Ammonium Hydroxide: The hydroxy salt of ammonium ion. It is formed when AMMONIA reacts with water molecules in solution.Food Packaging: Containers, packaging, and packaging materials for processed and raw foods and beverages. It includes packaging intended to be used for storage and also used for preparation of foods such as microwave food containers versus COOKING AND EATING UTENSILS. Packaging materials may be intended for food contact or designated non-contact, for example, shipping containers. FOOD LABELING is also available.Food Technology: The application of knowledge to the food industry.Vitis: A plant genus in the family VITACEAE, order Rhamnales, subclass Rosidae. It is a woody vine cultivated worldwide. It is best known for grapes, the edible fruit and used to make WINE and raisins.Meat: The edible portions of any animal used for food including domestic mammals (the major ones being cattle, swine, and sheep) along with poultry, fish, shellfish, and game.Fruit: The fleshy or dry ripened ovary of a plant, enclosing the seed or seeds.United States Department of Agriculture: A cabinet department in the Executive Branch of the United States Government concerned with improving and maintaining farm income and developing and expanding markets for agricultural products. Through inspection and grading services it safeguards and insures standards of quality in food supply and production.Consumer Satisfaction: Customer satisfaction or dissatisfaction with a benefit or service received.Food Preservatives: Substances capable of inhibiting, retarding or arresting the process of fermentation, acidification or other deterioration of foods.Food Handling: Any aspect of the operations in the preparation, processing, transport, storage, packaging, wrapping, exposure for sale, service, or delivery of food.Vacuum: A space in which the pressure is far below atmospheric pressure so that the remaining gases do not affect processes being carried on in the space.Blueberry Plant: Several plant species of the genus VACCINIUM known for the edible blueberry fruit.Meat-Packing Industry: The aggregate enterprise of technically producing packaged meat.Anthocyanins: A group of FLAVONOIDS derived from FLAVONOLS, which lack the ketone oxygen at the 4-position. They are glycosylated versions of cyanidin, pelargonidin or delphinidin. The conjugated bonds result in blue, red, and purple colors in flowers of plants.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Rosaceae: The rose plant family in the order ROSALES and class Magnoliopsida. They are generally woody plants. A number of the species of this family contain cyanogenic compounds.Ribes: A plant genus of the family GROSSULARIACEAE. GAMMA-LINOLENIC ACID is obtained from the black currant oil of the seeds.Taste: The ability to detect chemicals through gustatory receptors in the mouth, including those on the TONGUE; the PALATE; the PHARYNX; and the EPIGLOTTIS.Viburnum: A plant genus in the family CAPRIFOLIACEAE. The common name derives from its traditional use for menstrual cramps. It is a source of viburnine, valerianic acid, vibsanin, and ursolic acid. Note that true cranberry is VACCINIUM MACROCARPON.Fragaria: A plant genus of the family ROSACEAE known for the edible fruit.Random Allocation: A process involving chance used in therapeutic trials or other research endeavor for allocating experimental subjects, human or animal, between treatment and control groups, or among treatment groups. It may also apply to experiments on inanimate objects.Lycium: A plant genus of the family SOLANACEAE. Members contain CEREBROSIDES and SCOPOLETIN.Lonicera: A plant genus of the family CAPRIFOLIACEAE. Members contain iridoid glucosides.Muscle, Skeletal: A subtype of striated muscle, attached by TENDONS to the SKELETON. Skeletal muscles are innervated and their movement can be consciously controlled. They are also called voluntary muscles.Vaccinium: A plant genus of the family ERICACEAE known for species with edible fruits.Proanthocyanidins: Dimers and oligomers of flavan-3-ol units (CATECHIN analogs) linked mainly through C4 to C8 bonds to leucoanthocyanidins. They are structurally similar to ANTHOCYANINS but are the result of a different fork in biosynthetic pathways.Body Composition: The relative amounts of various components in the body, such as percentage of body fat.Flavonols: A group of 3-hydroxy-4-keto-FLAVONOIDS.Plant Extracts: Concentrated pharmaceutical preparations of plants obtained by removing active constituents with a suitable solvent, which is evaporated away, and adjusting the residue to a prescribed standard.Hippophae: A plant genus of the family ELAEAGNACEAE. Linoleic (18:2n-6) and alpha-linolenic acids (18:3n-3) comprised about 70% of seed oil fatty acids. This is unrelated to 'artificial sea buckthorn oil'. This genus does not belong to the buckthorn family (RHAMNACEAE).Coffea: A plant genus of the family RUBIACEAE. It is best known for the COFFEE beverage prepared from the beans (SEEDS).Wine: Fermented juice of fresh grapes or of other fruit or plant products used as a beverage.Vaccinium macrocarpon: A plant species of the family VACCINIUM known for the sour fruit which is sometimes used for urinary tract infections.Ellagic Acid: A fused four ring compound occurring free or combined in galls. Isolated from the kino of Eucalyptus maculata Hook and E. Hemipholia F. Muell. Activates Factor XII of the blood clotting system which also causes kinin release; used in research and as a dye.Gene Expression Regulation, Plant: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in plants.Hydrolyzable Tannins: Polymeric derivatives of GALLIC ACID that are esters of a sugar.Actinidia: A plant species of the family ACTINIDIACEAE, order Theales.Myrtus: A plant genus of the family MYRTACEAE. Members contain PHYTOHEMAGGLUTININS.Rosales: An order of the ANGIOSPERMS, subclass Rosidae. Its members include some of the most known ornamental and edible plants of temperate zones including roses, apples, cherries, and peaches.Plant Proteins: Proteins found in plants (flowers, herbs, shrubs, trees, etc.). The concept does not include proteins found in vegetables for which VEGETABLE PROTEINS is available.Polyphenols: A large class of organic compounds having more than one PHENOL group.Phytotherapy: Use of plants or herbs to treat diseases or to alleviate pain.Flavonoids: A group of phenyl benzopyrans named for having structures like FLAVONES.Freeze Drying: Method of tissue preparation in which the tissue specimen is frozen and then dehydrated at low temperature in a high vacuum. This method is also used for dehydrating pharmaceutical and food products.Weevils: BEETLES in the family Curculionidae and the largest family in the order COLEOPTERA. They have a markedly convex shape and many are considered pests.Elaeagnaceae: A plant family of the order Rhamnales, subclass Rosidae class Magnoliopsida. The plants have a characteristic silvery or rusty-colored sheen, caused by tiny distinctive scales. Flowers have a tubular structure of four sepals. Root nodules host the Frankia (ACTINOMYCETES) nitrogen-fixing symbionts.Phenols: Benzene derivatives that include one or more hydroxyl groups attached to the ring structure.Xylem: Plant tissue that carries water up the root and stem. Xylem cell walls derive most of their strength from LIGNIN. The vessels are similar to PHLOEM sieve tubes but lack companion cells and do not have perforated sides and pores.Genes, Plant: The functional hereditary units of PLANTS.Crataegus: A genus in the family ROSACEAE of shrubs and small trees native to the North Temperate Zone. It is best known for a traditional medication for the heart.Carbohydrate Metabolism: Cellular processes in biosynthesis (anabolism) and degradation (catabolism) of CARBOHYDRATES.p-Chloromercuribenzoic Acid: An organic mercurial used as a sulfhydryl reagent.Plant Epidermis: A thin layer of cells forming the outer integument of seed plants and ferns. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Antioxidants: Naturally occurring or synthetic substances that inhibit or retard the oxidation of a substance to which it is added. They counteract the harmful and damaging effects of oxidation in animal tissues.Pimenta: A plant genus in the family MYRTACEAE, order Myrtales, subclass Rosidae. It is best known for allspice from the dried berry of Pimenta diocia.Solanum: A plant genus of the family SOLANACEAE. Members contain SOLANACEOUS ALKALOIDS. Some species in this genus are called deadly nightshade which is also a common name for ATROPA BELLADONNA.Biosynthetic Pathways: Sets of enzymatic reactions occurring in organisms and that form biochemicals by making new covalent bonds.Beetles: INSECTS of the order Coleoptera, containing over 350,000 species in 150 families. They possess hard bodies and their mouthparts are adapted for chewing.Panax: An araliaceous genus of plants that contains a number of pharmacologically active agents used as stimulants, sedatives, and tonics, especially in traditional medicine. Sometimes confused with Siberian ginseng (ELEUTHEROCOCCUS).Plant Transpiration: The loss of water vapor by plants to the atmosphere. It occurs mainly from the leaves through pores (stomata) whose primary function is gas exchange. The water is replaced by a continuous column of water moving upwards from the roots within the xylem vessels. (Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)Oplopanax: A plant genus in the family ARALIACEAE, order Apiales, subclass Rosidae. It is the source of cirensenosides (triterpenoid saponins).Solanum nigrum: A plant species of the genus SOLANUM, family SOLANACEAE that contains steroidal glycosides.Vegetables: A food group comprised of EDIBLE PLANTS or their parts.Naphthaleneacetic Acids: Naphthalene derivatives containing the -CH2CCO2H radical at the 1-position, the 2-position, or both. Compounds are used as plant growth regulators to delay sprouting, exert weed control, thin fruit, etc.RNA, Plant: Ribonucleic acid in plants having regulatory and catalytic roles as well as involvement in protein synthesis.Plant Poisoning: Poisoning by the ingestion of plants or its leaves, berries, roots or stalks. The manifestations in both humans and animals vary in severity from mild to life threatening. In animals, especially domestic animals, it is usually the result of ingesting moldy or fermented forage.Beverages: Liquids that are suitable for drinking. (From Merriam Webster Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Lecythidaceae: A plant family of the order Lecythidales, subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida.Plant Growth Regulators: Any of the hormones produced naturally in plants and active in controlling growth and other functions. There are three primary classes: auxins, cytokinins, and gibberellins.Phytochemicals: A broad range of biologically active compounds which occur naturally in plants having important medicinal and nutritional properties.Physalis: A plant genus of the family SOLANACEAE. Members contain physalin and withangulatin.Hydroxybenzoates: Benzoate derivatives substituted by one or more hydroxy groups in any position on the benzene ring.DNA Shuffling: The use of DNA recombination (RECOMBINATION, GENETIC) to prepare a large gene library of novel, chimeric genes from a population of randomly fragmented DNA from related gene sequences.Sambucus: A plant genus in the family CAPRIFOLIACEAE known for elderberries.Eugenia: A genus in the family Myrtaceae sometimes known as "stoppers" in FOLK MEDICINE. Many species of the genus SYZYGIUM have synonymous names that begin with the Eugenia genus name.Metabolic Networks and Pathways: Complex sets of enzymatic reactions connected to each other via their product and substrate metabolites.TartratesStilbenes: Organic compounds that contain 1,2-diphenylethylene as a functional group.Water: A clear, odorless, tasteless liquid that is essential for most animal and plant life and is an excellent solvent for many substances. The chemical formula is hydrogen oxide (H2O). (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Laurus: A plant genus in the LAURACEAE family. Laurus nobilis L. leaves are known for use in SPICES, having a similar flavor as UMBELLULARIA.Capparis: A plant genus of the family CAPPARACEAE that contains mabinlin, a sweet protein.Food Preservation: Procedures or techniques used to keep food from spoiling.Dimethylnitrosamine: A nitrosamine derivative with alkylating, carcinogenic, and mutagenic properties. It causes serious liver damage and is a hepatocarcinogen in rodents.Genome, Plant: The genetic complement of a plant (PLANTS) as represented in its DNA.Gene Expression Profiling: The determination of the pattern of genes expressed at the level of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION, under specific circumstances or in a specific cell.Tannins: Polyphenolic compounds with molecular weights of around 500-3000 daltons and containing enough hydroxyl groups (1-2 per 100 MW) for effective cross linking of other compounds (ASTRINGENTS). The two main types are HYDROLYZABLE TANNINS and CONDENSED TANNINS. Historically, the term has applied to many compounds and plant extracts able to render skin COLLAGEN impervious to degradation. The word tannin derives from the Celtic word for OAK TREE which was used for leather processing.Taxus: Genus of coniferous yew trees or shrubs, several species of which have medicinal uses. Notable is the Pacific yew, Taxus brevifolia, which is used to make the anti-neoplastic drug taxol (PACLITAXEL).beta-Fructofuranosidase: A glycoside hydrolase found primarily in PLANTS and YEASTS. It has specificity for beta-D-fructofuranosides such as SUCROSE.Sporangia: A structure found in plants, fungi, and algae, that produces and contains spores.Mistletoe: Parasitic plants that form a bushy growth on branches of host trees which are in the order Santalales. It includes the Christmas mistletoe family (VISCACEAE), the showy mistletoe family (LORANTHACEAE) and the catkin mistletoe family (Eremolepidaceae). The composition of toxins, lectins, tyramine, phenethylamines, and other compounds may be affected by the host.Cluster Analysis: A set of statistical methods used to group variables or observations into strongly inter-related subgroups. In epidemiology, it may be used to analyze a closely grouped series of events or cases of disease or other health-related phenomenon with well-defined distribution patterns in relation to time or place or both.Nutritive Value: An indication of the contribution of a food to the nutrient content of the diet. This value depends on the quantity of a food which is digested and absorbed and the amounts of the essential nutrients (protein, fat, carbohydrate, minerals, vitamins) which it contains. This value can be affected by soil and growing conditions, handling and storage, and processing.Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid: Liquid chromatographic techniques which feature high inlet pressures, high sensitivity, and high speed.Frozen FoodsGinsenosides: Dammarane type triterpene saponins based mainly on the aglycones, protopanaxadiol and protopanaxatriol.Pigmentation: Coloration or discoloration of a part by a pigment.AlaskaProtein O-Methyltransferase: An enzyme that catalyzes the transfer of methyl groups from S-adenosylmethionine to free carboxyl groups of a protein molecule forming methyl esters. EC 2.1.1.-.Seeds: The encapsulated embryos of flowering plants. They are used as is or for animal feed because of the high content of concentrated nutrients like starches, proteins, and fats. Rapeseed, cottonseed, and sunflower seed are also produced for the oils (fats) they yield.Oxalic Acid: A strong dicarboxylic acid occurring in many plants and vegetables. It is produced in the body by metabolism of glyoxylic acid or ascorbic acid. It is not metabolized but excreted in the urine. It is used as an analytical reagent and general reducing agent.Anticarcinogenic Agents: Agents that reduce the frequency or rate of spontaneous or induced tumors independently of the mechanism involved.Diet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.Prunus: A plant genus in the family ROSACEAE, order Rosales, subclass Rosidae. It is best known as a source of edible fruits such as apricot, plum, peach, cherry, and almond.Ethylenes: Derivatives of ethylene, a simple organic gas of biological origin with many industrial and biological use.Trophozoites: Cells or feeding stage in the life cycle of sporozoan protozoa. In the malarial parasite, the trophozoite develops from the MEROZOITE and then splits into the SCHIZONT. Trophozoites that are left over from cell division can go on to form gametocytes.Baccharis: A plant genus of the family ASTERACEAE. Other plants called broom include CYTISUS; SPARTIUM; and BROMUS.Ericaceae: The heath plant family of the order Ericales, subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida that are generally shrubs or small trees. Leaves are alternate, simple, and leathery; flowers are symmetrical with a 4- or 5-parted corolla of partly fused petals.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Hemangioma: A vascular anomaly due to proliferation of BLOOD VESSELS that forms a tumor-like mass. The common types involve CAPILLARIES and VEINS. It can occur anywhere in the body but is most frequently noticed in the SKIN and SUBCUTANEOUS TISSUE. (from Stedman, 27th ed, 2000)Arecaceae: The palm family of order Arecales, subclass Arecidae, class Liliopsida.Abscisic Acid: Abscission-accelerating plant growth substance isolated from young cotton fruit, leaves of sycamore, birch, and other plants, and from potatoes, lemons, avocados, and other fruits.HydrocarbonsPrincipal Component Analysis: Mathematical procedure that transforms a number of possibly correlated variables into a smaller number of uncorrelated variables called principal components.Indoleacetic Acids: Acetic acid derivatives of the heterocyclic compound indole. (Merck Index, 11th ed)Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action during the developmental stages of an organism.Benzoic Acid: A fungistatic compound that is widely used as a food preservative. It is conjugated to GLYCINE in the liver and excreted as hippuric acid.Secale cereale: A hardy grain crop, rye, grown in northern climates. It is the most frequent host to ergot (CLAVICEPS), the toxic fungus. Its hybrid with TRITICUM is TRITICALE, another grain.Carotenoids: The general name for a group of fat-soluble pigments found in green, yellow, and leafy vegetables, and yellow fruits. They are aliphatic hydrocarbons consisting of a polyisoprene backbone.Heterocyclic Compounds: Ring compounds having atoms other than carbon in their nuclei. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Plant Leaves: Expanded structures, usually green, of vascular plants, characteristically consisting of a bladelike expansion attached to a stem, and functioning as the principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration. (American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)Food Hypersensitivity: Gastrointestinal disturbances, skin eruptions, or shock due to allergic reactions to allergens in food.Chemoprevention: The use of chemical compounds to prevent the development of a specific disease.Gene Ontology: Sets of structured vocabularies used for describing and categorizing genes, and gene products by their molecular function, involvement in biological processes, and cellular location. These vocabularies and their associations to genes and gene products (Gene Ontology annotations) are generated and curated by the Gene Ontology Consortium.Plant Bark: The outer layer of the woody parts of plants.Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis: Hybridization of a nucleic acid sample to a very large set of OLIGONUCLEOTIDE PROBES, which have been attached individually in columns and rows to a solid support, to determine a BASE SEQUENCE, or to detect variations in a gene sequence, GENE EXPRESSION, or for GENE MAPPING.Transcriptome: The pattern of GENE EXPRESSION at the level of genetic transcription in a specific organism or under specific circumstances in specific cells.Coffee: A beverage made from ground COFFEA beans (SEEDS) infused in hot water. It generally contains CAFFEINE and THEOPHYLLINE unless it is decaffeinated.DNA, Complementary: Single-stranded complementary DNA synthesized from an RNA template by the action of RNA-dependent DNA polymerase. cDNA (i.e., complementary DNA, not circular DNA, not C-DNA) is used in a variety of molecular cloning experiments as well as serving as a specific hybridization probe.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Flowers: The reproductive organs of plants.Aldehyde-Lyases: Enzymes that catalyze a reverse aldol condensation. A molecule containing a hydroxyl group and a carbonyl group is cleaved at a C-C bond to produce two smaller molecules (ALDEHYDES or KETONES). EC 4.1.2.Arctic Regions: The Arctic Ocean and the lands in it and adjacent to it. It includes Point Barrow, Alaska, most of the Franklin District in Canada, two thirds of Greenland, Svalbard, Franz Josef Land, Lapland, Novaya Zemlya, and Northern Siberia. (Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p66)Plant Preparations: Material prepared from plants.beta-Glucosidase: An exocellulase with specificity for a variety of beta-D-glycoside substrates. It catalyzes the hydrolysis of terminal non-reducing residues in beta-D-glucosides with release of GLUCOSE.Slovenia: Created 7 April 1992 as a result of the division of Yugoslavia.FinlandAcyltransferases: Enzymes from the transferase class that catalyze the transfer of acyl groups from donor to acceptor, forming either esters or amides. (From Enzyme Nomenclature 1992) EC 2.3.Coloring Agents: Chemicals and substances that impart color including soluble dyes and insoluble pigments. They are used in INKS; PAINTS; and as INDICATORS AND REAGENTS.ChitinaseColor: The visually perceived property of objects created by absorption or reflection of specific wavelengths of light.Dehydration: The condition that results from excessive loss of water from a living organism.Intracranial Aneurysm: Abnormal outpouching in the wall of intracranial blood vessels. Most common are the saccular (berry) aneurysms located at branch points in CIRCLE OF WILLIS at the base of the brain. Vessel rupture results in SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Giant aneurysms (>2.5 cm in diameter) may compress adjacent structures, including the OCULOMOTOR NERVE. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p841)Hydrostatic Pressure: The pressure due to the weight of fluid.HexosesMitosporic Fungi: A large and heterogenous group of fungi whose common characteristic is the absence of a sexual state. Many of the pathogenic fungi in humans belong to this group.Plants, Genetically Modified: PLANTS, or their progeny, whose GENOME has been altered by GENETIC ENGINEERING.Metabolomics: The systematic identification and quantitation of all the metabolic products of a cell, tissue, organ, or organism under varying conditions. The METABOLOME of a cell or organism is a dynamic collection of metabolites which represent its net response to current conditions.Cloning, Molecular: The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.Agriculture: The science, art or practice of cultivating soil, producing crops, and raising livestock.Bread: Baked food product made of flour or meal that is moistened, kneaded, and sometimes fermented. A major food since prehistoric times, it has been made in various forms using a variety of ingredients and methods.Plant Shoots: New immature growth of a plant including stem, leaves, tips of branches, and SEEDLINGS.Sequence Alignment: The arrangement of two or more amino acid or base sequences from an organism or organisms in such a way as to align areas of the sequences sharing common properties. The degree of relatedness or homology between the sequences is predicted computationally or statistically based on weights assigned to the elements aligned between the sequences. This in turn can serve as a potential indicator of the genetic relatedness between the organisms.Powders: Substances made up of an aggregation of small particles, as that obtained by grinding or trituration of a solid drug. In pharmacy it is a form in which substances are administered. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
  • Charles Edward Anderson Berry (October 18, 1926 - March 18, 2017) was an American singer and songwriter, and one of the pioneers of rock and roll music. (wikipedia.org)
  • Titled simply Chuck , the disc will be released in 2017 on Dualtone Reocrds and consist primarily of new, original songs written, recorded and produced by the founding rock and roll legend. (guitarplayer.com)
  • Nicknamed the " Father of Rock and Roll ", Berry refined and developed rhythm and blues into the major elements that made rock and roll distinctive with songs such as " Maybellene " (1955), " Roll Over Beethoven " (1956), " Rock and Roll Music " (1957) and " Johnny B. Goode " (1958). (wikipedia.org)
  • The guitar solo on Chuck Berry 's 1955 single " Maybellene " features "warm" overtone distortion produced by an inexpensive valve (tube) amplifier . (wikipedia.org)
  • Chuck Berry 's 1955 classic " Maybellene " features a guitar solo with warm overtones created by his small valve amplifier . (wikipedia.org)
  • Chuck Berry, singer and songwriter of rock and roll classics such as "Maybellene," "Roll Over Beethoven" and "Johnny B. Goode" died Mar. 18 at the age of 90. (thewrap.com)
  • Also featured in the film are memorable interviews with such artists as Little Richard, Bo Diddley, and Bruce Springsteen (who tells a funny and revealing story about backing up Berry at a concert years earlier). (themortonreport.com)
  • This study implies thatlaccases may be important during the early stages of B. cinerea infection on grape berries. (edu.au)
  • More recently, he was the subject of a widely discussed essay by author Chuck Klosterman predicting that hundreds of years hence, Berry would be singularly synonymous with rock and roll itself, and last month his classic 1973 red Cadillac Eldorado went on display as part of the permanent collection at the Smithsonian's new National Museum of African American Culture and History. (guitarplayer.com)
  • Chuck Klosterman Asks The Right Question: What If We're Wrong? (wbur.org)
  • Author Chuck Klosterman. (wbur.org)
  • Next week, The New York Times bestselling author Chuck Klosterman, author of "I Wear The Black Hat," releases his latest collection of cultural analysis, "But What If We're Wrong: Thinking About the Present As If It Were the Past," with Blue Rider Press. (wbur.org)
  • The Chiefs have at times held running back Jamaal Charles (left), tight end Tony Moeaki and safety Eric Berry from training camp practices. (kansascity.com)
  • On Tuesday during training camp, Indianapolis Colts head coach Chuck Pagano wore an Eric Berry shirt during to honor the player's announcement last month that he is currently cancer free. (sportsgrid.com)
  • These conversations were detailed in [Dec. 2014 article ](http://espn.go.com/nfl/story/_/page/hotread141224/kansas-city-chiefs-eric-berry-battles-cancer-strong-support)by ESPN's Ashley Fox. (sportsgrid.com)
  • The cinematic season once ruled by Irving Berlin, Charles Dickens, and It's a Wonderful Life now belongs to a little 1983 sleeper of a movie, A Christmas Story. (flipboard.com)
  • Other tunes by the likes of King of the Tramps, Southern Culture on the Skids, Dylan,Chuck Berry, Little George Sueref, Liquor Pigs, Hillbilly Voodoo Dolls, JJ Grey, and a song dedicated to Donny J Trump by Todd Rundgren & Donald Fagen (Steely Dan). (kfai.org)
  • Reuters) An eight-foot statue of rock and roll pioneer Chuck Berry was approved on Monday over the opposition of some local residents including one who said the Hall of Fame singer/songwriter should not be honored because he is a "felon and not a friend of women. (antimusic.com)
  • Brackman AC (1980) A delicate arrangement: the strange case of Charles Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace. (springer.com)
  • Quan li van demanar el nom, va dir "Rolling Stones" perque era la portada del disc de Muddy Watters amb la cançó "Rollin' Stone" que tenia en aquella moments a la vista. (wikipedia.org)
  • Released posthumously and recorded on his 90th birthday, this is the final album by rock and roll pioneer Chuck Berry. (nodepression.com)
  • Sterilized wine grapes(Chardonnay) were inoculated with a 10µl spore suspension (107spores∙ml-1) and incubated at24°C. Berries were collected at different time intervals post-inoculation, frozen in liquid nitrogenand total RNA extracted, followed by cDNA synthesis, RT-qPCR with primers designed for the threeLAC genes. (edu.au)
  • The album was reissued a year later with a new title, More Chuck Berry. (wikipedia.org)
  • Berry, a safety for the Kansas City Chiefs, returned to practice in July less than a year after being diagnosed with Hodgkin's lymphoma. (sportsgrid.com)
  • A great year for berries. (csmonitor.com)
  • Not only did Chuck Knox coach three NFL franchises - the Rams, Buffalo Bills and Seattle Seahawks - but he was named the league's coach of the year with all three. (dailypress.com)
  • Chuck Berry, the artist who codified the sound, rhythm and language of rock and roll, celebrates his 90th birthday today, October 18, with the surprise announcement that he will release a new album. (guitarplayer.com)
  • There's a reason Berry is number 7 on Rolling Stone's 100 greatest guitarists and their number 5 greatest artist. (thecelebritycafe.com)
  • You will find below the horoscope of Chuck Berry with his interactive chart, an excerpt of his astrological portrait and his planetary dominants. (astrotheme.com)
  • In 2007 his life became the subject of a full-length documentary, Chuck Close: A Portrait in Progress , directed by Marion Cajori. (biography.com)
  • St. Charles sheriff's deputies tell FOX 2 they received a call to the home on Monday, reporting someone had snuck into an office on the property and stolen a valuable Gibson guitar belonging to Berry. (fox2now.com)
  • Pea Vine Blues - Charlie Musselwhite 4. (archive.org)
  • El seu estil musical va estar influït per la música nord-americana especialment el blues i el Rock and Roll que ells van fusionar en un so basat en dues guitars rítmiques i prototip del Rhythmic and blues . (wikipedia.org)
  • One day the popular A student and notorious heart breaker Takumi Usui finds out her secret and makes a deal with her The Duchess Of Berry And The Court Of Charles X keep it hush from the school in exchange for spending some time with him.If a woman refrains from having , she wont get pregnant. (minadeblogs.com)