistance, improve clinical outcomes, and reduce unnecessary side effects or toxicity from ineffective antimicrobials.

There are several methods for performing microbial sensitivity tests, including:

1. Disk diffusion method (Kirby-Bauer test): A standardized paper disk containing a predetermined amount of an antibiotic is placed on an agar plate that has been inoculated with the isolated microorganism. After incubation, the zone of inhibition around the disk is measured to determine the susceptibility or resistance of the organism to that particular antibiotic.
2. Broth dilution method: A series of tubes or wells containing decreasing concentrations of an antimicrobial agent are inoculated with a standardized microbial suspension. After incubation, the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) is determined by observing the lowest concentration of the antibiotic that prevents visible growth of the organism.
3. Automated systems: These use sophisticated technology to perform both disk diffusion and broth dilution methods automatically, providing rapid and accurate results for a wide range of microorganisms and antimicrobial agents.

The interpretation of microbial sensitivity test results should be done cautiously, considering factors such as the site of infection, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the antibiotic, potential toxicity, and local resistance patterns. Regular monitoring of susceptibility patterns and ongoing antimicrobial stewardship programs are essential to ensure optimal use of these tests and to minimize the development of antibiotic resistance.

Pythium is a genus of microscopic, aquatic fungus-like organisms called oomycetes. They are commonly referred to as water molds and can be found in various environments such as soil, freshwater, and marine habitats. Some species of Pythium are known to cause plant diseases, while others can infect animals, including humans, causing a variety of conditions primarily related to the eye and skin.

In human medicine, Pythium insidiosum is the most relevant species, as it can cause a rare but severe infection called pythiosis. This infection typically affects the eyes (keratopythiosis) or the gastrointestinal tract (gastrointestinal pythiosis). The infection occurs through direct contact with contaminated water or soil, and it is more prevalent in tropical and subtropical regions.

Pythium insidiosum produces filamentous structures called hyphae that can invade and damage tissues, leading to the formation of granulomatous lesions. The infection can be difficult to diagnose and treat due to its rarity and the limited number of effective antifungal agents available. Surgical intervention and immunotherapy are often necessary in addition to medical treatment for successful management.

Cephalosporins are a class of antibiotics that are derived from the fungus Acremonium, originally isolated from seawater and cow dung. They have a similar chemical structure to penicillin and share a common four-membered beta-lactam ring in their molecular structure.

Cephalosporins work by inhibiting the synthesis of bacterial cell walls, which ultimately leads to bacterial death. They are broad-spectrum antibiotics, meaning they are effective against a wide range of bacteria, including both Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms.

There are several generations of cephalosporins, each with different spectra of activity and pharmacokinetic properties. The first generation cephalosporins have a narrow spectrum of activity and are primarily used to treat infections caused by susceptible Gram-positive bacteria, such as Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae.

Second-generation cephalosporins have an expanded spectrum of activity that includes some Gram-negative organisms, such as Escherichia coli and Haemophilus influenzae. Third-generation cephalosporins have even broader spectra of activity and are effective against many resistant Gram-negative bacteria, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae.

Fourth-generation cephalosporins have activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms, including some that are resistant to other antibiotics. They are often reserved for the treatment of serious infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria.

Cephalosporins are generally well tolerated, but like penicillin, they can cause allergic reactions in some individuals. Cross-reactivity between cephalosporins and penicillin is estimated to occur in 5-10% of patients with a history of penicillin allergy. Other potential adverse effects include gastrointestinal symptoms (such as nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea), neurotoxicity, and nephrotoxicity.

Anti-bacterial agents, also known as antibiotics, are a type of medication used to treat infections caused by bacteria. These agents work by either killing the bacteria or inhibiting their growth and reproduction. There are several different classes of anti-bacterial agents, including penicillins, cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones, macrolides, and tetracyclines, among others. Each class of antibiotic has a specific mechanism of action and is used to treat certain types of bacterial infections. It's important to note that anti-bacterial agents are not effective against viral infections, such as the common cold or flu. Misuse and overuse of antibiotics can lead to antibiotic resistance, which is a significant global health concern.

'Citrobacter freundii' is a species of Gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that is commonly found in the environment, including water, soil, and plants. It is also part of the normal gut flora in humans and animals. The bacterium can cause various types of infections in people with weakened immune systems, such as newborns, the elderly, and those with chronic diseases. Infections caused by 'Citrobacter freundii' may include urinary tract infections, pneumonia, bloodstream infections, and wound infections. Proper identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing are crucial for effective treatment of these infections.

Beta-lactams are a class of antibiotics that include penicillins, cephalosporins, carbapenems, and monobactams. They contain a beta-lactam ring in their chemical structure, which is responsible for their antibacterial activity. The beta-lactam ring inhibits the bacterial enzymes necessary for cell wall synthesis, leading to bacterial death. Beta-lactams are commonly used to treat a wide range of bacterial infections, including respiratory tract infections, skin and soft tissue infections, urinary tract infections, and bone and joint infections. However, some bacteria have developed resistance to beta-lactams through the production of beta-lactamases, enzymes that can break down the beta-lactam ring and render the antibiotic ineffective. To overcome this resistance, beta-lactam antibiotics are often combined with beta-lactamase inhibitors, which protect the beta-lactam ring from degradation.

A cephalosporinase is an enzyme that can break down and inactivate cephalosporins, a group of antibiotics commonly used to treat various bacterial infections. Bacteria that produce this enzyme are referred to as "cephalosporin-resistant" or "cephalosporinase-producing" organisms. The production of cephalosporinases by bacteria can lead to treatment failures and make infections more difficult to manage.

Cephalosporins are broad-spectrum antibiotics, which means they can be effective against a wide range of bacterial species. However, some bacteria have developed resistance mechanisms, such as the production of cephalosporinases, to counteract their effects. These enzymes hydrolyze the beta-lactam ring in cephalosporins, rendering them ineffective.

There are different classes of cephalosporinases (e.g., Ambler classes A, C, and D), each with distinct characteristics and substrate profiles. Some cephalosporinases can hydrolyze a broader range of cephalosporins than others, leading to varying degrees of resistance.

To overcome cephalosporinase-mediated resistance, alternative antibiotics or combinations of antibiotics may be used. Additionally, the development of new cephalosporins with improved stability against these enzymes is an ongoing area of research in the field of antimicrobial drug discovery.

"Enterobacter aerogenes" is a species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that are commonly found in the environment, including in soil, water, and vegetation. In medical contexts, E. aerogenes is often considered an opportunistic pathogen, meaning it can cause infection in individuals with compromised immune systems or underlying health conditions.

E. aerogenes is a member of the family Enterobacteriaceae and is closely related to other pathogens such as Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli. It is known for its ability to produce large amounts of gas, including carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide, which can contribute to its virulence and make it difficult to identify using traditional biochemical tests.

E. aerogenes can cause a variety of infections, including urinary tract infections, pneumonia, bacteremia, and wound infections. It is often resistant to multiple antibiotics, which can make treatment challenging. In recent years, there has been an increase in the number of E. aerogenes isolates that are resistant to carbapenems, a class of antibiotics that are often used as a last resort for treating serious bacterial infections.

Cephalosporin resistance refers to the ability of bacteria to resist the antibacterial effects of cephalosporins, a group of widely used antibiotics. These drugs work by interfering with the bacterial cell wall synthesis, thereby inhibiting bacterial growth and reproduction. However, some bacteria have developed mechanisms that enable them to survive in the presence of cephalosporins.

There are several ways in which bacteria can become resistant to cephalosporins. One common mechanism is through the production of beta-lactamases, enzymes that can break down the beta-lactam ring structure of cephalosporins and other related antibiotics. This makes the drugs ineffective against the bacteria.

Another mechanism of resistance involves changes in the bacterial cell membrane or the penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) that prevent the binding of cephalosporins to their target sites. These changes can occur due to genetic mutations or the acquisition of new genes through horizontal gene transfer.

Cephalosporin resistance is a significant public health concern, as it can limit the treatment options for bacterial infections and increase the risk of morbidity and mortality. The overuse and misuse of antibiotics are major drivers of antibiotic resistance, including cephalosporin resistance. Therefore, it is essential to use these drugs judiciously and follow proper infection prevention and control measures to prevent the spread of resistant bacteria.

Ceftazidime is a third-generation cephalosporin antibiotic, which is used to treat a variety of bacterial infections. It works by interfering with the bacteria's ability to form a cell wall, leading to bacterial cell death. Ceftazidime has a broad spectrum of activity and is effective against many Gram-negative and some Gram-positive bacteria.

It is often used to treat serious infections such as pneumonia, urinary tract infections, and sepsis, particularly when they are caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Ceftazidime is also commonly used in combination with other antibiotics to treat complicated abdominal infections, bone and joint infections, and hospital-acquired pneumonia.

Like all antibiotics, ceftazidime can cause side effects, including diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and allergic reactions. It may also affect the kidneys and should be used with caution in patients with impaired renal function. Ceftazidime is available in both intravenous (IV) and oral forms.

Gram-negative bacteria are a type of bacteria that do not retain the crystal violet stain used in the Gram staining method, a standard technique used in microbiology to classify and identify different types of bacteria based on their structural differences. This method was developed by Hans Christian Gram in 1884.

The primary characteristic distinguishing Gram-negative bacteria from Gram-positive bacteria is the composition and structure of their cell walls:

1. Cell wall: Gram-negative bacteria have a thin peptidoglycan layer, making it more susceptible to damage and less rigid compared to Gram-positive bacteria.
2. Outer membrane: They possess an additional outer membrane that contains lipopolysaccharides (LPS), which are endotoxins that can trigger strong immune responses in humans and animals. The outer membrane also contains proteins, known as porins, which form channels for the passage of molecules into and out of the cell.
3. Periplasm: Between the inner and outer membranes lies a compartment called the periplasm, where various enzymes and other molecules are located.

Some examples of Gram-negative bacteria include Escherichia coli (E. coli), Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Salmonella enterica, Shigella spp., and Neisseria meningitidis. These bacteria are often associated with various infections, such as urinary tract infections, pneumonia, sepsis, and meningitis. Due to their complex cell wall structure, Gram-negative bacteria can be more resistant to certain antibiotics, making them a significant concern in healthcare settings.

Microbial drug resistance is a significant medical issue that refers to the ability of microorganisms (such as bacteria, viruses, fungi, or parasites) to withstand or survive exposure to drugs or medications designed to kill them or limit their growth. This phenomenon has become a major global health concern, particularly in the context of bacterial infections, where it is also known as antibiotic resistance.

Drug resistance arises due to genetic changes in microorganisms that enable them to modify or bypass the effects of antimicrobial agents. These genetic alterations can be caused by mutations or the acquisition of resistance genes through horizontal gene transfer. The resistant microbes then replicate and multiply, forming populations that are increasingly difficult to eradicate with conventional treatments.

The consequences of drug-resistant infections include increased morbidity, mortality, healthcare costs, and the potential for widespread outbreaks. Factors contributing to the emergence and spread of microbial drug resistance include the overuse or misuse of antimicrobials, poor infection control practices, and inadequate surveillance systems.

To address this challenge, it is crucial to promote prudent antibiotic use, strengthen infection prevention and control measures, develop new antimicrobial agents, and invest in research to better understand the mechanisms underlying drug resistance.

Carbapenems are a class of broad-spectrum beta-lactam antibiotics, which are used to treat severe infections caused by bacteria that are resistant to other antibiotics. They have a similar chemical structure to penicillins and cephalosporins but are more resistant to the enzymes produced by bacteria that can inactivate these other antibiotics. Carbapenems are often reserved for use in serious infections caused by multidrug-resistant organisms, and they are typically given intravenously in a hospital setting. Examples of carbapenems include imipenem, meropenem, doripenem, and ertapenem.

Imperforate anus is a congenital condition in which the opening of the anus is absent or abnormally closed or narrowed, preventing the normal passage of stool. This results in a blockage in the digestive tract and can lead to serious health complications if not treated promptly.

The anus is the external opening of the rectum, which is the lower end of the digestive tract. During fetal development, the rectum and anus normally connect through a canal called the anal canal or the recto-anal canal. In imperforate anus, this canal may be completely closed or narrowed, or it may not form properly.

Imperforate anus can occur as an isolated condition or as part of a genetic syndrome or other congenital abnormalities. The exact cause is not fully understood, but it is believed to result from a combination of genetic and environmental factors.

Treatment for imperforate anus typically involves surgery to create an opening in the anus and restore normal bowel function. In some cases, additional procedures may be necessary to correct related abnormalities or complications. The prognosis for individuals with imperforate anus depends on the severity of the condition and any associated abnormalities. With prompt and appropriate treatment, most people with imperforate anus can lead normal lives.

Bacterial DNA refers to the genetic material found in bacteria. It is composed of a double-stranded helix containing four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), thymine (T), guanine (G), and cytosine (C) - that are linked together by phosphodiester bonds. The sequence of these bases in the DNA molecule carries the genetic information necessary for the growth, development, and reproduction of bacteria.

Bacterial DNA is circular in most bacterial species, although some have linear chromosomes. In addition to the main chromosome, many bacteria also contain small circular pieces of DNA called plasmids that can carry additional genes and provide resistance to antibiotics or other environmental stressors.

Unlike eukaryotic cells, which have their DNA enclosed within a nucleus, bacterial DNA is present in the cytoplasm of the cell, where it is in direct contact with the cell's metabolic machinery. This allows for rapid gene expression and regulation in response to changing environmental conditions.

Urogenital abnormalities refer to structural or functional anomalies that affect the urinary and genital systems. These two systems are closely linked during embryonic development, and sometimes they may not develop properly, leading to various types of congenital defects. Urogenital abnormalities can range from minor issues like a bifid scrotum (a condition where the scrotum is split into two parts) to more severe problems such as bladder exstrophy (where the bladder develops outside the body).

These conditions may affect urination, reproduction, and sexual function. They can also increase the risk of infections and other complications. Urogenital abnormalities can be diagnosed through physical examination, imaging tests, or genetic testing. Treatment options depend on the specific condition but may include surgery, medication, or lifestyle changes.

'Cucumis sativus' is the scientific name for the vegetable we commonly know as a cucumber. It belongs to the family Cucurbitaceae and is believed to have originated in South Asia. Cucumbers are widely consumed raw in salads, pickled, or used in various culinary applications. They have a high water content and contain various nutrients such as vitamin K, vitamin C, and potassium.

Uranyl nitrate is not typically defined in the context of medical terminology, but it is a chemical compound with the formula UO2(NO3)2·6H2O. It is used in various industrial and laboratory applications, including as a radiographic contrast agent for visualizing blood vessels and gastrointestinal tracts. However, due to its radioactive properties and potential health hazards, its use in medical settings is highly regulated and generally not common.

It's important to note that uranyl nitrate should be handled with appropriate precautions and safety measures, as it can be harmful if ingested or inhaled, and may pose radiation risks.

A plasmid is a small, circular, double-stranded DNA molecule that is separate from the chromosomal DNA of a bacterium or other organism. Plasmids are typically not essential for the survival of the organism, but they can confer beneficial traits such as antibiotic resistance or the ability to degrade certain types of pollutants.

Plasmids are capable of replicating independently of the chromosomal DNA and can be transferred between bacteria through a process called conjugation. They often contain genes that provide resistance to antibiotics, heavy metals, and other environmental stressors. Plasmids have also been engineered for use in molecular biology as cloning vectors, allowing scientists to replicate and manipulate specific DNA sequences.

Plasmids are important tools in genetic engineering and biotechnology because they can be easily manipulated and transferred between organisms. They have been used to produce vaccines, diagnostic tests, and genetically modified organisms (GMOs) for various applications, including agriculture, medicine, and industry.

"Klebsiella pneumoniae" is a medical term that refers to a type of bacteria belonging to the family Enterobacteriaceae. It's a gram-negative, encapsulated, non-motile, rod-shaped bacterium that can be found in various environments, including soil, water, and the gastrointestinal tracts of humans and animals.

"Klebsiella pneumoniae" is an opportunistic pathogen that can cause a range of infections, particularly in individuals with weakened immune systems or underlying medical conditions. It's a common cause of healthcare-associated infections, such as pneumonia, urinary tract infections, bloodstream infections, and wound infections.

The bacterium is known for its ability to produce a polysaccharide capsule that makes it resistant to phagocytosis by white blood cells, allowing it to evade the host's immune system. Additionally, "Klebsiella pneumoniae" has developed resistance to many antibiotics, making infections caused by this bacterium difficult to treat and a growing public health concern.

Bacteria are single-celled microorganisms that are among the earliest known life forms on Earth. They are typically characterized as having a cell wall and no membrane-bound organelles. The majority of bacteria have a prokaryotic organization, meaning they lack a nucleus and other membrane-bound organelles.

Bacteria exist in diverse environments and can be found in every habitat on Earth, including soil, water, and the bodies of plants and animals. Some bacteria are beneficial to their hosts, while others can cause disease. Beneficial bacteria play important roles in processes such as digestion, nitrogen fixation, and biogeochemical cycling.

Bacteria reproduce asexually through binary fission or budding, and some species can also exchange genetic material through conjugation. They have a wide range of metabolic capabilities, with many using organic compounds as their source of energy, while others are capable of photosynthesis or chemosynthesis.

Bacteria are highly adaptable and can evolve rapidly in response to environmental changes. This has led to the development of antibiotic resistance in some species, which poses a significant public health challenge. Understanding the biology and behavior of bacteria is essential for developing strategies to prevent and treat bacterial infections and diseases.

Bacterial drug resistance is a type of antimicrobial resistance that occurs when bacteria evolve the ability to survive and reproduce in the presence of drugs (such as antibiotics) that would normally kill them or inhibit their growth. This can happen due to various mechanisms, including genetic mutations or the acquisition of resistance genes from other bacteria.

As a result, bacterial infections may become more difficult to treat, requiring higher doses of medication, alternative drugs, or longer treatment courses. In some cases, drug-resistant infections can lead to serious health complications, increased healthcare costs, and higher mortality rates.

Examples of bacterial drug resistance include methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant Enterococci (VRE), and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). Preventing the spread of bacterial drug resistance is crucial for maintaining effective treatments for infectious diseases.

Imipenem is an antibiotic medication that belongs to the class of carbapenems. It is used to treat various types of bacterial infections, including pneumonia, sepsis, and skin infections. Imipenem works by inhibiting the synthesis of bacterial cell walls, leading to bacterial death.

Imipenem is often combined with another medication called cilastatin, which helps to prevent the breakdown of imipenem in the body and increase its effectiveness. The combination of imipenem and cilastatin is available under the brand name Primaxin.

Like other antibiotics, imipenem should be used with caution and only when necessary, as overuse can lead to antibiotic resistance. It is important to follow the prescribing physician's instructions carefully and complete the full course of treatment, even if symptoms improve before the medication is finished.

Cefotaxime is a third-generation cephalosporin antibiotic, which is used to treat a variety of bacterial infections. It works by inhibiting the synthesis of the bacterial cell wall. Cefotaxime has a broad spectrum of activity and is effective against many Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, including some that are resistant to other antibiotics.

Cefotaxime is often used to treat serious infections such as pneumonia, meningitis, and sepsis. It may also be used to prevent infections during surgery or in people with weakened immune systems. The drug is administered intravenously or intramuscularly, and its dosage depends on the type and severity of the infection being treated.

Like all antibiotics, cefotaxime can cause side effects, including diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and rash. In rare cases, it may cause serious allergic reactions or damage to the kidneys or liver. It is important to follow the prescribing physician's instructions carefully when taking this medication.

Ceftizoxime is a type of antibiotic known as a third-generation cephalosporin. It works by interfering with the bacteria's ability to form a cell wall, which is necessary for its survival. Ceftizoxime is effective against a wide range of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, including many that are resistant to other antibiotics.

It is commonly used to treat various types of infections, such as pneumonia, urinary tract infections, skin infections, and intra-abdominal infections. Ceftizoxime is available in both intravenous (IV) and oral forms, although the IV form is more commonly used in clinical practice.

Like all antibiotics, ceftizoxime should be used only to treat bacterial infections, as it has no effect on viral infections. Overuse or misuse of antibiotics can lead to the development of antibiotic resistance, which makes it more difficult to treat infections in the future.

It is important to note that ceftizoxime should only be used under the supervision of a healthcare provider, who will determine the appropriate dosage and duration of treatment based on the patient's individual needs and medical history.

Hydrocolpos is a medical condition that affects female fetuses and newborn girls. It refers to the accumulation of fluid in the vagina, often due to an obstruction in the reproductive tract. This can occur when the vaginal opening (introitus) is blocked by a membrane or mass, preventing the normal flow of fluids.

The fluid accumulation can lead to distention and enlargement of the vagina, which may be noticeable at birth or detected through prenatal ultrasound examinations. Hydrocolpos can sometimes be associated with other congenital anomalies, such as imperforate hymen, vaginal septum, or cloacal malformations.

If left untreated, hydrocolpos may cause complications such as infection, urinary tract problems, and difficulty with menstruation later in life. Treatment typically involves surgical correction of the underlying obstruction to restore normal drainage of fluids from the reproductive tract.

Bacterial proteins are a type of protein that are produced by bacteria as part of their structural or functional components. These proteins can be involved in various cellular processes, such as metabolism, DNA replication, transcription, and translation. They can also play a role in bacterial pathogenesis, helping the bacteria to evade the host's immune system, acquire nutrients, and multiply within the host.

Bacterial proteins can be classified into different categories based on their function, such as:

1. Enzymes: Proteins that catalyze chemical reactions in the bacterial cell.
2. Structural proteins: Proteins that provide structural support and maintain the shape of the bacterial cell.
3. Signaling proteins: Proteins that help bacteria to communicate with each other and coordinate their behavior.
4. Transport proteins: Proteins that facilitate the movement of molecules across the bacterial cell membrane.
5. Toxins: Proteins that are produced by pathogenic bacteria to damage host cells and promote infection.
6. Surface proteins: Proteins that are located on the surface of the bacterial cell and interact with the environment or host cells.

Understanding the structure and function of bacterial proteins is important for developing new antibiotics, vaccines, and other therapeutic strategies to combat bacterial infections.

A bacterial gene is a segment of DNA (or RNA in some viruses) that contains the genetic information necessary for the synthesis of a functional bacterial protein or RNA molecule. These genes are responsible for encoding various characteristics and functions of bacteria such as metabolism, reproduction, and resistance to antibiotics. They can be transmitted between bacteria through horizontal gene transfer mechanisms like conjugation, transformation, and transduction. Bacterial genes are often organized into operons, which are clusters of genes that are transcribed together as a single mRNA molecule.

It's important to note that the term "bacterial gene" is used to describe genetic elements found in bacteria, but not all genetic elements in bacteria are considered genes. For example, some DNA sequences may not encode functional products and are therefore not considered genes. Additionally, some bacterial genes may be plasmid-borne or phage-borne, rather than being located on the bacterial chromosome.

"Serratia marcescens" is a medically significant species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, motile bacillus bacteria that belongs to the family Enterobacteriaceae. It is commonly found in soil, water, and in the gastrointestinal tracts of humans and animals. The bacteria are known for their ability to produce a red pigment called prodigiosin, which gives them a distinctive pink color on many types of laboratory media.

"Serratia marcescens" can cause various types of infections, including respiratory tract infections, urinary tract infections, wound infections, and bacteremia (bloodstream infections). It is also known to be an opportunistic pathogen, which means that it primarily causes infections in individuals with weakened immune systems, such as those with chronic illnesses or who are undergoing medical treatments that suppress the immune system.

In healthcare settings, "Serratia marcescens" can cause outbreaks of infection, particularly in patients who are hospitalized for extended periods of time. It is resistant to many commonly used antibiotics, which makes it difficult to treat and control the spread of infections caused by this organism.

In addition to its medical significance, "Serratia marcescens" has also been used as a model organism in various areas of microbiological research, including studies on bacterial motility, biofilm formation, and antibiotic resistance.

Antibiosis is a type of interaction between different organisms in which one organism, known as the antibiotic producer, produces a chemical substance (known as an antibiotic) that inhibits or kills another organism, called the susceptible organism. This phenomenon was first discovered in bacteria and fungi, where certain species produce antibiotics to inhibit the growth of competing species in their environment.

The term "antibiosis" is derived from Greek words "anti" meaning against, and "biosis" meaning living together. It is a natural form of competition that helps maintain the balance of microbial communities in various environments, such as soil, water, and the human body.

In medical contexts, antibiosis refers to the use of antibiotics to treat or prevent bacterial infections in humans and animals. Antibiotics are chemical substances produced by microorganisms or synthesized artificially that can inhibit or kill other microorganisms. The discovery and development of antibiotics have revolutionized modern medicine, saving countless lives from bacterial infections that were once fatal.

However, the overuse and misuse of antibiotics have led to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, which can no longer be killed or inhibited by conventional antibiotics. Antibiotic resistance is a significant global health concern that requires urgent attention and action from healthcare providers, policymakers, and the public.

'Escherichia coli' (E. coli) is a type of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacterium that commonly inhabits the intestinal tract of humans and warm-blooded animals. It is a member of the family Enterobacteriaceae and one of the most well-studied prokaryotic model organisms in molecular biology.

While most E. coli strains are harmless and even beneficial to their hosts, some serotypes can cause various forms of gastrointestinal and extraintestinal illnesses in humans and animals. These pathogenic strains possess virulence factors that enable them to colonize and damage host tissues, leading to diseases such as diarrhea, urinary tract infections, pneumonia, and sepsis.

E. coli is a versatile organism with remarkable genetic diversity, which allows it to adapt to various environmental niches. It can be found in water, soil, food, and various man-made environments, making it an essential indicator of fecal contamination and a common cause of foodborne illnesses. The study of E. coli has contributed significantly to our understanding of fundamental biological processes, including DNA replication, gene regulation, and protein synthesis.

Nitroreductases are a group of enzymes that can reduce nitro groups (-NO2) to nitroso groups (-NHOH) or amino groups (-NH2) in various organic compounds. These enzymes are widely distributed in nature and found in many different types of organisms, including bacteria, fungi, plants, and animals.

In medicine, nitroreductases have been studied for their potential role in the activation of certain drugs or prodrugs. For example, some anticancer agents such as CB1954 (also known as 5-(aziridin-1-yl)-2,4-dinitrobenzamide) are relatively inert until they are reduced by nitroreductases to more reactive metabolites that can interact with DNA and other cellular components. This property has been exploited in the development of targeted cancer therapies that selectively deliver prodrugs to tumor cells, where they can be activated by endogenous nitroreductases to kill the cancer cells while minimizing toxicity to normal tissues.

Nitroreductases have also been implicated in the development of bacterial resistance to certain antibiotics, such as metronidazole and nitrofurantoin. These drugs are activated by nitroreductases in bacteria, but overexpression or mutation of the enzyme can lead to reduced drug activation and increased resistance.

Bladder exstrophy is a congenital birth defect that affects the urinary and reproductive systems, as well as the abdominal wall. In this condition, the bladder is not fully formed and is turned inside out and exposed on the outside of the body at birth. This results in the inability to control urination and can also lead to other complications such as infection and kidney damage if left untreated.

Bladder exstrophy occurs due to a problem with the development of the fetus during pregnancy, specifically during the formation of the lower abdominal wall. It is more common in boys than girls, and can occur on its own or as part of a spectrum of defects known as the exstrophy-epispadias complex.

Treatment for bladder exstrophy typically involves surgical reconstruction to repair the bladder and lower abdominal wall. This may be done in stages, starting with the closure of the abdominal wall and then followed by bladder reconstruction at a later time. In some cases, additional surgeries may be necessary to address other associated defects or complications. With proper treatment, most children with bladder exstrophy can lead normal lives, although they may require ongoing medical management and monitoring throughout their lives.

Quinolones are a class of antibacterial agents that are widely used in medicine to treat various types of infections caused by susceptible bacteria. These synthetic drugs contain a chemical structure related to quinoline and have broad-spectrum activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Quinolones work by inhibiting the bacterial DNA gyrase or topoisomerase IV enzymes, which are essential for bacterial DNA replication, transcription, and repair.

The first quinolone antibiotic was nalidixic acid, discovered in 1962. Since then, several generations of quinolones have been developed, with each generation having improved antibacterial activity and a broader spectrum of action compared to the previous one. The various generations of quinolones include:

1. First-generation quinolones (e.g., nalidixic acid): Primarily used for treating urinary tract infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria.
2. Second-generation quinolones (e.g., ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, norfloxacin): These drugs have improved activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and are used to treat a wider range of infections, including respiratory, gastrointestinal, and skin infections.
3. Third-generation quinolones (e.g., levofloxacin, sparfloxacin, grepafloxacin): These drugs have enhanced activity against Gram-positive bacteria, including some anaerobes and atypical organisms like Legionella and Mycoplasma species.
4. Fourth-generation quinolones (e.g., moxifloxacin, gatifloxacin): These drugs have the broadest spectrum of activity, including enhanced activity against Gram-positive bacteria, anaerobes, and some methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains.

Quinolones are generally well-tolerated, but like all medications, they can have side effects. Common adverse reactions include gastrointestinal symptoms (nausea, vomiting, diarrhea), headache, and dizziness. Serious side effects, such as tendinitis, tendon rupture, peripheral neuropathy, and QT interval prolongation, are less common but can occur, particularly in older patients or those with underlying medical conditions. The use of quinolones should be avoided or used cautiously in these populations.

Quinolone resistance has become an increasing concern due to the widespread use of these antibiotics. Bacteria can develop resistance through various mechanisms, including chromosomal mutations and the acquisition of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes. The overuse and misuse of quinolones contribute to the emergence and spread of resistant strains, which can limit treatment options for severe infections caused by these bacteria. Therefore, it is essential to use quinolones judiciously and only when clinically indicated, to help preserve their effectiveness and prevent further resistance development.

Beta-lactam resistance is a type of antibiotic resistance in which bacteria have developed the ability to inactivate or circumvent the action of beta-lactam antibiotics. Beta-lactams are a class of antibiotics that include penicillins, cephalosporins, carbapenems, and monobactams. They work by binding to and inhibiting the activity of enzymes called penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs), which are essential for bacterial cell wall synthesis.

Bacteria can develop beta-lactam resistance through several mechanisms:

1. Production of beta-lactamases: These are enzymes that bacteria produce to break down and inactivate beta-lactam antibiotics. Some bacteria have acquired genes that encode for beta-lactamases that can hydrolyze and destroy the beta-lactam ring, rendering the antibiotic ineffective.
2. Alteration of PBPs: Bacteria can also develop mutations in their PBPs that make them less susceptible to beta-lactams. These alterations can reduce the affinity of PBPs for beta-lactams or change their conformation, preventing the antibiotic from binding effectively.
3. Efflux pumps: Bacteria can also develop efflux pumps that actively pump beta-lactam antibiotics out of the cell, reducing their intracellular concentration and limiting their effectiveness.
4. Biofilm formation: Some bacteria can form biofilms, which are communities of microorganisms that adhere to surfaces and are encased in a protective matrix. Biofilms can make bacteria more resistant to beta-lactams by preventing the antibiotics from reaching their targets.

Beta-lactam resistance is a significant public health concern because it limits the effectiveness of these important antibiotics. The overuse and misuse of beta-lactams have contributed to the emergence and spread of resistant bacteria, making it essential to use these antibiotics judiciously and develop new strategies to combat bacterial resistance.

Serratia infections are caused by bacteria named Serratia marcescens, which belongs to the family Enterobacteriaceae. These gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic bacilli can be found in various environments, including water, soil, and food. While they are a part of the normal gut flora in humans and animals, Serratia species can cause infections under certain circumstances, such as impaired immune function or when introduced into sterile sites like the bloodstream, urinary tract, or lungs.

Serratia infections can manifest as:

1. Pneumonia: A lower respiratory tract infection that causes cough, chest pain, and difficulty breathing.
2. Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs): Bacterial invasion of the urinary system, leading to symptoms like dysuria, frequency, urgency, and cloudy or foul-smelling urine.
3. Bloodstream infections (Bacteremia/Septicemia): Invasion of the bloodstream by Serratia species, which can result in fever, chills, and sepsis.
4. Wound infections: Localized infection of wounds or surgical sites, causing pain, redness, swelling, and pus discharge.
5. Eye infections (Conjunctivitis/Keratitis): Bacterial invasion of the eye, leading to symptoms like redness, pain, tearing, and discharge.
6. Central Nervous System (CNS) infections: Rare but severe complications include meningitis or brain abscesses.

Serratia infections can be challenging to treat due to their resistance to multiple antibiotics, including first-line agents like ampicillin and cephalosporins. Therefore, healthcare providers often rely on carbapenems, fluoroquinolones, or aminoglycosides for treatment. Prompt diagnosis and appropriate antimicrobial therapy are crucial to ensure favorable outcomes in patients with Serratia infections.

Klebsiella is a genus of Gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, encapsulated, non-motile, rod-shaped bacteria that are part of the family Enterobacteriaceae. They are commonly found in the normal microbiota of the mouth, skin, and intestines, but can also cause various types of infections, particularly in individuals with weakened immune systems.

Klebsiella pneumoniae is the most common species and can cause pneumonia, urinary tract infections, bloodstream infections, and wound infections. Other Klebsiella species, such as K. oxytoca, can also cause similar types of infections. These bacteria are resistant to many antibiotics, making them difficult to treat and a significant public health concern.

DNA Sequence Analysis is the systematic determination of the order of nucleotides in a DNA molecule. It is a critical component of modern molecular biology, genetics, and genetic engineering. The process involves determining the exact order of the four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T) - in a DNA molecule or fragment. This information is used in various applications such as identifying gene mutations, studying evolutionary relationships, developing molecular markers for breeding, and diagnosing genetic diseases.

The process of DNA Sequence Analysis typically involves several steps, including DNA extraction, PCR amplification (if necessary), purification, sequencing reaction, and electrophoresis. The resulting data is then analyzed using specialized software to determine the exact sequence of nucleotides.

In recent years, high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies have revolutionized the field of genomics, enabling the rapid and cost-effective sequencing of entire genomes. This has led to an explosion of genomic data and new insights into the genetic basis of many diseases and traits.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

Cross infection, also known as cross-contamination, is the transmission of infectious agents or diseases between patients in a healthcare setting. This can occur through various means such as contaminated equipment, surfaces, hands of healthcare workers, or the air. It is an important concern in medical settings and measures are taken to prevent its occurrence, including proper hand hygiene, use of personal protective equipment (PPE), environmental cleaning and disinfection, and safe injection practices.

Penicillanic acid is not a term that has a widely accepted or established medical definition in the context of human medicine or clinical practice. It is a chemical compound that is a derivative of penicillin, an antibiotic produced by certain types of mold. Penicillanic acid is a breakdown product of penicillin and is not itself used as a medication.

In chemistry, penicillanic acid is a organic compound with the formula (CH3)2C6H5COOH. It is a derivative of benzene and has a carboxylic acid group and a five-membered ring containing a sulfur atom and a double bond, which is a characteristic feature of penicillin and its derivatives.

It's important to note that while penicillanic acid may have relevance in the context of chemistry or microbiology research, it does not have a direct medical definition or application in clinical medicine.

I believe there might be some confusion in your question. Algeria is a country located in North Africa, and it is not a medical term or concept. Therefore, it doesn't have a medical definition. If you had intended to ask about a different term, please provide clarification, and I would be happy to help you with that.

Thienamycins are a group of antibiotics that are characterized by their beta-lactam structure. They belong to the class of carbapenems and are known for their broad-spectrum antibacterial activity against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, including many that are resistant to other antibiotics. Thienamycins inhibit bacterial cell wall synthesis by binding to penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs), which leads to bacterial cell death.

Thienamycin itself is not used clinically due to its instability, but several semi-synthetic derivatives of thienamycin have been developed and are used in the treatment of serious infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria. Examples of thienamycin derivatives include imipenem, meropenem, and ertapenem. These antibiotics are often reserved for the treatment of severe infections that are unresponsive to other antibiotics due to their potential to select for resistant bacteria and their high cost.

One study has looked into birds that use their cloaca for cooling. The cloaca in birds may also be referred to as the vent. ... In the anatomy of some animals, a cloaca (/kloʊˈeɪkə/ kloh-AY-kə), PL: cloacae (/kloʊˈeɪsi/ kloh-AY-see or /kloʊˈeɪki/ kloh-AY- ... "cloaca". Online Etymology Dictionary. cloaca. Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short. A Latin Dictionary on Perseus Project. ... The word is from the Latin verb cluo, "(I) cleanse", thus the noun cloaca, "sewer, drain". Birds reproduce using their cloaca; ...
Cloaca is a 2003 Dutch film, directed by Willem van de Sande Bakhuyzen. It is a film adaptation of the 2002 theatre play Cloaca ... Cloaca at IMDb (Articles needing additional references from June 2019, All articles needing additional references, Articles ...
Cloaca (embryology) Cloaca Jenkins D, Bitner-Glindzicz M, Thomasson L, et al. (2007), "Mutational analyses of UPIIIA, SHH, ... A persistent cloaca is a symptom of a complex anorectal congenital disorder, in which the rectum, vagina, and urinary tract ... Diagnosis of a female with cloaca should be suspected in a female born with an imperforate anus and small looking genitalia. ... The goal for treatment of a female born with cloaca is to achieve bowel control, urinary control, and sexual function, which ...
... : article in Platner's Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome Pictures taken from inside the Cloaca Maxima Aquae ... The Cloaca Maxima was a symbol of Roman civilization, and its superiority to others. Roman authors were not the only people to ... 3.67.5 The Cloaca Maxima was large: large enough for "wagons loaded with hay to pass" according to Strabo. It could transport ... The Cloaca Maxima was well maintained throughout the life of the Roman Empire and even today drains rainwater and debris from ...
Look up cloaca in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. Cloaca is an anatomical feature of some animals. Cloaca may also refer to: ... ancient sewage system Cloaca Maxima, part of the sewage system in ancient Rome Cloaca (art), an artwork by Wim Delvoye Cloaca ( ... Cloaca (embryology), a structure in mammalian development Cloaca (genus), a synonym for Enterobacter, a bacterial genus ... Persistent cloaca, a congenital disorder in humans Cloaca (Capri), ...
MolluscaBase (2018). Herviella cloaca Rudman, 1980. Accessed on 2018-02-18. Rudman, W.B., 1999 (April 9) Herviella cloaca ... Herviella cloaca is a species of sea slug, an aeolid nudibranch, a marine gastropod mollusc in the family Facelinidae. This ...
The cloaca (PL: cloacae) is a structure in the development of the urinary and reproductive organs. The hind-gut is at first ... which is lined by ectoderm and named the ectodermal cloaca. A birth defect can arise known as a persistent cloaca where the ... Cloaca of human embryo from twenty-five to twenty-seven days old. Tail end of human embryo twenty-five to twenty-nine days old ... The cloaca is, for a time, shut off from the anterior by the cloacal membrane, formed by the apposition of the ectoderm and ...
The Cloaca is an archaeological site on the island of Capri, Italy. It was part of a sewage system built in Roman times. The ...
... released seven years after their first compilation Cloaca Maxima. The name Cloaca Maxima means "Great Sewer" in Latin, and was ... The compilation is divided between CDs in a similar way to the earlier Cloaca Maxima. Lyijy contains rock songs that CMX would ... Cloaca Maxima II (2004) is the second compilation album by the Finnish rock group CMX, ...
The Cloaca Maxima is one of the world's earliest sewage systems. Cloaca Maxima may also refer to: Cloaca Maxima (album), a 1997 ... a Finnish rock band This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Cloaca Maxima. If an internal link led ...
Cloaca Maxima (1997) is the first compilation album by the Finnish rock group CMX. The name Cloaca Maxima means "Great Sewer" ...
The Cloaca Circi Maximi or Cloaca Circi was one of the three main sewers in ancient Rome. Alongside the Cloaca Maxima and ... It was connected to a tunnel modelled on that of the Cloaca Maxima and now terminated on the Tiber upstream of the Cloaca ... The Torre della Moletta, or Tower of Moletta was built upon the ruins of the Cloaca Circi Maximi. Haselberger, Lothar; Romano, ... Chiavicone dell'Olmo The Cloaca Circi Maximi was built in the Augustan Period to clear Rome of unhealthy bodies of water. It ...
... cloacae EPS showed the presence of glucose and mannose in the molar ratio of 1: 1.5e−2. Enterobacter cloacae subsp. cloacae ... cloacae was announced in 2012. The bacteria used in the study were isolated from giant panda feces. Enterobacter cloacae is a ... P. GenBank New holotype for Enterobacter cloacae subsp. cloacae strain PR-4 isolated and identified by 16S rDNA gene sequence ... "Draft Genome Sequence of Enterobacter cloacae subsp. cloacae Strain 08XA1, a Fecal Bacterium of Giant Pandas". Journal of ...
... is a species of bacteria first isolated from sewage. Its type strain is SW28-13T (=CECT 7834T = LMG 26153T ... "Population dynamics and ecology of Arcobacter in sewage." Frontiers in microbiology 5 (2014). LPSN "Arcobacter cloacae" at the ... Levican, Arturo; Collado, Luis; Figueras, María José (2013). "Arcobacter cloacae sp. nov. and Arcobacter suis sp. nov., two new ...
... is a 1612 oil on canvas painting by Ludovico Carracci, now in the Getty Museum in ... popularly known as San Bastianello and erected on the site where the martyr's body had been recovered from the Cloaca Maxima, ... replacing it with the more edifying Saint Sebastian's Body Recovered from the Cloaca Maxima by Passignano Carracci's painting ...
... separating the cloaca from the exterior. After the separation of the rectum from the dorsal part of the cloaca, the ventral ... Cloaca. cp. Elevation which becomes clitoris or penis. i. Lower part of the intestine. ls. Fold of integument from which the ... This continues to grow caudally until it opens into the ventral part of the cloaca; beyond the pronephros it is termed the ... At a later stage the sinus tubercle opens in the middle, connecting the paramesonephric ducts with the cloaca. In the male the ...
Cloaca. cp. Elevation which becomes clitoris or penis. i. Lower part of the intestine. ls. Fold of integument from which the ... This continues to grow caudally until it opens into the ventral part of the cloaca; beyond the pronephros it is termed the ... At a later stage the eminence opens in the middle, connecting the Müllerian ducts with the cloaca. In the male the Müllerian ... The urinary bladder is formed partly from the endodermal cloaca and partly from the ends of the Wolffian ducts. In other words ...
"US VS US by Nikita Gale". Cloaca Projects. Retrieved May 24, 2023. Gale, Nikita (2020). "US VS. US". nikitagale. Foundation, ...
Cloaca Maxima. Ed. Hans Ulrich Obrist. Ostfildern: Cantz Verlag, 1994. 1993 Gerhard Richter, Gerhard Richter, Text: Schriften ... Hans Ulrich Obrist, Cloaca Maxima. Museum der Stadtentwässerung, Zürich, June 10 - October 30, 1994. 1993 Hans Ulrich Obrist, ...
The cloaca is lacking. Dal Sasso & Maganuco suggested the cloaca exit was rather low, at the level of the ischial feet and that ...
"Gouden Film voor Cloaca". goudenfilm.nl (in Dutch). Netherlands Film Festival / Netherlands Film Fund. 9 January 2004. Archived ...
... can breathe underwater by taking water into its cloaca.[citation needed] The cloaca is a cavity at the end of the digestive ... "Cloaca - Definition, Function and Quiz". Biology Dictionary. 4 July 2017. Retrieved 28 March 2019. Beeton, Robert (2009). " ...
Cloaca (2003; film for television) Embracing Time (2004; film for television) Lepel (2005) Leef! (2005) Ik Omhels Je Met 1000 ...
"Levyarvio: CMX: Cloaca Maxima II". Desibeli.net. 2005-03-19. Retrieved 2009-10-10. "CMX - Cloaca Maxima II -arvostelu". Noise. ... The band's second three-CD compilation Cloaca Maxima II, released in 2004, followed the format of the 1997 Cloaca Maxima ... CMX, originally Cloaca Maxima, is a Finnish rock band. They originally played hardcore punk, but soon expanded to play a wide ... The band's original name, Cloaca Maxima, Latin for the "Greatest Sewer", was taken from a footnote of H. P. Blavatsky's book ...
Birds, monotremes, and some reptiles have a part of the oviduct that leads to the cloaca. Chickens have a vaginal aperture that ... "What Is a Bird's Cloaca?". The Spruce. Archived from the original on January 13, 2018. Retrieved January 13, 2018. Brennan, P. ... In amphibians, birds, reptiles and monotremes, the cloaca is the single external opening for the gastrointestinal, urinary, and ... Birds have a cloaca into which the urinary, reproductive tract (vagina) and gastrointestinal tract empty. Females of some ...
Jus cloacae. In civil law, the right of sewerage or drainage. An easement consisting in the right to have a sewer, or to ...
A journey through the American cloaca. Bourke, J.G. (2005). Escatología y civilización: los excrementos y su presencia en las ...
Adult females have spermathecae in cloaca. Ambystomatids are nocturnal. Although they are more active at night, they may be ...
"Arcobacter cloacae sp. nov. and Arcobacter suis sp. nov., two new species isolated from food and sewage". Systematic and ...
... the cloaca) for their urinary, defecatory, and reproductive systems. Like reptiles, monotremes have a single cloaca. Marsupials ... The name monotreme derives from the Greek words μονός (monós 'single') and τρῆμα (trêma 'hole'), referring to the cloaca. Like ... only semen passes through the penis while urine is excreted through the male's cloaca. The monotreme penis is similar to that ...
One study has looked into birds that use their cloaca for cooling. The cloaca in birds may also be referred to as the vent. ... In the anatomy of some animals, a cloaca (/kloʊˈeɪkə/ kloh-AY-kə), PL: cloacae (/kloʊˈeɪsi/ kloh-AY-see or /kloʊˈeɪki/ kloh-AY- ... "cloaca". Online Etymology Dictionary. cloaca. Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short. A Latin Dictionary on Perseus Project. ... The word is from the Latin verb cluo, "(I) cleanse", thus the noun cloaca, "sewer, drain". Birds reproduce using their cloaca; ...
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SAAB 900 Cabrio in Cloaca, Movie, 2003 Class: Cars, Convertible - Model origin: - Built in: ...
Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacter cloacae in Patients from the US Veterans Health Administration, 2006-2015 Brigid M. Wilson, ... Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacter cloacae in Patients from the US Veterans Health Administration, 2006-2015. ... D) Nationwide percentage of carbapenem nonsusceptibility and resistance in E. cloacae complex. Isolates from patients in Puerto ... C) Emergence and dissemination ("second epidemic") of carbapenem-nonsusceptible and -resistant Enterobacter cloacae complex. ...
Home / Painting / He estado ahí, en la cloaca, pero ahora florezco (2023). ...
... see Cloaca (disambiguation).Cloaca of a red-tailed hawk... ... Cloaca of a red-tailed hawk. A cloaca (/kloʊˈeɪkə/ kloh-AY-kə ... Cloaca of a female bird. Cloaca of a male bird. A roseate spoonbill excreting urine in flight. Birds reproduce using their ... In reptiles, the cloaca consists of the urodeum, proctodeum, and coprodeum. Some species have modified cloacae for increased ... Most adult placental mammals have no cloaca. In the embryo, the embryonic cloaca divides into a posterior region that becomes ...
Precio De Maquina Destapa Cañerias - Desagues Sanitarios Destapaciones De Caños https://mysocialport.com/story2054943/pendiente-de-cloacas ...
... storage.googleapis.com/zonaoeste01b/destapa-cloaca/Cable-destapa-cloacas.html. ...
Cloaca. Retrograde genitography and VCUG are helpful in outlining the level of confluence of the urethra, vagina, and colon ...
Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment ...
Pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) reductase of Enterobacter cloacae PB2, a flavoprotein involved in the biodegradation of the ... Crystallization and preliminary diffraction studies of pentaerythritol tetranitrate reductase from Enterobacter cloacae PB2. ... Crystallization and preliminary diffraction studies of pentaerythritol tetranitrate reductase from Enterobacter cloacae PB2. In ... Crystallization and preliminary diffraction studies of pentaerythritol tetranitrate reductase from Enterobacter cloacae PB2. / ...
1 The Cloaca Maxima, or "Greatest Drain," was the major interceptor discharge outfall of Romes sewage system, and Cloacina was ... The Cloaca Maxima, or "Greatest Drain," was the major interceptor discharge outfall of Romes sewage system, and Cloacina was ... One of Romes Etruscan rulers, Tarquinius Priscus, is credited with starting the Cloaca Maxima and another, Tarquinius Superbus ... On the Roman Forum, just in front of the Basilica Aemilia and above the Cloaca Maxima, stood the little, round Venus Cloacina ...
... cloacae clinical isolate with an unusual resistance profile. ... E. cloacae UK. KP081315. NCM-A. E. cloacae Argentina. AJ536087 ... E. cloacae France. Z21956. [9]. a bla IMI-5, -6, -9, -10 and -11 have been assigned but no sequences nor publications are ... Findings: E. cloacae strain WCHECl-1060 was recovered from a blood sample of a leukemia patient, who was not previously exposed ... Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first report of an IMI-1 carbapenemase-producing colistin-resistant E. cloacae in ...
Dive into the research topics of Simultaneous cellulose degradation and electricity production by Enterobacter cloacae in a ... Simultaneous cellulose degradation and electricity production by Enterobacter cloacae in a microbial fuel cell. ...
Enterobacter cloacae (ATCC 35030) antimicrobial susceptibility data.
Cloaca -A chamber into which both the digestive system waste and the reproductive system empty before exiting the body. ... Cloaca. -A chamber into which both the digestive system waste and the reproductive system empty before exiting the body. ... Reptiles , from which mammals evolved, also have a cloaca.. Shrews digest their food very rapidly, so quickly, in fact, that ... Reptiles, from which mammals evolved, also have a cloaca.. Shrews digest their food very rapidly, so quickly, in fact, that ...
Enterobacter cloacae. * Klebseilla spp. *Pantoae aggloerans. * Rahnella aquatilis. * Serratia liquifaciens, Serratia marcescens ...
... near the cloaca (C); (B) In the next step at E11.0, the MM secretes signals that attract the UB to grow towards it. The UB ... near the cloaca (C); (B) In the next step at E11.0, the MM secretes signals that attract the UB to grow towards it. The UB ... paired nephric ducts emerge and grow posteriorly until they contact and connect to the cloaca. During this time, the nephric ... downstream of RET is essential for kidney growth and patterning through UB branching and nephric duct connection to cloaca [4, ...
LAC DPH has recently received reports of 2 cases of Enterobacter cloacae bloodstream infections in persons who received non-FDA ... The Los Angeles County Health Department (LAC DPH) has identified 2 cases of Enterobacter cloacae bloodstream infections in ... Enterobacter cloacae has taken on clinical significance as an opportunistic and nosocomial pathogen. ... Enterobacter cloacae infections linked to unapproved stem cell injections in LA County ...
Enterobacter cloacae. Transmission. Share on Pinterest. Thorough hand-washing can help prevent an infection.. ...
... ... Estimation of Cultivable Bacterial Diversity in the Cloacae and Pharynx in Eurasian Griffon Vultures (Gyps fulvus). Microbial ... Estimation of Cultivable Bacterial Diversity in the Cloacae and Pharynx in Eurasian Griffon Vultures (Gyps fulvus) ... Estimation of Cultivable Bacterial Diversity in the Cloacae and Pharynx in Eurasian Griffon Vultures (Gyps fulvus). ...
Cloaca Annot. 29); M. depressor anguli venti (Cloaca Annot. 30); M. levator cloacae [M. retractor phalli caudalis] (Cloaca ... M. transversus cloacae (Fig. 6.12A, and Cloaca, Annot. 28) may consist of one or two separate heads of origin and/or separate ... M. sphincter cloacae (Cloaca, Annot. 27) is an intrinsic striated muscle of the cloacal wall, extending into the dorsal and ... 51) ); M. dilator cloacae [M. retractor phalli cranialis] (Cloaca Annot. 32; Masc. Annot. 51). ...
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Enterobacter cloacae. * Klebseilla spp. *Pantoae aggloerans. * Rahnella aquatilis. * Serratia liquifaciens, Serratia marcescens ...
Diagnoses include: Imperforate Anus; Cloaca; Cloacal Exstrophy; Anal Stenosis; Bladder Exstrophy; VACTERL/VATER Association; ...
Government Cloaca April 1, 2010. Leave a Reply Cancel reply. Your email address will not be published. Required fields are ...
Enterobacter cloacae Haemophilus influenzae (beta-lactamase positive isolates only) Haemophilus parainfluenzae Klebsiella ...
If the cloaca persists as a baby girl grows in the womb, all the openings do not form and separate. For example, a baby may be ... Cloacal abnormalities: The cloaca is a tube-like structure. In the early stages of development, the urinary tract, rectum, and ...
  • C) Emergence and dissemination ("second epidemic") of carbapenem-nonsusceptible and -resistant Enterobacter cloacae complex. (cdc.gov)
  • Pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) reductase of Enterobacter cloacae PB2, a flavoprotein involved in the biodegradation of the explosive PETN, ethylene glycol dinitrate (EGDN) and glycerol trinitrate (GTN), was purified from an overexpressing strain of E. coli and crystallized at 293 K using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. (manchester.ac.uk)
  • A bla IMI -carrying Enterobacter cloacae , which was also resistant to colistin, is reported here. (medscape.com)
  • The Los Angeles County Health Department ( LAC DPH ) has identified 2 cases of Enterobacter cloacae bloodstream infections in persons who received non-FDA approved stem cell injections, prompting the issuance of a health advisory to providers. (outbreaknewstoday.com)
  • LAC DPH has recently received reports of 2 cases of Enterobacter cloacae bloodstream infections in persons who received non-FDA approved stem cell injections in August 2018 (not from Liveyon). (outbreaknewstoday.com)
  • Enterobacter cloacae has taken on clinical significance as an opportunistic and nosocomial pathogen. (outbreaknewstoday.com)
  • Of the total of 91 isolates, 89 were E. coli, one was Citrobacter youngae and one was Enterobacter cloacae. (who.int)
  • The following enteric bacteria (bacteria present in the intestinal tracts of humans and animals) were identified: Klebsiella oxytoca, Leclercia adecarboxylata, Enterobacter cloacae, and Citrobacter freundii. (cdc.gov)
  • Mating through the cloaca is called cloacal copulation and cloacal kissing. (wikipedia.org)
  • Staphylococcus and Erysipelothrix were isolated from the pharynx and Salmonella and Corynebacterium from the cloacae, and no Campylobacter was isolated from the cloacal swabs. (visavet.es)
  • Cloacal abnormalities: The cloaca is a tube-like structure. (medlineplus.gov)
  • With a few exceptions noted below, mammals have no cloaca. (wikipedia.org)
  • The monotremes (egg-laying mammals) possess a true cloaca. (wikipedia.org)
  • This is one of the features of marsupials (and monotremes) that suggest their basal nature, as the amniotes from which mammals evolved had a cloaca, and probably so did the earliest mammals. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most adult placental mammals have no trace of cloaca. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, some placental mammals retain a cloaca as adults: those are the tenrecs and golden moles (small mammals native to Africa), as well as some shrews. (wikipedia.org)
  • Diagrams to illustrate the changes in the cloaca in mammals during development. (detailedpedia.com)
  • One characteristic indicating that shrews are more primitive (i.e., with an older evolutionary lineage) than most mammals is the presence of a cloaca in many species. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Reptiles, from which mammals evolved, also have a cloaca. (encyclopedia.com)
  • In the embryo, the embryonic cloaca divides into a posterior region that becomes part of the anus, and an anterior region that develops depending on sex: in males it forms the penile urethra, while in females, it develops into the vestibule that receives the urethra and vagina. (wikipedia.org)
  • Being placental animals, humans have an embryonic cloaca which divides into separate tracts during the development of the urinary and reproductive organs. (wikipedia.org)
  • A , early embryonic stage, showing the cloaca receiving the urinary bladder, the rectum, and the Wolffian duct, as in non- therian vertebrates. (detailedpedia.com)
  • Birds that mate using this method touch their cloacae together, in some species for only a few seconds, sufficient time for sperm to be transferred from the male to the female. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some species have modified cloacae for increased gas exchange (see Reptile respiration and Reptile reproduction). (wikipedia.org)
  • B , later stage, showing the beginning of the fold which divides the cloaca into a ventral urogenital sinus which receives the urinary bladder , Wolffian ducts, and ureters , and into a dorsal part which receives the rectum . (detailedpedia.com)
  • D , completion of the fold, showing complete separation of the cloaca into ventral urogenital sinus and dorsal rectum. (detailedpedia.com)
  • A purification ceremony with myrtle was performed at or very close to an old Etruscan temple to Cloacina, above a little stream that would eventually be widened as the primary exit for Rome's major sewer, the Cloaca Maxima, to commemorate the peace between the Sabines and the Romans. (weirditaly.com)
  • Even in the marsupials that have one, the cloaca is partially subdivided into separate regions for the anus and urethra. (wikipedia.org)
  • In marsupials (and a few birds), the genital tract is separate from the anus, but a trace of the original cloaca does remain externally. (wikipedia.org)
  • In marsupials , the genital tract is separate from the anus, but a trace of the original cloaca does remain externally. (detailedpedia.com)
  • In the anatomy of some animals, a cloaca (/kloʊˈeɪkə/ kloh-AY-kə), PL: cloacae (/kloʊˈeɪsi/ kloh-AY-see or /kloʊˈeɪki/ kloh-AY-kee), is the rear orifice that serves as the only opening for the digestive, reproductive, and urinary tracts (if present) of many vertebrate animals. (wikipedia.org)
  • In lampreys and in some ray-finned fishes, part of the cloaca remains in the adult to receive the urinary and reproductive ducts, although the anus always opens separately. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cloaca - A chamber into which both the digestive system waste and the reproductive system empty before exiting the body. (encyclopedia.com)
  • See Fig. 6.10A. M. sphincter cloacae is also the hypertrophied muscular element of the phalloid organ in the Buffalo Weaver, Bubalornis albirostris (Bentz, 1983). (weber.edu)
  • A urinary bladder is present in fish as an expansible part of the urinary duct, in amphibians and bladder-possessing reptiles ( Sphenodon , turtles, most lizards) as a pocket in the cloaca . (britannica.com)
  • If the cloaca persists as a baby girl grows in the womb, all the openings do not form and separate. (medlineplus.gov)
  • One study has looked into birds that use their cloaca for cooling. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, a few human congenital disorders result in persons being born with a cloaca, including persistent cloaca and sirenomelia (mermaid syndrome). (wikipedia.org)
  • Key reactions for biochemical differentiation of the Enterobacter cloacae complex. (medscape.com)
  • Mechanisms of antibiotic resistance in the Enterobacter cloacae complex. (medscape.com)
  • C) Emergence and dissemination ("second epidemic") of carbapenem-nonsusceptible and -resistant Enterobacter cloacae complex. (cdc.gov)
  • Isolates of the Enterobacter cloacae complex have been increasingly isolated as nosocomial pathogens, but phenotypic identification of the E. cloacae complex is unreliable and irreproducible. (nih.gov)
  • In this paper we report the case ofa patient with no-socomial rotavirus-associated gastroenteritis complicated by Enterobacter cloacae bacteraemia who was treated with adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) for infantile spasm. (who.int)
  • Lin, TW , Chang, CH & Lin, PY 2017, ' Early development of saphenous vein graft infected pseudoaneurysm caused by perioperative Enterobacter cloacae bacteremia ', Kaohsiung Journal of Medical Sciences , vol. 33, no. 12, pp. 637-638. (ncku.edu.tw)
  • Most cases involved infection with Enterobacter cloacae and occurred in Cass County, where the state's largest city, Fargo, is located. (cdc.gov)
  • Genetic typing of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacter cloacae identified from patients at Sanford Health in Fargo, North Dakota, USA. (cdc.gov)
  • CdiA from Enterobacter cloacae Delivers a Toxic Ribosomal RNase into Target Bacteria. (nih.gov)
  • You will need specific antibiotics for enterobacter cloacae. (cancer.org)
  • planticola and Enterobacter cloacae can produce vitamin B12 during tempeh fermentation (Okada et al. (veganforum.com)
  • The following enteric bacteria (bacteria present in the intestinal tracts of humans and animals) were identified: Klebsiella oxytoca, Leclercia adecarboxylata, Enterobacter cloacae, and Citrobacter freundii. (cdc.gov)
  • At the posterior end near the cloaca is the respiratory tree. (sea-ex.com)
  • Sticky, white thread-like structures called cuvierian tubules are sometimes found inside near the cloaca. (sea-ex.com)
  • Cloaca - a severe anorectal malformation where the genital, urinary and gastrointestinal tracts share a common channel - can be observed through prenatal ultrasound, and pediatricians should be alert to the possibility of persistent cloaca. (nortonhealthcareprovider.com)
  • Prenatal ultrasound findings may raise suspicion of a persistent cloaca, allowing pediatricians to improve both prenatal counseling and family preparation, the study's authors concluded. (nortonhealthcareprovider.com)
  • The most severe form is called persistent cloaca. (healthychildren.org)
  • Nosocomial rotavirus gastroenteritis, E. cloacae septicaemia and disseminated intravascular coagulation were identified as the final diagnoses of the patient. (who.int)
  • Three carbapenem-resistant E. cloacae isolates from documented cases of CRE infection at the hospital during 2010 were analyzed for comparison. (cdc.gov)
  • During December 2011-December 2012, a total of 19 single-patient E. cloacae isolates and 1 E. aerogenes isolate had positive mHT results. (cdc.gov)
  • bla KPC was detected in 17 of the 19 E. cloacae isolates and in the 3 carbapenem-resistant E. cloacae isolates from 2010. (cdc.gov)
  • Interference with anorectal structure development at varying stages leads to various anomalies, ranging from anal stenosis, incomplete rupture of the anal membrane, or anal agenesis to complete failure of the upper portion of the cloaca to descend and failure of the proctodeum to invaginate. (medscape.com)
  • Cloaca swollen? (glidercentral.net)
  • This species does not exhibit sexual dimorphism (distinct differences in appearance between males and females), except during the breeding season when males develop a swollen cloaca. (si.edu)
  • Cloacal abnormalities: The cloaca is a tube-like structure. (medlineplus.gov)
  • by phenotypic methods employing commercially available kits or semiautomated systems that are limited to E. cloacae and E. asburiae , while for further identification and discrimination of the other species in this genus, biochemical tests or molecular methods such as 16S rRNA, rpoB and hsp60 gene sequencing should be used. (medscape.com)
  • This study shows that multilocus sequence analysis and comparative genomic hybridization based on a mixed genome array is a powerful method for studying species assignment within the E. cloacae complex. (nih.gov)
  • Based on genomic differences it is concluded that some previously defined (clonal and heterogenic) (sub)species of the E. cloacae complex have to be redefined because of disagreements with known or proposed nomenclature. (nih.gov)
  • We describe an outbreak of clonal carbapenem-resistant E. cloacae in a health care system in Fargo. (cdc.gov)
  • Members of the E. cloacae complex are part of the endogenous flora of humans and consequently of patients who have become chronically colonized, making it difficult to apply generalized strategies of infection control for these microorganisms that are able to acquire resistance determinants and so becoming MDR. (medscape.com)
  • All these observations, together with the awareness of the limited therapeutic options to treat these infections, bring us to the alarming conclusion that we need urgent action to slow down and control the worldwide epidemic spread of these bacteria, especially of the emerging carbapenemase-producing E. cloacae complex strains because they are transmitted by mobile genetic elements. (medscape.com)
  • D) Nationwide percentage of carbapenem nonsusceptibility and resistance in E. cloacae complex. (cdc.gov)
  • The E. cloacae complex is shown to be evolutionarily divided into two clades that are genetically distinct from each other. (nih.gov)
  • The external anal sphincter, derived from exterior mesoderm, is usually present but has varying degrees of formation, ranging from robust muscle (perineal or vestibular fistula) to virtually no muscle (complex long-common-channel cloaca, prostatic or bladder-neck fistula). (medscape.com)
  • Females develop fleshy folds on either side of their cloaca and an upturned tail. (hww.ca)
  • This is a branched tubular structure which pumps seawater in and out through the cloaca for respiration. (sea-ex.com)
  • The blood culture of the patient at the time of clinical deterioration (on day 8) yielded E. cloaca. (who.int)
  • At neural tube stages, MGC53193 is strongly expressed in the head epidermis and tissue surrounding the cloaca (cl). (xenbase.org)
  • solid symbols, positive for bla KPC -positive E. cloacae). (nih.gov)

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