A mitosporic Loculoascomycetes fungal genus including some economically important plant parasites. Teleomorphs include Mycosphaerella and Venturia.
A large and heterogenous group of fungi whose common characteristic is the absence of a sexual state. Many of the pathogenic fungi in humans belong to this group.
The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in the air. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.
A mitosporic Loculoascomycetes fungal genus including several plant pathogens and at least one species which produces a highly phytotoxic antibiotic. Its teleomorph is Lewia.
A kingdom of eukaryotic, heterotrophic organisms that live parasitically as saprobes, including MUSHROOMS; YEASTS; smuts, molds, etc. They reproduce either sexually or asexually, and have life cycles that range from simple to complex. Filamentous fungi, commonly known as molds, refer to those that grow as multicellular colonies.
A plant species of the family SOLANACEAE, native of South America, widely cultivated for their edible, fleshy, usually red fruit.
A mitosporic fungal genus. Phialophora verrucosa is a cause of chromomycosis (CHROMOBLASTOMYCOSIS). Ophiobolus is the teleomorph of Phialophora.
The atmospheric properties, characteristics and other atmospheric phenomena especially pertaining to WEATHER or CLIMATE.
A mitosporic Trichocomaceae fungal genus that develops fruiting organs resembling a broom. When identified, teleomorphs include EUPENICILLIUM and TALAROMYCES. Several species (but especially PENICILLIUM CHRYSOGENUM) are sources of the antibiotic penicillin.
Scaly papule or warty growth, caused by five fungi, that spreads as a result of satellite lesions affecting the foot or leg. The extremity may become swollen and, at its distal portion, covered with various nodular, tumorous, verrucous lesions that resemble cauliflower. In rare instances, the disease may begin on the hand or wrist and involve the entire upper extremity. (Arnold, Odom, and James, Andrew's Diseases of the Skin, 8th ed, p362)
Reproductive bodies produced by fungi.
A refined petroleum fraction used as a fuel as well as a solvent.
A genus of mitosporic fungi containing about 100 species and eleven different teleomorphs in the family Trichocomaceae.
The contamination of indoor air.
The generic name for the group of aliphatic hydrocarbons Cn-H2n+2. They are denoted by the suffix -ane. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
An endosymbiont that is either a bacterium or fungus living part of its life in a plant. Endophytes can benefit host plants by preventing pathogenic organisms from colonizing them.
Diseases of plants.
Sugar alcohol dehydrogenases that have specificity for MANNITOL. Enzymes in this category are generally classified according to their preference for a specific reducing cofactor.
The Christmas Mistletoe plant family of the order Santalales, subclass Rosidae, class Magnoliopsida. They are parasitic primarily on coniferous trees forming a drooping evergreen bush of leathery leaves on tree branches. The berries are sticky and toxic.
The monitoring of the level of toxins, chemical pollutants, microbial contaminants, or other harmful substances in the environment (soil, air, and water), workplace, or in the bodies of people and animals present in that environment.

Recombination between diverged clusters of the tomato Cf-9 plant disease resistance gene family. (1/180)

The tomato Cf-4 and Cf-9 genes are the founder members of a large gene family of homologues of Cladosporium fulvum resistance gene Cf-9 (Hcr9 genes), several of which confer resistance against C. fulvum through recognition of different pathogen-encoded avirulence determinants. Three loci of tandemly repeated Hcr9 genes-Southern Cross (SC), Milky Way (MW), and Northern Lights (NL)-are located on the short arm of tomato chromosome 1. Comparisons between 2 SC-Hcr9s, 11 from MW, and 5 from NL implicated sequence exchange between gene family members in their evolution. The extent to which novel variants can be generated by recombination depends on the degree of sequence polymorphism available within the gene family. Here we show that physical separation of Hcr9 genes can be associated with elevated sequence divergence. Two diverged subclasses of Hcr9s could be defined. These are physically separated from each other, with members of one class exclusively residing at Northern Lights. One exceptional Hcr9 at Northern Lights carried sequence features specific for Hcr9s at other loci, suggesting a recent transfer of this gene by an interlocus recombination event. As members of diverged subclasses are brought into physical vicinity within a tandem repeat, a larger spectrum of sequence variants can potentially be generated by subsequent interhomologue sequence exchange.  (+info)

Folding and conformational analysis of AVR9 peptide elicitors of the fungal tomato pathogen Cladosporium fulvum. (2/180)

The race-specific elicitor AVR9, produced by the phytopathogenic fungus Cladosporium fulvum, is a 28-residue beta-sheet peptide containing three disulfide bridges. The folding of this peptide to its native conformation was examined in the presence of oxidized (GSSG) and reduced (GSH) glutathione at concentrations resembling those present in the endoplasmic reticulum. The concentrations of GSH and GSSG, and the applied temperature strongly affected the folding efficiency. The effect of temperature appeared reversible. The conditions for in vitro folding were optimized and a maximum yield of 60-70% of correctly folded peptide was obtained. In vitro folded AVR9 is equally as active as native fungal AVR9. They both display similar NMR characteristics, indicating that they have the same 3D structure and identical disulfide bridges. Thus, AVR9 can be folded correctly in vitro. This folding can be described by disulfide bridge formation leading to scrambled three-disulfide species, followed by disulfide reshuffling to acquire the native structure. The presence of urea significantly affected the folding of AVR9, indicating that noncovalent interactions play a role in directing correct folding. Protein disulfide isomerase increased the folding rate at least 15-fold, but had no effect on the yield. The folding procedure has also been applied successfully to two mutant AVR9 peptides, (K23A)AVR9 and biotinylated AVR9. We conclude that the 28-residue sequence, without the preprosequence (as present in vivo), contains sufficient information to direct correct folding and disulfide bridge formation in vitro.  (+info)

Sensitization to individual allergens and bronchial responsiveness in the ECRHS. European Community Respiratory Health Survey. (3/180)

Little is known about the relation of bronchial responsiveness (BHR) to sensitization to individual allergens, or its variation between countries. Data were obtained for BHR, specific immunoglobulin E and confounding variables from 11,215 subjects, aged 20-44 yrs at the start of the European Community Respiratory Health Survey, in 34 centres in 15 countries. The relation of BHR to sensitization to cat, house dust mite, timothy grass and Cladosporium was estimated by means of multiple regression for each centre, and combined across centres by random effects meta-analysis, controlling for baseline lung function, height, sex, season of testing, age, smoking and age/sex and age/smoking interactions. BHR was greater, on average, in those sensitized to cat (p=0.023), house dust mite (p<0.001) and timothy grass (p=0.018), but not to Cladosporium (p=0.60), and increased with degree of sensitization (p<0.001). All relations showed heterogeneity between centres, although to a lesser extent in the relation to sensitization to house dust mite. More variation in bronchial responsiveness was explained by sensitization and degree of sensitization to the individual allergens than by atopy defined as any positive test in each centre, but the relative importance of each allergen varied. The use of atopy as a single variable in relation to bronchial hyperresponsiveness may be misleading.  (+info)

Agroinfiltration is a versatile tool that facilitates comparative analyses of Avr9/Cf-9-induced and Avr4/Cf-4-induced necrosis. (4/180)

The avirulence genes Avr9 and Avr4 from the fungal tomato pathogen Cladosporium fulvum encode extracellular proteins that elicit a hypersensitive response when injected into leaves of tomato plants carrying the matching resistance genes, Cf-9 and Cf-4, respectively. We successfully expressed both Avr9 and Avr4 genes in tobacco with the Agrobacterium tumefaciens transient transformation assay (agroinfiltration). In addition, we expressed the matching resistance genes, Cf-9 and Cf-4, through agroinfiltration. By combining transient Cf gene expression with either transgenic plants expressing one of the gene partners, Potato virus X (PVX)-mediated Avr gene expression, or elicitor injections, we demonstrated that agroinfiltration is a reliable and versatile tool to study Avr/Cf-mediated recognition. Significantly, agroinfiltration can be used to quantify and compare Avr/Cf-induced responses. Comparison of different Avr/Cf-interactions within one tobacco leaf showed that Avr9/Cf-9-induced necrosis developed slower than necrosis induced by Avr4/Cf-4. Quantitative analysis demonstrated that this temporal difference was due to a difference in Avr gene activities. Transient expression of matching Avr/Cf gene pairs in a number of plant families indicated that the signal transduction pathway required for Avr/Cf-induced responses is conserved within solanaceous species. Most non-solanaceous species did not develop specific Avr/Cf-induced responses. However, co-expression of the Avr4/Cf-4 gene pair in lettuce resulted in necrosis, providing the first proof that a resistance (R) gene can function in a different plant family.  (+info)

Humoral immune response in chromoblastomycosis during and after therapy. (5/180)

A longitudinal study was carried out in Madagascar, the most important focus of chromoblastomycosis (P. Esterre, A. Andriantsimahavandy, E. Ramarcel, and J. L. Pecarrere, Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg. 55:45-47, 1996), to investigate natural immunity to this disease. Sequential blood samples were obtained before, during, and at the end of a successful therapeutic trial with terbinafine, a new antifungal drug. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoblot methods, detailed analyses of antibody concentration and antigen mapping were conducted for 136 serum samples and tentatively correlated to epidemiological and pathobiological data. Two different cytoplasmic antigens, corresponding to the two fungal species involved (Fonsecaea pedrosoi and Cladophialophora carrionii), were used to analyze the distribution of different classes of immunoglobulins. This was done with respect to the origin of the isolates, clinical and pathobiological. Although strong individual variations were noticed, some major antigens (one of 18.5 kDa specific for F. pedrosoi and two of 23.5 and 33 kDa, respectively, specific for C. carrionii) corresponded to high antibody prevalence and concentration. As some antigenic components were also detected by immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgA antibodies, the role that these specific antibodies could play in the immune response is discussed.  (+info)

Biological screening of Brazilian medicinal plants. (6/180)

In this study, we screened sixty medicinal plant species from the Brazilian savanna ("cerrado") that could contain useful compounds for the control of tropical diseases. The plant selection was based on existing ethnobotanic information and interviews with local healers. Plant extracts were screened for: (a) molluscicidal activity against Biomphalaria glabrata, (b) toxicity to brine shrimp (Artemia salina L.), (c) antifungal activity in the bioautographic assay with Cladosporium sphaerospermum and (d) antibacterial activity in the agar diffusion assay against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Bacillus cereus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Forty-two species afforded extracts that showed some degree of activity in one or more of these bioassays.  (+info)

Growth and toxin production by Clostridium botulinum in moldy tomato juice. (7/180)

Tomato juice inoculated with Cladosporium sp. or Penicillium sp. developed pH gradients with the upper portions near the mold mats having pH values near neutrality and the lower portions remaining more acid. Clostridium botulinum spores in these moldy tomato juices germinated, grew out, and produced toxin.  (+info)

Identification of two highly divergent catalase genes in the fungal tomato pathogen, Cladosporium fulvum. (8/180)

Catalases of pathogenic micro-organisms have attracted attention as potential virulence factors. Homology-based screens were performed to identify catalase genes in the fungal tomato pathogen Cladosporium fulvum. Two highly divergent genes, Cat1 and Cat2, were isolated and characterized. Cat1 codes for a putative 566-amino-acid catalase subunit and belongs to the gene family that also encodes the mainly peroxisome-localized catalases of animal and yeast species. Cat2 codes for a putative catalase subunit of 745 amino acids and belongs to a different gene family coding for the large-subunit catalases similar to ones found in bacteria and filamentous fungi. Neither catalase had an obvious secretory signal sequence. A search for an extracellular catalase was unproductive. The Cat1 and Cat2 genes showed differential expression, with the Cat1 mRNA preferentially accumulating in spores and the Cat2 mRNA preferentially accumulating in response to external H(2)O(2). With Cat2-deleted strains, activity of the Cat2 gene product (CAT2) was identified among four proteins with catalase activity separated on non-denaturing gels. The CAT2 activity represented a minor fraction of the catalase activity in spores and H(2)O(2)-stressed mycelium, and no phenotype was observed for Cat2-deleted strains, which showed a normal response to H(2)O(2) treatment. These results indicate the existence of a complex catalase system in C. fulvum, with regard to both the structure and regulation of the genes involved. In addition, efficient C. fulvum gene-replacement technology has been established.  (+info)

'Cladosporium' is a genus of fungi that are widely distributed in the environment, particularly in soil, decaying plant material, and indoor air. These fungi are known for their dark-pigmented spores, which can be found in various shapes and sizes depending on the species. They are important causes of allergies and respiratory symptoms in humans, as well as plant diseases. Some species of Cladosporium can also produce toxins that may cause health problems in susceptible individuals. It is important to note that medical definitions typically refer to specific diseases or conditions that affect human health, so 'Cladosporium' itself would not be considered a medical definition.

Mitosporic fungi, also known as asexual fungi or anamorphic fungi, are a group of fungi that produce mitospores (also called conidia) during their asexual reproduction. Mitospores are produced from the tip of specialized hyphae called conidiophores and are used for dispersal and survival of the fungi in various environments. These fungi do not have a sexual reproductive stage or it has not been observed, making their taxonomic classification challenging. They are commonly found in soil, decaying organic matter, and water, and some of them can cause diseases in humans, animals, and plants. Examples of mitosporic fungi include Aspergillus, Penicillium, and Fusarium species.

Air microbiology is the study of microorganisms, such as bacteria, fungi, and viruses, that are present in the air. These microorganisms can be suspended in the air as particles or carried within droplets of liquid, such as those produced when a person coughs or sneezes.

Air microbiology is an important field of study because it helps us understand how these microorganisms are transmitted and how they may affect human health. For example, certain airborne bacteria and fungi can cause respiratory infections, while airborne viruses can cause diseases such as the common cold and influenza.

Air microbiology involves various techniques for collecting and analyzing air samples, including culturing microorganisms on growth media, using molecular biology methods to identify specific types of microorganisms, and measuring the concentration of microorganisms in the air. This information can be used to develop strategies for controlling the spread of airborne pathogens and protecting public health.

'Alternaria' is a genus of widely distributed saprophytic fungi that are often found in soil, plant debris, and water. They produce darkly pigmented, septate hyphae and conidia (asexual spores) that are characterized by their distinctive beak-like projections.

Alternaria species can cause various types of plant diseases, including leaf spots, blights, and rots, which can result in significant crop losses. They also produce a variety of mycotoxins, which can have harmful effects on human and animal health.

In humans, Alternaria species can cause allergic reactions, such as hay fever and asthma, as well as skin and respiratory tract infections. Exposure to Alternaria spores is also a known risk factor for the development of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA), a condition characterized by inflammation and scarring of the lungs.

It's important to note that medical definitions can vary depending on the context, so it may be helpful to consult a reliable medical or scientific source for more specific information about Alternaria and its potential health effects.

Fungi, in the context of medical definitions, are a group of eukaryotic organisms that include microorganisms such as yeasts and molds, as well as the more familiar mushrooms. The study of fungi is known as mycology.

Fungi can exist as unicellular organisms or as multicellular filamentous structures called hyphae. They are heterotrophs, which means they obtain their nutrients by decomposing organic matter or by living as parasites on other organisms. Some fungi can cause various diseases in humans, animals, and plants, known as mycoses. These infections range from superficial, localized skin infections to systemic, life-threatening invasive diseases.

Examples of fungal infections include athlete's foot (tinea pedis), ringworm (dermatophytosis), candidiasis (yeast infection), histoplasmosis, coccidioidomycosis, and aspergillosis. Fungal infections can be challenging to treat due to the limited number of antifungal drugs available and the potential for drug resistance.

"Lycopersicon esculentum" is the scientific name for the common red tomato. It is a species of fruit from the nightshade family (Solanaceae) that is native to western South America and Central America. Tomatoes are widely grown and consumed in many parts of the world as a vegetable, although they are technically a fruit. They are rich in nutrients such as vitamin C, potassium, and lycopene, which has been studied for its potential health benefits.

"Phialophora" is a genus of fungi that belongs to the family Herpotrichiellaceae. These fungi are characterized by their pigmented, septate hyphae and the production of flask-shaped conidiogenous cells called phialides. Some species of Phialophora are known to cause various types of infections in humans, particularly in individuals with weakened immune systems. For example, Phialophora verrucosa is a common cause of chromoblastomycosis, a chronic fungal infection that often affects the skin and underlying tissues, leading to the formation of warty or cauliflower-like lesions. Proper diagnosis and treatment of Phialophora infections typically require consultation with a medical professional and may involve the use of antifungal medications.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Meteorological Concepts" is quite broad and can refer to various ideas and phenomena related to the study of meteorology, which is the scientific discipline that deals with the atmosphere and its processes. Here are a few examples of meteorological concepts:

1. Air pressure: The force exerted by the weight of the air above a given point. It's usually measured in hectopascals (hPa), inches of mercury (inHg), or millibars (mbar).
2. Temperature: A measure of the warmth or coldness of an object or environment, often reported in degrees Celsius (°C) or Fahrenheit (°F).
3. Humidity: The amount of water vapor present in the air. Relative humidity is the ratio of the current water vapor content to the maximum possible content at a given temperature.
4. Precipitation: Any form of water that falls from the atmosphere and reaches the ground, including rain, snow, sleet, or hail.
5. Wind: The horizontal movement of air relative to the surface of the Earth. It's usually described in terms of its speed (measured in knots, miles per hour, or meters per second) and direction (often given as a compass bearing).
6. Clouds: Visible masses of water droplets or ice crystals suspended in the atmosphere. They form due to the condensation of atmospheric water vapor and are classified based on their appearance, altitude, and other characteristics.
7. Fronts: Boundaries between different air masses that have distinct temperature and humidity properties. These boundaries can lead to various weather phenomena, such as precipitation and severe thunderstorms.
8. Air pollution: The presence of harmful substances in the atmosphere, often resulting from human activities like industrial processes or transportation.
9. Weather forecasting: The use of scientific principles, observations, and computer models to predict future weather conditions.
10. Climate: The long-term average of weather patterns and conditions in a specific region, typically over a period of 30 years or more.

These are just a few examples of meteorological concepts. There are many more aspects of atmospheric science that could be explored, such as the study of tornadoes, hurricanes, and other extreme weather events.

"Penicillium" is not a medical term per se, but it is a genus of mold that is widely used in the field of medicine, specifically in the production of antibiotics. Here's a scientific definition:

Penicillium is a genus of ascomycete fungi that are commonly found in the environment, particularly in soil, decaying vegetation, and food. Many species of Penicillium produce penicillin, a group of antibiotics with activity against gram-positive bacteria. The discovery and isolation of penicillin from Penicillium notatum by Alexander Fleming in 1928 revolutionized the field of medicine and led to the development of modern antibiotic therapy. Since then, various species of Penicillium have been used in the industrial production of penicillin and other antibiotics, as well as in the production of enzymes, organic acids, and other industrial products.

Chromoblastomycosis is a chronic, progressive fungal infection of the skin and underlying tissues. It is caused by several species of dematiaceous (melanin-containing) fungi, which are typically found in soil and organic matter. The disease is most commonly acquired through traumatic inoculation of the fungus into the skin, often through minor cuts, scrapes, or puncture wounds.

The infection initially presents as a painless papule or nodule at the site of inoculation, which may gradually enlarge and become verrucous (wart-like) or cauliflower-like in appearance. The lesions can be single or multiple and are typically found on the lower extremities, particularly the feet and legs. Dissemination to other parts of the body is rare but can occur in immunocompromised individuals.

Chromoblastomycosis is characterized by the formation of muriform (medlar) bodies, which are thick-walled, rectangular, or rounded fungal cells with multiple septations. These structures can be found within giant cells and histiocytes in the dermis and subcutaneous tissues and are considered pathognomonic for the disease.

Diagnosis of chromoblastomycosis is typically made through a combination of clinical presentation, histopathological examination, and fungal culture. Treatment usually involves a combination of surgical excision, physical treatments (such as cryotherapy, thermotherapy, or laser therapy), and antifungal medications (such as itraconazole, posaconazole, or terbinafine). The prognosis for chromoblastomycosis is generally good with early diagnosis and appropriate treatment; however, the infection can become chronic and disfiguring if left untreated or inadequately managed.

Fungal spores are defined as the reproductive units of fungi that are produced by specialized structures called hyphae. These spores are typically single-celled and can exist in various shapes such as round, oval, or ellipsoidal. They are highly resistant to extreme environmental conditions like heat, cold, and dryness, which allows them to survive for long periods until they find a suitable environment to germinate and grow into a new fungal organism. Fungal spores can be found in the air, water, soil, and on various surfaces, making them easily dispersible and capable of causing infections in humans, animals, and plants.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Kerosene" is not a medical term. It is a type of fuel that is commonly used in lamps, stoves, and heating systems. Medically, the term "kerosene sniffing" or "huffing" is used to describe the dangerous practice of inhaling kerosene vapors to get high, which can lead to serious health consequences, including death.

"Aspergillus" is a genus of filamentous fungi (molds) that are widely distributed in the environment. These molds are commonly found in decaying organic matter such as leaf litter, compost piles, and rotting vegetation. They can also be found in indoor environments like air conditioning systems, dust, and building materials.

The medical relevance of Aspergillus comes from the fact that some species can cause a range of diseases in humans, particularly in individuals with weakened immune systems or underlying lung conditions. The most common disease caused by Aspergillus is called aspergillosis, which can manifest as allergic reactions, lung infections (like pneumonia), and invasive infections that can spread to other parts of the body.

Aspergillus species produce small, airborne spores called conidia, which can be inhaled into the lungs and cause infection. The severity of aspergillosis depends on various factors, including the individual's immune status, the specific Aspergillus species involved, and the extent of fungal invasion in the body.

Common Aspergillus species that can cause human disease include A. fumigatus, A. flavus, A. niger, and A. terreus. Preventing exposure to Aspergillus spores and maintaining a healthy immune system are crucial steps in minimizing the risk of aspergillosis.

Indoor air pollution refers to the contamination of air within buildings and structures due to presence of particles, gases, or biological materials that can harmfully affect the health of occupants. These pollutants can originate from various sources including cooking stoves, heating systems, building materials, furniture, tobacco products, outdoor air, and microbial growth. Some common indoor air pollutants include particulate matter, carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and mold. Prolonged exposure to these pollutants can cause a range of health issues, from respiratory problems to cancer, depending on the type and level of exposure. Effective ventilation, air filtration, and source control are some of the strategies used to reduce indoor air pollution.

Alkanes are a group of saturated hydrocarbons, which are characterized by the presence of single bonds between carbon atoms in their molecular structure. The general formula for alkanes is CnH2n+2, where n represents the number of carbon atoms in the molecule.

The simplest and shortest alkane is methane (CH4), which contains one carbon atom and four hydrogen atoms. As the number of carbon atoms increases, the length and complexity of the alkane chain also increase. For example, ethane (C2H6) contains two carbon atoms and six hydrogen atoms, while propane (C3H8) contains three carbon atoms and eight hydrogen atoms.

Alkanes are important components of fossil fuels such as natural gas, crude oil, and coal. They are also used as starting materials in the production of various chemicals and materials, including plastics, fertilizers, and pharmaceuticals. In the medical field, alkanes may be used as anesthetics or as solvents for various medical applications.

Endophytes are microorganisms, typically bacteria or fungi, that live inside the tissues of plants without causing any visible disease or harm to the plant. They can be found in almost all plant species and are known to exist in a mutualistic relationship with their host plants. Endophytes can provide various benefits to the plants such as growth promotion, increased resistance to pathogens, and protection against herbivores. Some endophytic fungi also produce bioactive compounds that have potential applications in medicine, agriculture, and industry.

A plant disease is a disorder that affects the normal growth and development of plants, caused by pathogenic organisms such as bacteria, viruses, fungi, parasites, or nematodes, as well as environmental factors like nutrient deficiencies, extreme temperatures, or physical damage. These diseases can cause various symptoms, including discoloration, wilting, stunted growth, necrosis, and reduced yield or productivity, which can have significant economic and ecological impacts.

Mannitol dehydrogenases are a group of enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of mannitol to mannose or the reverse reduction reaction, depending on the cofactor used. These enzymes play a crucial role in the metabolism of mannitol, a sugar alcohol found in various organisms, including bacteria, fungi, and plants.

There are two main types of mannitol dehydrogenases:

1. Mannitol-2-dehydrogenase (MT-2DH; EC 1.1.1.67): This enzyme oxidizes mannitol to fructose, using NAD+ as a cofactor. It is widely distributed in bacteria and fungi, contributing to their metabolic versatility.
2. Mannitol-1-dehydrogenase (MT-1DH; EC 1.1.1.17): This enzyme catalyzes the conversion of mannitol to mannose, using NADP+ as a cofactor. It is primarily found in plants and some bacteria, where it plays a role in osmoregulation and stress response.

In summary, mannitol dehydrogenases are enzymes that facilitate the interconversion of mannitol and its corresponding sugars (mannose or fructose) through oxidation-reduction reactions.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Viscaceae" is not a medical term. It is a botanical term that refers to a family of plants commonly known as mistletoes. These are parasitic plants that grow on the branches of trees and shrinks, extracting water and nutrients from them. They have been used in traditional medicine in various cultures, but it's important to note that the use of such substances should be under the guidance of a healthcare professional due to potential side effects and interactions with other medications.

Environmental monitoring is the systematic and ongoing surveillance, measurement, and assessment of environmental parameters, pollutants, or other stressors in order to evaluate potential impacts on human health, ecological systems, or compliance with regulatory standards. This process typically involves collecting and analyzing data from various sources, such as air, water, soil, and biota, and using this information to inform decisions related to public health, environmental protection, and resource management.

In medical terms, environmental monitoring may refer specifically to the assessment of environmental factors that can impact human health, such as air quality, water contamination, or exposure to hazardous substances. This type of monitoring is often conducted in occupational settings, where workers may be exposed to potential health hazards, as well as in community-based settings, where environmental factors may contribute to public health issues. The goal of environmental monitoring in a medical context is to identify and mitigate potential health risks associated with environmental exposures, and to promote healthy and safe environments for individuals and communities.

Indoors Cladosporium species may grow on surfaces when moisture is present. Cladosporium fulvum, cause of tomato leaf mould, ... Fortunately, Cladosporium is not associated with anaphylaxis. Several Cladosporium species are known to be hyperparasitic to ... "Cladosporium cladosporioides and Cladosporium pseudocladosporioides as potential new fungal antagonists of Puccinia horiana ... Cladosporium is a genus of fungi including some of the most common indoor and outdoor molds. Some species are endophytes or ...
... is a fungal plant pathogen that causes Cladosporium speckle on banana and which occurs in most countries in ... Unsuccessful attempts to transfer the Cladosporium pathogen in vitro to healthy banana plants seem to confirm reports that the ... for the causal organism of Cladosporium speckle disease of banana Archived 2013-12-27 at the Wayback Machine, Mycological ... Cladosporium, Fungal plant pathogens and diseases, Banana diseases, Fungi described in 1945, All stub articles, Capnodiales ...
... is a low-risk microbe that usually poses little to No threat of infection In healthy adults As it has a ... Cladosporium oxysporum expands moderately, often floccose at the center of the fungus that consists of woolly tufts, and it can ... Cladosporium oxysporum is mostly located Asia and Africa, but it can also be found distributed throughout tropical and the ... Cladosporium oxysporum is a saprobic secondary invader in warmer climates, meaning they invade and feed on organisms that are ...
... is a fungus found in hypersaline environments. It grows well at 4 °C but not at 30 °C, and has ... "Phylogeny and ecology of the ubiquitous saprobe Cladosporium sphaerospermum, with descriptions of seven new species from ... Cladosporium, Fungi described in 2007, All stub articles, Capnodiales stubs). ...
... is a fungus found in hypersaline environments. It has ovoid to ellipsoid conidia. It has also been found ... "Phylogeny and ecology of the ubiquitous saprobe Cladosporium sphaerospermum, with descriptions of seven new species from ... Cladosporium, Fungi described in 2007, All stub articles, Capnodiales stubs). ...
... is a fungal plant pathogen that affects cucumbers. Ellis, J. B.; Arthur (1889). "Cladosporium ... Cladosporium, Fungal plant pathogens and diseases, Vegetable diseases, Fungi described in 1889, All stub articles, Capnodiales ...
... is a radiotrophic fungus belonging to the genus Cladosporium and was described in 1886 by Albert ... Cladosporium sphaerospermum also produces ramoconidia 6-14 × 3.5-4.0 μm in length and this feature can be used as a method of ... Cladosporium sphaerospermum is also a psychrophilic fungus, known to grow at temperatures as low as −5 °C (23 °F) with an upper ... Cladosporium sphaerospermum is also been shown to inhabit paint films on walls and other surfaces as well as old paintings. ...
... is a fungus found in hypersaline environments. It has globoid conidia. It has also been found in plant ... "Phylogeny and ecology of the ubiquitous saprobe Cladosporium sphaerospermum, with descriptions of seven new species from ... Cladosporium, Fungi described in 2007, All stub articles, Capnodiales stubs). ...
... is the type species of the genus Cladosporium. Its spores are highly prevalent in the air; the genus ... Cladosporium herbarum is also found all over the world on dead organic material, in the soil, and sometimes appears as a plant ... It can cause Cladosporium ear rot on corn. Most often, C. herbarum conidia have 1 nucleus, but some can have 2 nuclei. During ... Cladosporium herbarum is a common fungus found worldwide in organic and inorganic matter. It is efficiently distributed in the ...
... and C. herbarum cause Cladosporium rot of red wine grapevines. The incidence of infection is much ... In 1952 that Gerardus Albertus de Vries transferred the species to the genus Cladosporium where it remains today. Cladosporium ... Other early names for this taxon included Cladosporium hypophyllum, Monilia humicola and Cladosporium pisicola. ... Cladosporium cladosporioides is a darkly pigmented mold that occurs world-wide on a wide range of materials both outdoors and ...
... is a fungus found in hypersaline environments. It has ovoid to ellipsoid conidia. It has also been found ... "Phylogeny and ecology of the ubiquitous saprobe Cladosporium sphaerospermum, with descriptions of seven new species from ... Cladosporium, Fungi described in 2007, All stub articles, Capnodiales stubs). ...
... is a fungus found in hypersaline environments. It has globoid conidia. It has also been found in plant ... "Phylogeny and ecology of the ubiquitous saprobe Cladosporium sphaerospermum, with descriptions of seven new species from ... Cladosporium, Fungi described in 2007, All stub articles, Capnodiales stubs). ...
... is a fungus. Braun, U.; Hill, C.F.; Schubert, K. (2006). "New species and new records of biotrophic ... Cladosporium, Fungal plant pathogens and diseases, Fungi described in 2006, All stub articles, Capnodiales stubs). ...
... is a fungus found in hypersaline environments. It has spherical, ornamented conidia with long digitate ... "Phylogeny and ecology of the ubiquitous saprobe Cladosporium sphaerospermum, with descriptions of seven new species from ... Cladosporium, Fungi described in 2007, All stub articles, Capnodiales stubs). ...
... is a fungus. It was discovered between 2005 and 2007 and recorded as potentially endemic to New ... Cladosporium, Fungal plant pathogens and diseases, Monocot diseases, Fungi described in 2006, Fungi of New Zealand, All stub ...
... is a synonym of Fusicladium effusum, the plant pathogen which causes pecan scab. Pecan scab is the most ... Cladosporium, Fungal tree pathogens and diseases, Nut tree diseases, Fungi described in 1888, All stub articles, Capnodiales ...
... is a fungus found in hypersaline environments. It has globoid conidia. It has also been isolated from ... "Phylogeny and ecology of the ubiquitous saprobe Cladosporium sphaerospermum, with descriptions of seven new species from ... Cladosporium, Fungi described in 2007, All stub articles, Capnodiales stubs). ...
... is a species of fungus in the genus Cladosporium (anamorphic Davidiella). It forms arid brown spots on ... 8), pages 471 (1882) Cladosporium Citri Mass. and C. elegans Penz. Confused. Fawcett, H. S., Mycologia, Volume 2, (article) v t ... e (Articles with short description, Short description matches Wikidata, Articles with 'species' microformats, Cladosporium, ...
... is a disease that affects maize. The disease is caused by the saprophytic fungus Cladosporium herbarum and ... For example, Cladosporium ear rot looks similar to Trichoderma ear rot, but Trichoderma ear rot has a more intense green color ... One of the most effective ways of managing Cladosporium ear rot is to identify its presence as early as possible and to manage ... Cladosporium Kernel Rot of Corn, Iowa State University Entomology Department, 22 Oct. 2004, [1]. Munkvold, Gary, et al. "Corn ...
Cladosporium cladosporioides f. sp. pisicola is a fungal plant pathogen that affects pea plants. Index Fungorum USDA ARS Fungal ... Cladosporium, Forma specialis taxa, All stub articles, Capnodiales stubs, Fungal plant disease stubs). ...
Cladosporium". Trans Kansas Acad 62:200-207. 1959. Luttrell ES, Rogerson CT. "Homothallism in an undescribed Cochliobolus and ...
Cladosporium sp. and Drechslera sp. Indications existed as well with respect to the role of organic matters in drinking water. ...
The genus Cladosporium was first discovered in 1816, several human pathogenic species belonging to Cladosporium are now ... Bensch, K; Braun, U; Groenewald, J.Z; Crous, P.W (2012). "The genus Cladosporium". Studies in Mycology. 72 (1): 1-401. doi: ... J.A von Arx, a Dutch mycologist, for his efforts in classify the genus Cladosporium. The genus Cladophialophora currently ... The fungus was considered to be of the genus Cladosporium. ... physiology and taxonomy of human-pathogenic Cladosporium- ...
Thomma, Bart P. H. J.; Van Esse, H. Peter; Crous, Pedro W.; De Wit, Pierre J. G. M. (July 2005). "Cladosporium fulvum (syn. ...
... particularly Cladosporium. In their 2012 monograph on the genus Cladosporium, Konstanze Bensch and colleagues note that ... Bensch, K.; Braun, U.; Groenewald, J.Z.; Crous, P.W. (2012). "The genus Cladosporium". Studies in Mycology. 72: 1-401. doi: ... David, John Charles (1997). A Contribution to the Systematics of Cladosporium. Revision of the Fungi Previously Referred to ... luci probably does not belong in Cladosporium in the strict sense. David suggests that it is probably cercosporoid (referring ...
Cladosporium Leaf Mold. Stergiopoulos I, Groenewald M, Staats M, Lindhout P, Crous PW, De Wit PJ. Mating-type genes and the ... Cladosporium fulvum is an Ascomycete called Passalora fulva, a non-obligate pathogen that causes the disease on tomatoes known ... Cladosporium fulvum-Tomato Pathosystem: Fungal Infection Strategy and Plant Responses Bilal ¨Okmen and Pierre J. G. M. de Wit ... The causal fungus of tomato leaf mold may also be referred to as Cladosporium fulvum (Cooke 1883), a former name. The tomato ...
... and Cladosporium sp. However, some insecticidal activity has been shown in one study, possibly showing some use as an ...
Genus: Cladosporium Link 1816 Cladosporium aphidis Thüm. 1877 Cladosporium asteromatoides Sacc. 1885 Cladosporium baccae ... 1877 Cladosporium pisicola W.C. Snyder [as pisicolum], (1934) Cladosporium tenuissimum Cooke 1878 Cladosporium vignae Rac. (sic ... Cladosporium citri possibly Massee 1899 Cladosporium cucumerinum Ellis & Arthur 1889 Cladosporium elatum (Harz) Nannf. 1934 ... Cooke) U. Braun & Crous, (2003) Cladosporium macrocarpum Preuss 1848 Cladosporium melanophloei Thüm. ...
1906 Cladosporium punctulatum var. xylogenum Fairm. 1922 Cladosporium vincae Fairm. 1911 Clasterosporium larviforme Fairm. 1922 ...
Rodríguez-Rajo FJ, Iglesias I, Jato V (April 2005). "Variation assessment of airborne Alternaria and Cladosporium spores at ... Peternel R, Culig J, Hrga I (2004). "Atmospheric concentrations of Cladosporium spp. and Alternaria spp. spores in Zagreb ( ...
Indoors Cladosporium species may grow on surfaces when moisture is present. Cladosporium fulvum, cause of tomato leaf mould, ... Fortunately, Cladosporium is not associated with anaphylaxis. Several Cladosporium species are known to be hyperparasitic to ... "Cladosporium cladosporioides and Cladosporium pseudocladosporioides as potential new fungal antagonists of Puccinia horiana ... Cladosporium is a genus of fungi including some of the most common indoor and outdoor molds. Some species are endophytes or ...
Cladosporium is a common mold that may cause allergic reactions in some people. Learn how to identify and remove this type of ... There are over 500 species of Cladosporium. Many other types of mold can also grow in your home. Cladosporium may appear as ... Cladosporium is a common mold that may affect your health. It can cause allergies and asthma in some people. In very rare cases ... Cladosporium can grow both indoors and outdoors. Spores from the mold can be airborne, which is also how the mold spreads. ...
... taxonomic positions and number of subtaxa of Variety Cladosporium herbarum var. aphidicola C. Massal. (1918) ... Cladosporium herbarum (Pers.) Link (1821). Ref: [Kirk, P.M.] (ed.), present: [23 Dec 2014].. ...
Cladosporium fulvum is an asexual fungus for which no sexual stage is currently known. Molecular data, however, support C. ... Cladosporium fulvum (syn. Passalora fulva), a highly specialized plant pathogen as a model for functional studies on plant ... and unlike Cladosporium s.s., which has teleomorphs that reside in Davidiella, and not Mycosphaerella.. ...
Home / Pest Index / Leaf Spot ( Cladosporium ). Leaf Spot ( Cladosporium ). Learn how to control Leaf Spot ( Cladosporium ) ... Q&A related to Leaf Spot ( Cladosporium ). * Will Bonide INFUSE Lawn & Landscape Fungicide Granules kill the leaf spot/black ...
... Link, Mag. Gesell. naturf. Freunde, Berlin 7: 37. 1816 (1815).. *For synonyms see Bensch et al. (2012). ... Cladosporium was previously extremely heterogeneous and encompassed 772 names assigned to this genus (Dugan et al. 2004). ... Braun et al. 2003 (sexual morph); Crous et al. 2007a, b (cladosporium-like genera); Schubert et al. 2007 (morphology, phylogeny ... Bensch K, Groenewald JZ, Braun U, et al. (2015). Common but different: The expanding realm of Cladosporium. Studies in Mycology ...
Members of the Cladosporium genus are particularly important for allergy sufferers. This mold can be a major trigger for $ ... Cladosporium Members of the Cladosporium genus are particularly important for allergy sufferers. This mold can be a major ... Cladosporium Members of the Cladosporium genus are particularly important for allergy sufferers. This mold can be a major ... Cladosporium. Members of the Cladosporium genus are particularly important for allergy sufferers. This mold can be a major ...
It could be cladosporium, a common type of mold that can cause health issues. ... Can I Remove Cladosporium on My Own Without Professional Help?. Yes, you can remove cladosporium on your own without ... Identifying Cladosporium in Your Home. To determine if theres Cladosporium in your home, you can conduct a visual inspection ... Cladosporium Removal on Different Surfaces. Now that you know how to prevent Cladosporium regrowth in your home, lets talk ...
"Cladosporium" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicines controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject ... This graph shows the total number of publications written about "Cladosporium" by people in this website by year, and whether " ... Below are the most recent publications written about "Cladosporium" by people in Profiles. ...
Cladosporium. Published on April 6, 2022. by Shopify API .author_wrap { display: none !important; } .author_wrap { display: ...
Tag: Cladosporium. Mold-Specific Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction. [vc_row type="in_container" full_screen_row_position=" ...
Cladosporium. Although Cladosporium molds are some of the most common, they rarely cause health problems in humans and can be ...
Lauge R. Extracellular proteins of the tomato pathogen Cladosporium fulvum; role in pathogenicity and avirulence. Wageningen: ... Lauge, R. (1999). Extracellular proteins of the tomato pathogen Cladosporium fulvum; role in pathogenicity and avirulence. [ ... The interaction between the biotrophic fungus Cladosporium fulvum (Cooke) and its only host, tomato ( Lycopersicon esculentum ... Dive into the research topics of Extracellular proteins of the tomato pathogen Cladosporium fulvum; role in pathogenicity and ...
Cladosporium halotolerans: Exploring an Unheeded Human Pathogen. Cladosporium halotolerans: Exploring an Unheeded Human ...
What is mold? How and why does mold appear? How to get rid of mold? What are the common mold in house symptoms? Discover answers in this overview...
Cladosporium Pod Spot (Cladosporium vigna). Symptoms: Pod lesions start as small, narrow, brown-black spots with a slightly ...
Cladosporium fulvumleaf-moldtomatoesdisease resistancepathogensplant pathogenshorticultural cropshorticultural crops disease ... A virulence genes of Cladosporium fulvum and the receptors of their products in tomato. ...
Cladosporium does not really pose any significant health issues but can still lead to damage and allergic reactions. ... Like Cladosporium, fusarium mold grows very quickly in carpeting, fabrics, and on many other surfaces in cool temperatures. ... Found both indoors and outdoors, Cladosporium typically features a dark green or brown color and can grow in warm and cool ...
Cladosporium spp.. *Air filters 105. Sporothrix. *Construction (pseudoepidemic) 118. + The American Institute of Architects ( ...
Cladosporium species, and Penicillium species. Although rare, some of the identified Bacillus species can cause disease in ...
Cladosporium spp.. Curvularia spp.. Drechslera dematioidea. Epicoccum spp.. Exserohilum rostratum. Fusarium chlamydosporum. ... Cladosporium oxysporum. Curvularia lunata. Drechslera australiensis. Fusarium moniliforme. Fusarium solani. Penicillium ...
Cladosporium-like • Phialophora-like • Acrotheca-like Rhinocladiella Cladosporium Phialophora Acrotheca ... Cladosporium) carrionii Cladophialophora bantiana Phialophora verrucosa Fonsecaea pedrosoi Exophiala species Wangiella species ... Cladosporium] carrionii • C. bantiana • Phialophora verrucosa • Fonsecaea pedrosoi • Exophiala species • Wangiella species ...
Over the past 2 decades, allergic fungal sinusitis (AFS) has become increasingly defined. Historically mistaken for a paranasal sinus tumor, allergic fungal sinusitis (AFS) now is believed to be an allergic reaction to aerosolized environmental fungi, usually of the dematiaceous species, in an immunocompetent host.
Over the past 2 decades, allergic fungal sinusitis (AFS) has become increasingly defined. Historically mistaken for a paranasal sinus tumor, allergic fungal sinusitis (AFS) now is believed to be an allergic reaction to aerosolized environmental fungi, usually of the dematiaceous species, in an immunocompetent host.
3). Among these taxa, Cladosporium sp., Pilidium concavum and two Capnodiales were identified and they were most abundant in ...
Isolates of Cladosporium and Fusarium were ascribed to different species, of these C. ramotenellum, C. halotolerans and F. ... Isolates of Cladosporium and Fusarium were ascribed to different species, of these C. ramotenellum, C. halotolerans and F. ... Fungi like Cladosporium, Fusarium, Epicoccum and Aureobasidium can occur on withered grapes causing spoilage of passito wine. ... Fungi like Cladosporium, Fusarium, Epicoccum and Aureobasidium can occur on withered grapes causing spoilage of passito wine. ...
Cladosporium, and. *Alternaria.. Effects of exposure to these species include:. *Nasal congestion, ...
Alternaria and Cladosporium spores in the atmosphere of Konya and their relationship with meteorological factors ... Alternaria and Cladosporium spores in the atmosphere of Konya and their relationship with meteorological factors Hasibe ARTAÇ 1 ... Materials and Methods: Measurement of Alternaria and Cladosporium spores were carried out between January 1st 2008 and December ... Results: While Alternaria spores were identified as 424 (19.2%) and 3977 (8.6%) spores/m3; Cladosporium spores were detected as ...
BRS-155 for Aspergillus spp., Cladosporium spp., and in both cultivars for Fusarium spp.. ...
  • The most common types of mold include aspergillus, cladosporium and stachybotrys chartarum (also known as black mold). (hgtv.com)
  • The most frequent species were Candida albicans, Aspergillus niger, Cladosporium cladosporioides and Cladosporium oxysporum. (bvsalud.org)
  • 59.5%), Cladosporium (13.8%), Alternaria (11.3%) and Penicillium (10.7%) species were the most prevalent. (who.int)
  • The aim of this study was to determine the meteorological factors (temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, wind direction, rainfall) affecting Alternaria and Cladosporium spores in the atmosphere of Konya, Turkey. (aai.org.tr)
  • Measurement of Alternaria and Cladosporium spores were carried out between January 1st 2008 and December 31st 2009, with a Burkard Volumetric 7-Days Spore Trap. (aai.org.tr)
  • These findings showed that the concentrations of Alternaria and Cladosporium spores in Konya were affected from meteorological factors. (aai.org.tr)
  • Cladosporium spores were detected higher than Alternaria spores. (aai.org.tr)
  • Cladosporium is a genus of fungi including some of the most common indoor and outdoor molds. (wikipedia.org)
  • Several Cladosporium species are known to be hyperparasitic to rust fungi. (wikipedia.org)
  • Fungi like Cladosporium, Fusarium, Epicoccum and Aureobasidium can occur on withered grapes causing spoilage of passito wine. (univr.it)
  • The presence of keratinophilic fungi occur abundantly in the keratinophilic fungi was confirmed by sludge environment and the influence of en lowpower microscopic examination. (who.int)
  • Cladosporium fulvum, cause of tomato leaf mould, has been an important genetic model, in that the genetics of host resistance are understood. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cladosporium fulvum (syn. (bspp.org.uk)
  • Cladosporium fulvum is an asexual fungus for which no sexual stage is currently known. (bspp.org.uk)
  • The interaction between the biotrophic fungus Cladosporium fulvum (Cooke) and its only host, tomato ( Lycopersicon esculentum Miller) complies with the gene-for-gene model. (wur.nl)
  • Cladosporium is a common mold that may affect your health. (healthline.com)
  • Consider hiring a professional mold tester or company to inspect your home, as there are more dangerous black molds than cladosporium . (healthline.com)
  • It could be cladosporium, a common type of mold that can cause health issues. (pinkmold.org)
  • Cladosporium is a type of mold that can be found both indoors and outdoors. (pinkmold.org)
  • While Cladosporium is a common mold found both indoors and outdoors, it can cause health problems, especially for people with weakened immune systems or respiratory conditions. (pinkmold.org)
  • Remember, if you suspect that you have Cladosporium in your home or workplace, it's best to consult with a professional mold remediation specialist to ensure proper removal and minimize health risks. (pinkmold.org)
  • To determine if there's Cladosporium in your home, you can conduct a visual inspection for signs of mold growth. (pinkmold.org)
  • Cladosporium is a common type of mold that can grow in damp and humid environments, such as bathrooms, basements, or areas with water damage. (pinkmold.org)
  • Cladosporium is a mold often found in bathrooms, and it can be difficult to remove. (mygirlyspace.com)
  • Cladosporium is a black or green "peppery" mold that develops on the back of toilets, painted surfaces, and fiberglass air ducts. (hogsback.ca)
  • On the basis of morphological features and 18S rDNA sequences, the pathogen was identified as Cladosporium sp. (scirp.org)
  • Isolates of Cladosporium and Fusarium were ascribed to different species, of these C. ramotenellum, C. halotolerans and F. graminearum were isolated from Vitis vinifera for the first time. (univr.it)
  • For example, populations of Cladosporium cladosporioides -- a common outdoor fungus -- increased. (sciencedaily.com)
  • Cladosporium cladosporioides and Cladosporium pseudocladosporioides as potential new fungal antagonists of Puccinia horiana Henn. (wikipedia.org)
  • The airborne spores of Cladosporium species are significant allergens, and in large amounts they can severely affect people with asthma and other respiratory diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cladosporium spores were detected as 1784 (80.8%) and 42158 (91.4%) spores/m 3 in 2008 and 2009 years, respectively. (aai.org.tr)
  • In the 1960s, it was estimated that the genus Cladosporium contained around 500 plant-pathogenic and saprotrophic species, but this number has since been increased to over 772 species. (wikipedia.org)
  • Members of the Cladosporium genus are particularly important for allergy sufferers. (allergy-details.com)
  • Many species of Cladosporium are commonly found on living and dead plant material. (wikipedia.org)
  • Indoors Cladosporium species may grow on surfaces when moisture is present. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cladosporium species are often highly osmotolerant, growing easily on media containing 10% glucose or 12-17% NaCl. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cladosporium species are present in the Human mycobiome but are rarely pathogenic to humans. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cladosporium species produce no major mycotoxins of concern, but do produce volatile organic compounds (VOCs) associated with odours. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most species of Cladosporium aren't dangerous to humans. (healthline.com)
  • There are over 500 species of Cladosporium . (healthline.com)
  • So the species was identified as Cladosporium sp. (scirp.org)
  • Cladosporium" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicine's controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) . (wakehealth.edu)
  • Asthma exacerbation: Exposure to Cladosporium can worsen asthma symptoms, leading to difficulty breathing, wheezing, and chest tightness. (pinkmold.org)
  • Learn how to control Leaf Spot ( Cladosporium ) with these easy to use products! (domyown.com)
  • Health Effects: Cladosporium can cause allergic reactions in some individuals. (pinkmold.org)
  • Allergic reactions: Cladosporium can trigger allergic reactions in some individuals. (pinkmold.org)
  • BLAST search of this nucleotide sequence illustrated 99% identity with 18S rDNA sequences of several Cladosporium sp. (scirp.org)
  • Respiratory infections: In rare cases, Cladosporium can cause respiratory infections, especially in individuals with weakened immune systems. (pinkmold.org)
  • Its taxonomic disposition is supported by its DNA phylogeny, as well as the distinct scars on its conidial hila, which are typical of Passalora , and unlike Cladosporium s.s. , which has teleomorphs that reside in Davidiella , and not Mycosphaerella . (bspp.org.uk)
  • Exposure to Cladosporium affects people in different ways. (healthline.com)
  • You should be aware of the potential health risks associated with exposure to Cladosporium. (pinkmold.org)
  • Hypersensitivity pneumonitis: Prolonged exposure to Cladosporium can result in hypersensitivity pneumonitis, a condition characterized by inflammation of the lungs. (pinkmold.org)
  • Cladosporium is generally found in rugs and hardwood flooring. (hogsback.ca)
  • Reactions to Cladosporium are rare, and are usually an allergic response, but they can be potentially dangerous, causing a fungal infection in the lungs. (healthline.com)
  • infection in fresh leaves of the indigowoad rootin China, and we believe that this information will be useful for studying Cladosporium sp. (scirp.org)
  • Whether it's on walls, furniture, or other surfaces, we'll help you maintain a cladosporium-free environment for a healthier home. (pinkmold.org)
  • Appearance: Cladosporium appears as green, brown, or black spots on surfaces. (pinkmold.org)
  • A. Cladosporium leaf blotch of peony, also known as red spot or measles, is a common disease in Indiana. (purdue.edu)
  • Cladosporium may appear as brown, green, or black spots. (healthline.com)
  • The daily concentrations of Cladosporium spore in 2008 were positively correlated with daily mean temperature (r= 0.181, p= 0.045), maximum temperature (r= 0.193, p= 0.033) and wind speed (r= 0.242, p= 0.007) and whereas they were negatively correlated with relative humidity (r = -0.215, p = 0.017). (aai.org.tr)
  • strains had similar infectivity, while significant variability was observed among Cladosporium spp. (univr.it)
  • This graph shows the total number of publications written about "Cladosporium" by people in this website by year, and whether "Cladosporium" was a major or minor topic of these publications. (wakehealth.edu)
  • If you're dealing with Cladosporium, it's important to understand its characteristics and how it can affect your health. (pinkmold.org)
  • Below are the most recent publications written about "Cladosporium" by people in Profiles. (wakehealth.edu)
  • It can be difficult to identify Cladosporium in your home without professional help. (healthline.com)
  • The best choice is to find a professional to help you identify if you are dealing with Cladosporium or something else. (healthline.com)
  • Removal: If you find Cladosporium in your home, it's best to seek professional help for removal. (pinkmold.org)
  • In this article, we'll guide you through the process of cladosporium removal, giving you practical steps to take and non-toxic methods to try. (pinkmold.org)
  • Cladosporium can be removed using non-toxic methods such as vinegar, baking soda, and maintaining cleanliness, or by using effective chemical solutions recommended by professionals. (pinkmold.org)
  • What Is Cladosporium and Is It Dangerous to Your Health? (healthline.com)
  • Is Cladosporium dangerous for pregnant women? (healthline.com)
  • There is no current research to suggest that Cladosporium is dangerous to a fetus during pregnancy. (healthline.com)