Clethraceae: A plant family of the order Ericales, subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida.Actinidiaceae: A plant family of the order Theales, subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida. It is best known for Kiwi fruit (ACTINIDIA).Rhododendron: A plant genus of the family ERICACEAE.Balsaminaceae: A plant family of the order Geraniales (or Ericales in APG system), subclass Rosidae, class Magnoliopsida.Ericaceae: The heath plant family of the order Ericales, subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida that are generally shrubs or small trees. Leaves are alternate, simple, and leathery; flowers are symmetrical with a 4- or 5-parted corolla of partly fused petals.Plants, Genetically Modified: PLANTS, or their progeny, whose GENOME has been altered by GENETIC ENGINEERING.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Resuscitation Orders: Instructions issued by a physician pertaining to the institution, continuation, or withdrawal of life support measures. The concept includes policies, laws, statutes, decisions, guidelines, and discussions that may affect the issuance of such orders.VirginiaWest VirginiaFloridaIsocoumarins: Compounds that differ from COUMARINS in having the positions of the ring and ketone oxygens reversed so the keto oxygen is at the 1-position of the molecule.Ontario: A province of Canada lying between the provinces of Manitoba and Quebec. Its capital is Toronto. It takes its name from Lake Ontario which is said to represent the Iroquois oniatariio, beautiful lake. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p892 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p391)Greenhouse Effect: The effect of GLOBAL WARMING and the resulting increase in world temperatures. The predicted health effects of such long-term climatic change include increased incidence of respiratory, water-borne, and vector-borne diseases.Tetrahydrouridine: An inhibitor of nucleotide metabolism.BrazilEncyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Angiosperms: Members of the group of vascular plants which bear flowers. They are differentiated from GYMNOSPERMS by their production of seeds within a closed chamber (OVARY, PLANT). The Angiosperms division is composed of two classes, the monocotyledons (Liliopsida) and dicotyledons (Magnoliopsida). Angiosperms represent approximately 80% of all known living plants.X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy: Analysis of the energy absorbed across a spectrum of x-ray energies/wavelengths to determine the chemical structure and electronic states of the absorbing medium.MedlinePlus: NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE service for health professionals and consumers. It links extensive information from the National Institutes of Health and other reviewed sources of information on specific diseases and conditions.Sulfurtransferases: Enzymes which transfer sulfur atoms to various acceptor molecules. EC 2.8.1.BooksSTAT3 Transcription Factor: A signal transducer and activator of transcription that mediates cellular responses to INTERLEUKIN-6 family members. STAT3 is constitutively activated in a variety of TUMORS and is a major downstream transducer for the CYTOKINE RECEPTOR GP130.Immersion: The placing of a body or a part thereof into a liquid.Book SelectionBook Reviews as Topic: Critical analyses of books or other monographic works.Rare BooksBook PricesCuba: An island in the Greater Antilles in the West Indies, south of Florida. With the adjacent islands it forms the Republic of Cuba. Its capital is Havana. It was discovered by Columbus on his first voyage in 1492 and conquered by Spain in 1511. It has a varied history under Spain, Great Britain, and the United States but has been independent since 1902. The name Cuba is said to be an Indian name of unknown origin but the language that gave the name is extinct, so the etymology is a conjecture. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p302 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p132)BerlinMuseumsPolygalaceae: A plant family of the order Polygalales, subclass Rosidae, class Magnoliopsida.GermanyTourette Syndrome: A neuropsychological disorder related to alterations in DOPAMINE metabolism and neurotransmission involving frontal-subcortical neuronal circuits. Both multiple motor and one or more vocal tics need to be present with TICS occurring many times a day, nearly daily, over a period of more than one year. The onset is before age 18 and the disturbance is not due to direct physiological effects of a substance or a another medical condition. The disturbance causes marked distress or significant impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning. (From DSM-IV, 1994; Neurol Clin 1997 May;15(2):357-79)Programming Languages: Specific languages used to prepare computer programs.Software: Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.Indonesia: A republic stretching from the Indian Ocean east to New Guinea, comprising six main islands: Java, Sumatra, Bali, Kalimantan (the Indonesian portion of the island of Borneo), Sulawesi (formerly known as the Celebes) and Irian Jaya (the western part of New Guinea). Its capital is Djakarta. The ethnic groups living there are largely Chinese, Arab, Eurasian, Indian, and Pakistani; 85% of the peoples are of the Islamic faith.User-Computer Interface: The portion of an interactive computer program that issues messages to and receives commands from a user.Computer Graphics: The process of pictorial communication, between human and computers, in which the computer input and output have the form of charts, drawings, or other appropriate pictorial representation.Hypermedia: Computerized compilations of information units (text, sound, graphics, and/or video) interconnected by logical nonlinear linkages that enable users to follow optimal paths through the material and also the systems used to create and display this information. (From Thesaurus of ERIC Descriptors, 1994)Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Encephalomyelitis, Acute Disseminated: An acute or subacute inflammatory process of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM characterized histologically by multiple foci of perivascular demyelination. Symptom onset usually occurs several days after an acute viral infection or immunization, but it may coincide with the onset of infection or rarely no antecedent event can be identified. Clinical manifestations include CONFUSION, somnolence, FEVER, nuchal rigidity, and involuntary movements. The illness may progress to COMA and eventually be fatal. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p921)Salsola: A plant genus of the family CHENOPODIACEAE. The extract may be called lochein. Tumbleweed may occasionally refer to AMARANTHUS.Calcium Sulfate: A calcium salt that is used for a variety of purposes including: building materials, as a desiccant, in dentistry as an impression material, cast, or die, and in medicine for immobilizing casts and as a tablet excipient. It exists in various forms and states of hydration. Plaster of Paris is a mixture of powdered and heat-treated gypsum.Sin Nombre virus: A species of HANTAVIRUS which emerged in the Four Corners area of the United States in 1993. It causes a serious, often fatal pulmonary illness (HANTAVIRUS PULMONARY SYNDROME) in humans. Transmission is by inhaling aerosolized rodent secretions that contain virus particles, carried especially by deer mice (PEROMYSCUS maniculatus) and pinyon mice (P. truei).Cat's Claw: A vine (Uncaria tomentosa) indigenous to the Amazon rainforest whose name is derived from its hook-like thorns. It contains oxindole alkaloids and glycosides and has many medicinal uses.Quercetin: A flavonol widely distributed in plants. It is an antioxidant, like many other phenolic heterocyclic compounds. Glycosylated forms include RUTIN and quercetrin.Gardening: Cultivation of PLANTS; (FRUIT; VEGETABLES; MEDICINAL HERBS) on small plots of ground or in containers.ArchivesComputer Security: Protective measures against unauthorized access to or interference with computer operating systems, telecommunications, or data structures, especially the modification, deletion, destruction, or release of data in computers. It includes methods of forestalling interference by computer viruses or so-called computer hackers aiming to compromise stored data.Confidentiality: The privacy of information and its protection against unauthorized disclosure.Privacy: The state of being free from intrusion or disturbance in one's private life or affairs. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, 1993)Pesticides: Chemicals used to destroy pests of any sort. The concept includes fungicides (FUNGICIDES, INDUSTRIAL); INSECTICIDES; RODENTICIDES; etc.Poultry: Domesticated birds raised for food. It typically includes CHICKENS; TURKEYS, DUCKS; GEESE; and others.

Phloem loading. A reevaluation of the relationship between plasmodesmatal frequencies and loading strategies. (1/4)

The incidence of plasmodesmata in the minor vein phloem of leaves varies widely between species. On this basis, two pathways of phloem loading have been proposed: symplastic where frequencies are high, and apoplastic where they are low. However, putative symplastic-loading species fall into at least two categories. In one, the plants translocate raffinose-family oligosaccharides (RFOs). In the other, the primary sugar in the phloem sap is sucrose (Suc). While a thermodynamically feasible mechanism of symplastic loading has been postulated for species that transport RFOs, no such mechanism is known for Suc transporters. We used p-chloromercuribenzenesulfonic acid inhibition of apoplastic loading to distinguish between the two pathways in three species that have abundant minor vein plasmodesmata and are therefore putative symplastic loaders. Clethra barbinervis and Liquidambar styraciflua transport Suc, while Catalpa speciosa transports RFOs. The results indicate that, contrary to the hypothesis that all species with abundant minor vein plasmodesmata load symplastically, C. barbinervis and L. styraciflua load from the apoplast. C. speciosa, being an RFO transporter, loads from the symplast, as expected. Data from these three species, and from the literature, also indicate that plants with abundant plasmodesmata in the minor vein phloem have abundant plasmodesmata between mesophyll cells. Thus, plasmodesmatal frequencies in the minor veins may be a reflection of overall frequencies in the lamina and may have limited relevance to phloem loading. We suggest that symplastic loading is restricted to plants that translocate oligosaccharides larger than Suc, such as RFOs, and that other plants, no matter how many plasmodesmata they have in the minor vein phloem, load via the apoplast.  (+info)

Glandulocalyx upatoiensis, a fossil flower of Ericales (Actinidiaceae/Clethraceae) from the Late Cretaceous (Santonian) of Georgia, USA. (2/4)

 (+info)

Triterpene saponins from Clethra barbinervis and their hyaluronidase inhibitory activities. (3/4)

An extract of Clethra barbinervis with an inhibitory effect on hyaluronidase activity was fractionated guided by the results of an assay. From the active fractions, seven new triterpene saponins (1-4, 6-8) and a new lignan glycoside (14) were isolated together with 14 known compounds (5, 9-13, 15-22). Some of the saponins (2, 3, 9) were revealed as hyaluronidase inhibitors similar to epicatechin (17).  (+info)

Structures of ryobunins A-C from the leaves of Clethra barbinervis. (4/4)

From a MeOH extract of the leaves of Clethra barbinervis Sieb. et Zucc., ryobunins A-C, three new triterpene glucosides, i.e. one ursane, one seco-ursane and one oleanane-type glucoside, along with four known compounds were isolated. Their structures were elucidated based on chemical and spectral evidence.  (+info)

Albach, D. C., P. S. Soltis, D. E. Soltis, and R. G. Olmstead. 2001. Phylogenetic analysis of asterids based on sequences of four genes. Annals of the Missouri Botanical Garden 88:163-212.. Anderberg, A. A. 1992. The circumscription of the Ericales, and their cladistic relationships to other families of "higher" dicotyledons. Systematic Botany 17:660-675.. Anderberg, A. A., C. Rydin, and M. K llersj . 2002. Phylogenetic relationships in the order Ericales s.l.: analyses of molecular data from five genes from the plastid and mitochondrial genomes. American Journal of Botany 89:677-687.. Anderberg, A. A. and B. St hl. 1995. Phylogenetic interrelationships in the order Primulales, with special emphasis on the family circumscriptions. Canadian Journal of Botany 73:1699-1730.. Anderberg, A. A., B. St hl and M. K llersj . 1998. Phylogenetic relationships in the Primulales inferred from rbcL sequence data. Plant Systematics and Evolution 211:93-102.. Anderberg, A. A., B. St hl and M. K llersj . 2000. ...
Description from Flora of China. Clethra sect. Clematoclethra Franchet, Nouv. Arch. Mus. Hist. Nat., sér. 2, 10: 53. 1888; Pentastigma Maximowicz ex Komarov.. Woody vines, deciduous. Branchlets glabrous, puberulent, tomentose, lanate, or setose. Bud scales laminated, blackish brown, leathery, hairy or not, always persistent at bases of young shoots. Leaves petiolate, leathery to papery, margin entire or finely bristle-toothed or callus-toothed. Flowers solitary or on cymose inflorescences, bisexual. Sepals 5, imbricate, connate at base, persistent. Petals 5, imbricate. Stamens 10; filaments short, stout, dilated toward base; anthers ovoid, versatile, 2-celled, dehiscing through 2 longitudinal slits, inverted due to inflexion of filaments after anthesis, their morphological bases apical when mature. Ovary globose, glabrous, 5-ribbed, 5-loculed; ovules 8-10 per locule; styles connate into a cylindrical to filiform, somewhat fleshy, sometimes 5-striate structure; stigma capitate, small, 5-lobuled. ...
Ericales: Ericales, rhododendron order of flowering plants, containing 25 families, 346 genera, and more than 11,000 species. The relationships of the order are unclear. It belongs to neither of the two major asterid groups (Asterids I or Asterids II), but with Cornales it is basal to the core asterid clade
Anderberg, A.A., Rydin, C. & Källerjö, M. 2002. Phylogenetic relationships in the order Ericales s.l.: Analyses of molecular data from five genes from the plastid and mitochondrial genomes. American Journal of Botany 89(4): 677-687. doi: 10.3732/ajb.89.4.677 Full text PDF reference page ...
ABSTRACT. Recent processing of additional samples, re-processing of the M. Makrides samples and re-evaluation of benthic and planktic foraminifera assemblages previously described from Mzamba Cliff, has led to the finding of several rare species that support previous ammonite datings of the succession. These include numbers of the planktic species Dicarinella asymetrica (Sigal) and Sigalia sp., which are limited to the Middle to Late Santonian, and to the Middle Santonian, respectively. Sigalia sp. appears to be a different species from the widely distributed Sigalia deflaensis (Sigal), as it is distinguished by depressed sutures throughout. Alternatively Sigalia sp. maybe avariant limited to shallow or temperate waters; or it may be a juvenile form of Sigalia deflaensis. In addition, rare tests of the Santonian larger benthic foraminifera Pseudosiderolites sp. have been found, the first such larger foraminifera from the Late Cretaceous succession of southern Africa. Comments on the possible ...
Botanical Name: Arbutus andrachne Family: Ericaceae Genus: Arbutus Species: A. andrachne Kingdom: Plantae Order: Ericales Common Names:Greek Strawberry Tree or
Looking for Monotrotaceae? Find out information about Monotrotaceae. A large family of dicotyledonous plants in the order Ericales distinguished by having twice as many stamens as corolla lobes. a family of dicotyledonous... Explanation of Monotrotaceae
Actinidia eriantha Benth. is a diploid perennial woody vine native to China and is recognized as a valuable species for commercial kiwifruit improvement with high levels of ascorbic acid as well as having been used in traditional Chinese medicine. Due to the lack of genomic resources for the species, microsatellite markers for population genetics studies are scarce. In this study, RNASeq was conducted on fruit tissue of A. eriantha, yielding 5,678,129 reads with a total output of 3.41 Gb. De novo assembly yielded 69,783 non-redundant unigenes (41.3 Mb), of which 21,730 were annotated using protein databases. A total of 8,658 EST-SSR loci were identified in 7,495 unigene sequences, for which primer pairs were successfully designed for 3,842 loci (44.4 %). Among these, 183 primer pairs were assayed for PCR amplification, yielding 69 with detectable polymorphism in A. eriantha. Additionally, 61 of the 69 polymorphic loci could be successfully amplified in at least one other Actinidia species. Of these, 14
Adult behavior: Adults (predominantly males) sip moisture from mud (Opler and Krizek 1984) - probably for sodium (Arms et al. 1974). Adults of both sexes sip nectar from flowers. Coastal sweet pepperbush (Clethra alnifolia L.), pickerelweed (Pontederia cordata L.), and thistles (Cirsium spp.), are reported to be particularly attractive as nectar sources (Opler and Krizek 1984, Tyler 1975). Palamedes swallowtails are considered the primary pollinators of sandhill thistle (Cirsium repandum Michaux) (Theis and Raguso 2005) and orange-fringed orchid (Platanthera ciliaris (L.)Lindl.) (Chupp et al. 2015).. Many plants are valuable as nectar sources for Palamedes swallowtails. Minno and Minno (1999) have extensive lists of both native and exotic nectar plants for butterflies. Most states have native plant societies that are valuable sources of information on native plants and many also hold native plant sales. For a list and contact information for native plant societies, see the American Horticultural ...
APG IV Classification: Domain: Eukaryota • (unranked): Archaeplastida • Regnum: Plantae • Cladus: angiosperms • Cladus: eudicots • Cladus: core eudicots • Cladus: superasterids • Cladus: asterids • Ordo: Ericales • Familia: Ericaceae • Subfamilia: Vaccinioideae • Tribus: Vaccinieae • Genus: Gaylussacia Kunth ...
This book characterize the efficiency of symplasmic transport, mechanisms of molecule passage via plasmodesmata, and the external and internal factors that regulate plasmodesmatal conductivity ...
The specimens are beautiful, perfectly preserved fossil flowers, which at one point in time were borne by plants that lived in a steamy tropical forest with both large and small trees, climbing vines, palms, grasses and other vegetation, said George Poinar, Jr., a courtesy professor in the College of Science at Oregon State University, and one of the worlds experts on plant and animal life forms preserved in amber.. Specimens such as this are what give us insights into the ecology of ecosystems in the distant past, Poinar said. It shows that the asterids, which later gave humans all types of foods and other products, were already evolving many millions of years ago.. Asterids, the researchers noted in this study, are among Earths most important and diverse plants, with 10 orders, 98 families, and about 80,000 species. They represent about one-third of all the Earths diversity of angiosperms, or flowering plants.. And one ancient genus, which has now been shown to be inherently toxic, ...
(a) Delineating the transport path Phloem loading is used variously to describe transport events outside, and inside, phloem tissues of leaves. The broader general application is adopted here - that is, phloem loading describes photoassimilate transport from the cytoplasm of photosynthetic mesophyll cells to se-cc complexes of leaf phloem.
APG IV Classification: Domain: Eukaryota • (unranked): Archaeplastida • Regnum: Plantae • Cladus: angiosperms • Cladus: eudicots • Cladus: core eudicots • Cladus: superasterids • Cladus: asterids • Ordo: Ericales • Familia: Ericaceae • Subfamilia: Ericoideae • Tribus: Ericeae • Genus: Erica • Species: Erica haematocodon T.M.Salter ...
Angiosperm evolution has given rise to an overwhelming diversity of floral morphologies adapted to pollination by a multitude of different vectors. This diversity is mirrored in the high variability of breeding systems and reproductive strategies across angiosperms. Hence, it is hypothesized that floral form and function have important effects on diversification [1-4]. There is an extensive body of literature on floral morphology, pertaining both to extant and extinct taxa [5-11]. However, the distribution of flower morphological diversity across major subclades, let alone across the angiosperms as a whole, has rarely been addressed using an explicitly analytical and synthetic approach [12,13]. Such broad-scale analyses of disparity (morphological diversity) have so far been largely restricted to animal groups [14-17].. Morphospace analyses are used to study macro-evolutionary patterns and trends in disparity within and among clades. While disparity analyses are traditionally conducted on large ...
F!M LIBRARY c,« 8S ±L^l5 F.4S& SUMMER WILD FLOWERS J. FRANCIS MACBRIDE Assistant Curator, Taxonomy, Department of Botany GO 53* Published by FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY CHICAGO 1924 A *,? This leaflet is the third of a series of Field Museum leaflets illustrating some of the more common or attrac- tive wild flowers of the Chicago region. The two pre- ceding leaflets describe the spring and early summer flowers, and a fourth will illustrate autumn flowers and fruits. LIST OF BOTANICAL LEAFLETS ISSUED TO DATE No. 1. Figs $ .10 No. 2. The Coco Palm 10 No. 3. Wheat .10 No. 4. Cacao 10 No. 5. A Fossil Flower 10 No. 6. The Cannon Ball Tree (in preparation) ... .10 No. 7. Spring Wild Flowers 25 No. 8. Spring and Early Summer Wild Flowers . . .25 No. 9. Summer Wild Flowers 25 No. 10. Autumn Flowers and Fruits 25 D. C. DAVIES DIRECTOR FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY CHICAGO, U.S.A. Field Museum of Natural History DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY Chicago, 1924 Leaflet Number 9 SUMMER WILD FLOWERS MILKWEED. ...
A collection of short commentaries on scientific papers published in 1998, covering topics such as boat-building by Homo erectus, biogeography of baobab trees, dispersal by hurricane, design in the genetic code, molecular machines, the problem of homology, peppered moths, lateral gene transfer, Antarctic fish hemoglobins, mammoth phylogeny, origin of life, diversity of Ordovician fossils, patterns of diversity in fossils, bryozoan carbonates, fossil insects and plants, fossil record of vertebrate tracks, body size in North American mammals, Precambrian sponges, Cambrian traces of dinoflagellates, fossil flowers, fossil bird taphonomy, decay of shrimps, catastrophic burial of dinosaurs, fossil whales, and Adam, death and sin. Published in Origins v. 25, n. 2.
Eukaryota; Viridiplantae; Streptophyta; Embryophyta; Tracheophyta; Spermatophyta; Magnoliophyta; eudicotyledons; Gunneridae; Pentapetalae; asterids; Ericales; Ericaceae; Vaccinioideae; Vaccinieae; Vaccinium ...
Breeding occurs in acidic (pH 3.6-5.6 (Palis, unpubl. data)), tannin-stained ephemeral wetlands (swamps or graminoid-dominated depressions) that range in size from 0.02 to 9.5 ha, and are usually not more than 0.5 m deep (Palis, unpubl. data). The overstory is typically dominated by pond cypress (Taxodium ascendens), blackgum (Nyssa sylvatica var. biflora) and slash pine, but can also include red maple (Acer rubrum), sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua), sweetbay (Magnolia virginiana), and loblolly bay (Gordonia lasianthus). Canopy coverage ranges from near zero to almost 100% (Palis, unpubl. data). The midstory, which is often very dense, is most often composed of young of the aforementioned species, myrtle-leaved holly (Ilex myrtifolia), Chapmans St. Johns-wort (Hypericum chapmanii), sandweed (Hypericum fasciculatum), titi (Cyrilla racemiflora), storax (Styrax americana), popash (Fraxinus caroliniana), sweet pepperbush (Clethra alnifolia), fetterbush (Lyonia lucida), vine-wicky (Pieris ...
Green lacewings (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae) are voracious predators of aphids and other small, soft-bodied insects and mites. Earlier, we identified (1R,2S,5R,8R)-iridodial from wild males of the goldeneyed lacewing, Chrysopa oculata Say, which is released from thousands of microscopic dermal glands on the abdominal sterna. Iridodial-baited traps attract C. oculata and other Chrysopa spp. males into traps, while females come to the vicinity of, but do not usually enter traps. Despite their healthy appearance and normal fertility, laboratory-reared C. oculata males do not produce iridodial. Surprisingly, goldeneyed lacewing males caught alive in iridodial-baited traps attempt to eat the lure and, in Asia, males of other Chrysopa species reportedly eat the native plant, Actinidia polygama (Siebold & Zucc.) Maxim. (Actinidiaceae) to obtain the monoterpenoid, neomatatabiol. These observations suggest that Chrysopa males must sequester exogenous natural iridoids in order to produce iridodial; we investigated
Garnit, Hechmi, Bouhlel, Salah and Jarvis, Ian (2017) Geochemistry and depositional environments of Paleocene - Eocene phosphorites : Metlaoui Group, Tunisia. Journal of African Earth Sciences, ISSN (print) 1464-343X (Epub Ahead of Print) Fralick, Philip, Planavsky, Noah, Burton, Justin, Jarvis, Ian, Addison, W.D., Barrett, T.J. and Brumpton, G.R. (2017) Geochemistry of Paleoproterozoic Gunflint Formation carbonate : implications for hydrosphere-atmosphere evolution. Precambrian Research, 290, pp. 126-146. ISSN (print) 0301-9268 Hunt, James E. and Jarvis, Ian (2017) Prodigious submarine landslides during the inception and early growth of volcanic islands. Nature Communications, 8, ISSN (online) 2041-1723 Thibault, N., Jarvis, I., Voigt, S., Gale, A. S., Attree, K. and Jenkyns, H. C. (2016) Astronomical calibration and global correlation of the Santonian (Cretaceous) based on the marine carbon-isotope record. Paleoceanography, 31(6), pp. 847-865. ISSN (print) 0883-8305 Wilson, Penelope I.R., ...
From: Ben Creisler [email protected] New in open-access Palaeontologia Electronica: Attila Osi, Xabier Pereda Suberbiola, and Tamás Földes (2014) Partial skull and endocranial cast of the ankylosaurian dinosaur Hungarosaurus from the Late Cretaceous of Hungary: implications for locomotion. Palaeontologia Electronica 17.1.1A: 18 pgs palaeo-electronica.org/content/2014/612-skull-of-hungarosaurus http://palaeo-electronica.org/content/2014/612-skull-of-hungarosaurus A partial skull of ankylosaur from the Upper Cretaceous (Santonian) Csehbánya Formation in Iharkút and the endocranial cast taken from it are described. The morphology of the exoccipital, the elongated neck region of the basioccipital, the shape of the occipital condyle, and the different flexure of the medulla relative to the forebrain unambiguously differentiate this specimen from the basicranium of Struthiosaurus, so it is assigned to Hungarosaurus sp. Whereas the endocranial cast reflects a brain generally similar to those of ...
As gunerídeas são um grande grupo de eudicotiledóneas que haviam sido nomeadas informalmente como «núcleo das eudicotiledóneas» ou «eudicotiledóneas nucleares» (em inglés "core eudicots") por quase todos os trabalhos sobre filogenia das angiospérmicas. Compreendem um grupo extremamente amplo e diverso de angiospérmicas, com uma grande variabilidade no hábito, morfologia, química, distribuição geográfica e outros atributos. A sistemática clássica, baseada unicamente em informação morfológica, não foi capaz de reconhecer este grupo. Como tal, a circunscrição das gunerídeas como um clado é baseada numa forte evidencia a partir de dos dados de análises moleculares.[25][26][27] A composição do clado é a seguinte: Gunnerales, Berberidopsidales (incluindo Aextoxicaceae),[28][29]Dilleniaceae, Santalales, Saxifragales, Vitaceae e todos os clados de Asteridae, Caryophyllales e Rosidae. Por outras palavras, o clado é composto por Gunnerales mais a totalidade do clado das ...
Clethraceae Klotzsch, nom. cons.. *Cyrillaceae Lindl., nom. cons.. *Diapensiaceae Lindl., nom. cons. ...
1763) [Clethraceae]". Taxon. 31 (3): 568. doi:10.2307/1220698. JSTOR 1220698. ICN 2011 Melbourne Code Voss, E. G. (August 1986 ...
1, 1897; Dicotyledoneae: Clethraceae etc. Abt. 2, 1895; Dicotyledoneae: Oleaceae etc. Abt. 3a, 1897; Dicotyledoneae: ...
Clethraceae Klotzsch, nom. cons. Cyrillaceae Lindl., nom. cons. Ericaceae Juss., nom. cons. Mitrastemonaceae Makino, nom. cons ...
Clethraceae family 3. Ericaceae order 3. Diapensiales family 1. Diapensiaceae order 4. Bruniales family 1. Bruniaceae family 2 ...
Clethraceae Klotzsch, nom. cons.. *Cyrillaceae Lindl., nom. cons.. *Ericaceae Juss., nom. cons. ...
Clethraceae Klotzsch Cyrillaceae Lindl. Diapensiaceae Lindl. Ebenaceae Gürke Ericaceae Juss. Fouquieriaceae DC. Lecythidaceae A ...
Bischer in Aussereuropäischen gebieten gemachten blütenbiologischen beobachtungen; 2. Teil: Clethraceae bis Compositae. Leipzig ...
Ammoides , Ammoselinum , Andriana , Anethum , Angelica , Anginon , Angoseseli , Anisopoda , Anisosciadium , Anisotome , Annesorhiza , Anthriscus , Aphanopleura , Apiastrum , Apiopetalum , Apium , Apodicarpum , Arafoe , Arctopus , Arcuatopterus , Arracacia , Artedia , Asciadium , Asteriscium , Astomaea , Astrantia , Astrodaucus , Astydamia , Athamanta , Atrema , Aulacospermum , Aulospermum , Austropeucedanum , Autumnalia , Azilia , Azorella , Berula , Bifora , Bilacunaria , Billburttia , Bolax , Bonannia , Bowlesia , Brachyscias , Bubon , Bunium , Bupleurum , Cachrys , Calyptrosciadium , Canaria , Cannaboides , Capnophyllum , Carlesia , Caropsis , Carum , Caucalis , Cenolophium , Centella , Cephalopodum , Cervaria , Chaerophyllopsis , Chaerophyllum , Chamaesciadium , Chamaesium , Chamarea , Changium , Chlaenosciadium , Chuanminshen , Chymsydia , Cicuta , Cnidium , Coaxana , Conioselinum , Conium , Conopodium , Coriandrum , Coristospermum , Cortia , Cortiella , Cotopaxia , Coulterophytum , ...
... clethraceae (wd , gwp gwe g , in it p) MeSH B06.388.100.228 --- combretaceae (wd , gwp gwe g , in it p) MeSH B06.388.100.228. ...
clementis is a tree in the family Clethraceae. Clethra canescens var. clementis grows up to 10 metres (30 ft) tall. The smooth ...
... is a tree in the family Clethraceae. The specific epithet longispicata is from the Latin meaning "long ...
... is a tree in the family Clethraceae. The specific epithet pachyphylla is from the Greek meaning "thick ...
The genera of the Cyrillaceae and Clethraceae of the southeastern United States. J. Arnold Arbor. 42: 96-106. Flora of North ...
... is a genus of flowering plants in the family Clethraceae described as a genus in 1846. It is one of two genera in this ... Anderberg, A. A. & Zhang, Z. (2002). Phylogenetic relationships of Cyrillaceae and Clethraceae (Ericales) with special emphasis ...
... is one of two genera in the family Clethraceae (the other being Purdiaea). The species may be evergreen or deciduous, ...
... though recent research has shown this genus is better placed in the closely related family Clethraceae. Angiosperm Phylogeny ... Phylogenetic relationships of Cyrillaceae and Clethraceae (Ericales) with special emphasis on the genus Purdiaea. Organisms, ...
Volume 7 part 1 (1971) - Revisions: Byblidaceae, Cardiopteridaceae, Clethraceae, Haloragaceae, Icacinaceae, Lemnaceae, ...
Trees of the genera Apollonias (Lauraceae), Ocotea (Lauraceae), Persea (Lauraceae), Clethra (Clethraceae), Dracaena (Ruscaceae ...
This trait is not found in the Clethraceae and Cyrillaceae, the two families most closely related to the Ericaceae. Most ...
Trees of the genera Apollonias (Lauraceae), Ocotea (Lauraceae), Persea (Lauraceae), Clethra (Clethraceae), Dracaena (Ruscaceae ... and Clethraceae. Epiphytes, including orchids, ferns, moss, lichen, and liverworts, are more abundant than in either temperate ...
... is a species of flowering plant in the genus Clethra of the family Clethraceae, native to the far east, ...
... the Clethraceae, the Sarraceniaceae, and the Roridulaceae. Further genetic evidence points to the Actinidiaceae being sister to ...
Family Clethraceae (clethra family) Family Cyrillaceae (cyrilla family) Family Diapensiaceae Family Ebenaceae (ebony and ... Family Ericaceae Family Cyrillaceae Family Clethraceae Family Grubbiaceae Family Empetraceae Family Epacridaceae Family ...
Sympetalae-Polycarpellatae ordo Ebenales Sapotaceae Ebenaceae Symplocaceae Styracaceae Fouquieriaceae ordo Ericales Clethraceae ...
Clethraceae, flowering plant family with two genera in the order Ericales. The genus Clethra has some 65 species occurring from ... Ericales: Clethraceae. Clethraceae contains two genera. Clethra. , with 75 species, grows from East Asia to Malesia, in the ... Ericales: Clethraceae. Clethraceae contains two genera. Clethra, with 75 species, grows from East Asia to Malesia, in the ... Clethraceae, flowering plant family with two genera in the order Ericales. The genus Clethra has some 65 species occurring from ...
... Name. Homonyms. Clethraceae. Common names. clethras in English. pepperbushes in English. white alder in English. ... Tucker, Gordon C., and Sean C. Jones / Flora of North America Editorial Committee, eds., 2009: Clethraceae Klotzsch: White ... Clethraceae Dataset GBIF Backbone Taxonomy Rank FAMILY Published in Linnaea 24: 12. Mai http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by- ...
The Clethraceae are a small family of flowering plants in the order Ericales, composed of two genera, Clethra and Purdiaea, ... Phylogenetic relationships of Cyrillaceae and Clethraceae (Ericales) with special emphasis on the genus Purdiaea. Organisms, ...
Clethraceae. Clethraceae contains two genera. Clethra, with 75 species, grows from East Asia to Malesia, in the southeastern ... The Ericaceae group contains Ericaceae, Clethraceae, and Cyrillaceae, which are characterized by having a hollow style as well ... Clethraceae, and Cyrillaceae. The Balsaminaceae group contains Balsaminaceae, Marcgraviaceae, and Tetrameristaceae (including ...
Clethraceae. *Clethra alnifolia - coastal eastern USA and Canada W/C Convolvulaceae. Subfamily Convolvuloideae Tribe ...
As gunerídeas são um grande grupo de eudicotiledóneas que haviam sido nomeadas informalmente como «núcleo das eudicotiledóneas» ou «eudicotiledóneas nucleares» (em inglés "core eudicots") por quase todos os trabalhos sobre filogenia das angiospérmicas. Compreendem um grupo extremamente amplo e diverso de angiospérmicas, com uma grande variabilidade no hábito, morfologia, química, distribuição geográfica e outros atributos. A sistemática clássica, baseada unicamente em informação morfológica, não foi capaz de reconhecer este grupo. Como tal, a circunscrição das gunerídeas como um clado é baseada numa forte evidencia a partir de dos dados de análises moleculares.[25][26][27] A composição do clado é a seguinte: Gunnerales, Berberidopsidales (incluindo Aextoxicaceae),[28][29]Dilleniaceae, Santalales, Saxifragales, Vitaceae e todos os clados de Asteridae, Caryophyllales e Rosidae. Por outras palavras, o clado é composto por Gunnerales mais a totalidade do clado das ...
Clethraceae Klotzsch, nom. cons.. *Cyrillaceae Lindl., nom. cons.. *Diapensiaceae Lindl., nom. cons. ...
Clethraceae. - White Alder Family 2.. Pyrolaceae. - Wintergreen Family 3.. Monotropaceae. - Indian-Pipe Family ...
Clethraceae - Clethra family Genus. Clethra L. - sweetpepperbush Species. Clethra alnifolia L. - coastal sweetpepperbush ...
2: Clethraceae-Compositae. 1984. 2 foldg.maps. XXVII,660 p. 8vo. Paper bd. ...
Dicotiledóneas (Acanthaceae-Clethraceae). Vol. V. Dicotiledóneas (Clusiaceae-Haloragaceae). Vol. VI. Dicotiledóneas ( ...
Clethraceae 1. Clusiaceae 1. Cornaceae 1. Cupressaceae 1. Dioscoreaceae 1. Ebenaceae 1. Elaeagnaceae 6. Ericaceae 4. Fabaceae ...
Clethraceae - 29 pages. Cyrillaceae - 19 pages. Icacinaceae - 13 pages. Smilacaceae - 23 pages. softcover, 15 × 23 cm, 188 ...
Clethraceae Klotzsch, nom. cons.. *Cyrillaceae Lindl., nom. cons.. *Ericaceae Juss., nom. cons. ...
Clethraceae / Susana Valencia Ávalos. - 1. ed., 2010. - 27 S. - Ill., zahlr. Kt. - ISBN: 978-607-02-1690-9. - Signatur: F 15.1- ...
Este juego de datos recoge la Lista de Táxones de la Flora Vascular Española presentada como una tabla adaptada al formato estándar Darwin Core. Comprende las especies y subespecies de flora vascular presentes en la Península Ibérica, Islas Baleares e Islas Canarias, además de sus géneros y familias correspondientes (no se han incluido híbridos). Incluye un total de 10.493 taxones dispuestos en 212 familias, 1399 géneros, 7069 especies y 1813 subespecies. Para su elaboración se ha utilizado como fuente primaria Flora iberica (http://www.floraiberica.es) y ha sido completada con taxones mencionados en la legislación (Atlas y Libros Rojos), así como otras obras donde se recogen taxones canarios, alóctonos u otros aún no tratados por esta obra (ver apartado Citations). Operativamente se entiende que un taxon es un nombre científico con una descripción que lo circunscribe, en este caso, las descripciones vienen referidas por la referencia bibliográfica de las obras (floras, ...
1763) [Clethraceae]". Taxon. 31 (3): 568. doi:10.2307/1220698. JSTOR 1220698. ICN 2011 Melbourne Code Voss, E. G. (August 1986 ...
Ammoides , Ammoselinum , Andriana , Anethum , Angelica , Anginon , Angoseseli , Anisopoda , Anisosciadium , Anisotome , Annesorhiza , Anthriscus , Aphanopleura , Apiastrum , Apiopetalum , Apium , Apodicarpum , Arafoe , Arctopus , Arcuatopterus , Arracacia , Artedia , Asciadium , Asteriscium , Astomaea , Astrantia , Astrodaucus , Astydamia , Athamanta , Atrema , Aulacospermum , Aulospermum , Austropeucedanum , Autumnalia , Azilia , Azorella , Berula , Bifora , Bilacunaria , Billburttia , Bolax , Bonannia , Bowlesia , Brachyscias , Bubon , Bunium , Bupleurum , Cachrys , Calyptrosciadium , Canaria , Cannaboides , Capnophyllum , Carlesia , Caropsis , Carum , Caucalis , Cenolophium , Centella , Cephalopodum , Cervaria , Chaerophyllopsis , Chaerophyllum , Chamaesciadium , Chamaesium , Chamarea , Changium , Chlaenosciadium , Chuanminshen , Chymsydia , Cicuta , Cnidium , Coaxana , Conioselinum , Conium , Conopodium , Coriandrum , Coristospermum , Cortia , Cortiella , Cotopaxia , Coulterophytum , ...
Butterfly Attracting Plant Shade Tolerant Plant For Sale In Augusta Richmond County. Sweet William, orange glory butterfly plant and Arizona Red Shades Gaillardia
Wild Flower Plant For Moist Soil For Sale In Antioch. Ensata Japanese Iris, Japanese Iris Iris ensata - Iris ensata spontaenea , Iris kaempferi, ensata japanese iris, japanese iris iris ensata - iris ensata spontaenea , iris kaempferi and Hardhack, Steeplebush, Hardhack Spirea, Meadow Sweet, Steeple Bush, Fernald Hardhack Spiraea tomentosa
50782 specimens found in the database ...
Novelties in Clethra (Clethraceae) from Mexico. Ibugana 13 11-26.. Grady, B.R. & S.L. OKane, Jr. 2007. New species and ...
Family: Clethraceae Category: climbers, shrubs, Color: pinks, reds, whites, Cleyera ( Cleyera ) Family: Theaceae Category: ... Family: Clethraceae Category: climbers, landscape, shrubs, Color: pinks, whites, Clethra alnifolia ( Summer Sweet Clethra ) ...
Clethraceae, Cyrillaceae, and Ericaceae. ...
Clethra formosa (Clethraceae), una nueva especie de Costa Rica. Anales Jard. Bot. Madrid 63: 35-39. The new sp. is a Costa ... Clethra suaveolens was included in the first authors latest Manual draft treatment of Clethraceae, but the cited voucher is ...
  • The coherence of the petals is sometimes very slight or they are quite separate, as in Clethraceae, Pyrolaceae, some Ericaceae. (chestofbooks.com)
  • Comprende las especies y subespecies de flora vascular presentes en la Península Ibérica, Islas Baleares e Islas Canarias, además de sus géneros y familias correspondientes (no se han incluido híbridos). (gbif.org)
  • Para su elaboración se ha utilizado como fuente primaria Flora iberica ( http://www.floraiberica.es ) y ha sido completada con taxones mencionados en la legislación (Atlas y Libros Rojos), así como otras obras donde se recogen taxones canarios, alóctonos u otros aún no tratados por esta obra (ver apartado Citations). (gbif.org)
  • En caso de discrepancia entre los autores de los nombres científicos entre IPNI y Flora iberica, se ha seguido el criterio de Flora iberica y mantenido el LSID de IPNI. (gbif.org)
  • Para la taxonomía se ha seguido en lo posible a Flora iberica (incluyendo las listadas como «Especies que han de buscarse») y subsidiariamente el proyecto Anthos ( http://www.anthos.es/ ). (gbif.org)