A plant species of the genus CINNAMOMUM that contains CINNAMATES and has been used in traditional Chinese medicine (DRUGS, CHINESE HERBAL).
A plant genus in the LAURACEAE family. The bark of the trees is used in FOLK MEDICINE and FLAVORING AGENTS.
The tree which is known for its bark which is sold as cinnamon. The oil contains about 65-80% cinnamaldehyde and 10% EUGENOL and many TERPENES.
A tree, Cinnamomum camphora (L.) J. Presl, known as the source of CAMPHOR.
A genus in the family Myrtaceae sometimes known as "stoppers" in FOLK MEDICINE. Many species of the genus SYZYGIUM have synonymous names that begin with the Eugenia genus name.
The outer layer of the woody parts of plants.
Aromatic substances added to food before or after cooking to enhance its flavor. These are usually of vegetable origin.
An oil from flower buds of SYZYGIUM trees which contains large amounts of EUGENOL.
A cinnamate derivative of the shikamate pathway found in CLOVE OIL and other PLANTS.
Oils which evaporate readily. The volatile oils occur in aromatic plants, to which they give odor and other characteristics. Most volatile oils consist of a mixture of two or more TERPENES or of a mixture of an eleoptene (the more volatile constituent of a volatile oil) with a stearopten (the more solid constituent). The synonym essential oils refers to the essence of a plant, as its perfume or scent, and not to its indispensability.
A family of gram-negative bacteria in the order Rhodocyclales, class BETAPROTEOBACTERIA. It includes many genera previously assigned to the family PSEUDOMONADACEAE.
Concentrated pharmaceutical preparations of plants obtained by removing active constituents with a suitable solvent, which is evaporated away, and adjusting the residue to a prescribed standard.
Acrolein is an unsaturated aldehyde (C3H4O), highly reactive, toxic and naturally occurring compound that can be found in certain foods, tobacco smoke and is produced as a result of environmental pollution or industrial processes.
Chemical agents or odors that stimulate sexual desires. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
The dried seeds, bark, root, stems, buds, leaves, or fruit of aromatic plants used to season food.
A plant species of the genus PINUS which is the source of pinosylvin. It is sometimes called Scotch pine or Scots pine, which is also a common name for other species of this genus.
A plant family of the order Zingiberales, subclass Zingiberidae, class Liliopsida. It includes plants which have both flavoring and medicinal properties such as GINGER; turmeric (CURCUMA), and cardamom (ELETTARIA).
A plant genus of the family MYRTACEAE. The common name of tea tree is also used for MELALEUCA and KUNZEA.
A class in the phylum PROTEOBACTERIA comprised of chemoheterotrophs and chemoautotrophs which derive nutrients from decomposition of organic material.
A plant species in the MYRISTICACEAE family. The seed is used as a spice and used for antimicrobial and psychoactive effects. Myristicin, SAFROLE, and methyleugenol are key components.

Comparative pharmacokinetic behavior of glycyrrhetic acid after oral administration of glycyrrhizic acid and Gancao-Fuzi-Tang. (1/9)

Comparative pharmacokinetic profiles of glycyrrhetic acid (GA), glycyrrhizic acid (GL) and Gancao-Fuzi-Tang (KF) after oral administration of GL and KF were studied. Plasma samples taken from rats were acidified with acetic acid and GA was extracted with isopropanol-ethyl ether (1 : 1). Separation of GA was performed on a C(18) column with the detection wavelength set at 254 nm. The mobile phase was methanol-acetonitrile-water-acetic acid (58 : 18 : 24 : 1 v/v). The results showed that the mean residence time and area under the curve of GA in KF-administered rats were 27.6+/-1.5 h and 122.8+/-46.7 microg.h/ml respectively, which were significantly different from those in GL-administered rats (15.0+/-2.0 h and 40.9+/-9.6 microg.h/ml, respectively). The results suggest the increased effect of GA after oral administration of KF in comparison with GL.  (+info)

Cortex cinnamomi extract prevents streptozotocin- and cytokine-induced beta-cell damage by inhibiting NF-kappaB. (2/9)

AIM: To clarify the mechanism underlying the anti-diabetic activities of cortex cinnamomi extract (CCE). METHODS: To induce in vivo diabetes, mice were injected with streptozotocin (STZ) via a tail vein (100 mg STZ/kg body weight). To determine the effects of CCE, mice were administered CCE twice daily for 7 d by oral gavage starting 1 wk before the STZ injection. Blood glucose and plasma insulin concentration were measured as an index of diabetes. Also, to induce cytotoxicity of RINm5F cells, we treated with cytokines (IL-1beta (2.0 ng/mL) and IFN-gamma (100 U/mL)). Cell viability and nitric oxide production were measured colorimetrically. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA and protein expression were determined by RT-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. The activation of NF-kappaB was assayed by using gel mobility shift assays of nuclear extracts. RESULTS: Treatment of mice with STZ resulted in hyperglycemia and hypoinsulinemia, which was further evidenced by immunohistochemical staining of islets. However, the diabetogenic effects of STZ were completely prevented when mice were pretreated with CCE. The inhibitory effect of CCE on STZ-induced hyperglycemia was mediated through the suppression of iNOS expression. In rat insulinoma RINm5F cells, CCE completely protected against interleukin-1beta and interferon-gamma-mediated cytotoxicity. Moreover, RINm5F cells incubated with CCE showed significant reductions in interleukin-1beta and interferon-gamma-induced nitric oxide production and in iNOS mRNA and protein expression, and these findings correlated well with in vivo observations. CONCLUSION: The molecular mechanism by which CCE inhibits iNOS gene expression appears to involve the inhibition of NF-kappaB activation. These results reveal the possible therapeutic value of CCE for the prevention of diabetes mellitus progression.  (+info)

Cinnamomum cassia bark in two herbal formulas increases life span in Caenorhabditis elegans via insulin signaling and stress response pathways. (3/9)

 (+info)

Therapeutic effects on murine oral candidiasis by oral administration of cassia (Cinnamomum cassia) preparation. (4/9)

We examined the effects of spices and herbs on Candida albicans growth using in vitro assay and therapeutic activity of some selected herbal preparations against murine oral candidiasis. All tested samples: lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus), lemon balm (Melissa officinalis), thyme (Thymus vulgaris), rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis), roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa), green tea (Camellia sinensis), and cassia (Cinnamomum cassia) inhibited Candida mycelial growth in vitro. The results of this assay showed that the anti-Candida activity of lemongrass, green tea, and cassia is stronger than that of the other tested herbs. Oral administration of lemongrass or green tea did not result in significant improvement in the murine oral candidiasis, while the administration of cassia improved the symptoms and reduced the number of viable Candida cells in the oral cavity. The results of in vitro Candida growth assay including GC/MS analysis suggested that cinnamaldehyde in the cassia preparation was the principal component responsible for the inhibitory activity of Candida mycelial growth. These findings suggest that oral intake of a cassia preparation is a clinical candidate for a prophylactic or therapeutic tool against oral Candida infection.  (+info)

Protective effects of Cinnamomum cassia Blume in the fibrogenesis of activated HSC-T6 cells and dimethylnitrosamine-induced acute liver injury in SD rats. (5/9)

Cinnamomum cassia Blume (CC) is one of the world's oldest natural spices, and is commonly used in traditional oriental medicine. We investigated the protective effect of ethanol extract from Cinnamomum cassia Blume (CCE) on the activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). In addition, we examined the effects of CC powder in Sprague-Dawley rats with acute liver injury induced by dimethylnitrosamine (DMN). In vitro, HSC-T6 cells exhibit an activated phenotype, as reflected in their fibroblast-like morphology. CCE significantly reduced the expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA), connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta1), and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1). In vivo, the results were significantly protected by CC powder in the serum total protein, albumin, total-bilirubin, direct-bilirubin, glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT), glutamic pyruvic transaminase (GPT), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP). We suggest that CC inhibits fibrogenesis, followed by HSC-T6 cell activation and increased restoration of liver function, ultimately resulting in acute liver injury.  (+info)

Aqueous cinnamon extract (ACE-c) from the bark of Cinnamomum cassia causes apoptosis in human cervical cancer cell line (SiHa) through loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. (6/9)

 (+info)

Antioxidant activity of various parts of Cinnamomum cassia extracted with different extraction methods. (7/9)

 (+info)

Identification of compounds from the water soluble extract of Cinnamomum cassia barks and their inhibitory effects against high-glucose-induced mesangial cells. (8/9)

 (+info)

The medical definition of "Cinnamomum aromaticum" refers to the bark of the tree known as Cinnamomum cassia, which is commonly called Chinese cinnamon or Cassia cinnamon. This bark has been used in traditional medicine for various purposes, including treating gastrointestinal disorders, managing blood sugar levels, and fighting microbial infections. Some studies suggest that compounds found in Cinnamomum aromaticum, such as cinnamaldehyde, may have anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antimicrobial properties. However, more research is needed to confirm these potential health benefits and establish safe and effective dosages.

'Cinnamomum' is a genus name in the plant family Lauraceae, which includes several species of trees that are sources of cinnamon, a popular spice. The bark of these trees is dried and ground into a powder or rolled into quills, which are used to flavor food and drinks.

Two common species of Cinnamomum that are used for their aromatic bark are:

1. Cinnamomum verum (also known as Ceylon cinnamon or "true" cinnamon) - This species is native to Sri Lanka and southern India, and its bark has a sweet, delicate flavor and aroma. It contains less coumarin, a compound that can be harmful in large amounts, compared to other cinnamon species.
2. Cinnamomum cassia (also known as Chinese cinnamon or "cassia") - This species is native to southern China and Southeast Asia, and its bark has a stronger, more pungent flavor and aroma than Ceylon cinnamon. It contains higher levels of coumarin, which may pose health concerns if consumed in large quantities.

It's important to note that 'Cinnamomum' is a plant genus name and not a medical term or diagnosis. However, the spice derived from these trees, cinnamon, has been studied for its potential medicinal properties, including anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and blood sugar regulation effects. More research is needed to confirm these benefits and determine safe and effective dosages.

'Cinnamomum zeylanicum' is the botanical name for true cinnamon, also known as Sri Lanka cinnamon or Ceylon cinnamon. It is a species of tree native to Sri Lanka and southern India, which is cultivated for its aromatic bark that is used as a spice. The bark is harvested by cutting down the branches of the tree and removing the outer bark, revealing the inner bark which is then cut into lengths and left to dry. As it dries, it curls up into rolls known as quills.

True cinnamon has a lighter color, a more delicate flavor, and a less bitter taste than cassia cinnamon, which comes from a related species 'Cinnamomum cassia'. Both forms of cinnamon contain similar compounds, including cinnamaldehyde, which is responsible for their characteristic aroma and health benefits. However, true cinnamon has been found to have lower levels of coumarin, a compound that can be harmful in large amounts, making it a preferred choice for some consumers.

The medical definition of "Cinnamomum camphora" refers to the Camphor Laurel tree, a large evergreen tree native to East Asia. The tree's wood is a source of camphor, a waxy, flammable solid with a strong aroma and medicinal properties.

Camphor has been used historically in traditional medicine to treat various conditions such as respiratory infections, skin diseases, and inflammation. However, its use in modern medicine is limited due to potential toxicity and side effects. It is still used topically in some over-the-counter products like creams, ointments, and vapor rubs for temporary relief of minor aches and pains, as well as for cough suppression and nasal decongestion.

It's important to note that the use of camphor should be done with caution and under the guidance of a healthcare professional, as high concentrations or improper use can lead to serious adverse effects such as seizures, liver damage, and even death.

"Eugenia" is a term that comes from the field of genetics and refers to the practice or study of improving the genetic features of a population. The name "Eugenics" was coined by Francis Galton, a British statistician and scientist, in 1883.

The goal of eugenics is to increase the frequency of traits that are considered desirable and decrease the frequency of traits that are considered undesirable. This can be achieved through various methods, including selective breeding, genetic engineering, and population screening.

It's important to note that eugenics has a controversial history, as it was used in the past to justify forced sterilization, racial discrimination, and other human rights abuses. Today, the term "eugenics" is often associated with coercive or discriminatory practices, and its use is generally discouraged. Instead, modern genetics focuses on providing individuals with information and options for making informed decisions about their own health and reproduction.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Plant Bark" is not a term with a specific medical definition. In general, the bark refers to the outermost covering of a tree or other plant, which serves as protection and provides a barrier against external threats. It is composed of layers including the inner bark (phloem), which transports nutrients throughout the plant, and the outer bark (periderm), which is made up of dead cells that form a protective layer.

While some plants or plant parts do have medicinal properties and are used in various forms of traditional or alternative medicine, "Plant Bark" by itself does not have any specific medical connotations. If you're referring to a specific type of plant bark with potential medicinal uses, please provide more details so I can give a more accurate response.

Condiments are typically tangy or flavorful substances that are used to add taste and flavor to food. They can be in the form of sauces, pastes, spreads, or powders. Examples include ketchup, mustard, mayonnaise, soy sauce, vinegar, hot sauce, salt, pepper, and herbs & spices. Some condiments can also provide additional benefits such as added nutrients or potential health properties. However, it's important to note that some condiments can also be high in sugar, sodium, or unhealthy fats, so they should be used in moderation as part of a balanced diet.

Clove oil is a essential oil derived from the clove plant (Syzygium aromaticum), which is a member of the Myrtaceae family. It is produced by steam distillation of the dried flower buds of the plant. Clove oil is composed of several compounds, including eugenol (60-90%), eugenyl acetate, and caryophyllene.

Eugenol is the main active component in clove oil and has been found to have various medicinal properties such as analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antimicrobial effects. Clove oil has been traditionally used in dentistry for its analgesic and antibacterial properties, and it is still used today as a dental analgesic and in mouthwashes and toothpastes.

However, it's important to note that clove oil can be toxic if ingested or applied undiluted to the skin, and it should be used with caution. It should not be used during pregnancy, and it may interact with certain medications such as blood thinners. Always consult a healthcare professional before using clove oil for medicinal purposes.

Eugenol is defined in medical terms as a phenolic compound that is the main active component of oil of cloves, which is derived from the clove tree (Syzygium aromaticum). It has been used in dentistry for its analgesic and antibacterial properties. In addition, eugenol is used in perfumes, flavorings, and as a local antiseptic and anesthetic in medical applications. It's also used in some mouthwashes and toothpastes. However, it can cause allergic reactions in some people, so its use should be monitored carefully.

Volatile oils, also known as essential oils, are a type of organic compound that are naturally produced in plants. They are called "volatile" because they evaporate quickly at room temperature due to their high vapor pressure. These oils are composed of complex mixtures of various compounds, including terpenes, terpenoids, aldehydes, ketones, esters, and alcohols. They are responsible for the characteristic aroma and flavor of many plants and are often used in perfumes, flavors, and aromatherapy. In a medical context, volatile oils may have therapeutic properties and be used in certain medications or treatments, but it's important to note that they can also cause adverse reactions if not used properly.

Rhodocyclaceae is a family of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic bacteria that are commonly found in various environments such as soil, water, and the gastrointestinal tracts of animals. These bacteria are known for their ability to perform anaerobic respiration using various electron acceptors, including nitrate, sulfur compounds, and metals.

The family Rhodocyclaceae includes several genera of bacteria that have been reclassified from other families in the past few decades. Some notable genera within this family include:

* Rhodocyclus: These are aerobic, non-motile bacteria that form thick-walled cysts and are capable of using a variety of organic compounds as electron donors and acceptors for respiration.
* Dechloromonas: These are motile, gram-negative bacteria that can use chlorinated compounds as electron donors and reduce them to less harmful forms.
* Azonexus: These are aerobic, non-motile bacteria that can oxidize ammonia to nitrite and are often found in wastewater treatment plants.
* Aromatoleum: These are anaerobic, motile bacteria that can degrade aromatic compounds such as benzene and toluene.

Overall, the family Rhodocyclaceae is a diverse group of bacteria that play important roles in various biogeochemical cycles and have potential applications in bioremediation and other environmental technologies.

A plant extract is a preparation containing chemical constituents that have been extracted from a plant using a solvent. The resulting extract may contain a single compound or a mixture of several compounds, depending on the extraction process and the specific plant material used. These extracts are often used in various industries including pharmaceuticals, nutraceuticals, cosmetics, and food and beverage, due to their potential therapeutic or beneficial properties. The composition of plant extracts can vary widely, and it is important to ensure their quality, safety, and efficacy before use in any application.

Acrolein is an unsaturated aldehyde with the chemical formula CH2CHCHO. It is a colorless liquid that has a distinct unpleasant odor and is highly reactive. Acrolein is produced by the partial oxidation of certain organic compounds, such as glycerol and fatty acids, and it is also found in small amounts in some foods, such as coffee and bread.

Acrolein is a potent irritant to the eyes, nose, and throat, and exposure to high levels can cause coughing, wheezing, and shortness of breath. It has been shown to have toxic effects on the lungs, heart, and nervous system, and prolonged exposure has been linked to an increased risk of cancer.

In the medical field, acrolein is sometimes used as a laboratory reagent or as a preservative for biological specimens. However, due to its potential health hazards, it must be handled with care and appropriate safety precautions should be taken when working with this compound.

Aphrodisiacs are substances that are believed to stimulate sexual desire or increase sexual pleasure. They can come in various forms, including foods, drinks, and medications. Some claimed aphrodisiacs include oysters, chocolate, certain herbs like ginseng and gingko biloba, as well as drugs such as Viagra. However, it's important to note that the effectiveness of most aphrodisiacs is not supported by scientific evidence, and some may even have harmful side effects if misused or taken in large quantities.

It's always recommended to consult with a healthcare professional before taking any substances for sexual purposes.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "spices" is not a term that has a medical definition. Spices are typically defined in the context of food and cooking as dried parts of plants (such as seeds, bark, or roots) used to add flavor or aroma to dishes. If you have any questions related to nutrition or dietary habits and their potential impact on health, I would be happy to try to help with those!

"Pinus sylvestris" is the scientific name for a species of tree, not a medical term. It is commonly known as the Scotch Pine or Scots Pine and is native to Eurasia, ranging from Western Europe to Eastern Siberia. The tree can also be found in other parts of the world as an introduced species.

Here's some information about Pinus sylvestris that you might find interesting:
* Pinus sylvestris is a coniferous evergreen tree that typically grows to a height of 30-40 meters (98-131 feet) but can reach up to 60 meters (197 feet) in some cases.
* The bark of the tree is thick, scaly, and orange-reddish in color, while the leaves are needle-shaped, green, and grow in clusters of two.
* Pinus sylvestris produces both male and female cones, with the male cones releasing pollen and the female cones producing seeds.
* The tree is an important source of timber and is commonly used for construction, pulp and paper production, and as a Christmas tree.
* Pinus sylvestris has several medicinal uses, including as a treatment for respiratory conditions such as bronchitis and asthma, as well as for skin conditions like eczema and psoriasis. The needles and bark of the tree contain compounds with anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and antioxidant properties that are believed to be responsible for these therapeutic effects.

Zingiberaceae is not a medical term, but a taxonomic category in botany. It refers to the family of flowering plants that includes ginger, turmeric, and cardamom, among others. These plants are native to warm and tropical regions, primarily in Asia. Some species of Zingiberaceae have been used in traditional medicine for various purposes, such as treating digestive issues or inflammation. However, the specific medicinal properties and uses of each plant depend on the species and may vary. Therefore, it is important to consult with a healthcare professional before using any herbal remedies.

Leptospermum is a genus of flowering plants in the myrtle family, Myrtaceae. It includes around 80 species of shrubs and small trees that are native to Australia and Southeast Asia. The plants are commonly known as tea trees due to their aromatic leaves which have been used to make a medicinal tea.

The essential oil derived from some species of Leptospermum, particularly Leptospermum scoparium (Manuka), has antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties. This oil is used in various medical and therapeutic applications, such as in the treatment of wounds, burns, and skin infections.

However, it's important to note that not all Leptospermum species have medicinal properties, and the use of this plant and its derivatives should be done under the guidance of a healthcare professional.

Betaproteobacteria is a class of proteobacteria, a group of gram-negative bacteria. This class includes several genera of bacteria that are widely distributed in the environment, and can be found in soil, water, and various organisms including humans. Some members of Betaproteobacteria are important pathogens, causing diseases such as meningitis, pneumonia, and urinary tract infections. Other members of this class are capable of breaking down environmental pollutants, making them useful in bioremediation applications.

'Myristica fragrans' is not a medical term itself, but it refers to a plant species also known as the nutmeg tree. In medicine and pharmacology, its main active components, such as myristicin and elemicin, have been studied for their potential medicinal properties. Myristicin has been explored for its possible antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and neuroprotective effects, while elemicin has shown promise in research related to its potential analgesic (pain-relieving) and anti-inflammatory properties. However, it is essential to note that these compounds are present only in small quantities within the nutmeg seeds and should not be used as a primary source of medication without proper medical supervision.

Cinnamomum aromaticum Nees, syn. Cinnamomum cassia Nees ex Blume) ISO 3217:1974 Oil of lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus) ISO ... f. et Thomson, forma macrophylla) ISO 3524:2003 Oil of cinnamon leaf, Sri Lanka type (Cinnamomum zeylanicum Blume) ISO 3525: ... Eugenia caryophyllus (Sprengel) Bullock et S. Harrison] ISO 3142:1997 Oil of clove buds [Syzygium aromaticum (L.) Merr. et ... Eugenia caryophyllus (Sprengel) Bullock et S. Harrison] ISO 3143:1997 Oil of clove stems [Syzygium aromaticum (L.) Merr. et ...
The larvae feed on Cinnamomum verum, Cinnamomum camphora, Syzygium aromaticum and Litsea glutinosa. They live in a silken web, ...
Cinnamon Cinnamomum aromaticum (Cassia) Japanese cinnamon Malabathrum Saigon cinnamon Pan, F.J. (1998). "Cinnamomum osmophloeum ... One of the aborigines of Taiwan, the Tsou called the soil Cinnamomum osmophloeum as Nigi. Cinnamomum osmophloeum is recognized ... Cinnamomum osmophloeum, commonly known as pseudocinnamomum or indigenous cinnamon, is a medium-sized evergreen tree in the ... Wang SY, Yang CW, Liao JW, Zhen WW, Chu FH, Chang ST (August 2008). "Essential oil from leaves of Cinnamomum osmophloeum acts ...
"Syzygium aromaticum (L.) Merr. and L.M. Perry". Kew Science, Plants of the World Online. 2021. Retrieved 28 February 2021. " ... Wikisource has the text of the 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica article "Cloves". Cinnamomum cassia Gallic acid Insect repellent ... "Syzygium aromaticum". Plants for a Future. (Articles containing Ancient Greek (to 1453)-language text, Articles with short ... Cloves are the aromatic flower buds of a tree in the family Myrtaceae, Syzygium aromaticum (/sɪˈzɪdʒiːəm ˌærəˈmætɪkəm/). They ...
Cinnamomum verum Clove - Syzygium aromaticum Clover - Trifolium spp. Coakum - Phytolacca americana Coconut - Cocos nucifera ...
Cassia - Cinnamomum aromaticum, called cassia or Chinese cinnamon, is an evergreen tree native to southern China, Bangladesh, ... Limnophila aromatica (rice paddy herb) - Limnophila aromatica is a tropical flowering plant in the plantain family, ... Camphor - Cinnamomum camphora is a large evergreen tree that grows up to 20-30 metres tall. Caraway - also known as meridian ... Cinnamon - spice obtained from the inner bark of several trees from the genus Cinnamomum that is used in both sweet and savoury ...
Cinnamomum aromaticum, from the form of a roll or quill which it assumed in drying, and was later transferred to the West ...
... nutmeg Cinnamomum verum - cinnamon (bark) Cinnamomum aromaticum - cassia (bark) Syzygium aromaticum - clove Foeniculum vulgare ...
Cinnamomum aromaticum) Cayenne pepper (Capsicum annuum) Celery leaf (Apium graveolens) Celery seed (Apium graveolens) Chervil ( ... Cinnamomum burmannii, Cassia vera) Cinnamon, Saigon or Vietnamese (Cinnamomum loureiroi) Cinnamon, true or Ceylon (Cinnamomum ... thyrsiflora) Bay leaf (Laurus nobilis) Bay leaf, Indian; tejpat, malabathrum (Cinnamomum tamala) Bay leaf, Indonesian; ... Limnophila aromatica) (Vietnam) Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) Rue (Ruta graveolens) Safflower (Carthamus tinctorius), only ...
... cinnamomum MeSH B06.388.100.590.149.124 - cinnamomum aromaticum MeSH B06.388.100.590.149.249 - cinnamomum camphora MeSH B06.388 ... 149.500 - cinnamomum zeylanicum MeSH B06.388.100.590.177 - cryptocarya MeSH B06.388.100.590.399 - laurus MeSH B06.388.100.590. ...
... with the exception of postmenopausal patients studied using Cinnamomum aromaticum. Cinnamtannin B1 possesses multiple phenolic ... 2005). "Antidiabetic effect of Cinnamomum cassia and Cinnamomum zeylanicum In vivo and In vitro". Phytotherapy Research. 19 (3 ... "A proanthocyanidin from Cinnamomum zeylanicum stimulates phosphorylation of insulin receptor in 3T3-L1 adipocyties" (PDF). ... Cinnamtannin B1 is a condensed tannin found in Cinnamomum verum. It falls under the category of type A proanthocyanidin. ...
Cinnamomum zeylanicum (cinnamon), Cinnamomum aromaticum (cassia) Leaves: Teucrium scordium (water germander), Fraxinus ... Syzygium aromaticum (clove), Canary Island wine, Agaricus fruiting bodies Gums, oils and resins: Acaciae (acacia), Styrax ...
... with the addition of Cinnamomum aromaticum (肉桂) and Astragalus propinquus (黃芪) Egg drop soup is a light Chinese soup. Ginseng ...
Zenner L, Callait MP, Granier C, Chauve C: In vitro effect of essential oils from Cinnamomum aromaticum, citrus lemon and ...
... angustitepalum Cinnamomum appelianum Cinnamomum archboldianum Cinnamomum arfakense Cinnamomum aromaticum - Chinese ... Cinnamomum lawang Cinnamomum ledermannii Cinnamomum liangii Cinnamomum ligneum Cinnamomum lineatum Cinnamomum lioui Cinnamomum ... Cinnamomum baileyanum Cinnamomum baillonii Cinnamomum balansae Cinnamomum bamoense Cinnamomum beccarii Cinnamomum bejolghota ... Cinnamomum asomicum Cinnamomum assamicum Cinnamomum aubletii Cinnamomum aureofulvum Cinnamomum auricolor Cinnamomum ...
Cinnamomum aromaticum), or else one of the species endemic to the Indian subcontinent (Cinnamomum tamala, or Cinnamomum ... Cinnamomum zeylanicum). The Persian loanword is, itself, borrowed from the Hindi, dālacīnī (Cinnamomum cassia). Rabbi Avraham ... 259-260 Not to be confused with what is called in modern Hebrew, Ṣippōren or what is known as cloves (Syzygium aromaticum). ... Cinnamomum zeylanicum) was also compounded in the incense offering, but it was known by the Sages under the name of "Qelufah ...
Cinnamomum verum) Cloves (Karanfil) (Syzygium aromaticum) Coconut (Hindistan cevizi) (Cocos nucifera) Coriander (Kişniş) ( ...
Dighe VV, Gursale AA, Sane RT, Menon S, Patel PH (2005). "Quantitative Determination of Eugenol from Cinnamomum tamala Nees and ... The currently accepted name is Syzygium aromaticum. The biosynthesis of eugenol begins with the amino acid tyrosine. L-tyrosine ... Cortés Rojas DF, de Souza CR, Oliveira WP (February 2014). "Clove (Syzygium aromaticum): a precious spice". Asian Pacific ... Eugenol naturally occurs in numerous plants, including the following: Cloves (Syzygium aromaticum) Wormwood[citation needed] ...
Bombax ceiba Boswellia serrata Carica papaya Cinnamomum verum Citrus Cocos nucifera Diospyros suaveolens Dryobalanops aromatica ...
Garcinia (Garcinia gummi-gutta) Black pepper (Piper nigrum) Ginger (Zingiber officinale) Clove (Syzygium aromaticum) Cardamom ( ... Elettaria cardamomum') Nutmeg (Myristica fragrans) Turmeric (Curcuma longa) Cinnamon (Cinnamomum verum) Paprika (Capsicum ...
... exalaticin Cinnamomum oliveri, safrole, Oliver's Cinnamon Cymbopogon refractus, Barbed wire grass Doryphora sassafras, safrole ... Doryphora aromatica, safrole Eucalyptus dives, piperitone chemovar, Peppermint Gum Eucalyptus globulus, cineole chemovar, ...
The 2010 FDA document listed notoginseng (Panax pseudoginseng) root, borneol crystal from Dryobalanops aromatica, Boea ... camphor crystal from Cinnamomum camphora, and peppermint (Menta haplocalyx) leaves as active ingredients in Yunnan Baiyao ...
The camphor tree (Cinnamomum camphora) produces an essential oil and the eucalyptus tree (Eucalyptus globulus) is the main ... Syzygium aromaticum). Many trees have flowers rich in nectar which are attractive to bees. The production of forest honey is an ... These include cinnamon, made from the bark of the cinnamon tree (Cinnamomum zeylanicum) and allspice, the dried small fruits of ...
Cinnamomum burmannii) Flowers Ilang-ilang Ylang ylang (Cananga odorata) Melati Jasmine (Jasminum sambac) Rumput Alang-alang ( ... Zingiber zerumbet or Zingiber aromaticum) Lengkuas or Laos Greater Galangal (Alpinia galanga) Temulawak (Curcuma xanthorrhiza) ...
Cinnamomum zeylanicum) [6.9-11.1%] Malabathrum (Cinnamomum tamala) [25.3%] Ylang-ylang (Cananga odorata) [3.1-10.7%] Copaiba ... Syzygium aromaticum) [1.7-19.5% of clove bud essential oil] Hops (Humulus lupulus) [5.1-14.5%] Basil (Ocimum spp.) [5.3-10.5% O ... Cinnamomum zeylanicum Blume)". Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture. 83 (1): 53-55. Bibcode:2003JSFA...83...53K. doi: ... Syzygium aromaticum L.)". BioResources. 2 (2): 265-269. doi:10.15376/biores.2.2.265-269. Wang, Guodong; Tian, Li; Aziz, Naveed ...
Wintera aromatica is now known as Drimys winteri and is in the family Winteraceae. The family Canellaceae was established by ... Three of these are now in Cinnamomum, and the fourth, which he called Laurus winterana, consisted of what are now Canella ... In 1737, in his Hortus Cliffortianus, Linnaeus combined Canella with Drimys, a genus now in Winteraceae, and Cinnamomum, now in ... the constituent species of which were Canella alba and Wintera aromatica. The name Canella alba was validated by Murray in 1784 ...
It is found in the wood of the camphor laurel (Cinnamomum camphora), a large evergreen tree found in East Asia; and in the ... This port traded in camphor extracted from the Borneo camphor trees (Dryobalanops aromatica) that were abundant in the region. ...
Cinnamomum mercadoi (kalingag) Cinnamomum parthenoxylon (saffron laurel) Cycas rumphii (queen sago palm) Cycas scratchleyana ... panax) Saccharum edule Setaria palmifolia Syzygium aromaticum (clove) Syzygium polyanthum (Indonesian bay leaf) Anacolosa ... Cinnamomum tamala) Lemongrass (Cymbopogon flexuosus) Neem (Azadirachta Indica) Ashwagandha Shatamull (Asparagus racemosus) ... Clymenia platypoda Clymenia polyandra Corynocarpus cribbianus Cryptocarya aromatica Cucumis sativus (cucumber) Dillenia ...
Endemic Cinnamomum dubium - Endemic Cinnamomum ovalifolium - Endemic Cinnamomum verum - N Cryptocarya wightiana - N Litsea ... N Syzygium aromaticum - I Syzygium assimile - N Syzygium caryophyllatum - N Syzygium cordifolium - Endemic Syzygium cumini - N ...
percoriacea Cinnamomum camphora Cinnamomum caudatum Cinnamomum iners Cinnamomum longipetiolatum Cryptocarya amygdalina Lindera ... Colocasia esculenta Colocasia fallax Colocasia gigantea Epipremnum giganteum Hapaline benthamiana Homalomena aromatica ... siamensis Turpinia pomifera Knema laurina Cinnamomum iners Baccaurea ramiflora A common deciduous understory tree: Bauhinia ...
Cinnamomum aromaticum/Cinnamomum loureiroi avec mynaturalorigins.shop, la e-platform B2B des ingrédients naturels bio, ...
Cinnamomum aromaticum Nees, syn. Cinnamomum cassia Nees ex Blume) ISO 3217:1974 Oil of lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus) ISO ... f. et Thomson, forma macrophylla) ISO 3524:2003 Oil of cinnamon leaf, Sri Lanka type (Cinnamomum zeylanicum Blume) ISO 3525: ... Eugenia caryophyllus (Sprengel) Bullock et S. Harrison] ISO 3142:1997 Oil of clove buds [Syzygium aromaticum (L.) Merr. et ... Eugenia caryophyllus (Sprengel) Bullock et S. Harrison] ISO 3143:1997 Oil of clove stems [Syzygium aromaticum (L.) Merr. et ...
Cinnamon. Cassia cinnamon, or Cinnamomum aromaticum, is a popular spice used in cooking worldwide. Animal and in vitro studies ...
1 oz (Cinnamomum aromaticum). Black Pepper. Powder, 1 oz (Piper nigrum). About Us. *Company History ...
Cut, 16 oz (Cinnamomum aromaticum). Chicory Root. Roasted, Cut, 4 oz (Cichorium intybus) ...
Cinnamon bark (Cinnamomum aromaticum) 44%. ~~ Nutmeg seed (Myristica fragrans) 22%. , Lavender flower [essential oil] ( ...
Cinnamon bark (Cinnamomum aromaticum) O. Additional Ingredients:. Certified organic vegetable glycerin & distilled water. Non- ...
Cinnamon (Bark) (Cinnamomum verum and/or Cinnamomum aromaticum and/or Cinnamomum burmannii). 1.2g. †. ...
Originating from Indonesia, our Cinnamomum burmanni chips have a spicy flavor and are great for cooking or in potpourri. ... Cinnamomum aromaticum is native to China, growing wild in the southern mountains, whereas C. burmannii is native to Indonesia. ... Cinnamomum sp. appears in recorded history dating back to at least 1,700 years B.C.E where it was a component of embalming ... As C. aromaticum is native to China, it has been used there extensively for thousands of years in TCM (traditional Chinese ...
Cassia, or cinnamomum aromaticum. Cassia is usually sold as cinnamon in the United States. Recipes calling for cinnamon can use ... Ceylon cinnamon comes from the crumbly inner bark of the cinnamomum zeylanicum tree, and its flavor is sweet and delicate. It ... Saigon cinnamon, or cinnamomum loureiroi. Saigon cinnamon is the most prized member of the Cassia family. It has a full, ... Ceylon cinnamon, or "true cinnamon," or cinnamomum zeylanicum. ...
Cinnamomum aromaticum Bark Extract. Bitter Melon Fruit Extract. Gymnema Leaf Extract. Holy Basil Leaf Extract. ...
Cassia Bark (cinnamomum aromaticum) - 15 mg. Coenzyme Q10 (ubiquinone) - 15 mg. Licorice Root Extract (4:1) - 10 mg. Black ...
Cinnamomum aromaticumor C. cassia) is related to real cinnamon (Cinnamomum verum or C. zeylanicum). Both trees are indigenous ... Cloves are the unopened flower buds of the Syzygium aromaticum, a plant that originally only grew on the Maluku Islands (the ...
Cassia cinnamon (Cinnamomum aromaticum -Stem bark/Écorce du tronc) 5:1 DHE 350 mg.... 70 mg ...
Proprietary Blend: Fenugreek Seed Extract (4:1), Cinnamomum aromaticum Bark Extract (8% flavonoids), Bitter Melon Fruit Extract ...
Signature Bliss - Jojoba Oil (Simmondsia chinensis), Clove (Syzgium aromaticum), Cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum), Lemon ( ... Signature Bliss - Jojoba Oil (Simmondsia chinensis), Clove (Syzgium aromaticum), Cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum), Lemon ( ... Signature Peaceful - Jojoba Oil (Simmondsia chinensis), Sweet Orange (Citrus sinensis), Camphor (Cinnamomum camphora), Cananga ... Signature Peaceful - Jojoba Oil (Simmondsia chinensis), Sweet Orange (Citrus sinensis), Camphor (Cinnamomum camphora), Cananga ...
Cassia Bark (Crushed) - Cinnamomum aromaticum. £5.50. Add to basket + View Product * Cassia Bark (Quills) - Cinnamomum ...
Cinnamon (Cinnamomum aromaticum) Bark. Extract standardized to 8% flavonoids (8 mg). 100 mg. **. ...
Actividad repelente in vitro de los aceites esenciales de Syzygium Aromaticum Clavo de olor y Cinnamomum Verum Canela sobre ... El objetivo del presente trabajo fue evaluar la actividad repelente in vitro de los aceites esenciales del Syzygium aromaticum ... SubjectAceite esencial (1)Aedes aegypti (1)Cinnamomum verum (1) Concentración (1) ... "clavo de olor" y Cinnamomum verum "canela" y la combinación de ambos aceites 50/50 v/v sobre ... ...
Cinnamomum aromaticum. 5. + 232. Maytenus. 5. + 233. Houttuynia. 5. + 234. Phyllanthus. 5. + ...
Cinnamomum. FooDB. *FooDB Cinnamomum aromaticum. FooDB. *FooDB Cinnamomum verum. FooDB. *FooDB Cirsium. FooDB. *FooDB ...
Cinnamomum burmanii. 162.500. 585.000. Kayu Manis Cina / Cassia Oil. Cinnamomum aromaticum. 56.500 ...
cinnamomum aromaticum. Yes. species. eukaryota. plants. species. 119260. click here. cinnamomum verum. Yes. species. eukaryota ...
Cinnamomum aromaticum Bark. 300 mg. †. Cinnamomum spp.. 100 mg. †. Bark Extract. †Daily Value not established.. ...
Suppression of Inflammatory and Fibrotic Signals by Cinnamon (Cinnamomum cassia) and Cinnamaldehyde in Cyclophosphamide-Induced ...
Cinnamomum verum J.S. Presl Laurus cinnamomum L. Cinnamomum aromaticum Nees C. cassia Nees ex Blume ... This is pure Ceylon cinnamon ( Cinnamomum zeylanicum or Cinnamomum verum ) which is native to the island of Sri Lanka. Ceylon ... The real or Ceylon cinnamon, Cinnamomum zeylanicum Blume (syn. Cinnamomum verum Berchthold & Presl), and seven additional ... Cinnamomum is a genus with approximately 250 aromatic species, most of which are found in Asia and Australia. Many of these ...
Cinnamomum aromaticum2. *. Citrón16. *. Citrónová kôra2. *. Citrónová tráva7. *. Citrus7. ...
Cinnamon (Cinnamomum Aromaticum) Fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum) Gymnema sylvestre Extract Inositol Lipoic Acid Quercetin ... Cinnamon Extract (Cinnamomi cassia 20:1, Cinnulin PF) 100 mg Alpha R Lipoic Acid 50 mg Inositol 60 mg Rutin 50 mg Bilberry ...
Cinnamomum aromaticum 17% * Distillation 15% * Syzygium 15% * Plant Extracts 11% 48 Scopus citations ...
Flavonoids Cinnamomum aromaticum Bark 100 mg Suggested Use: 1 to 2 tablets or capsules daily, after meals. ... Now available in vegetarian capsules! Supplement Facts 2 vegi capsules contain: Cinnamomum aromaticum 300 mg Bark Extract 10:1 ... Cinnamomum aromaticum 300 mg. Bark Extract 10:1, Yielding 8% Flavonoids. Cinnamomum aromaticum Bark 100 mg ...
  • f. et Thomson, forma macrophylla) ISO 3524:2003 Oil of cinnamon leaf, Sri Lanka type (Cinnamomum zeylanicum Blume) ISO 3525:2008 Oil of amyris (Amyris balsamifera L.) ISO 3526:2005 Oil of sage, Spanish (Salvia lavandulifolia Vahl) ISO 3527:2016 Essential oil of parsley fruits (Petroselinum sativum Hoffm. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ceylon cinnamon comes from the crumbly inner bark of the cinnamomum zeylanicum tree, and its flavor is sweet and delicate. (durangodowntown.com)
  • Also known as 'Chinese cinnamon', and indeed, cassia ( Cinnamomum aromaticum or C. cassia ) is related to real cinnamon ( Cinnamomum verum or C. zeylanicum ). (coquinaria.nl)
  • This is pure Ceylon cinnamon ( Cinnamomum zeylanicum or Cinnamomum verum ) which is native to the island of Sri Lanka. (cylonies.com)
  • The real or Ceylon cinnamon, Cinnamomum zeylanicum Blume (syn. (cylonies.com)
  • Cinnamomum zeylanicum ), clove bud EO* (Syzygium aromaticum), ginger root EO* ( Zingiber officinale ) & hemp extract. (spiritoftheherbsdenver.com)
  • Cinnamomum verum J. Presl, Cinnamomum zeylanicum Nees എന്നീ പ്രധാനപ്പെട്ട ജനുസ്സുകൾ കൂടാതെ ലോറേഷ്യേ എന്ന ഇതിന്റെ കുടുംബത്തിൽ 300 ഓളം വിവിധ ജനുസ്സുകൾ ഉണ്ട്. (wikipedia.org)
  • Actividad repelente in vitro de los aceites esenciales de Syzygium Aromaticum Clavo de olor y Cinnamomum Verum Canela sobre Aedes Aegypti. (edu.pe)
  • Cinnamomum verum Berchthold & Presl), and seven additional cinnamon species are native to Sri Lanka. (cylonies.com)
  • Ceylon cinnamon comes from a tree called Cinnamomum verum. (supplemented.co.uk)
  • Cinnamomum verum (Ceylon cinnamon) and Cinnamomum aromaticum (Cassia cinnamon or Chinese cinnamon) are commonly used. (supplemented.co.uk)
  • Ceylon cinnamon, or Cinnamomum verum, comes from a small tree native to Sri Lanka. (supplemented.co.uk)
  • Eugenia caryophyllus (Sprengel) Bullock et S. Harrison] ISO 3142:1997 Oil of clove buds [Syzygium aromaticum (L.) Merr. (wikipedia.org)
  • Eugenia caryophyllus (Sprengel) Bullock et S. Harrison] ISO 3143:1997 Oil of clove stems [Syzygium aromaticum (L.) Merr. (wikipedia.org)
  • and clove ( Syzygium aromaticum ) to infuse your home with classic aromas of the season. (theherbalacademy.com)
  • Signature Peaceful - Jojoba Oil (Simmondsia chinensis), Sweet Orange (Citrus sinensis), Camphor (Cinnamomum camphora), Cananga (Cananga odorata var. (pspbuddies.com)
  • ISO 3216:1997 Oil of cassia, Chinese type (Cinnamomum aromaticum Nees, syn. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ceylon cinnamon (Cinnamomum Zylanicum) is an aromatic evergreen tree native to Sri Lanka. (ceylongoodness.com)
  • Cinnamomum aromaticum - and it's related to the better known spice cinnamon. (blogspot.com)
  • As C. aromaticum is native to China, it has been used there extensively for thousands of years in TCM (traditional Chinese medicine). (mountainroseherbs.com)
  • Cinnamomum aromaticum is native to China, growing wild in the southern mountains, whereas C. burmannii is native to Indonesia. (mountainroseherbs.com)
  • This Holiday Stovetop Potpourri recipe features warming scents, like orange, cinnamon ( Cinnamomum spp. (theherbalacademy.com)
  • 2. Cassia cinnamon or Chinese cinnamon (Cinnamomum aromaticum), which originates from southern China, is typically less expensive than Ceylon cinnamon. (healthworks.com)
  • This bush should not be confused with the Cassia tree (CINNAMOMUM). (bvsalud.org)
  • Cinnamomum aromaticum (CC): Also known as Cinnamon cassia, or "Chinese cinnamon. (sunshinentc.com)
  • A plant species of the genus CINNAMOMUM that contains CINNAMATES and has been used in traditional Chinese medicine ( DRUGS, CHINESE HERBAL ). (nih.gov)
  • Answer: Cinnamon is a spice that comes from the branches of wild trees that belong to the genus 'Cinnamomum' - native to the Caribbean, South America, and Southeast Asia. (healthworks.com)
  • Soy Lecithin (non-GMO, certified organic), Cassia (Cinnamomum aromaticum) (bark) certified organic powder, Apple (Malus pumila) pectin cellulose powder, Licorice (Glycyrrhiza echinata) (root) powder. (neurobiologix.com)
  • Cassia cinnamon (Cinnamomum aromaticum), grown in southeastern Asia, is the most common type sold in North America. (nih.gov)
  • Cassia cinnamon, or Cinnamomum aromaticum, can contain high levels of coumarin, a natural blood thinner. (naturalhealth365.com)