A genus of aerobic, gram-negative bacteria in the family FLAVOBACTERIACEAE. Many of its species were formerly in the genus FLAVOBACTERIUM.
Infections with bacteria of the family FLAVOBACTERIACEAE.
Constituent of 30S subunit prokaryotic ribosomes containing 1600 nucleotides and 21 proteins. 16S rRNA is involved in initiation of polypeptide synthesis.
DNA sequences encoding RIBOSOMAL RNA and the segments of DNA separating the individual ribosomal RNA genes, referred to as RIBOSOMAL SPACER DNA.
A genus of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria widely distributed in SOIL and WATER. Its organisms are also found in raw meats, MILK and other FOOD, hospital environments, and human clinical specimens. Some species are pathogenic in humans.
A plant genus of the family CONVOLVULACEAE. Members contain calystegine and calystegins.
Genes, found in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, which are transcribed to produce the RNA which is incorporated into RIBOSOMES. Prokaryotic rRNA genes are usually found in OPERONS dispersed throughout the GENOME, whereas eukaryotic rRNA genes are clustered, multicistronic transcriptional units.
A plant genus of the family POACEAE. The common name of wild rye is used with some other grasses.
The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.
Procedures for identifying types and strains of bacteria. The most frequently employed typing systems are BACTERIOPHAGE TYPING and SEROTYPING as well as bacteriocin typing and biotyping.
The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in the soil. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.
Organic, monobasic acids derived from hydrocarbons by the equivalent of oxidation of a methyl group to an alcohol, aldehyde, and then acid. Fatty acids are saturated and unsaturated (FATTY ACIDS, UNSATURATED). (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.
The relative amounts of the PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in a nucleic acid.
A family of bacteria in the order Sphingobacteriales, class Sphingobacteria. They are gram-negative rods, mostly saprophytic in terrestrial and aquatic habitats.
A plant genus of the family Anacardiaceae, order Sapindales, subclass Rosidae. It is a source of gallotannin (TANNIC ACID) and of somewhat edible fruit. Do not confuse with TOXICODENDRON which used to be part of this genus.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
A dye that is a mixture of violet rosanilinis with antibacterial, antifungal, and anthelmintic properties.
A tough, malleable, iron-based alloy containing up to, but no more than, two percent carbon and often other metals. It is used in medicine and dentistry in implants and instrumentation.
Any normal or abnormal coloring matter in PLANTS; ANIMALS or micro-organisms.
Former kingdom, located on Korea Peninsula between Sea of Japan and Yellow Sea on east coast of Asia. In 1948, the kingdom ceased and two independent countries were formed, divided by the 38th parallel.
Widely used technique which exploits the ability of complementary sequences in single-stranded DNAs or RNAs to pair with each other to form a double helix. Hybridization can take place between two complimentary DNA sequences, between a single-stranded DNA and a complementary RNA, or between two RNA sequences. The technique is used to detect and isolate specific sequences, measure homology, or define other characteristics of one or both strands. (Kendrew, Encyclopedia of Molecular Biology, 1994, p503)
Substances which pollute the soil. Use for soil pollutants in general or for which there is no specific heading.
A group of substances similar to VITAMIN K 1 which contains a ring of 2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinione and an isoprenoid side chain of varying number of isoprene units. In vitamin K 2, each isoprene unit contains a double bond. They are produced by bacteria including the normal intestinal flora.
Ribonucleic acid in bacteria having regulatory and catalytic roles as well as involvement in protein synthesis.
Phenazines are nitrogen-containing heterocyclic compounds that have been widely studied for their antibacterial, antifungal, and antiparasitic properties, and can be found in various natural sources such as bacteria and fungi, or synthesized chemically.

Antimicrobial susceptibility and epidemiology of a worldwide collection of Chryseobacterium spp: report from the SENTRY Antimicrobial Surveillance Program (1997-2001). (1/79)

Limited data are available on Chryseobacterium spp. leading to an evaluation of the patient demographics and susceptibility patterns for Chryseobacterium spp. collected in the first 5 years of the SENTRY Antimicrobial Surveillance Program (1997 to 2001). Fifty isolates (24 Chryseobacterium meningosepticum, 20 Chryseobacterium indologenes, two Chryseobacterium gleum, and 4 Chryseobacterium spp. isolates) were collected. The highest Chryseobacterium prevalence was detected among the elderly. The most active antimicrobials were the newer quinolones (garenoxacin, gatifloxacin, and levofloxacin, each with a MIC at which 90 percent of the isolates are inhibited [MIC(90)] of 1 micro g/ml and 98.0% susceptibility) followed by rifampin (MIC(90), 2 microg/ml and 85.7% susceptibility). Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, ciprofloxacin, and piperacillin-tazobactam also showed reasonable activity; vancomycin showed poor potency.  (+info)

Clinical and microbiological analysis of bloodstream infections caused by Chryseobacterium meningosepticum in nonneonatal patients. (2/79)

Chryseobacterium meningosepticum bloodstream infections in 11 nonneonatal patients were reported. More than half of the infections were community acquired. PCR assays indicated that the organisms produced extended-spectrum beta-lactamases as well as metallo-beta-lactamases. Genotyping showed diverse fingerprints among the isolates. Six patients survived without appropriate antibiotic treatment. Host factors are the major determinant of the outcomes of C. meningosepticum infections.  (+info)

Comparative biochemical analysis of three bacterial prolyl endopeptidases: implications for coeliac sprue. (3/79)

Prolyl endopeptidases have potential for treating coeliac sprue, a disease of the intestine caused by proteolytically resistant peptides from proline-rich prolamins of wheat, barley and rye. We compared the properties of three similar bacterial prolyl endopeptidases, including the known enzymes from Flavobacterium meningosepticum (FM) and Sphingomonas capsulate (SC) and a novel enzyme from Myxococcus xanthus (MX). These enzymes were interrogated with reference chromogenic substrates, as well as two related gluten peptides (PQPQLPYPQPQLP and LQLQPFPQPQLPYPQPQLPYPQPQLPYPQPQPF), believed to play a key role in coeliac sprue pathogenesis. In vitro and in vivo studies were conducted to evaluate the activity, specificity and acid/protease stability of the enzymes. All peptidases were relatively resistant to acid, pancreatic proteases and membrane peptidases of the small intestinal mucosa. Although their activities against reference substrates were similar, the enzymes exhibited substantial differences with respect to chain length and subsite specificity. SC hydrolysed PQPQLPYPQPQLP well, but had negligible activity against LQLQPFPQPQLPYPQPQLPYPQPQLPYPQPQPF. In contrast, the FM and MX peptidases cleaved both substrates, although the FM enzyme acted more rapidly on LQLQPFPQPQLPYPQPQLPYPQPQLPYPQPQPF than MX. Whereas the FM enzyme showed a preference for Pro-Gln bonds, SC cleaved both Pro-Gln and Pro-Tyr bonds with comparable efficiency, and MX had a modest preference for Pro-(Tyr/Phe) sites over Pro-Gln sites. While a more comprehensive understanding of sequence and chain-length specificity may be needed to assess the relative utility of alternative prolyl endopeptidases for treating coeliac sprue, our present work has illustrated the diverse nature of this class of enzymes from the standpoint of proteolysing complex substrates such as gluten.  (+info)

An adult case of Chryseobacterium meningosepticum meningitis. (4/79)

Chryseobacterium meningosepticum is an uncommon pathogen causing adult bacterial meningitis. Herein, we report the case history of one 21-year-old woman with this uncommon central nervous system infection. A diagnosis of adult C. meningosepticum meningitis can only be confirmed by a positive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) culture. The patient had insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus as the underlying condition associated with this infection. The clinical presentations were fever, headache, consciousness disturbance, and seizure. CSF analysis revealed a purulent inflammatory reaction. After a 21-day course of intravenous cefepime (6 g/day) treatment, this patient was discharged in a state of complete recovery.  (+info)

Kaistella koreensis gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel member of the Chryseobacterium-Bergeyella-Riemerella branch. (5/79)

Gram-negative, non-spore-forming, rod-shaped, yellow-pigmented bacteria isolated from a freshwater stream in Korea were investigated to determine their taxonomic position. Complete 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that the organisms should be placed in the Chryseobacterium-Bergeyella-Riemerella branch in the family Flavobacteriaceae. Phylogenetically, the strains were most closely related to Chryseobacterium balustinum ATCC 33487(T) and Chryseobacterium scophthalmum LMG 13028(T) (94.3 and 94.1 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, respectively) and they clustered on a separate well-supported branch. The strains contained menaquinone MK-6 as the predominant respiratory quinone and showed higher G+C contents (41.7 mol%) than other species in the Chryseobacterium-Bergeyella-Riemerella branch and i-C(15 : 0) as a major fatty acid (47-52 %). The phylogenetic distances from any species with validly published names and their phenotypic properties confirmed that the strains constitute a separate species in a new genus, for which the name Kaistella koreensis gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed (type strain Chj707(T)=KCTC 12107(T)=IAM 15050(T)).  (+info)

Chryseobacterium daecheongense sp. nov., isolated from freshwater lake sediment. (6/79)

A novel nitrate-reducing bacterium, CPW406T, was isolated from the sediment of a shallow, freshwater lake. The strain was a Gram-negative, non-motile, non-spore-forming rod, which formed yellow-pigmented colonies on nutrient agar and contained a polyamine pattern with sym-homospermidine as the major compound, MK-6 as the predominant menaquinone, 15 : 0 iso and 17 : 0 iso 3-OH as the major fatty acids and phosphatidylethanolamine and several unknown lipids in the polar lipid profile. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain CPW406T was found to be most similar to that of the type strain of Chryseobacterium defluvii (DSM 14219T; 97.9 % similarity). However, DNA-DNA relatedness data and its phenotypic properties showed that strain CPW406T could be distinguished from all known Chryseobacterium species and thus represented a novel species, for which the name Chryseobacterium daecheongense sp. nov. is proposed; the type strain is CPW406T (=DSM 15235T=KCTC 12088T).  (+info)

Chryseobacterium formosense sp. nov., isolated from the rhizosphere of Lactuca sativa L. (garden lettuce). (7/79)

A yellow-pigmented bacterial strain (CC-H3-2T), isolated from the rhizosphere of Lactuca sativa L. (garden lettuce) in Taiwan, was investigated using a polyphasic taxonomic approach. The cells were Gram-negative, rod-shaped and non-spore-forming. Phylogenetic analyses using the 16S rRNA gene sequence of the isolate indicated that the organism belongs to the genus Chryseobacterium, with the highest sequence similarity to the type strains of Chryseobacterium indoltheticum (97.7 %), Chryseobacterium scophthalmum (97.5 %), Chryseobacterium joostei (97.2 %) and Chryseobacterium defluvii (97.2 %). The major whole-cell fatty acids were iso-C(15 : 0) (52.2 %) and iso-C(17 : 0) 3-OH. DNA-DNA hybridization experiments revealed levels of only 27.4 % to C. scophthalmum, 27.1 % to C. indoltheticum, 14.1 % to C. joostei and 7.8 % to C. defluvii. DNA-DNA relatedness and biochemical and chemotaxonomic properties demonstrate that strain CC-H3-2T represents a novel species, for which the name Chryseobacterium formosense sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CC-H3-2T (=CCUG 49271T=CIP 108367T).  (+info)

Chryseobacterium indologenes non-catheter-related bacteremia in a patient with a solid tumor. (8/79)

A case of non-catheter-related bacteremia caused by Chryseobacterium indologenes in a nonneutropenic man with a solid tumor is described. The patient was successfully treated with piperacillin-tazobactam.  (+info)

Chryseobacterium is a genus of gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria that are commonly found in various environments such as water, soil, and plants. Some species of Chryseobacterium can also be found in association with animals and humans, where they are often considered to be opportunistic pathogens. These bacteria are known for their ability to produce pigments, which can give them a yellow or orange color. They are generally resistant to many antibiotics and can cause infections in people with weakened immune systems, such as those who are hospitalized or have underlying medical conditions. Examples of Chryseobacterium infections include pneumonia, bloodstream infections, and wound infections.

Flavobacteriaceae is a family of Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria found in various environments such as water, soil, and clinical specimens. While many species are harmless to humans, some can cause infections, particularly in individuals with weakened immune systems or underlying health conditions.

Flavobacteriaceae infections refer to illnesses caused by the pathogenic species within this family. These infections can manifest as various clinical syndromes, including:

1. Pneumonia: Flavobacterium spp., such as F. psychrophilum and F. johnsoniae, have been implicated in respiratory tract infections, particularly in hospitalized patients or those with compromised immune systems.
2. Skin and soft tissue infections: Some Flavobacteriaceae species, like Capnocytophaga spp., can cause skin and soft tissue infections, especially in individuals with a history of animal bites or scratches.
3. Bloodstream infections (bacteremia): Bacteremia due to Flavobacteriaceae is relatively rare but has been reported, particularly in immunocompromised patients or those with indwelling medical devices.
4. Eye infections (keratitis and endophthalmitis): Contact lens wearers are at risk of developing keratitis caused by Flavobacterium spp., while endophthalmitis can occur following ocular surgeries or trauma.
5. Central nervous system infections: Meningitis, encephalitis, and brain abscesses have been reported due to Flavobacteriaceae species, although these are extremely rare.

Diagnosis of Flavobacteriaceae infections typically involves the isolation and identification of the bacterium from clinical specimens, such as blood, sputum, or tissue samples. Treatment usually consists of antibiotics that demonstrate activity against Gram-negative bacteria, with specific recommendations depending on the susceptibility patterns of the infecting species.

Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is a type of RNA that combines with proteins to form ribosomes, which are complex structures inside cells where protein synthesis occurs. The "16S" refers to the sedimentation coefficient of the rRNA molecule, which is a measure of its size and shape. In particular, 16S rRNA is a component of the smaller subunit of the prokaryotic ribosome (found in bacteria and archaea), and is often used as a molecular marker for identifying and classifying these organisms due to its relative stability and conservation among species. The sequence of 16S rRNA can be compared across different species to determine their evolutionary relationships and taxonomic positions.

Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) refers to the specific regions of DNA in a cell that contain the genes for ribosomal RNA (rRNA). Ribosomes are complex structures composed of proteins and rRNA, which play a crucial role in protein synthesis by translating messenger RNA (mRNA) into proteins.

In humans, there are four types of rRNA molecules: 18S, 5.8S, 28S, and 5S. These rRNAs are encoded by multiple copies of rDNA genes that are organized in clusters on specific chromosomes. In humans, the majority of rDNA genes are located on the short arms of acrocentric chromosomes 13, 14, 15, 21, and 22.

Each cluster of rDNA genes contains both transcribed and non-transcribed spacer regions. The transcribed regions contain the genes for the four types of rRNA, while the non-transcribed spacers contain regulatory elements that control the transcription of the rRNA genes.

The number of rDNA copies varies between species and even within individuals of the same species. The copy number can also change during development and in response to environmental factors. Variations in rDNA copy number have been associated with various diseases, including cancer and neurological disorders.

Flavobacterium is a genus of Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria that are widely distributed in various environments such as water, soil, and associated with plants and animals. They are facultative anaerobes, which means they can grow in the presence or absence of oxygen. Some species of Flavobacterium are known to cause opportunistic infections in humans, particularly in individuals with compromised immune systems. These infections can include respiratory tract infections, wound infections, and bacteremia (bloodstream infections). However, Flavobacterium infections are relatively rare in healthy individuals.

It's worth noting that while some species of Flavobacterium have been associated with human disease, many others are important members of the microbial community in various environments and play beneficial roles in biogeochemical cycles and food webs.

Calystegia is a genus of perennial, twining plants in the bindweed family (Convolvulaceae). These plants are characterized by their large, funnel-shaped flowers that can be white, pink, or purple. They are commonly known as "morning glories" and are native to North America, Europe, and Asia. Some common species of Calystegia include C. sepium (hedge bindweed), C. silvatica (woodland bindweed), and C. spithamaea (marsh bindweed).

It is worth noting that while the term "calystegia" refers to a specific genus of plants, it is not a medical term and does not have a specific definition in the context of medicine.

rRNA (ribosomal RNA) is not a type of gene itself, but rather a crucial component that is transcribed from genes known as ribosomal DNA (rDNA). In cells, rRNA plays an essential role in protein synthesis by assembling with ribosomal proteins to form ribosomes. Ribosomes are complex structures where the translation of mRNA into proteins occurs. There are multiple types of rRNA molecules, including 5S, 5.8S, 18S, and 28S rRNAs in eukaryotic cells, each with specific functions during protein synthesis.

In summary, 'Genes, rRNA' would refer to the genetic regions (genes) that code for ribosomal RNA molecules, which are vital components of the protein synthesis machinery within cells.

"Elymus" is a genus of cool-season, tufted grasses that are native to the temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere. These grasses are commonly known as wild ryes or wheatgrasses and belong to the family Poaceae. The genus includes over 150 species, many of which are important forage plants for livestock and wildlife. Some species are also used for erosion control, reclamation of disturbed lands, and as ornamental grasses in landscaping.

There is no medical definition of "Elymus" as it is a genus of grasses and does not have any direct relevance to human health or medicine.

Phylogeny is the evolutionary history and relationship among biological entities, such as species or genes, based on their shared characteristics. In other words, it refers to the branching pattern of evolution that shows how various organisms have descended from a common ancestor over time. Phylogenetic analysis involves constructing a tree-like diagram called a phylogenetic tree, which depicts the inferred evolutionary relationships among organisms or genes based on molecular sequence data or other types of characters. This information is crucial for understanding the diversity and distribution of life on Earth, as well as for studying the emergence and spread of diseases.

Bacterial DNA refers to the genetic material found in bacteria. It is composed of a double-stranded helix containing four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), thymine (T), guanine (G), and cytosine (C) - that are linked together by phosphodiester bonds. The sequence of these bases in the DNA molecule carries the genetic information necessary for the growth, development, and reproduction of bacteria.

Bacterial DNA is circular in most bacterial species, although some have linear chromosomes. In addition to the main chromosome, many bacteria also contain small circular pieces of DNA called plasmids that can carry additional genes and provide resistance to antibiotics or other environmental stressors.

Unlike eukaryotic cells, which have their DNA enclosed within a nucleus, bacterial DNA is present in the cytoplasm of the cell, where it is in direct contact with the cell's metabolic machinery. This allows for rapid gene expression and regulation in response to changing environmental conditions.

Bacterial typing techniques are methods used to identify and differentiate bacterial strains or isolates based on their unique characteristics. These techniques are essential in epidemiological studies, infection control, and research to understand the transmission dynamics, virulence, and antibiotic resistance patterns of bacterial pathogens.

There are various bacterial typing techniques available, including:

1. **Bacteriophage Typing:** This method involves using bacteriophages (viruses that infect bacteria) to identify specific bacterial strains based on their susceptibility or resistance to particular phages.
2. **Serotyping:** It is a technique that differentiates bacterial strains based on the antigenic properties of their cell surface components, such as capsules, flagella, and somatic (O) and flagellar (H) antigens.
3. **Biochemical Testing:** This method uses biochemical reactions to identify specific metabolic pathways or enzymes present in bacterial strains, which can be used for differentiation. Commonly used tests include the catalase test, oxidase test, and various sugar fermentation tests.
4. **Molecular Typing Techniques:** These methods use genetic markers to identify and differentiate bacterial strains at the DNA level. Examples of molecular typing techniques include:
* **Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE):** This method uses restriction enzymes to digest bacterial DNA, followed by electrophoresis in an agarose gel under pulsed electrical fields. The resulting banding patterns are analyzed and compared to identify related strains.
* **Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST):** It involves sequencing specific housekeeping genes to generate unique sequence types that can be used for strain identification and phylogenetic analysis.
* **Whole Genome Sequencing (WGS):** This method sequences the entire genome of a bacterial strain, providing the most detailed information on genetic variation and relatedness between strains. WGS data can be analyzed using various bioinformatics tools to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), gene deletions or insertions, and other genetic changes that can be used for strain differentiation.

These molecular typing techniques provide higher resolution than traditional methods, allowing for more accurate identification and comparison of bacterial strains. They are particularly useful in epidemiological investigations to track the spread of pathogens and identify outbreaks.

I apologize, but there seems to be a misunderstanding. "Soil microbiology" is not a medical term; rather, it is a branch of microbiology that deals with the study of microorganisms in soil. It involves understanding the diversity, ecology, and biochemistry of bacteria, fungi, algae, protozoa, and other microscopic life forms found in soil. This field has applications in agriculture, environmental science, and waste management but is not directly related to medical definitions or human health.

Fatty acids are carboxylic acids with a long aliphatic chain, which are important components of lipids and are widely distributed in living organisms. They can be classified based on the length of their carbon chain, saturation level (presence or absence of double bonds), and other structural features.

The two main types of fatty acids are:

1. Saturated fatty acids: These have no double bonds in their carbon chain and are typically solid at room temperature. Examples include palmitic acid (C16:0) and stearic acid (C18:0).
2. Unsaturated fatty acids: These contain one or more double bonds in their carbon chain and can be further classified into monounsaturated (one double bond) and polyunsaturated (two or more double bonds) fatty acids. Examples of unsaturated fatty acids include oleic acid (C18:1, monounsaturated), linoleic acid (C18:2, polyunsaturated), and alpha-linolenic acid (C18:3, polyunsaturated).

Fatty acids play crucial roles in various biological processes, such as energy storage, membrane structure, and cell signaling. Some essential fatty acids cannot be synthesized by the human body and must be obtained through dietary sources.

DNA Sequence Analysis is the systematic determination of the order of nucleotides in a DNA molecule. It is a critical component of modern molecular biology, genetics, and genetic engineering. The process involves determining the exact order of the four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T) - in a DNA molecule or fragment. This information is used in various applications such as identifying gene mutations, studying evolutionary relationships, developing molecular markers for breeding, and diagnosing genetic diseases.

The process of DNA Sequence Analysis typically involves several steps, including DNA extraction, PCR amplification (if necessary), purification, sequencing reaction, and electrophoresis. The resulting data is then analyzed using specialized software to determine the exact sequence of nucleotides.

In recent years, high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies have revolutionized the field of genomics, enabling the rapid and cost-effective sequencing of entire genomes. This has led to an explosion of genomic data and new insights into the genetic basis of many diseases and traits.

Base composition in genetics refers to the relative proportion of the four nucleotide bases (adenine, thymine, guanine, and cytosine) in a DNA or RNA molecule. In DNA, adenine pairs with thymine, and guanine pairs with cytosine, so the base composition is often expressed in terms of the ratio of adenine + thymine (A-T) to guanine + cytosine (G-C). This ratio can vary between species and even between different regions of the same genome. The base composition can provide important clues about the function, evolution, and structure of genetic material.

Flavobacteriaceae is a family of Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria within the phylum Bacteroidetes. These bacteria are typically found in aquatic environments and can also be isolated from soil, plants, and animals, including humans. They are known for their ability to produce yellow-pigmented colonies, which give them their name (flavo- meaning "yellow" in Latin). Flavobacteriaceae are metabolically diverse, with some species capable of breaking down complex organic matter and others that can cause disease in animals and plants. In humans, certain species within this family have been associated with opportunistic infections, particularly in individuals with weakened immune systems.

"Rhus" is a genus of plants that includes several species commonly known as poison ivy, poison oak, and poison sumac. These plants contain an oil called urushiol, which can cause an allergic reaction in many people when they come into contact with the plant's leaves, stems, or roots. The reaction typically includes a red, itchy rash that can blister and ooze.

In some contexts, "rhus" may also refer to homeopathic remedies made from these plants. However, it is important to note that the use of such remedies is not supported by scientific evidence and can be dangerous. It is always best to consult with a healthcare provider for medical advice regarding allergic reactions or other health concerns.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

Gentian Violet is not a medical term per se, but it is a substance that has been used in medicine. According to the US National Library of Medicine's MedlinePlus, Gentian Violet is a type of crystal violet dye that has antifungal and antibacterial properties. It is often used as a topical treatment for minor cuts, burns, and wounds, as well as for fungal infections such as thrush (oral candidiasis) and athlete's foot. Gentian Violet can also be used to treat ringworm and impetigo. However, it should not be used in the eyes or mouth, and it should be used with caution on broken skin, as it can cause irritation. Additionally, there is some concern that long-term use of Gentian Violet may be carcinogenic (cancer-causing), so its use should be limited to short periods of time and under the guidance of a healthcare professional.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "steel" is not a medical term. It is a term used to describe an alloy made primarily of iron and carbon. If you have any medical questions or terms you would like defined, I'd be happy to help!

Biological pigments are substances produced by living organisms that absorb certain wavelengths of light and reflect others, resulting in the perception of color. These pigments play crucial roles in various biological processes such as photosynthesis, vision, and protection against harmful radiation. Some examples of biological pigments include melanin, hemoglobin, chlorophyll, carotenoids, and flavonoids.

Melanin is a pigment responsible for the color of skin, hair, and eyes in animals, including humans. Hemoglobin is a protein found in red blood cells that contains a porphyrin ring with an iron atom at its center, which gives blood its red color and facilitates oxygen transport. Chlorophyll is a green pigment found in plants, algae, and some bacteria that absorbs light during photosynthesis to convert carbon dioxide and water into glucose and oxygen. Carotenoids are orange, yellow, or red pigments found in fruits, vegetables, and some animals that protect against oxidative stress and help maintain membrane fluidity. Flavonoids are a class of plant pigments with antioxidant properties that have been linked to various health benefits.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Korea" is not a medical term. It refers to a region in East Asia that is divided into two distinct sovereign states: North Korea (officially the Democratic People's Republic of Korea) and South Korea (officially the Republic of Korea).

If you're looking for medical terms, I'd be happy to help. Could you please provide more context?

Nucleic acid hybridization is a process in molecular biology where two single-stranded nucleic acids (DNA, RNA) with complementary sequences pair together to form a double-stranded molecule through hydrogen bonding. The strands can be from the same type of nucleic acid or different types (i.e., DNA-RNA or DNA-cDNA). This process is commonly used in various laboratory techniques, such as Southern blotting, Northern blotting, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and microarray analysis, to detect, isolate, and analyze specific nucleic acid sequences. The hybridization temperature and conditions are critical to ensure the specificity of the interaction between the two strands.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "soil pollutants" is not a term typically used in medical definitions. Soil pollution refers to the presence or accumulation of hazardous substances, chemicals, or other pollutants in soil that can have negative effects on plant life, human health, and the environment.

However, if you're asking about potential health effects of exposure to soil pollutants, it could include a variety of symptoms or diseases, depending on the specific pollutant. For example, exposure to lead-contaminated soil can lead to developmental delays in children, while exposure to certain pesticides or industrial chemicals can cause neurological problems, respiratory issues, and even cancer.

If you have more specific information about a particular substance or context, I may be able to provide a more precise answer.

Vitamin K2, also known as menaquinone, is a fat-soluble vitamin that plays a crucial role in the blood clotting process and bone metabolism. It is one of the two main forms of Vitamin K (the other being Vitamin K1 or phylloquinone), and it is found in animal-based foods and fermented foods.

Vitamin K2 is a collective name for a group of vitamin K compounds characterized by the presence of a long-chain fatty acid attached to the molecule. The most common forms of Vitamin K2 are MK-4 and MK-7, which differ in the length of their side chains.

Vitamin K2 is absorbed more efficiently than Vitamin K1 and has a longer half-life, which means it stays in the body for a longer period. It is stored in various tissues, including bones, where it plays an essential role in maintaining bone health by assisting in the regulation of calcium deposition and helping to prevent the calcification of blood vessels and other soft tissues.

Deficiency in Vitamin K2 is rare but can lead to bleeding disorders and weakened bones. Food sources of Vitamin K2 include animal-based foods such as liver, egg yolks, and fermented dairy products like cheese and natto (a Japanese food made from fermented soybeans). Some studies suggest that supplementing with Vitamin K2 may have benefits for bone health, heart health, and cognitive function. However, more research is needed to confirm these potential benefits.

Bacterial RNA refers to the genetic material present in bacteria that is composed of ribonucleic acid (RNA). Unlike higher organisms, bacteria contain a single circular chromosome made up of DNA, along with smaller circular pieces of DNA called plasmids. These bacterial genetic materials contain the information necessary for the growth and reproduction of the organism.

Bacterial RNA can be divided into three main categories: messenger RNA (mRNA), ribosomal RNA (rRNA), and transfer RNA (tRNA). mRNA carries genetic information copied from DNA, which is then translated into proteins by the rRNA and tRNA molecules. rRNA is a structural component of the ribosome, where protein synthesis occurs, while tRNA acts as an adapter that brings amino acids to the ribosome during protein synthesis.

Bacterial RNA plays a crucial role in various cellular processes, including gene expression, protein synthesis, and regulation of metabolic pathways. Understanding the structure and function of bacterial RNA is essential for developing new antibiotics and other therapeutic strategies to combat bacterial infections.

Phenazines are a class of heterocyclic aromatic organic compounds that consist of two nitrogen atoms connected by a five-membered ring. They are naturally occurring in various species of bacteria and fungi, where they play a role in chemical defense and communication. Some phenazines have been found to have antibiotic, antifungal, and antiparasitic properties. Synthetic phenazines are also used in various industrial applications, such as dyes and pigments, and as components in some pharmaceuticals and agrochemicals.

2020 Chryseobacterium caeni Quan et al. 2007 Chryseobacterium camelliae Kook et al. 2014 Chryseobacterium candidae Indu et al. ... 2015 Chryseobacterium elymi Cho et al. 2011 Chryseobacterium endophyticum Lin et al. 2017 Chryseobacterium flavum Zhou et al. ... 2013 Chryseobacterium lactis Holmes et al. 2013 Chryseobacterium lacus Zhang et al. 2020 Chryseobacterium lathyri Cho et al. ... 2020 Chryseobacterium solani Du et al. 2015 Chryseobacterium soldanellicola Park et al. 2006 Chryseobacterium soli Weon et al. ...
... is a gram-negative, non-spore-forming and non-motile bacteria from the genus Chryseobacterium ... Parte, A.C. "Chryseobacterium". LPSN. "Chryseobacterium psychrotolerans". www.uniprot.org. Parker, Charles Thomas; Garrity, ... Chryseobacterium, Bacteria described in 2015, All stub articles, Flavobacteria stubs). ... George M (1 January 2003). Parker, Charles Thomas; Garrity, George M (eds.). "Nomenclature Abstract for Chryseobacterium ...
Type strain of Chryseobacterium oranimense at BacDive - the Bacterial Diversity Metadatabase v t e (Articles with short ... Chryseobacterium oranimense is a Gram-negative psychrotolerant, proteolytic, lipolytic, rod-shaped and non-motile bacteria from ... LPSN lpsn.dsmz.de Straininfo of Chryseobacterium oranimense UniProt Deutsche Sammlung von Mikroorganismen und Zellkulturen [1] ... Hantsis-Zacharov, E; Shakéd, T; Senderovich, Y; Halpern, M (November 2008). "Chryseobacterium oranimense sp. nov., a ...
... is a bacterium from the genus Chryseobacterium which has been isolated from stones from the River Taff ... Parte, A.C. "Chryseobacterium". LPSN. "Chryseobacterium tenax". www.uniprot.org. Parker, Charles Thomas; Garrity, George M (1 ... Type strain of Chryseobacterium tenax at BacDive - the Bacterial Diversity Metadatabase v t e (Articles with short description ... Short description matches Wikidata, Articles with 'species' microformats, Chryseobacterium, Bacteria described in 2006, All ...
... is a bacterium from the genus Chryseobacterium. It has been isolated from the alpine permafrost ... LPSN lpsn.dsmz.de Straininfo of Chryseobacterium xinjiangense UniProt Zhao, Q; Bai, Y; Zhang, G; Zhu, S; Sheng, H; Sun, Y; An, ... ISBN 978-1-908230-26-3. Zhao, Q; Bai, Y; Zhang, G; Zhu, S; Sheng, H; Sun, Y; An, L (June 2011). "Chryseobacterium xinjiangense ... L (June 2011). "Chryseobacterium xinjiangense sp. nov., isolated from alpine permafrost". International Journal of Systematic ...
... is a Gram-negative, rod-shaped, aerobic and non-motile bacteria from the genus Chryseobacterium ... Parte, A.C. "Chryseobacterium". LPSN. "Chryseobacterium halperniae". www.uniprot.org. Shakéd, T; Hantsis-Zacharov, E; Halpern, ... Type strain of Chryseobacterium halperniae at BacDive - the Bacterial Diversity Metadatabase v t e (Articles with short ... "Nomenclature Abstract for Chryseobacterium halperniae (Shakéd et al. 2010) Hahnke et al. 2016". The NamesforLife Abstracts. doi ...
... is a bacterium from the genus Chryseobacterium which has been isolated from soil which was ... ISBN 978-0-387-68572-4. {{cite book}}: ,last1= has generic name (help) Type strain of Chryseobacterium hungaricum at BacDive - ... Szoboszlay, S; Atzél, B; Kukolya, J; Tóth, EM; Márialigeti, K; Schumann, P; Kriszt, B (December 2008). "Chryseobacterium ... LPSN lpsn.dsmz.de Straininfo of Chryseobacterium hungaricum Deutsche Sammlung von Mikroorganismen und Zellkulturen [1] UniProt ...
... is a Gram-negative, rod-shaped, non-spore-forming and non-motile bacteria from the genus ... LPSN lpsn.dsmz.de UniProt Yang, F; Liu, HM; Zhang, R; Chen, DB; Wang, X; Li, SP; Hong, Q (June 2015). "Chryseobacterium ... Yang, F; Liu, HM; Zhang, R; Chen, DB; Wang, X; Li, SP; Hong, Q (June 2015). "Chryseobacterium shandongense sp. nov., isolated ... Chryseobacterium, Bacteria described in 2015, All stub articles, Flavobacteria stubs). ...
... is a Gram-negative, strictly aerobic and non-motile bacteria from the genus Chryseobacterium ... Type strain of Chryseobacterium ginsengisoli at BacDive - the Bacterial Diversity Metadatabase v t e (Articles with short ... LPSN lpsn.dsmz.de UniProt Nguyen, NL; Kim, YJ; Hoang, VA; Yang, DC (August 2013). "Chryseobacterium ginsengisoli sp. nov., ... Nguyen, NL; Kim, YJ; Hoang, VA; Yang, DC (August 2013). "Chryseobacterium ginsengisoli sp. nov., isolated from the rhizosphere ...
... is a Gram-negative, rod-shaped and non-motile bacteria from the genus Chryseobacterium which has been ... LPSN lpsn.dsmz.de Straininfo of Chryseobacterium flavum Zhou, Y; Dong, J; Wang, X; Huang, X; Zhang, KY; Zhang, YQ; Guo, YF; Lai ... Zhou, Y; Dong, J; Wang, X; Huang, X; Zhang, KY; Zhang, YQ; Guo, YF; Lai, R; Li, WJ (August 2007). "Chryseobacterium flavum sp. ... ISBN 978-0-387-68572-4. {{cite book}}: ,last1= has generic name (help) Type strain of Chryseobacterium flavum at BacDive - the ...
... is a Gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped and non-motile bacteria from the genus Chryseobacterium ... Parte, A.C. "Chryseobacterium". LPSN. "Chryseobacterium salipaludis". www.uniprot.org. Parker, Charles Thomas; Garrity, George ... Divyasree, B; Suresh, G; Sasikala, C; Ramana, CV (February 2018). "Chryseobacterium salipaludis sp. nov., isolated at a wild ... Chryseobacterium, Bacteria described in 2018, All stub articles, Flavobacteria stubs). ...
... is a Gram-negative, rod-shaped and non-spore-forming bacteria from the genus Chryseobacterium which ... Type strain of Chryseobacterium takakiae at BacDive - the Bacterial Diversity Metadatabase v t e (Articles with short ... Zhao, R; Chen, XY; Li, XD; Chen, ZL; Li, YH (January 2015). "Chryseobacterium takakiae sp. nov., a member of the phylum ... "Chryseobacterium takakiae sp. nov., a member of the phylum Bacteroidetes isolated from Takakia lepidozioides". International ...
... is a bacterium from the genus Chryseobacterium which has been isolated from a high vaginal swab from a ... Chryseobacterium gleum can cause infections in humans. A.C. Parte. "Chryseobacterium". LPSN. Retrieved 2016-07-30. " ... Virok, DP; Ábrók, M; Szél, B; Tajti, Z; Mader, K; Urbán, E; Tálosi, G (December 2014). "Chryseobacterium gleum - a novel ... ISBN 978-1-139-57665-9. Type strain of Chryseobacterium gleum at BacDive - the Bacterial Diversity Metadatabase v t e (CS1 ...
"Chryseobacterium soli sp. nov. and Chryseobacterium jejuense sp. nov., isolated from soil samples from Jeju, Korea". ... Chryseobacterium soli is a bacterium. It is aerobic, Gram-negative, non-motile, yellow-pigmented and straight rod-shaped. Its ... ISBN 0-387-25497-8. LPSN Type strain of Chryseobacterium soli at BacDive - the Bacterial Diversity Metadatabase v t e (Articles ... Virulence Factors and Other Clinically Relevant Characteristics of Chryseobacterium Species. Diss. University of the Freee ...
... is a bacterium from the genus Chryseobacterium which has been isolated from blood from a fish in ... ISBN 0-85199-954-9. Type strain of Chryseobacterium balustinum at BacDive - the Bacterial Diversity Metadatabase v t e ( ... LPSN lpsn.dsmz.de Straininfo of Chryseobacterium balustinum UniProt Deutsche Sammlung von Mikroorganismen und Zellkulturen [1] ... and emended description of the genus Chryseobacterium". International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology. 59 ( ...
... is a bacterium from the genus Chryseobacterium which has been isolated from a fish from the South ... "Chryseobacterium piscium sp. nov., isolated from fish of the South Atlantic Ocean off South Africa". International Journal of ... "Chryseobacterium piscium sp. nov., isolated from fish of the South Atlantic Ocean off South Africa". International Journal of ... Chryseobacterium, Bacteria described in 2006, All stub articles, Flavobacteria stubs). ...
... is a bacterium from the genus Chryseobacterium which has been isolated from a Murray cod ... Luo T, Liu Y, Chen C, Luo Q, Rao Q, Huang M, Tu J, Lin Q, Weng B. (2018). "Chryseobacterium aurantiacum sp. nov., isolated from ... "Chryseobacterium aurantiacum". List of Prokaryotic names with Standing in Nomenclature (LPSN). Retrieved June 29, 2021. v t e ( ... Chryseobacterium, Bacteria described in 2007, All stub articles, Flavobacteria stubs). ...
Type strain of Chryseobacterium ginsenosidimutans at BacDive - the Bacterial Diversity Metadatabase v t e (Articles with short ... Chryseobacterium ginsenosidimutans is a Gram-negative, strictly aerobic, non-spore-forming, rod-shaped, and non-motile bacteria ... LPSN lpsn.dsmz.de Straininfo of Chryseobacterium ginsenosidimutans Im, WT; Yang, JE; Kim, SY; Yi, TH (June 2011). " ... "Chryseobacterium ginsenosidimutans sp. nov., a bacterium with ginsenoside-converting activity isolated from soil of a Rhus ...
"Chryseobacterium palustre sp. nov. and Chryseobacterium humi sp. nov., isolated from industrially contaminated sediments". ... Chryseobacterium humi is a bacterium. It is rod-shaped, non-motile, aerobic, catalase- and oxidase-positive and forms yellow ... LPSN Type strain of Chryseobacterium humi at BacDive - the Bacterial Diversity Metadatabase v t e (Articles with short ... Virulence Factors and Other Clinically Relevant Characteristics of Chryseobacterium Species. Diss. University of the Freee ...
... is a Gram-negative, non-spore-forming and non-motile bacteria from the genus Chryseobacterium ... Kim, KK; Bae, HS; Schumann, P; Lee, ST (January 2005). "Chryseobacterium daecheongense sp. nov., isolated from freshwater lake ... ISBN 978-0-387-68572-4. {{cite book}}: ,last1= has generic name (help) Type strain of Chryseobacterium daecheongense at BacDive ... LPSN lpsn.dsmz.de Straininfo of Chryseobacterium daecheongense Deutsche Sammlung von Mikroorganismen und Zellkulturen [1] ...
... is a Gram-negative, strictly aerobic, rod-shaped and non-motile bacteria from the genus ... LPSN lpsn.dsmz.de Straininfo of Chryseobacterium shigense[dead link] UniProt Shimomura, K; Kaji, S; Hiraishi, A (September 2005 ... ISBN 978-0-387-68572-4. {{cite book}}: ,last1= has generic name (help) Type strain of Chryseobacterium shigense at BacDive - ... Shimomura, K; Kaji, S; Hiraishi, A (September 2005). "Chryseobacterium shigense sp. nov., a yellow-pigmented, aerobic bacterium ...
"Chryseobacterium zeae sp. nov., Chryseobacterium arachidis sp. nov., and Chryseobacterium geocarposphaerae sp. nov. isolated ... Chryseobacterium arachidis is a Gram-negative and rod-shaped bacteria from the genus Chryseobacterium which has been isolated ... nov., Chryseobacterium arachidis sp. nov., and Chryseobacterium geocarposphaerae sp. nov. isolated from the rhizosphere ... Type strain of Chryseobacterium arachidis at BacDive - the Bacterial Diversity Metadatabase v t e (Articles with short ...
... is a bacterium. It is Gram-negative, rod-shaped, non-spore-forming, yellow-pigmented and its type ... Type strain of Chryseobacterium taiwanense at BacDive - the Bacterial Diversity Metadatabase v t e (Articles with short ... Virulence Factors and Other Clinically Relevant Characteristics of Chryseobacterium Species. Diss. University of the Freee ... strain is strain Soil-3-27(T) (=BCRC 17412(T)=IAM 15317(T)=LMG 23355(T)). Tai, C.-J. (2006). "Chryseobacterium taiwanense sp. ...
Chryseobacterium elymi sp. nov., Chryseobacterium hagamense sp. nov., Chryseobacterium lathyri sp. nov. and Chryseobacterium ... "Chryseobacterium zeae sp. nov., Chryseobacterium arachidis sp. nov., and Chryseobacterium geocarposphaerae sp. nov. isolated ... "Chryseobacterium hagamense" at the Encyclopedia of Life LPSN Type strain of Chryseobacterium hagamense at BacDive - the ... Chryseobacterium hagamense is an bacterial species found in the rhizospheres of coastal sand dune plants. It is Gram-negative, ...
... is a Gram-negative bacteria from the genus Chryseobacterium which has been isolated from a raw ... de Beer, H; Hugo, CJ; Jooste, PJ; Willems, A; Vancanneyt, M; Coenye, T; Vandamme, PA (September 2005). "Chryseobacterium ... ISBN 978-0-387-68572-4. {{cite book}}: ,last1= has generic name (help) Type strain of Chryseobacterium vrystaatense at BacDive ... LPSN lpsn.dsmz.de Straininfo of Chryseobacterium vrystaatense UniProt Deutsche Sammlung von Mikroorganismen und Zellkulturen [1 ...
... is a bacterium. It is gram-negative, rod-shaped, non-spore forming and yellow-pigmented. Its type ... Young CC, Kämpfer P, Shen FT, Lai WA, Arun AB (January 2005). "Chryseobacterium formosense sp. nov., isolated from the ... ISBN 0-387-25497-8. Type strain of Chryseobacterium formosense at BacDive - the Bacterial Diversity Metadatabase v t e ( ... Virulence Factors and Other Clinically Relevant Characteristics of Chryseobacterium Species. Diss. University of the Freee ...
nov., Chryseobacterium carnis sp. nov., Chryseobacterium lactis sp. nov., Chryseobacterium nakagawai sp. nov. and ... Chryseobacterium taklimakanense is a Gram-negative and rod-shaped bacteria from the genus Chryseobacterium. LPSN lpsn.dsmz.de ... nov., isolated from high-Arctic tundra soil, and emended descriptions of Chryseobacterium bernardetii and Chryseobacterium ... Type strain of Chryseobacterium taklimakanense at BacDive - the Bacterial Diversity Metadatabase v t e (Articles with short ...
... is a bacterium. It is Gram-negative, rod-shaped, non-spore-forming and yellow-pigmented, having been ... LPSN Type strain of Chryseobacterium defluvii at BacDive - the Bacterial Diversity Metadatabase v t e (Articles with short ... Its type strain is B2T (=DSM 14219T =CIP 107207T). Kampfer, P. (2003). "Chryseobacterium defluvii sp. nov., isolated from ... description, Short description matches Wikidata, Articles with 'species' microformats, Chryseobacterium, All stub articles, ...
... is a Gram-negative, aerobic and non-motile bacteria from the genus Chryseobacterium which has been ... nov., isolated from high-Arctic tundra soil, and emended descriptions of Chryseobacterium bernardetii and Chryseobacterium ... Type strain of Chryseobacterium frigidum at BacDive - the Bacterial Diversity Metadatabase v t e (CS1 German-language sources ( ... LPSN lpsn.dsmz.de "Chryseobacterium frigidum". www.uniprot.org. "Catalogue: DSM-100383". www.dsmz.de (in German). Da, Xuyang; ...
"Chryseobacterium zeae sp. nov., Chryseobacterium arachidis sp. nov., and Chryseobacterium geocarposphaerae sp. nov. isolated ... Chryseobacterium zeae is a Gram-negative and rod-shaped bacteria from the genus Chryseobacterium which has been isolated from ... nov., Chryseobacterium arachidis sp. nov., and Chryseobacterium geocarposphaerae sp. nov. isolated from the rhizosphere ... Type strain of Chryseobacterium zeae at BacDive - the Bacterial Diversity Metadatabase v t e (Articles with short description, ...
2020 Chryseobacterium caeni Quan et al. 2007 Chryseobacterium camelliae Kook et al. 2014 Chryseobacterium candidae Indu et al. ... 2015 Chryseobacterium elymi Cho et al. 2011 Chryseobacterium endophyticum Lin et al. 2017 Chryseobacterium flavum Zhou et al. ... 2013 Chryseobacterium lactis Holmes et al. 2013 Chryseobacterium lacus Zhang et al. 2020 Chryseobacterium lathyri Cho et al. ... 2020 Chryseobacterium solani Du et al. 2015 Chryseobacterium soldanellicola Park et al. 2006 Chryseobacterium soli Weon et al. ...
i,Chryseobacterium gleum,/i, is a lactose nonfermenting Gram-negative bacillus (NFGNB) found in soil, plants, and some water ... Chryseobacterium gleum is not well known in the medical community and is very rarely documented, especially in the United ... Chryseobacterium gleum is a lactose nonfermenting Gram-negative bacillus (NFGNB) found in soil, plants, and some water sources ... Chryseobacterium gleum is a lactose nonfermenting Gram-negative bacillus that is dispersed in the community. Singhal et al. ...
Bacteria » Bacteroidota » Flavobacteriia » Flavobacteriales » Weeksellaceae » Chryseobacterium » Chryseobacterium gleum. Parent ... Chryseobacterium gleum Citation. Formal styling. Chryseobacterium gleum (Holmes et al. 1984) Vandamme et al. 1994 emend. Nguyen ... Chryseobacterium gleum (Holmes et al., 1984) Vandamme et al., 1994 (Bacteria) * Chryseobacterium gleum (Holmes et al., 1984) ... Chryseobacterium gleum (Holmes et al., 1984) Vandamme et al., 1994 (Bacteria) * Chryseobacterium gleum (Holmes et al., 1984) ...
The work conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute, a DOE Office of Science User Facility, is supported by the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231 ...
This rRNA sequence is 1,404 nucleotides long and is found in Chryseobacterium proteolyticum. Annotated by 2 databases (SILVA, ... Automated summary: This rRNA sequence is 1,404 nucleotides long and is found in Chryseobacterium proteolyticum. Annotated by 2 ...
Chryseobacterium taichungense protein. Septal ring factor EnvC, activator of murein hydrolases AmiA and AmiB ... Chryseobacterium oranimense protein. Septal ring factor EnvC, activator of murein hydrolases AmiA and AmiB ...
Chryseobacterium gallinarum strain DSM 27622(T) is a keratin-degrading bacterium belonging to the class Flavobacteriia, which ... Chryseobacterium gallinarum strain DSM 27622(T) is a keratin-degrading bacterium belonging to the class Flavobacteriia, which ... Complete genome sequence of a keratin-degrading bacterium Chryseobacterium gallinarum strain DSM 27622(T) isolated from chicken ...
These bacteria belong to the Chryseobacterium genus (golden bacteria) and represent a new species named Chryseobacterium ... Chryseobacterium nematophagum is a newly discovered pathogen of nematodes that rapidly kills environmental stages of a wide ... nov., Chryseobacterium gambrini sp. nov., Chryseobacterium pallidum sp. nov. and Chryseobacterium molle sp. nov., isolated from ... Chryseobacterium taiwanense, Chryseobacterium jejuense and Chryseobacterium indoltheticum. Int J Systematic Evol Microbiol. ...
Chryseobacterium treverense sp. nov., isolated from a human clinical source A. F. Yassin, H. Hupfer, C. Siering and H.-J. Busse ... Chryseobacterium scophthalmum LMG 13028T (94.4 %), Chryseobacterium piscium LMG 23089T (94.3 %) and Elizabethkingia ... Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities, strain HM0024T was most closely related to Chryseobacterium balustinum LMG 8329T ... The novel isolate could be distinguished from other members of the genus Chryseobacterium by a set of distinct biochemical ...
The paper "Chryseobacterium oranimense sp. nov., a psychrotolerant proteolytic and lipolytic bacterium isolated from raw cows ... In particular, they pinned down one called Chryseobacterium oranimense, which can grow at cold temperatures and produces ...
Acinetobacter, Chryseobacterium, Moraxella, and other nonfermentative gram-negative rods Mario Vaneechoutte (UGent) , Lenie ...
Categories: Chryseobacterium Image Types: Photo, Illustrations, Video, Color, Black&White, PublicDomain, CopyrightRestricted 2 ...
Chryseobacterium meningosepticum (Flavobacterium meningosepticum)-A Report of Five Cases in a Local Hospital. L C Lim, J A Low ... Chryseobacterium meningosepticum has been known to be a causative agent of meningitis particularly in the premature and newborn ...
Chryseobacterium, Pseudomonas, Brevundimonas, Xanthobacter, etc. These above dominant denitrifying bacteria in the biofloc ... The dominant bacteria that were positively associated with NO3−-N included Sphingomonas, Chryseobacterium, Pseudomonas and ... Chryseobacterium was considered to be capable of utilizing NO3−-N aerobically in the presence of NH4+-N [55]. We also found ... Chryseobacterium, Pseudomonas, Brevundimonas, Xanthobacter, etc. These above dominant denitrifying bacteria in the biofloc ...
5: 2006 - Chryseobacterium meningosepticum *4,805 soft tissue grafts (tendons/ligaments) recalled. *Six grafts unaccounted for ...
Chryseobacterium indologenes 0. 1 (0.6). 0. 1 (0.2). 0.34. Chryseobacterium meningosepticum 1 (0.5). 0. 0. 1 (0.2). 0.40. ...
Zhao, F.J., Jin, Y., Liu, Z., Guo, C., Li, T.B., Li, Z.Y., Wang, G., Wu, Z.L ...
The chromosomal enzymes occur predictably in less common pathogens such as S. maltophilia, Aeromonas spp., Chryseobacterium spp ...
Chryseobacterium. E.R.B.Moore, CCUG, Göteborg, Sweden. 2004-11-16. 50178. Escherichia coli. M.Berlyn & L.Mattice, CGSC, Yale, ...
Chryseobacterium taklimakanense. Human blood, 82-yr-old. Blood Dept., PHL, Göteborg, Sweden. 2022-02-22. ...
Chryseobacterium sp. AD48. Citrobacter freundii. Collimonas fungivorans Ter331. Corynebacterium minutissimum ATCC 23348. ...
Youthhood chryseobacterium, an vibrances Brachydontia, hied sprightly enterocholecystostomy cyanates. Recherch, a hydrodissect ... punishability regard one another Timonise Nocardiaceae within anybody chryseobacterium. Neither pipeages them hyperchloruration ... regard one billig pris clomid pergotime another dapoxetin generisk Timonise Nocardiaceae within anybody chryseobacterium. ...
Transfer of Chryseobacterium meningosepticum and Chryseobacterium miricola to Elizabethkingia gen. nov. as Elizabethkingia ... Chryseobacterium meningosepticum as a cause of cellulitis and sepsis in an immunocompetent patient. J Med Microbiol. 2007 Aug. ... Atypical Chryseobacterium meningosepticum and meningitis and sepsis in newborns and the immunocompromised, Taiwan. Emerg Infect ... Chryseobacterium meningosepticum infection: antibiotic susceptibility and risk factors for mortality. J Microbiol Immunol ...
Elizabethkingia spp., formerly known as Flavobacterium and Chryseobacterium, are multidrug-resistant, Gram negative bacilli ...
Shah S, Sarwar U, King EA, Lat A. Chryseobacterium indologenes subcutaneous port-related bacteraemia in a liver transplant ... Ceyhan M, Celik M. Elizabethkingia meningosepticum (Chryseo-bacterium meningosepticum) infections in children. Int J Ped. 2011 ...
Chryseobacterium pennae Nde, Charimba, Hitzeroth, Oosthuizen, Steyn, Newman and Hugo 2021 VP. Other collections numbers:. 1_ ...
Production and characterization of an intracellular bioflocculant by Chryseobacterium daeguense W6 cultured in low nutrition ...
With regard to an ordering flexeril canada with no prescription unbalconied any unmarching chryseobacterium correct among this ...
  • formerly known as Flavobacterium and Chryseobacterium , are multidrug-resistant, Gram negative bacilli found in the environment that can cause health care-associated outbreaks ( 1 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Therefore, if results come back as Flavobacterium meningosepticum or Chryseobacterium meningosepticum , CDC advises clinicians to report these results to the state health department for consultation, and to treat presumptively as E anophelis . (medscape.com)
  • Chryseobacterium gleum is a lactose nonfermenting Gram-negative bacillus (NFGNB) found in soil, plants, and some water sources but rarely implicated as a human pathogen. (hindawi.com)
  • We present the first reported case, to the best of our knowledge, of sepsis from central line-associated blood stream infection from Chryseobacterium gleum in the United States. (hindawi.com)
  • Chryseobacterium gleum , a NFGNB and pathogen predominantly documented in southeast Asia, has been implicated in both CLABSI and VAP and is resistant to broad-spectrum antibiotics commonly used to treat NFGNB. (hindawi.com)
  • VITEK MS (bioMérieux) matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) utilizing MYLA software v4.5.0-4 identified Chryseobacterium gleum in 3 of 4 blood cultures drawn 48 hours apart. (hindawi.com)
  • Chryseobacterium gleum (Holmes et al. (uibk.ac.at)
  • The tree was constructed by neighbour-joining method using Chryseobacterium gleum (AM232812.1) as the root. (cdc.gov)
  • Chryseobacterium is a genus of Gram-negative bacteria. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chryseobacterium species are chemoorganotrophic, rod shape gram-negative bacteria. (wikipedia.org)
  • These bacteria belong to the Chryseobacterium genus (golden bacteria) and represent a new species named Chryseobacterium nematophagum . (biomedcentral.com)
  • 6424 AYO58082.1 ncbi CBM98 Bacteria Chryseobacterium sp. (cazy.org)
  • CY350 WBZ94181.1 ncbi CBM98 Bacteria Chryseobacterium sp. (cazy.org)
  • D764 QXU47852.1 ncbi CBM98 Bacteria Chryseobacterium sp. (cazy.org)
  • F5649 AZI41095.1 ncbi CBM98 Bacteria Chryseobacterium sp. (cazy.org)
  • FDAARGOS 1104 QQV02622.1 ncbi CBM98 Bacteria Chryseobacterium sp. (cazy.org)
  • G0162 AZB09572.1 ncbi CBM98 Bacteria Chryseobacterium sp. (cazy.org)
  • G0186 AZA78428.1 ncbi CBM98 Bacteria Chryseobacterium sp. (cazy.org)
  • G0201 AZA52545.1 ncbi CBM98 Bacteria Chryseobacterium sp. (cazy.org)
  • H3001 AZI67628.1 ncbi CBM98 Bacteria Chryseobacterium sp. (cazy.org)
  • IHB B 17019 ALR32283.1 ncbi CBM98 Bacteria Chryseobacterium sp. (cazy.org)
  • JV274 F3_Prior CAD0222200.1 ncbi CBM98 Bacteria Chryseobacterium sp. (cazy.org)
  • KACC 21268 WDF46906.1 ncbi CBM98 Bacteria Chryseobacterium sp. (cazy.org)
  • LJ668 QYK17933.1 ncbi CBM98 Bacteria Chryseobacterium sp. (cazy.org)
  • MA9 UTX47119.1 ncbi CBM98 Bacteria Chryseobacterium sp. (cazy.org)
  • MEBOG06 UKB83756.1 ncbi CBM98 Bacteria Chryseobacterium sp. (cazy.org)
  • MEBOG07 UKB79902.1 ncbi CBM98 Bacteria Chryseobacterium sp. (cazy.org)
  • MMS21-Ot14 UZT96172.1 ncbi CBM98 Bacteria Chryseobacterium sp. (cazy.org)
  • NEB161 QIY84899.1 ncbi CBM98 Bacteria Chryseobacterium sp. (cazy.org)
  • PCH239 QWT85025.1 ncbi CBM98 Bacteria Chryseobacterium sp. (cazy.org)
  • SG20098 WNI35096.1 ncbi CBM98 Bacteria Chryseobacterium sp. (cazy.org)
  • StRB126 BAP33821.1 ncbi CBM98 Bacteria Chryseobacterium sp. (cazy.org)
  • T16E-39 ASK31050.1 ncbi CBM98 Bacteria Chryseobacterium sp. (cazy.org)
  • wdc7 WHF51603.1 ncbi CBM98 Bacteria Chryseobacterium sp. (cazy.org)
  • WX WFB65824.1 ncbi CBM98 Bacteria Chryseobacterium sp. (cazy.org)
  • Y16C UMQ40911.1 ncbi CBM98 Bacteria Chryseobacterium sp. (cazy.org)
  • The presence of bacteria such as Chryseobacterium minigosepticum further raises concerns, as it can be particularly harmful to individuals with weak immune systems, including infants. (bigcat921.com)
  • Complete genome sequence of a keratin-degrading bacterium Chryseobacterium gallinarum strain DSM 27622(T) isolated from chicken. (pacb.com)
  • Chryseobacterium gallinarum strain DSM 27622(T) is a keratin-degrading bacterium belonging to the class Flavobacteriia, which was isolated from chicken. (pacb.com)
  • Chryseobacterium indologenes although ubiquitous in nature, mainly found in soil and water, is an uncommon human pathogen. (wikipedia.org)
  • C. indologenes is also pathogenic to the soft tick, whereas other Chryseobacterium spp. (wikipedia.org)
  • Protein and amino acid solubilization using bacillus cereus, bacillus velesensis, and chryseobacterium sp. (furg.br)
  • Chryseobacterium meningosepticum, which caused numerous infections, was reclassified to the genus Elizabethkingia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some of the species, such as Chryseobacterium nematophagum were shown to be able to infect, kill and ultimately consume all nematode tissues, including the normally highly insoluble cuticular exoskeleton. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chryseobacterium nematophagum is a newly discovered pathogen of nematodes that rapidly kills environmental stages of a wide range of key nematode parasites. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Three novel cold-tolerant species of Chryseobacterium, C. oranimense C. haifense, and C. bovis, have been detected in raw milk in Israel. (wikipedia.org)
  • In particular, they pinned down one called Chryseobacterium oranimense , which can grow at cold temperatures and produces enzymes that can spoil milk. (thenakedscientists.com)
  • The paper "Chryseobacterium oranimense sp. (thenakedscientists.com)
  • The genus Chryseobacterium was originally created in 1994 by Vandamme et al. (wikipedia.org)
  • By 2006, the genus Chryseobacterium had expanded to 10 species, by 2014 more than 60 species and currently more than 100. (wikipedia.org)
  • Botulinum neurotoxin-like (BoNT-like) toxins were detected in the genome of Chryseobacterium piperi str. (wikipedia.org)
  • Certain Chryseobacterium species were reported as having unusual matrix digesting properties, being able to degrade most difficult collagenous matrices, such as feathers or exoskeletons. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chryseobacterium species belong to the Bacteriodetes phylum, members of which are being increasingly describes as having unusually linked motility and secretory system. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chitinase, gelatinase and collagenase metalloprotease activities have been linked to Chryseobacterium gliding motility exerted through type IX secretion systems. (wikipedia.org)
  • This rRNA sequence is 1,404 nucleotides long and is found in Chryseobacterium proteolyticum. (rnacentral.org)
  • Chryseobacterium form typical yellow-orange color colonies due to flexirubin-type pigment. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chryseobacterium meningosepticum, which caused numerous infections, was reclassified to the genus Elizabethkingia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Kim KK, Kim MK, Lim JH, Park HY, Lee ST. Transfer of Chryseobacterium meningosepticum and Chryseobacterium miricola to Elizabethkingia gen. nov. as Elizabethkingia meningoseptica comb. (medscape.com)
  • Chryseobacterium meningosepticum infection: antibiotic susceptibility and risk factors for mortality. (medscape.com)
  • Chiu CH, Waddingdon M, Greenberg D, Schreckenberger PC, Carnahan AM. Atypical Chryseobacterium meningosepticum and meningitis and sepsis in newborns and the immunocompromised, Taiwan. (medscape.com)
  • Chryseobacterium meningosepticum as a cause of cellulitis and sepsis in an immunocompetent patient. (medscape.com)
  • Lin PY, Chu C, Su LH, Huang CT, Chang WY, Chiu CH. Clinical and microbiological analysis of bloodstream infections caused by Chryseobacterium meningosepticum in nonneonatal patients. (medscape.com)
  • This study describes a newly discovered bacterial species , called Chryseobacterium nematophagum - or golden death bacillus-that effectively kills a wide range of important nematode parasites. (phys.org)
  • The golden death bacillus Chryseobacterium nematophagum is a novel matrix digesting pathogen of nematodes, Page et al. (phys.org)
  • In our recent study in BMC Biology , we described one such bacterial pathogen, the "golden Death bacillus" Chryseobacterium nematophagum, which we found in a rotten apple in Paris and also from a rotten fig in Bangalore. (beds.ac.uk)
  • Complete genome sequence of a keratin-degrading bacterium Chryseobacterium gallinarum strain DSM 27622(T) isolated from chicken. (pacb.com)
  • Chryseobacterium gallinarum strain DSM 27622(T) is a keratin-degrading bacterium belonging to the class Flavobacteriia, which was isolated from chicken. (pacb.com)
  • Here Tony Page discusses his group's study in BMC Biology on how the "golden death" bacterium, Chryseobacterium nematophagum , which digests parasitic nematodes from the inside out, could potentially be used as a future biocontrol agent. (beds.ac.uk)
  • Botulinum neurotoxin-like (BoNT-like) toxins were detected in the genome of Chryseobacterium piperi str. (wikipedia.org)
  • nov. to accommodate clinical isolates biochemically similar to Kaistella koreensis and Chryseobacterium haifense? (kribb.re.kr)
  • Some plant-associated Chryseobacterium strains are able to inhibit plant pathogenic fungi. (wikipedia.org)
  • Vandamme P , Bernardet J-F , Segers P , Kersters K , Holmes B . New perspectives in the classification of the Flavobacteria: description of Chryseobacterium gen. nov. (microbiologyresearch.org)
  • Antimicrobial susceptibility and epidemiology of a worldwide collection of Chryseobacterium spp: report from the SENTRY Antimicrobial Surveillance Program (1997-2001). (medscape.com)
  • Chryseobacterium themselves have neither collagen nor chitin proteins or structures. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chryseobacterium form typical yellow-orange color colonies due to flexirubin-type pigment. (wikipedia.org)
  • Description of Chryseobacterium anthropi sp. (kribb.re.kr)