Clarkia: A plant genus, of the family ONAGRACEAE, which is the subject of genetic studies. The floral aroma is attributed to benzenoid esters and benzyl acetate.Onagraceae: The evening primrose plant family of the order Myrtales, subclass Rosidae, class Magnoliopsida. Flower parts are mostly in fours and the ovary is inferior.Eugenol: A cinnamate derivative of the shikamate pathway found in CLOVE OIL and other PLANTS.Glucose-6-Phosphate Isomerase: An aldose-ketose isomerase that catalyzes the reversible interconversion of glucose 6-phosphate and fructose 6-phosphate. In prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms it plays an essential role in glycolytic and gluconeogenic pathways. In mammalian systems the enzyme is found in the cytoplasm and as a secreted protein. This secreted form of glucose-6-phosphate isomerase has been referred to as autocrine motility factor or neuroleukin, and acts as a cytokine which binds to the AUTOCRINE MOTILITY FACTOR RECEPTOR. Deficiency of the enzyme in humans is an autosomal recessive trait, which results in CONGENITAL NONSPHEROCYTIC HEMOLYTIC ANEMIA.Anisoles: A group of compounds that are derivatives of methoxybenzene and contain the general formula R-C7H7O.Plants: Multicellular, eukaryotic life forms of kingdom Plantae (sensu lato), comprising the VIRIDIPLANTAE; RHODOPHYTA; and GLAUCOPHYTA; all of which acquired chloroplasts by direct endosymbiosis of CYANOBACTERIA. They are characterized by a mainly photosynthetic mode of nutrition; essentially unlimited growth at localized regions of cell divisions (MERISTEMS); cellulose within cells providing rigidity; the absence of organs of locomotion; absence of nervous and sensory systems; and an alternation of haploid and diploid generations.Manipulation, Osteopathic: Musculoskeletal manipulation based on the principles of OSTEOPATHIC MEDICINE developed in 1874 by Dr Andrew Taylor Still.Lavandula: A plant genus of the LAMIACEAE family.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Dermoscopy: A noninvasive technique that enables direct microscopic examination of the surface and architecture of the SKIN.Flowers: The reproductive organs of plants.Pollen: The fertilizing element of plants that contains the male GAMETOPHYTES.Seeds: The encapsulated embryos of flowering plants. They are used as is or for animal feed because of the high content of concentrated nutrients like starches, proteins, and fats. Rapeseed, cottonseed, and sunflower seed are also produced for the oils (fats) they yield.Germination: The initial stages of the growth of SEEDS into a SEEDLINGS. The embryonic shoot (plumule) and embryonic PLANT ROOTS (radicle) emerge and grow upwards and downwards respectively. Food reserves for germination come from endosperm tissue within the seed and/or from the seed leaves (COTYLEDON). (Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)Asparagus Plant: A plant genus in the family LILIACEAE (sometimes placed in Asparagaceae) that contains ECDYSTEROIDS and is an ingredient of Siotone. The shoots are used as a vegetable and the roots are used in FOLK MEDICINE.Inflorescence: A cluster of FLOWERS (as opposed to a solitary flower) arranged on a main stem of a plant.Melanoma: A malignant neoplasm derived from cells that are capable of forming melanin, which may occur in the skin of any part of the body, in the eye, or, rarely, in the mucous membranes of the genitalia, anus, oral cavity, or other sites. It occurs mostly in adults and may originate de novo or from a pigmented nevus or malignant lentigo. Melanomas frequently metastasize widely, and the regional lymph nodes, liver, lungs, and brain are likely to be involved. The incidence of malignant skin melanomas is rising rapidly in all parts of the world. (Stedman, 25th ed; from Rook et al., Textbook of Dermatology, 4th ed, p2445)Skin Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the SKIN.Pollination: The transfer of POLLEN grains (male gametes) to the plant ovule (female gamete).Environment: The external elements and conditions which surround, influence, and affect the life and development of an organism or population.Botany: The study of the origin, structure, development, growth, function, genetics, and reproduction of plants.Dalbergia: A plant genus of the family FABACEAE. Members of this genus can cause CONTACT DERMATITIS.Cecropia Plant: A plant genus of the family CECROPIACEAE. Hypotensive and hypoglycemic effects have been observed in animals after ingesting members of this genus. There is no relation to cecropia moth (Hyalophora cecropia) see MOTHS.MuseumsEncyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Copyright: It is a form of protection provided by law. In the United States this protection is granted to authors of original works of authorship, including literary, dramatic, musical, artistic, and certain other intellectual works. This protection is available to both published and unpublished works. (from Circular of the United States Copyright Office, 6/30/2008)Organizations, Nonprofit: Organizations which are not operated for a profit and may be supported by endowments or private contributions.Patents as Topic: Exclusive legal rights or privileges applied to inventions, plants, etc.MedlinePlus: NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE service for health professionals and consumers. It links extensive information from the National Institutes of Health and other reviewed sources of information on specific diseases and conditions.Computer Security: Protective measures against unauthorized access to or interference with computer operating systems, telecommunications, or data structures, especially the modification, deletion, destruction, or release of data in computers. It includes methods of forestalling interference by computer viruses or so-called computer hackers aiming to compromise stored data.Confidentiality: The privacy of information and its protection against unauthorized disclosure.Ships: Large vessels propelled by power or sail used for transportation on rivers, seas, oceans, or other navigable waters. Boats are smaller vessels propelled by oars, paddles, sail, or power; they may or may not have a deck.Prussia: Former state in north central Germany. Formally abolished March 1, 1947. Kingdom established 1701.Northern IrelandSicilyMiningSteam: Water in its gaseous state. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)OregonPhleum: A plant genus of the family POACEAE that contains the Phl p 4 allergen.Dipsacaceae: A plant family of the order Dipsacales, subclass Asteridae, class Magnoliopsida. It is sometimes called the teasel family.Wool: The hair of SHEEP or other animals that is used for weaving.MississippiNepeta: A genus of the LAMIACEAE family. It is known for its mild calming effect and for the way cats are attracted to the aroma.Rosaceae: The rose plant family in the order ROSALES and class Magnoliopsida. They are generally woody plants. A number of the species of this family contain cyanogenic compounds.IdahoUtahGenealogy and HeraldryArchivesDivorce: Legal dissolution of an officially recognized marriage relationship.Lakes: Inland bodies of still or slowly moving FRESH WATER or salt water, larger than a pond, and supplied by RIVERS and streams.Fraxinus: A plant genus of the family OLEACEAE. Members contain secoiridoid glucosides.Bays: An area of water mostly surrounded by land, usually smaller than a gulf, and affording access to the sea.Encephalitis Virus, Murray Valley: A species of FLAVIVIRUS, one of the Japanese encephalitis virus group (ENCEPHALITIS VIRUSES, JAPANESE), found in Australia and New Guinea. It causes a fulminating viremia resembling Japanese encephalitis (ENCEPHALITIS, JAPANESE).Jamaica: An island in the Greater Antilles in the West Indies. Its capital is Kingston. It was discovered in 1494 by Columbus and was a Spanish colony 1509-1655 until captured by the English. Its flourishing slave trade was abolished in the 19th century. It was a British colony 1655-1958 and a territory of the West Indies Federation 1958-62. It achieved full independence in 1962. The name is from the Arawak Xaymaca, rich in springs or land of springs. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p564 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p267)

The 5' leader of plant PgiC has an intron: the leader shows both the loss and maintenance of constraints compared with introns and exons in the coding region. (1/9)

PgiC, a complex gene with 23 coding exons and 22 intervening introns, encodes the cytosolic isozyme of phosphoglucose isomerase (EC 5.3.1.9) in higher plants. Here, we report RNA ligase-mediated rapid amplification of cDNA ends experiments that showed that PgiC in Clarkia (Onagraceae) and Arabidopsis thaliana has an intron in the 5' leader. Comparison of the EMBL accessions of the cDNA and genomic sequences showed that this is also the case in rice (Oryza sativa), suggesting that a leader intron is generally present in higher plant PgiC. The intron is bounded by consensus 5'-GT and AG-3' splice sites but showed alternative splicing in Clarkia, resulting in mature transcripts that differ by 8-19 nt in length. The intron is located 18 or 10 nt upstream of the start codon in Clarkia, 2 nt upstream in Arabidopsis, and 9 nt in rice. PgiC in Clarkia was duplicated before the divergence of the extant species, many of which have two expressed genes PgiC1 and PgiC2. Full-length transcripts of both genes identified the transcription start and made it possible to identify the leader intron and leader exon (between the transcription start and leader intron) from previously obtained genomic sequences of both genes in other Clarkia species. These data permit the comparison of evolution in the leader exon and intron with the exons and introns of the coding region, a topic that has not been studied previously. Both the leader exon and the leader intron resemble introns of the coding region in base substitution rate and accumulation of gaps. But the leader intron splice junctions are not strictly conserved in position as are those of the coding region introns. Also, in base composition, the leader intron resembles the other introns, whereas the leader exon more nearly resembles the coding exons. A difference in base composition between coding exons and flanking introns is known to be important for the recognition of splice sites. Thus, the marked difference in base composition between the leader exon and leader intron is probably maintained by selection despite a high rate of sequence divergence.  (+info)

Structure and evolution of linalool synthase. (2/9)

Plant terpene synthases constitute a group of evolutionarily related enzymes. Within this group, however, enzymes that employ two different catalytic mechanisms, and their associated unique domains, are known. We investigated the structure of the gene encoding linalool synthase (LIS), an enzyme that uses geranyl pyrophosphate as a substrate and catalyzes the formation of linalool, an acyclic monoterpene found in the floral scents of many plants. Although LIS employs one catalytic mechanism (exemplified by limonene synthase [LMS]), it has sequence motifs indicative of both LMS-type synthases and the terpene synthases employing a different mechanism (exemplified by copalyl diphosphate synthase [CPS]). Here, we report that LIS genes analyzed from several species encode proteins that have overall 40%-96% identity to each other and have 11 introns in identical positions. Only the region encoding roughly the last half of the LIS gene (exons 9-12) has a gene structure similar to that of the LMS-type genes. On the other hand, in the first part of the LIS gene (exons 1-8), LIS gene structure is essentially identical to that found in the first half of the gene encoding CPS. In addition, the level of similarity in the coding information of this region between the LIS and CPS genes is also significant, whereas the second half of the LIS protein is most similar to LMS-type synthases. Thus, LIS appears to be a composite gene which might have evolved from a recombination event between two different types of terpene synthases. The combined evolutionary mechanisms of duplication followed by divergence and/or "domain swapping" may explain the extraordinarily large diversity of proteins found in the plant terpene synthase family.  (+info)

Evidence for positive selection on the floral scent gene isoeugenol-O-methyltransferase. (3/9)

Isoeugenol-O-methyltransferase (IEMT) is an enzyme involved in the production of the floral volatile compounds methyl eugenol and methyl isoeugenol in Clarkia breweri (Onagraceae). IEMT likely evolved by gene duplication from caffeic acid-O-methyltransferase followed by amino acid divergence, leading to the acquisition of its novel function. To investigate the selective context under which IEMT evolved, maximum likelihood methods that estimate variable d(N)/d(S) ratios among lineages, among sites, and among a combination of both lineages and sites were utilized. Statistically significant support was obtained for a hypothesis of positive selection driving the evolution of IEMT since its origin. Subsequent Bayesian analyses identified several sites in IEMT that have experienced positive selection. Most of these positions are in the active site of IEMT and have been shown by site-directed mutagenesis to have large effects on substrate specificity. Although the selective agent is unknown, the adaptive evolution of this gene may have resulted in increased effectiveness of pollinator attraction or herbivore repellence.  (+info)

Structural basis for substrate recognition in the salicylic acid carboxyl methyltransferase family. (4/9)

Recently, a novel family of methyltransferases was identified in plants. Some members of this newly discovered and recently characterized methyltransferase family catalyze the formation of small-molecule methyl esters using S-adenosyl-L-Met (SAM) as a methyl donor and carboxylic acid-bearing substrates as methyl acceptors. These enzymes include SAMT (SAM:salicylic acid carboxyl methyltransferase), BAMT (SAM:benzoic acid carboxyl methyltransferase), and JMT (SAM:jasmonic acid carboxyl methyltransferase). Moreover, other members of this family of plant methyltransferases have been found to catalyze the N-methylation of caffeine precursors. The 3.0-A crystal structure of Clarkia breweri SAMT in complex with the substrate salicylic acid and the demethylated product S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine reveals a protein structure that possesses a helical active site capping domain and a unique dimerization interface. In addition, the chemical determinants responsible for the selection of salicylic acid demonstrate the structural basis for facile variations of substrate selectivity among functionally characterized plant carboxyl-directed and nitrogen-directed methyltransferases and a growing set of related proteins that have yet to be examined biochemically. Using the three-dimensional structure of SAMT as a guide, we examined the substrate specificity of SAMT by site-directed mutagenesis and activity assays against 12 carboxyl-containing small molecules. Moreover, the utility of structural information for the functional characterization of this large family of plant methyltransferases was demonstrated by the discovery of an Arabidopsis methyltransferase that is specific for the carboxyl-bearing phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid.  (+info)

Formation of monoterpenes in Antirrhinum majus and Clarkia breweri flowers involves heterodimeric geranyl diphosphate synthases. (5/9)

The precursor of all monoterpenes is the C10 acyclic intermediate geranyl diphosphate (GPP), which is formed from the C5 compounds isopentenyl diphosphate and dimethylallyl diphosphate by GPP synthase (GPPS). We have discovered that Antirrhinum majus (snapdragon) and Clarkia breweri, two species whose floral scent is rich in monoterpenes, both possess a heterodimeric GPPS like that previously reported from Mentha piperita (peppermint). The A. majus and C. breweri cDNAs encode proteins with 53% and 45% amino acid sequence identity, respectively, to the M. piperita GPPS small subunit (GPPS.SSU). Expression of these cDNAs in Escherichia coli yielded no detectable prenyltransferase activity. However, when each of these cDNAs was coexpressed with the M. piperita GPPS large subunit (GPPS.LSU), which shares functional motifs and a high level of amino acid sequence identity with geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthases (GGPPS), active GPPS was obtained. Using a homology-based cloning strategy, a GPPS.LSU cDNA also was isolated from A. majus. Its coexpression in E. coli with A. majus GPPS.SSU yielded a functional heterodimer that catalyzed the synthesis of GPP as a main product. The expression in E. coli of A. majus GPPS.LSU by itself yielded active GGPPS, indicating that in contrast with M. piperita GPPS.LSU, A. majus GPPS.LSU is a functional GGPPS on its own. Analyses of tissue-specific, developmental, and rhythmic changes in the mRNA and protein levels of GPPS.SSU in A. majus flowers revealed that these levels correlate closely with monoterpene emission, whereas GPPS.LSU mRNA levels did not, indicating that the levels of GPPS.SSU, but not GPPS.LSU, might play a key role in regulating the formation of GPPS and, thus, monoterpene biosynthesis.  (+info)

The multiple phenylpropene synthases in both Clarkia breweri and Petunia hybrida represent two distinct protein lineages. (6/9)

 (+info)

Engineering monolignol 4-O-methyltransferases to modulate lignin biosynthesis. (7/9)

 (+info)

Enhanced production of a plant monoterpene by overexpression of the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase catalytic domain in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. (8/9)

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Clarkia amoena (es); Clarkia amoena (fr); Lěćna acaleja (hsb); Clarkia amoena (ast); Clarkia amoena (ru); Clarkia amoena (la); Sommerazalee (de); Clarkia amoena (vi); Clarkia amoena (ga); գոդեցիա հրաշալի (hy); Clarkia amoena (bg); Clarkia amoena (pt); Clarkia amoena (ro); ゴデチア (ja); гадэцыя прывабная (be); Atlasblomma (sv); Clarkia amoena (war); Clarkia amoena (pl); Clarkia amoena (uk); Clarkia amoena (nl); Clarkia amoena (ceb); Godetia (cy); Clarkia amoena (it); Isosilkkikukka (fi); Clarkia amoena (en); وداع الربيع (ar); گل ریحانی (fa); Clarkia amoena (sq) specie di pianta (it); উদ্ভিদের প্রজাতি (bn); especie de planta (ast); espècie de planta (ca); Art der Gattung Clarkia (de); lloj i bimëve (sq); բույսերի տեսակ (hy); вид растение (bg); specie de plante (ro); especie de planta (gl); מין של צמח (he); soort uit het geslacht Clarkia (nl); вид рослин (uk); speco di ...
After getting all pumped up about this whole gallbladder liver cleanse, and reading different links to this site, I ordered the product called Clarkia in order to do a parasite purge. Then as I read further I found out that Clarkia is not made by Dr. Clark. I e-mailed Dr. Clark s associates and found this out. Although I have not received the Clarkia yet, and therefore cannot make any comments about the product itself, I am now concerned that I have been misled. Could anyone please tell me if I have been wripped off by a nock-off product that is not going to do me any good. Or is ...
Author(s): Hove, Alisa A; Mazer, Susan J; Ivey, Christopher T | Abstract: In habitats where resource availability declines during the growing season, selection may favor early-flowering individuals. Under such ephemerally favorable conditions, late-blooming species (and individuals) may be particularly vulnerable to resource limitation of seed production. In California, a region prone to seasonal drought, members of the annual genus Clarkia are among the last to flower in the spring. We compared pollen limitation (PL) of seed set and outcrossing rates between early- and late-flowering individuals in two mixed-mating Clarkia taxa to detect whether flowering time is associated with changes in seed set due to resource depletion, PL, or increased selfing. In 2008-2010, we hand-pollinated one flower on a total of 1855 individual plants either Early (near the onset of flowering) or Late (near the end of flowering) in the flowering season and compared seed set to adjacent, open-pollinated flowers on the same
Learn how to grow clarkia (Clarkia unguiculata) flowers from seed, including sowing and germination, light and soil requirements, spacing and harvesting, from Johnnys Selected Seeds.
Native: indigenous.. Non-native: introduced (intentionally or unintentionally); has become naturalized.. County documented: documented to exist in the county by evidence (herbarium specimen, photograph). Also covers those considered historical (not seen in 20 years). State documented: documented to exist in the state, but not documented to a county within the state. Also covers those considered historical (not seen in 20 years).. Note: when native and non-native populations both exist in a county, only native status is shown on the map.. ...
For vascular plants occurring in wildlands or otherwise outside of cultivation in California, the Jepson eFlora contains taxonomic treatments, distribution maps, illustrations, photographs, and identification keys.
Habit: Annual < 1.5 m. Stem: prostrate to erect, glabrous, often glaucous, or puberulent (hairs long, spreading). Leaf: pinnately veined; petiole < 4 cm or 0; blade 1--10 cm, linear to elliptic or ovate, entire or shallow-toothed, glabrous or sparsely puberulent. Inflorescence: spike, raceme; bracts leaf-like; axis in bud straight or recurved at tip, in flower +- straight; buds erect or not. Flower: hypanthium obconic to cup-shaped, or long, slender, generally with ring of hairs within; sepals 4, generally fused to tip in bud, reflexed at least at base, staying fused at least at tip, in 4s or 2s, or all coming free; corolla bowl-shaped to rotate, petals 5--60 mm, often lobed or clawed, lavender or pink to dark red, pale yellow, or white, often spotted, flecked, or streaked with red, purple, or white; stamens 8, in 2 like or unlike series, or 4, filaments cylindric to wider distally, subtended by ciliate scales or generally not, anthers attached at base, pollen white or yellow to blue-gray, ...
105b. Abstract Ultrastructural analyses of Miocene leaf tissues from the Clarkia flora indicate the preservation of various protoplasmic features such as chloroplasts, mitochondria, and nuclei. Statistical analyses of the ultrastructural data indicate a predictable pattern of differential preservation attending the degeneration of the protoplasm. Of the 2300 randomly sampled cells form the type locality (P-33), 25% contain mitochondria, 90.1% contain chloroplasts, and 4.3% contain nuclei. Comparable analyses of tissues from site P-40 indicate that 34.6% have chloroplasts, less than 3% have mitochondria, and less than 1% have nuclei. These data are interpreted as compatible with a frequency of organelle preservation (C,,M,N) in which nuclei are preferentially destroyed during or before fossilization. Simulated fossilization involving the compression of living leaf tissues and studies of senescent and dehydrated tissues are used to evaluate the probable effects of these factors on the sequence of ...
We planted them in meter squared plots at OSUs North Willamette Research Center. Between April and October, we monitored floral visitation, sampled visiting insects using an "insect vacuum", and tracked floral bloom.. With one season in the books, we have some purely anecdotal impressions of which wildflower species are the most attractive to bees. Goldenrod (Solidago canadensis) and Douglas aster (Symphyotrichum subspicatum) were both highly attractive to a wide diversity of native bees, as well as to a variety of beetles, bugs, and syrphid flies. As an added bonus, both these species had long bloom durations, providing habitat and colorful displays for significant portions of the summer. Annual flowers Clarkia amoena and Gilia capitata attracted a range of native bees; Clarkia was also visited by leafcutter bees for a different purpose - cutting circular petal slices to build nest cells with.. ...
Adair , Avery , Black Bear , Black Cloud , Bradley , Bunn , Burke , Calder , Carbonate , Carbon Center , Clarkia , Delta , Dorsey , Elkhorn , Emerald Creek , Enaville , Erlmo , Ethelton , Falcon , Ferguson , Frisco , Gem , Gentry , Gibson City , Golconda , Golconda Mill , Gold Creek , Herrick , Horsecamp , Hoyt , Keeler , Kellogg-Wardner , Kingston , Kyle , Larson , Linfor , McCarthy , Mace , Marble Creek , Masonia , Morning , Mullan , Murray , Osburn , Page , Pearson , Pine Creek , Pinehurst , Pocono , Polaris , Prichard , Roland , Shont , Silver King , Silverton , Smelter Heights , Smelterville , Steamboat Rocks , Stetson , Stull , Sunnyside , Sweeney , Thiard , Wardner , Webb , Woodland Park ...
For this download cyprinid fishes it Does helpful you see at least one of the including foods to be and get at novel the support in your vegan: Apple Cider Vinegar, Garlic, Baking Soda, Essiac Tea, Clarkia, and Hyperthermia. Those with question love then comforted with pcos in the single normal horn bonuses of the feature; buzz; the Eating and &. bonuses learn books or single download cyprinid fishes systematics biology weeks been by: 1) the doctor, 2) a lovely TV, 3) women, part, end, 4) superfoods, 5) vibrance pains, 6) track of light sides, 7) internal lifestyle lady pulsing a pre-diabetic of lucky epic, and 8) possible changes, people and production devastation-is.
And now I get to enjoy the gardens newly organized and well-weeded form, free of work for at least a few weeks. Certainly the fully-in-bloom Echium Blue Bedder was a hit, for humans and bees alike. In fact I think I heard one of the bees say "Hey, we were here first. Scam!" The gorgeous coral-pink hues of the prolific Clarkia Aurora were also a hit. The Shady Lane, as the walkway to the back yard is called, was also very much appreciated. It didnt hurt that the sweet smelling Philadelphus Belle Etoile was in bloom there ...
Gene Information This gene encodes a protein belonging to ubiE/COQ5 methyltransferase family. The gene is deleted in Williams syndrome a multisystem developmental disorder caused by the deletion of contiguous genes at 7q11.22-q11.23. [provided by RefSeq Jul 2008]. ...
Onagraceae: Evening primrose family of flowering plants, belonging to the myrtle order (Myrtales), comprising 18 genera and 655 species, and concentrated in the temperate region of the New...
Pectin lyases (PNLs) are important enzymes that are involved in plant cell wall degradation during the infection process. Colletotrichum is a diverse genus of fungi, which allows the study of the evolution of PNLs and their possible role in pathogen-host interactions and lifestyle adaptations. The phylogenetic reconstruction of PNLs from Colletotrichum and analysis of selection pressures showed the formation of protein lineages by groups of species with different selection pressures and specific patterns. The analysis of positive selection at individual sites using different methods allowed for the identification of three codons with evidence of positive selection in the oligosaccharide-binding region and two codons on the antiparallel sheet, which may influence the interaction with the substrate ...
ECHAs dossier evaluation process covers compliance checks and the examination of testing proposals. By consulting the table below, you can find out whether ECHA has started to evaluate dossiers for a particular substance and follow the progress through the evaluation process. The table below displays the type, scope and status of the assessment undertaken for a given dossier. The decision date and the non-confidential version of the decision are published shortly after the decision has been adopted. Before publishing the non-confidential version of an adopted decision on its website, ECHA consults the addressees of the decision on this version. ECHA systematically removes any personal data from the non-confidential version of a decision. Some sections may also be redacted based on justified claims by registrants, regarding information confidential or deemed to harm their commercial interest if disclosed. Check the expandable boxes below for more details. ...
Shop Leucine carboxyl methyltransferase ELISA Kit, Recombinant Protein and Leucine carboxyl methyltransferase Antibody at MyBioSource. Custom ELISA Kit, Recombinant Protein and Antibody are available.
Amine Reactive PEG Derivatives and PEGylation Reagents: PEG NHS ester - N-hydroxyl succinimidyl ester (SCM, glutarate, succinate, glutaramide) PEG aldehyde - PEG propionaldehyde PEG carboxylic acid - carboxyl methyl, acetic acid, glutaric and succinic acid PEG cyanur, bromide, and chloride PEG mesylate and tosylate PEG NPC - nitrophenyl carbonate PEG epoxide - PEG glycidyl ether
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Expression of the Semliki Forest virus p62/E2 protein was studied in the polarized epithelial cell line Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK). After infection this transmembrane protein, together with the other spike subunit E1, accumulates at the basolateral surface of MDCK cells (Fuller, S. D., C.-H. von Bonsdorff, and K. Simons, 1985, EMBO (Eur. Mol. Biol. Organ.) J., 4:2475-2485). The cDNAs encoding truncated forms of the protein were used to stably transform MDCK cells to examine the role of subunit oligomerization (E1-E2) and the cytoplasmic domain of p62/E2 in directed transport to the basolateral surface. The biochemical characteristics and polarity of the expressed proteins were studied using cell monolayers grown on nitrocellulose filters. A wild-type form of p62/E2, in the absence of E1, and two forms having either 15 or 3 of the wild-type 31-amino acid carboxyl cytoplasmic domain were all localized to the basolateral surface. These results indicate that the cytoplasmic domain of E2 does ...
MicroRNAs are key regulators of angiogenesis, as illustrated by the vascular defects observed in miR-126-deficient animals. While the miR-126 duplex gives rise to two mature microRNAs (miR-126-3p and -5p), these defects were attributed to the loss of miR-126-3p while the role of miR-126-5p during normal angiogenesis in vivo remains unknown. Here, we show that miR-126-5p is expressed in endothelial but also by retinal ganglion cells (RGC) of the postnatal retina and participates in protecting endothelial cells from apoptosis during the establishment of the retinal vasculature. miR-126-5p negatively controls class-3 Semaphorin protein (Sema3A) in RGC through the repression of SetD5, an uncharacterized member of the methyltransferase family of proteins. In vitro, SetD5 controls Sema3A expression independently of its SET domain and co-immunoprecipitates with BRD2, a bromodomain protein which recruits transcription regulators onto the chromatin. Both SetD5 and BRD2 bind to the transcription start ...
Complete information for LCMT1 gene (Protein Coding), Leucine Carboxyl Methyltransferase 1, including: function, proteins, disorders, pathways, orthologs, and expression. GeneCards - The Human Gene Compendium
This plant produces upright racemes of two-lipped flowers with spreading, rounded lobes in a vast arrray of warm colors. It flowers profusely summer through autumn.. ...
The invention relates to novel S-nitrosothiols derived from penicillamine or glutathione of general formula (I), wherein A and B are phenyl groups or together represent a -CH2-Q-CH2- radical forming a six-membered ring in which Q represents an oxygen or sulfur atom or an N-R 3 radical , wherein R3 is hydrogen or an C1-C4 alkyl group; R1 is an acyl radical which may be a C1 -C5 aliphatic acyl radical or a glutamic acid radical bonded by its non-amino acid carboxyl ; R2 is a hydroxyl group or a glycine radical bonded by peptidic linkage in such a way that R2 is an hydroxyl group when R1 is an aliphatic acyl radical and R2 is a glycine radical when R1 is a glutamic acid radical . Said novel compounds exhibit vasodilating and blood platelet aggregation inhibiting activity and are useful in the treatment of circulatory system dysfunctions, especially cardiovascular dysfunctions ...
Circaea lutetiana aka Circaea quadrisulcata Onagraceae Standing one to three feet tall, this woodland forb has tiny, white, two-petaled flowers. The petals are so deeply cleft that youd think there are four. Enchanters nightshades native range is from the Great Plains east to the Atlantic, north into Canada, and all the way south (except Florida).…
[137 Pages Report] Check for Discount on 2014-2029 Report on Global Linalool Market by Player, Region, Type, Application and Sales Channel report by MAResearch. The global Linalool market was valued at $XX million in...
Clarkia; built by Harland & Wolff, laid down 30 October 1939, launched 7 March 1940 and completed 22 April 1940. Clover; built ...
Clark, IA; Hunt, NH (1983). "Evidence for reactive oxygen intermediates causing hemolysis and parasite death in malaria". ...
HMS Clarkia, Flower-class corvette for British Admiralty, launched 7 March 1940, completed 22 April 1940, scrapped 1947. HMS ... "HMS Clarkia". The Yard. Retrieved 27 February 2017. "Lavington Court". The Yard. Retrieved 27 February 2017. "Debrett". The ...
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... using examples from Clarkia, he asserted that several species of Clarkia often occur sympatrically, yet hybrids are very rare ... Clarkia franciscana Lewis and Raven (1958)...The repeated occurrence of the same pattern of differentiation in Clarkia suggests ... In Clarkia, we have not observed marked changes in physiology and pattern of development that could be described as ... In the early 1950's, in the course of revising the genus Clarkia Harlan Lewis and his wife Margaret Lewis discovered the ...
Clark, IA (June 2007). "The advent of the cytokine storm". Immunology and cell biology. 85 (4): 271-3. doi:10.1038/sj.icb. ...
Clark IA (June-August 2007). "How TNF was recognized as a key mechanism of disease". Cytokine Growth Factor Rev. 18 (3-4): 335- ... Clark IA, Virelizier JL, Carswell EA, Wood PR (June 1981). "Possible importance of macrophage-derived mediators in acute ... Clark IA (July 1982). "Suggested importance of monokines in pathophysiology of endotoxin shock and malaria". Klin. Wochenschr. ...
In Clarkia, we have not observed marked changes in physiology and pattern of development that could be described as ... Lewis and Raven postulated that species in the Genus Clarkia had a mode of speciation that resulted ...as a consequence of a ... A similar mode of origin by rapid reorganization of the chromosomes is suggested for the derivation of other species of Clarkia ... The repeated occurrence of the same pattern of differentiation in Clarkia suggests that a rapid reorganization of chromosomes ...
Clarkia elegans (Farewell to Spring). Adults[5][edit]. *Columbines. *Larkspurs. *Petunia. *Honeysuckle ...
"Linalool synthase - Clarkia concinna (Red ribbons)". Uniprot.org. Retrieved 2012-08-02. Kawaide H, Imai R, Sassa T, Kamiya Y ( ...
Clarkia, Vicia, Cirsium and Stachys species. The larvae feed on Clarkia unguiculata. "CATE Creating a Taxonomic eScience - ...
The youngest and easternmost of the known occurrences is near Clarkia, Idaho, where sediments of the Langhian age Lake Clarkia ... from the Miocene of Clarkia, Idaho, USA". Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology. 145 (3-4): 193-200. doi:10.1016/j.revpalbo. ... Smiley for his extensive efforts studying the Clarkia sites and their flora. Leaves of Acer smileyi are simple in structure, ... to the leaf specimens a series of paratype specimens were described for the associated samaras recovered at the Clarkia site ...
... clarkia (wd , gwp gwe g , in it p) MeSH B06.388.100.786.416 --- epilobium (wd , gwp gwe g , in it p) MeSH B06.388.100.786.611 ...
Rare wildflowers include Kern Canyon clarkia (Clarkia xantiana ssp. parviflora) and goosefoot yellow violet (Viola pinetorum ...
Travers, S. E. & S. J. Mazer (2000). "The absence of cryptic self-incompatibility in Clarkia unguiculata (Onagraceae)". ...
Clarkia has a number of polyploid species, and one, Clarkia tenella, is a tetraploid located in Chile and Argentina; it is the ... They hypothesized that Clarkia tenella and Clarkia davyi arose in from a common allotetraploid ancestor in North America and ... While there he worked on the cytogenetics of Clarkia, and published on chromosomal counts in Clarkia in their Annual Report. It ... Another paper was a taxonomic study that changed some of the nomenclature in Clarkia, combining species of Clarkia with Godetia ...
Ford, Brian J. (1992). "Brownian movement in Clarkia pollen: A reprise of the first observations". The Microscope. 40 (4): 235- ...
Saltational speciation has been recognized in the genus Clarkia (Lewis, 1966). It has been suggested (Carr, 1980, 2000) that ...
Common understory plant associates are Calochortus luteus, Clarkia unguiculata and Delphinium variegatum.[citation needed] ...
Studies of genetic variation in an introgressive complex in Clarkia (Onagraceae). Editor University of Kansas, Botany, 596 pp. ...
Clarkia fossil beds, Idaho ‎ (add CC foto, put refs into std format) ...
The larvae feed on Camissonia bistorta, Camissonia californica, Camissonia dentata and Clarkia rhomboidea. Species info ...
There were six escort vessels: HMS Clarkia, Heliotrope, Sabre, Scimitar, Shakiri, and Wellington. Violent storms beset the ...
TAYLOR, D. W., 1985b, Miocene freshwater mollusks from the Clarkia fossil site, Idaho. Pp. 73-74, in: C. J. SMILEY, ed., Late ... 265-321, in: C. J. SMILEY, ed., Late Cenozoic history of the Pacific Northwest: Interdisciplinary Studies on the Clarkia Fossil ... Cenozoic history of the Pacific Northwest: Interdisciplinary Studies on the Clarkia Fossil Beds of Northern Idaho. American ...
Wildflowers include clarkia, Indian paintbrush, sego lily, elephanthead, larkspur, shooting star, and bluebell. Rocky bluffs in ...
Clarkia amoena (es); Clarkia amoena (fr); Lěćna acaleja (hsb); Clarkia amoena (ast); Clarkia amoena (ru); Clarkia amoena (la); ... Clarkia amoena (war); Clarkia amoena (pl); Clarkia amoena (uk); Clarkia amoena (nl); Clarkia amoena (ceb); Godetia (cy); ... Clarkia amoena (ga); գոդեցիա հրաշալի (hy); Clarkia amoena (bg); Clarkia amoena (pt); Clarkia amoena (ro); ゴデチア (ja); гадэцыя ... Clarkia amoena (it); Isosilkkikukka (fi); Clarkia amoena (en); وداع الربيع (ar); گل ریحانی (fa); Clarkia amoena (sq) specie di ...
Clarkia biloba and C. lingulata, are both native to California. C. lingulata is known only from two sites in the central Sierra ... Other articles where Clarkia biloba is discussed: evolution: Quantum speciation: Two closely related species, ... Two closely related species, Clarkia biloba and C. lingulata, are both native to California. C. lingulata is known only from ...
... © 2001 George W. Hartwell. Clarkia unguiculata. © 2001 George W. Hartwell. Clarkia unguiculata. © 2010 ... Clarkia unguiculata. © 2011 Neal Kramer. Clarkia unguiculata. © 2013 Barry Breckling. Clarkia unguiculata. © 1999 California ... Next taxon: Clarkia virgata. Name Search Contact/Feedback Citation for this treatment: Harlan Lewis 2012, Clarkia unguiculata, ... More photos of Clarkia unguiculata in CalPhotos. Geographic subdivisions for Clarkia unguiculata: NCoR, s CaRF, SN, ScV (Sutter ...
... subsp. lindleyi. © 2008 Vernon Smith. Clarkia amoena subsp. huntiana. © 2011 Vernon Smith. Clarkia amoena. © ... Clarkia amoena. © 2011 Barry Breckling. Clarkia amoena subsp. amoena. © 2012 Vernon Smith. Clarkia amoena. © 1998 Gary A. ... Previous taxon: Clarkia affinis. Next taxon: Clarkia amoena subsp. amoena. Name Search ... Genus: Clarkia. View Description. Dichotomous Key. Habit: Annual < 1.5 m. Stem: prostrate to erect, glabrous, often glaucous, ...
... subsp. albicaulis. © 2011 Vernon Smith. Clarkia gracilis subsp. gracilis. © 2008 Keir Morse. Clarkia gracilis ... Clarkia gracilis subsp. tracyi. © 2010 Vernon Smith. Clarkia gracilis subsp. gracilis. © 2008 Keir Morse. Clarkia gracilis ... Note: From hybrids between Clarkia amoena and a probably extinct relative of Clarkia lassenensis. Jepson eFlora Author: Harlan ... Previous taxon: Clarkia franciscana. Next taxon: Clarkia gracilis subsp. albicaulis. Name Search ...
Previous taxon: Clarkia mosquinii. Next taxon: Clarkia purpurea. Name Search Botanical illustration including Clarkia prostrata ... Clarkia prostrata. © 2016 Aaron Schusteff. Clarkia prostrata. © 2014 California Academy of Sciences. Clarkia prostrata. © 2016 ... Flowering Time: May--Jul Note: Possibly from hybrids between Clarkia davyi, Clarkia speciosa. Jepson eFlora Author: Harlan ... Genus: Clarkia. View Description. Dichotomous Key. Habit: Annual < 1.5 m. Stem: prostrate to erect, glabrous, often glaucous, ...
Clarkia arcuata Clarkia australis Clarkia biloba Clarkia borealis Clarkia bottae Clarkia breweri Clarkia concinna Clarkia ... cylindrica Clarkia davyi Clarkia delicata Clarkia dudleyana Clarkia epilobioides Clarkia exilis Clarkia franciscana Clarkia ... gracilis Clarkia heterandra Clarkia imbricata Clarkia jolonensis Clarkia lassenensis Clarkia lewisii Clarkia lingulata Clarkia ... mildrediae Clarkia modesta Clarkia mosquinii Clarkia prostrata Clarkia pulchella Clarkia purpurea Clarkia rhomboidea Clarkia ...
Clarkia lewisii (Lewis clarkia) is a herb species of plants in the family Onagraceae, with a self-supporting growth habit. It ...
Find local weather forecasts for Clarkia, United States throughout the world ...
Jepson Manual Profile: Clarkia cylindrica Clarkia cylindrica - U.C. Photo gallery. ... Clarkia cylindrica is an annual herb producing an erect stem to around 0.5 metres (1.6 ft) in maximum height. Leaves are mainly ... Clarkia cylindrica is species of flowering plant in the evening primrose family known by the common name speckled fairyfan, or ... speckled clarkia. It is endemic to California, where it grows in the chaparral, oak woodlands, and grasslands of the southern ...
Clarkia purpurea is a species of wildflower known by the common names winecup clarkia, winecup fairyfan, and purple clarkia. ... quadrivulnera Calflora database: Clarkia purpurea ssp. viminea Jepson Manual Profile: Clarkia purpurea Clarkia purpurea - U.C. ... Subspecies include: Clarkia purpurea ssp. purpurea Clarkia purpurea ssp. quadrivulnera Clarkia purpurea ssp. viminea The ... Winecup clarkia) . accessed 2.2.2013 Calflora database: Clarkia purpurea ssp. purpurea Calflora database: Clarkia purpurea ssp ...
It is an uncommon species in the evening primrose family known by the common names Kern River clarkia and slender clarkia. ... Jepson Manual Profile of Clarkia exilis UC Photos gallery - Clarkia exilis. ... Clarkia exilis is an annual herb producing a slender, erect stem often exceeding half a meter in height. The bright green ... Clarkia exilis is endemic to California, where it is known only from the woodlands of the southernmost Sierra Nevada foothills ...
Clarkia similis is a species of flowering plant in the evening primrose family known by the common name Ramona clarkia. It is ...
This species of Clarkia is very closely related to Clarkia virgata, and it has been suggested that it is not actually a ... Clarkia australis is a species of flowering plant in the evening primrose family known by the common name Smalls southern ... 1999). The status of Clarkia australis (Onagraceae). Am J Bot 86:428-435 Jepson Manual Profile Photo gallery. ... clarkia. It is endemic to California, where it grows in the forests of the central Sierra Nevada. It is an uncommon species ...
tembloriensis Calflora Database: Clarkia tembloriensis (Temblor Range clarkia) Jepson Manual (TJM93) Profile of Clarkia ... Clarkia tembloriensis ssp. tembloriensis (syn: Clarkia tembloriensis subsp. longistyla) - Temblor Range clarkia - distribution ... Calflora: Clarkia tembloriensis Jepson eFlora (TJM2): Clarkia tembloriensis Jepson eFlora: Clarkia tembloriensis ssp. ... The two current subspecies are: Clarkia tembloriensis ssp. calientensis - Vaseks clarkia - found at only three sites near ...
Clarkia williamsonii Clarkia williamsonii - U.C. Photo gallery. ... Clarkia williamsonii is an erect annual herb with linear to ... Clarkia williamsonii is a species of flowering rejoin soendemic to California, where it is known from the forests and woodlands ...
Clarkia mildrediae is an uncommon species of flowering plant in the evening primrose family known by the common name Mildreds ... As the bud opens the sepals all separate instead of remaining fused as those of many other Clarkia species do. The triangular ... clarkia. It is endemic to California, where it is known from the forests of the southernmost Cascade Range and northern Sierra ...
Clarkia unguiculata is a species of wildflower known by the common name elegant clarkia or mountain garland. This plant is ... Clarkia unguiculata Moeller, D. A., et al. 2005. Ecological context of the evolution of self-pollination in Clarkia xantiana: ... Flowers of the genus Clarkia are primarily pollinated by specialist bees found in their native habitat "Clarkias independently ... Media related to Clarkia unguiculata at Wikimedia Commons Calphotos photo gallery. ...
Clarkia affinis is a species of wildflower known as chaparral clarkia. It is endemic to California, where it grows mainly on ...
Clarkia concinna is a species of wildflower known as red ribbons. It is endemic to California, where it can be found in the low ... "Clarkia concinna". Natural Resources Conservation Service PLANTS Database. USDA. Retrieved 17 January 2016. Jepson Manual ...
The Presidio clarkia, Clarkia franciscana, is an erect annual herb growing up to about 40 centimeters in maximum height. The ... Media related to Clarkia franciscana at Wikimedia Commons Jepson Manual Treatment of Clarkia franciscana Endangered Species at ... Presidio clarkia Clarkia franciscana - U.C. Photo gallery. ... Clarkia franciscana is a rare species of flowering plant in the ... Clarkia franciscana is a federally listed endangered species. The two San Francisco populations are on land which is protected ...
Clarkia jolonensis is an uncommon species of flowering plant in the evening primrose family known by the common name Jolon ... This plant is very similar to, and historically confused with, Clarkia lewisii, which differs from C. jolonensis in that the ... clarkia. It is endemic to Monterey County, California, where it is known from the woodlands of the Central Coast Ranges. This ...
amoena Clarkia amoena subsp. huntiana Clarkia amoena subsp. whitneyi (Whitneys farewell to spring) Farewell to spring is ... Jepson Flora Project: Clarkia amoena Plants of British Columbia: Clarkia amoena. ... Clarkia amoena (farewell to spring or godetia; syn. Godetia amoena) is a flowering plant native to western North America, found ... Three subspecies are currently recognised, though intermediate forms are commonly found: Clarkia amoena subsp. ...
Clarkia biloba ssp. biloba - two lobed clarkia Clarkia biloba ssp. brandegeeae - Brandegees clarkia CalFlora Database: Clarkia ... biloba CalFlora: Clarkia biloba ssp. brandegeeae Jepson Manual Profile - Clarkia biloba Clarkia biloba Photo gallery. ... Clarkia biloba is a species of flowering plant in the evening primrose family known by the common name twolobe clarkia and two ... Clarkia biloba ssp. australis - Mariposa clarkia; the rarest, known only in the Merced River drainage in the Sierra foothills; ...
Clarkia is located in a flat meadow area which was created by the Miocene Epoch Lake Clarkia. The sediments from this lake ... Clarkia is named for Capt. William Clark of the Lewis and Clark expedition. The first residents of the town of Clarkia ... Clarkia, Idaho". Journal of Paleontology. 49 (5): 833-844. ISSN 0022-3360. Climate Summary for Clarkia, Idaho. ... Clarkia is a small unincorporated community in the southwestern corner of Shoshone County, Idaho United States. It is ...
  • Clarkia is named for Capt. William Clark of the Lewis and Clark expedition. (wikipedia.org)
  • This species of Clarkia is very closely related to Clarkia virgata, and it has been suggested that it is not actually a separate species, but hybridization studies have demonstrated that there has been sufficient reproductive isolation to produce hybrid incompatibility between the two taxa, confirming that they should be treated as separate species. (wikipedia.org)
  • We compared pollen limitation (PL) of seed set and outcrossing rates between early- and late-flowering individuals in two mixed-mating Clarkia taxa to detect whether flowering time is associated with changes in seed set due to resource depletion, PL, or increased selfing. (escholarship.org)
  • Clarkia lassenensis is pollinated by both native bees and butterflies and is usually in bloom in the late spring early summer months. (wikipedia.org)