A plant family of the order Ericales, subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida.
A plant family of the order Theales, subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida. It is best known for Kiwi fruit (ACTINIDIA).
Members of the group of vascular plants which bear flowers. They are differentiated from GYMNOSPERMS by their production of seeds within a closed chamber (OVARY, PLANT). The Angiosperms division is composed of two classes, the monocotyledons (Liliopsida) and dicotyledons (Magnoliopsida). Angiosperms represent approximately 80% of all known living plants.
The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.
A species of ascomycetous fungi of the family Sordariaceae, order SORDARIALES, much used in biochemical, genetic, and physiologic studies.
The segregation and degradation of damaged or unwanted cytoplasmic constituents by autophagic vacuoles (cytolysosomes) composed of LYSOSOMES containing cellular components in the process of digestion; it plays an important role in BIOLOGICAL METAMORPHOSIS of amphibians, in the removal of bone by osteoclasts, and in the degradation of normal cell components in nutritional deficiency states.
A mosquito-borne encephalitis caused by the Japanese B encephalitis virus (ENCEPHALITIS VIRUS, JAPANESE) occurring throughout Eastern Asia and Australia. The majority of infections occur in children and are subclinical or have features limited to transient fever and gastrointestinal symptoms. Inflammation of the brain, spinal cord, and meninges may occur and lead to transient or permanent neurologic deficits (including a POLIOMYELITIS-like presentation); SEIZURES; COMA; and death. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p751; Lancet 1998 Apr 11;351(9109):1094-7)
Gymnosperms are a group of vascular plants whose seeds are not enclosed by a ripened ovary (fruit), in contrast to ANGIOSPERMS whose seeds are surrounded by an ovary wall. The seeds of many gymnosperms (literally, "naked seed") are borne in cones and are not visible. Taxonomists now recognize four distinct divisions of extant gymnospermous plants (CONIFEROPHYTA; CYCADOPHYTA; GINKGOPHYTA; and GNETOPHYTA).
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.

Phloem loading. A reevaluation of the relationship between plasmodesmatal frequencies and loading strategies. (1/4)

The incidence of plasmodesmata in the minor vein phloem of leaves varies widely between species. On this basis, two pathways of phloem loading have been proposed: symplastic where frequencies are high, and apoplastic where they are low. However, putative symplastic-loading species fall into at least two categories. In one, the plants translocate raffinose-family oligosaccharides (RFOs). In the other, the primary sugar in the phloem sap is sucrose (Suc). While a thermodynamically feasible mechanism of symplastic loading has been postulated for species that transport RFOs, no such mechanism is known for Suc transporters. We used p-chloromercuribenzenesulfonic acid inhibition of apoplastic loading to distinguish between the two pathways in three species that have abundant minor vein plasmodesmata and are therefore putative symplastic loaders. Clethra barbinervis and Liquidambar styraciflua transport Suc, while Catalpa speciosa transports RFOs. The results indicate that, contrary to the hypothesis that all species with abundant minor vein plasmodesmata load symplastically, C. barbinervis and L. styraciflua load from the apoplast. C. speciosa, being an RFO transporter, loads from the symplast, as expected. Data from these three species, and from the literature, also indicate that plants with abundant plasmodesmata in the minor vein phloem have abundant plasmodesmata between mesophyll cells. Thus, plasmodesmatal frequencies in the minor veins may be a reflection of overall frequencies in the lamina and may have limited relevance to phloem loading. We suggest that symplastic loading is restricted to plants that translocate oligosaccharides larger than Suc, such as RFOs, and that other plants, no matter how many plasmodesmata they have in the minor vein phloem, load via the apoplast.  (+info)

Glandulocalyx upatoiensis, a fossil flower of Ericales (Actinidiaceae/Clethraceae) from the Late Cretaceous (Santonian) of Georgia, USA. (2/4)

 (+info)

Triterpene saponins from Clethra barbinervis and their hyaluronidase inhibitory activities. (3/4)

An extract of Clethra barbinervis with an inhibitory effect on hyaluronidase activity was fractionated guided by the results of an assay. From the active fractions, seven new triterpene saponins (1-4, 6-8) and a new lignan glycoside (14) were isolated together with 14 known compounds (5, 9-13, 15-22). Some of the saponins (2, 3, 9) were revealed as hyaluronidase inhibitors similar to epicatechin (17).  (+info)

Structures of ryobunins A-C from the leaves of Clethra barbinervis. (4/4)

From a MeOH extract of the leaves of Clethra barbinervis Sieb. et Zucc., ryobunins A-C, three new triterpene glucosides, i.e. one ursane, one seco-ursane and one oleanane-type glucoside, along with four known compounds were isolated. Their structures were elucidated based on chemical and spectral evidence.  (+info)

Clethraceae is a family of flowering plants that includes shrubs and small trees. It is primarily found in eastern Asia, with a few species in southeastern North America. The family is characterized by simple, alternate leaves and showy, bell-shaped flowers. Clethra alnifolia, also known as summersweet or coastal sweetpepperbush, is a common species in this family that is native to the eastern United States and is often grown for its fragrant, white flowers.

Actinidiaceae is a family of plants in the order Ericales, which includes shrubs and trees. It contains around 350 species, with the most well-known genus being Actinidia, which includes the kiwi fruit (Actinidia deliciosa). These plants are native to temperate regions of Asia, particularly China, Japan, and Korea. They typically have simple, alternate leaves and small flowers with both male and female reproductive structures. The fruits of these plants can be edible and are often eaten fresh or used in jams and other products.

Angiosperms, also known as flowering plants, are a group of plants that produce seeds enclosed within an ovary. The term "angiosperm" comes from the Greek words "angeion," meaning "case" or "capsule," and "sperma," meaning "seed." This group includes the majority of plant species, with over 300,000 known species.

Angiosperms are characterized by their reproductive structures, which consist of flowers. The flower contains male and female reproductive organs, including stamens (which produce pollen) and carpels (which contain the ovules). After fertilization, the ovule develops into a seed, while the ovary matures into a fruit, which provides protection and nutrition for the developing embryo.

Angiosperms are further divided into two main groups: monocots and eudicots. Monocots have one cotyledon or embryonic leaf, while eudicots have two. Examples of monocots include grasses, lilies, and orchids, while examples of eudicots include roses, sunflowers, and legumes.

Angiosperms are ecologically and economically important, providing food, shelter, and other resources for many organisms, including humans. They have evolved a wide range of adaptations to different environments, from the desert to the ocean floor, making them one of the most diverse and successful groups of plants on Earth.

Phylogeny is the evolutionary history and relationship among biological entities, such as species or genes, based on their shared characteristics. In other words, it refers to the branching pattern of evolution that shows how various organisms have descended from a common ancestor over time. Phylogenetic analysis involves constructing a tree-like diagram called a phylogenetic tree, which depicts the inferred evolutionary relationships among organisms or genes based on molecular sequence data or other types of characters. This information is crucial for understanding the diversity and distribution of life on Earth, as well as for studying the emergence and spread of diseases.

"Neurospora crassa" is not a medical term, but it is a scientific name used in the field of biology. It refers to a type of filamentous fungus that belongs to the phylum Ascomycota. This organism is commonly found in the environment and has been widely used as a model system for studying various biological processes, including genetics, cell biology, and molecular biology.

"Neurospora crassa" has a characteristic red pigment that makes it easy to identify, and it reproduces sexually through the formation of specialized structures called ascocarps or "fruiting bodies." The fungus undergoes meiosis inside these structures, resulting in the production of ascospores, which are haploid spores that can germinate and form new individuals.

The genome of "Neurospora crassa" was one of the first fungal genomes to be sequenced, and it has served as an important tool for understanding fundamental biological processes in eukaryotic cells. However, because it is not a medical term, there is no official medical definition for "Neurospora crassa."

Autophagy is a fundamental cellular process that involves the degradation and recycling of damaged or unnecessary cellular components, such as proteins and organelles. The term "autophagy" comes from the Greek words "auto" meaning self and "phagy" meaning eating. It is a natural process that occurs in all types of cells and helps maintain cellular homeostasis by breaking down and recycling these components.

There are several different types of autophagy, including macroautophagy, microautophagy, and chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA). Macroautophagy is the most well-known form and involves the formation of a double-membraned vesicle called an autophagosome, which engulfs the cellular component to be degraded. The autophagosome then fuses with a lysosome, an organelle containing enzymes that break down and recycle the contents of the autophagosome.

Autophagy plays important roles in various cellular processes, including adaptation to starvation, removal of damaged organelles, clearance of protein aggregates, and regulation of programmed cell death (apoptosis). Dysregulation of autophagy has been implicated in a number of diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and infectious diseases.

Japanese encephalitis is a viral inflammation of the brain (encephalitis) caused by the Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV). It is transmitted to humans through the bite of infected Culex mosquitoes, particularly in rural and agricultural areas. The majority of JE cases occur in children under the age of 15. Most people infected with JEV do not develop symptoms, but some may experience mild symptoms such as fever, headache, and vomiting. In severe cases, JEV can cause high fever, neck stiffness, seizures, confusion, and coma. There is no specific treatment for Japanese encephalitis, and care is focused on managing symptoms and supporting the patient's overall health. Prevention measures include vaccination and avoiding mosquito bites in endemic areas.

Gymnosperms are a group of seed-producing plants that include conifers, cycads, Ginkgo, and gnetophytes. The name "gymnosperm" comes from the Greek words "gymnos," meaning naked, and "sperma," meaning seed. This refers to the fact that the seeds of gymnosperms are not enclosed within an ovary or fruit, but are exposed on the surface of modified leaves called cones or strobili.

Gymnosperms are vascular plants, which means they have specialized tissues for transporting water and nutrients throughout the plant. They are also heterosporous, meaning that they produce two types of spores: male microspores and female megaspores. The microspores develop into male gametophytes, which produce sperm cells, while the megaspores develop into female gametophytes, which produce egg cells.

Gymnosperms are an important group of plants that have been around for millions of years. They are adapted to a wide range of environments, from temperate forests to deserts and high mountain ranges. Many gymnosperms are evergreen, with needle-like or scale-like leaves that are able to resist drought and cold temperatures.

Conifers, which include trees such as pines, firs, spruces, and redwoods, are the most diverse and widespread group of gymnosperms. They are characterized by their woody cones and needle-shaped leaves. Cycads are another group of gymnosperms that are found in tropical and subtropical regions. They have large, stiff leaves and produce large seeds that are enclosed in a fleshy covering. Ginkgo is a unique gymnosperm that has been around for over 200 million years. It is a deciduous tree with fan-shaped leaves and large, naked seeds.

Gnetophytes are a small group of gymnosperms that include the ephedra, welwitschia, and gnetum. They have unique features such as vessels in their wood and motile sperm cells, which are not found in other gymnosperms.

Overall, gymnosperms are an important group of plants that have adapted to a wide range of environments and play a crucial role in many ecosystems.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

The Clethraceae are a small family of flowering plants in the order Ericales, composed of two genera, Clethra and Purdiaea, ... doi:10.11646/phytotaxa.261.3.1. Anderberg, A.A.; Zhang, Z. (2002). "Phylogenetic relationships of Cyrillaceae and Clethraceae ( ...
IPNI, Clethraceae, Type. Schneider & Bayer 2004, p. 72. POWO, Clethraceae. Christenhusz, Fay & Chase 2017, pp. 504-505. Stearn ... ISBN 978-0-367-44751-9. Schneider, J. V.; Bayer, C. (2004). "Clethraceae". In Kubitzki, K. (ed.). Celastrales, Oxalidales, ...
1763) [Clethraceae]". Taxon. 31 (3): 568. doi:10.2307/1220698. JSTOR 1220698. ICN 2011 Melbourne Code Voss, E. G. (August 1986 ...
1, 1897; Dicotyledoneae: Clethraceae etc. Abt. 2, 1895; Dicotyledoneae: Oleaceae etc. Abt. 3a, 1897; Dicotyledoneae: ...
Clethraceae Klotzsch, nom. cons. Cyrillaceae Lindl., nom. cons. Ericaceae Juss., nom. cons. Mitrastemonaceae Makino, nom. cons ...
Clethraceae family 3. Ericaceae order 3. Diapensiales family 1. Diapensiaceae order 4. Bruniales family 1. Bruniaceae family 2 ...
Clethraceae Klotzsch Cyrillaceae Lindl. Diapensiaceae Lindl. Ebenaceae Gürke Ericaceae Juss. Fouquieriaceae DC. Lecythidaceae A ...
Bischer in Aussereuropäischen gebieten gemachten blütenbiologischen beobachtungen; 2. Teil: Clethraceae bis Compositae. Leipzig ...
clementis is a tree in the family Clethraceae. Clethra canescens var. clementis grows up to 10 metres (30 ft) tall. The smooth ...
... is a tree in the family Clethraceae. The specific epithet longispicata is from the Latin meaning "long ...
... is a tree in the family Clethraceae. The specific epithet pachyphylla is from the Greek meaning "thick ...
The genera of the Cyrillaceae and Clethraceae of the southeastern United States. J. Arnold Arbor. 42: 96-106. "Clethra ...
In 1912, Johannes Gottfried Hallier regarded Roridula as a specialized member of the Clethraceae. Hutchinson in 1959, and ...
... is a genus of flowering plants in the family Clethraceae described as a genus in 1846. It is one of two genera in this ... Anderberg, A. A. & Zhang, Z. (2002). Phylogenetic relationships of Cyrillaceae and Clethraceae (Ericales) with special emphasis ...
... is one of two genera in the family Clethraceae (the other being Purdiaea). The species may be evergreen or deciduous, ...
... , the Japanese clethra, is a species of flowering plant in the family Clethraceae. It is native to eastern ...
HEMINGSON, JOYCE CANFIELD (1986). THE POLLINATION BIOLOGY OF CLETHRA ALNIFOLIA L. (CLETHRACEAE) (ESSENTIAL OIL, CHEMICAL ... is a species of flowering plant in the genus Clethra of the family Clethraceae, native to eastern North America from southern ...
doi:10.11646/phytotaxa.261.3.1. Anderberg, A.A.; Zhang, Z. (2002). "Phylogenetic relationships of Cyrillaceae and Clethraceae ( ... though recent research has shown this genus is better placed in the closely related family Clethraceae. Fossil Cyrilla and ...
Volume 7 part 1 (1971) - Revisions: Byblidaceae, Cardiopteridaceae, Clethraceae, Haloragaceae, Icacinaceae, Lemnaceae, ...
Trees of the genera Apollonias (Lauraceae), Ocotea (Lauraceae), Persea (Lauraceae), Clethra (Clethraceae), Dracaena (Ruscaceae ...
This trait is not found in the Clethraceae and Cyrillaceae, the two families most closely related to the Ericaceae. Most ...
Trees of the genera Apollonias (Lauraceae), Ocotea (Lauraceae), Persea (Lauraceae), Clethra (Clethraceae), Dracaena (Ruscaceae ... and Clethraceae. Epiphytes, including orchids, ferns, moss, lichen, and liverworts, are more abundant than in either temperate ...
... the Clethraceae, the Sarraceniaceae, and the Roridulaceae. Further genetic evidence points to the Actinidiaceae being sister to ...
Family Clethraceae (clethra family) Family Cyrillaceae (cyrilla family) Family Diapensiaceae Family Ebenaceae (ebony and ... Family Ericaceae Family Cyrillaceae Family Clethraceae Family Grubbiaceae Family Empetraceae Family Epacridaceae Family ...
Sympetalae-Polycarpellatae ordo Ebenales Sapotaceae Ebenaceae Symplocaceae Styracaceae Fouquieriaceae ordo Ericales Clethraceae ...
Clethraceae and Caprifoliaceae families and numerous other Solanaceae. About one in three specimens of Brunfelsia plowmaniana ...
Hoplestigmataceae Loasaceae Cucurbitaceae Ordo Cistales Cistaceae Bixaceae Cochlospermaceae Ordo Ericales Clethraceae ...
... clethraceae MeSH B06.388.100.228 - combretaceae MeSH B06.388.100.228.166 - combretum MeSH B06.388.100.228.583 - terminalia MeSH ...
Alangiaceae Nyssaceae Davidiaceae Cornaceae Garryaceae Araliaceae Umbelliferae or Apiaceae Diapensiaceae Clethraceae Pyrolaceae ...
Moringaceae Resedaceae Order Batales Gyrostemonaceae Bataceae Order Ericales Cyrillaceae Clethraceae Grubbiaceae Empetraceae ...
The Clethraceae are a small family of flowering plants in the order Ericales, composed of two genera, Clethra and Purdiaea, ... doi:10.11646/phytotaxa.261.3.1. Anderberg, A.A.; Zhang, Z. (2002). "Phylogenetic relationships of Cyrillaceae and Clethraceae ( ...
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Clethraceae. A plant family of the order Ericales, subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida.. ...
Clethraceae. N. S. Leaf. Q. Clinopodium pulchellum. (Kunth) Govaerts*. Panizara. Lamiaceae. N. S. Leaf. Q. ...
매화오리나무과(梅花----科, 학명: Clethraceae 클레트라케아이[*])는 진달래목의 과이다.[1] 동아시아, 북아메리카, 대서양의 마데이라 제도에 약 2속 40~90종가량, 한국에는 매화오리나무 1속 1종이 있다. 관목 ...
Create a checklist by selecting either family and genus, distribution or a combination of the two. ...
The Torner Collection images are in the public domain. When using these images, please include the following credit statement: Torner Collection of Sessé and Mociño Biological Illustrations, courtesy of the Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pa.. ...
Thank you for visiting my gallery of New Yorks wildflowers. Most of the photos are my own, but I wish to thank Alex Roukis for his contribution, particularly of hard-to-find wetland wildflowers. Hes on Flickr, and his album of New York State plants can be accessed here. You can also visit my Flickr pages where you can browse my album of New York Wildflowers.. Ive been photographing the wild plants I observe in the field for over a decade with the intention of keeping a record of sightings. Hopefully, this gallery will help you to identify a plant, as well as to appreciate the diversity and beauty of our wildflowers. This gallery is not intended as a comprehensive guide to all the wild flora of New York. Please see my New York Wild Flora page for a list of print and digital resources and guides.. Wildflowers include flowering vines, shrubs and small trees, and grasses. Plants are arranged by habitat, and within each habitat, by color group, and within each color group, alphabetically by ...
ClethraceaeClethraceae. ClethraClethra. Clethra mexicanamexicana. Yes: 1 image(s). View. ...
Espèces (in biblio)] Clethraceae. [Espèces (in biblio)] Cornaceae. [Espèces (in biblio)] Ericaceae. [Thèmes] Flore. ... This volume treats the Apiaceae, Cornaceae, Aucubaceae, Helwingiaceae, Mastixiaceae, Toricelliaceae, Diapensiaceae, Clethraceae ...
This page provides a complete list of taxa that have images. Use the controls below to browse and search for images by family, genus, or species ...
Systematika krytosymjenjakow po APG III je na kóncu lěta 2009 wuńdźena aktualizacija wot Angiosperm Phylogeny Group najprjedy w lěće 1998 (APG I) namjetana a w lěće 2003 předźěłana (APG II) systematika krytosymjenjakow. Porno předchadnikej, APG II, je so ličba njeplacěrowanych swójbow pomjeńšiła. Město toho je 14 nowych porjadow.[1] ...
Enter the name or part of a name you wish to search for. The asterisk character * can be used as wildcard, but must not be used as first character ...
User Defined Bibliographic Records for "Styracaceae ...
Clethraceae. Engravings -- England -- 20th century. Fringetree. Oleaceae (olive family). Phillyrea arborea. Prints -- England ...
The autumn crocus family used to be part of the lily family but has since been promoted, like other former lily family members, to its own family. There is only one North American species, bellwort. Bellwort is a monocot with lily-like characteristics - three sepals and three petals that are identical in size and color. Found in in eastern woodlands, they bloom in early spring and produce drooping yellow blossoms.. ...
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Founded in 1964, the University of Southern Mississippi Herbarium specializes in vascular plants of Mississippi and the southeastern U.S., with a particular emphasis on aquatic and wetland plants. ...
mpwnse: clethraceae. *mpwnsg: grubbiaceae. *mpwnsi: empetraceae. *mpwnsk: epacridaceae. *mpwnsm: ericaceae*mpwnsmh: heaths ...
Clethra arborea (Clethraceae) - Plate 394 £275.00 Asplenium monanthes (Aspleniaceae) - Plate 401 £150.00 ...
Clethraceae/química , Colômbia , Feminino , Citometria de Fluxo , Humanos , Concentração Inibidora 50 , Interferon gama/ ...
  • The Clethraceae are a small family of flowering plants in the order Ericales, composed of two genera, Clethra and Purdiaea, with approximately 75 species. (wikipedia.org)