Lung Diseases, Obstructive: Any disorder marked by obstruction of conducting airways of the lung. AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION may be acute, chronic, intermittent, or persistent.Pulmonary Heart Disease: Hypertrophy and dilation of the RIGHT VENTRICLE of the heart that is caused by PULMONARY HYPERTENSION. This condition is often associated with pulmonary parenchymal or vascular diseases, such as CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE and PULMONARY EMBOLISM.Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive: A disease of chronic diffuse irreversible airflow obstruction. Subcategories of COPD include CHRONIC BRONCHITIS and PULMONARY EMPHYSEMA.Spirometry: Measurement of volume of air inhaled or exhaled by the lung.Oxygen Inhalation Therapy: Inhalation of oxygen aimed at restoring toward normal any pathophysiologic alterations of gas exchange in the cardiopulmonary system, as by the use of a respirator, nasal catheter, tent, chamber, or mask. (From Dorland, 27th ed & Stedman, 25th ed)Forced Expiratory Volume: Measure of the maximum amount of air that can be expelled in a given number of seconds during a FORCED VITAL CAPACITY determination . It is usually given as FEV followed by a subscript indicating the number of seconds over which the measurement is made, although it is sometimes given as a percentage of forced vital capacity.Respiratory Function Tests: Measurement of the various processes involved in the act of respiration: inspiration, expiration, oxygen and carbon dioxide exchange, lung volume and compliance, etc.Airway Obstruction: Any hindrance to the passage of air into and out of the lungs.Terbutaline: A selective beta-2 adrenergic agonist used as a bronchodilator and tocolytic.Asthma: A form of bronchial disorder with three distinct components: airway hyper-responsiveness (RESPIRATORY HYPERSENSITIVITY), airway INFLAMMATION, and intermittent AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION. It is characterized by spasmodic contraction of airway smooth muscle, WHEEZING, and dyspnea (DYSPNEA, PAROXYSMAL).Bronchitis: Inflammation of the large airways in the lung including any part of the BRONCHI, from the PRIMARY BRONCHI to the TERTIARY BRONCHI.Ipratropium: A muscarinic antagonist structurally related to ATROPINE but often considered safer and more effective for inhalation use. It is used for various bronchial disorders, in rhinitis, and as an antiarrhythmic.Bronchodilator Agents: Agents that cause an increase in the expansion of a bronchus or bronchial tubes.Vital Capacity: The volume of air that is exhaled by a maximal expiration following a maximal inspiration.Administration, Inhalation: The administration of drugs by the respiratory route. It includes insufflation into the respiratory tract.Albuterol: A short-acting beta-2 adrenergic agonist that is primarily used as a bronchodilator agent to treat ASTHMA. Albuterol is prepared as a racemic mixture of R(-) and S(+) stereoisomers. The stereospecific preparation of R(-) isomer of albuterol is referred to as levalbuterol.Peak Expiratory Flow Rate: Measurement of the maximum rate of airflow attained during a FORCED VITAL CAPACITY determination. Common abbreviations are PEFR and PFR.Lung: Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.Bronchi: The larger air passages of the lungs arising from the terminal bifurcation of the TRACHEA. They include the largest two primary bronchi which branch out into secondary bronchi, and tertiary bronchi which extend into BRONCHIOLES and PULMONARY ALVEOLI.Adrenal Cortex HormonesTheophylline: A methyl xanthine derivative from tea with diuretic, smooth muscle relaxant, bronchial dilation, cardiac and central nervous system stimulant activities. Theophylline inhibits the 3',5'-CYCLIC NUCLEOTIDE PHOSPHODIESTERASE that degrades CYCLIC AMP thus potentiates the actions of agents that act through ADENYLYL CYCLASES and cyclic AMP.Aerosols: Colloids with a gaseous dispersing phase and either liquid (fog) or solid (smoke) dispersed phase; used in fumigation or in inhalation therapy; may contain propellant agents.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Sputum: Material coughed up from the lungs and expectorated via the mouth. It contains MUCUS, cellular debris, and microorganisms. It may also contain blood or pus.Sleep Apnea, Obstructive: A disorder characterized by recurrent apneas during sleep despite persistent respiratory efforts. It is due to upper airway obstruction. The respiratory pauses may induce HYPERCAPNIA or HYPOXIA. Cardiac arrhythmias and elevation of systemic and pulmonary arterial pressures may occur. Frequent partial arousals occur throughout sleep, resulting in relative SLEEP DEPRIVATION and daytime tiredness. Associated conditions include OBESITY; ACROMEGALY; MYXEDEMA; micrognathia; MYOTONIC DYSTROPHY; adenotonsilar dystrophy; and NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p395)Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Airway Remodeling: The structural changes in the number, mass, size and/or composition of the airway tissues.Oxygen: An element with atomic symbol O, atomic number 8, and atomic weight [15.99903; 15.99977]. It is the most abundant element on earth and essential for respiration.Airway Resistance: Physiologically, the opposition to flow of air caused by the forces of friction. As a part of pulmonary function testing, it is the ratio of driving pressure to the rate of air flow.Respiratory Tract DiseasesPrevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Double-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)EnglandNebulizers and Vaporizers: Devices that cause a liquid or solid to be converted into an aerosol (spray) or a vapor. It is used in drug administration by inhalation, humidification of ambient air, and in certain analytical instruments.Bronchial Hyperreactivity: Tendency of the smooth muscle of the tracheobronchial tree to contract more intensely in response to a given stimulus than it does in the response seen in normal individuals. This condition is present in virtually all symptomatic patients with asthma. The most prominent manifestation of this smooth muscle contraction is a decrease in airway caliber that can be readily measured in the pulmonary function laboratory.Respiratory System: The tubular and cavernous organs and structures, by means of which pulmonary ventilation and gas exchange between ambient air and the blood are brought about.Respiratory Mucosa: The mucous membrane lining the RESPIRATORY TRACT, including the NASAL CAVITY; the LARYNX; the TRACHEA; and the BRONCHI tree. The respiratory mucosa consists of various types of epithelial cells ranging from ciliated columnar to simple squamous, mucous GOBLET CELLS, and glands containing both mucous and serous cells.Pulmonary Emphysema: Enlargement of air spaces distal to the TERMINAL BRONCHIOLES where gas-exchange normally takes place. This is usually due to destruction of the alveolar wall. Pulmonary emphysema can be classified by the location and distribution of the lesions.Dyspnea: Difficult or labored breathing.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Respiratory Hypersensitivity: A form of hypersensitivity affecting the respiratory tract. It includes ASTHMA and RHINITIS, ALLERGIC, SEASONAL.Jaundice, Obstructive: Jaundice, the condition with yellowish staining of the skin and mucous membranes, that is due to impaired BILE flow in the BILIARY TRACT, such as INTRAHEPATIC CHOLESTASIS, or EXTRAHEPATIC CHOLESTASIS.National Academy of Sciences (U.S.): A United States organization of distinguished scientists and engineers established for the purpose of investigating and reporting upon any subject of art or science as requested by any department of government. The National Research Council organized by NAS serves as the principal operating agency to stimulate and support research.Bronchography: Radiography of the bronchial tree after injection of a contrast medium.Authorship: The profession of writing. Also the identity of the writer as the creator of a literary production.Institute of Medicine (U.S.): Identifies, for study and analysis, important issues and problems that relate to health and medicine. The Institute initiates and conducts studies of national policy and planning for health care and health-related education and research; it also responds to requests from the federal government and other agencies for studies and advice.Neuropsychology: A branch of psychology which investigates the correlation between experience or behavior and the basic neurophysiological processes. The term neuropsychology stresses the dominant role of the nervous system. It is a more narrowly defined field than physiological psychology or psychophysiology.Copyright: It is a form of protection provided by law. In the United States this protection is granted to authors of original works of authorship, including literary, dramatic, musical, artistic, and certain other intellectual works. This protection is available to both published and unpublished works. (from Circular of the United States Copyright Office, 6/30/2008)Inflammation: A pathological process characterized by injury or destruction of tissues caused by a variety of cytologic and chemical reactions. It is usually manifested by typical signs of pain, heat, redness, swelling, and loss of function.Muscle, Smooth: Unstriated and unstriped muscle, one of the muscles of the internal organs, blood vessels, hair follicles, etc. Contractile elements are elongated, usually spindle-shaped cells with centrally located nuclei. Smooth muscle fibers are bound together into sheets or bundles by reticular fibers and frequently elastic nets are also abundant. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Muscle, Smooth, Vascular: The nonstriated involuntary muscle tissue of blood vessels.
"Characteristics of airway hyperresponsiveness in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease". Am. J. Respir. Crit. Care ... "Methacholine reactivity predicts changes in lung function over time in smokers with early chronic obstructive pulmonary disease ... is a hallmark of asthma but also occurs frequently in people suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In ... Bronchial hyperresponsiveness (or other combinations with airway or hyperreactivity) is a state characterised by easily ...
... is a drug for obstructive airway disease. Nicrosini, F.; Carpinella, G. (1978). "Eprozinol treatment of chronic ...
It is also seen in people with chronic obstructive airway disease. "Laryngocele" at Dorland's Medical Dictionary. ...
"A Persistent and Diverse Airway Microbiota Present during Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Exacerbations". OMICS: A ... community composition seem to play a role in progression of such pulmonary disorders as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease ( ... The airways are continually exposed to a multitude of microorganisms, some of which are able to persist and even colonize ... The airway epithelium together with alveolar macrophages and dendritic cells play a major role in the initial recognition of ...
Abnormal levels of ATP and adenosine are present in the airways of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The ... Esther CR, Jr; Alexis, NE; Picher, M (2011). "Regulation of airway nucleotides in chronic lung diseases". Sub-cellular ... "Adenosine signaling during acute and chronic disease states". Journal of Molecular Medicine. 91 (2): 173-181. doi:10.1007/ ... In Alzheimer's disease (AD), the expression of A1 and A2A receptors in the frontal cortex of the human brain is increased, ...
... in patients with chronic obstructive airways disease". Br J Clin Pharmacol. 26 (6): 709-713. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2125.1988. ... Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) Allergic rhinitis Atopic dermatitis Hives Angioedema Anaphylaxis Food allergies ... Eyes: chronic use may predispose to cataract and retinopathy. Vulnerability to infection: By suppressing immune reactions ( ... Archives of Disease in Childhood. 101 (4): 365-70. doi:10.1136/archdischild-2015-309522. PMC 4819633 . PMID 26768830. Rietschel ...
May 2013). "A dynamic bronchial airway gene expression signature of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung function ... "Increase of Th17 cells in peripheral blood of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease". Respiratory Medicine. 105 ( ... High levels of this cytokine are associated with several chronic inflammatory diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, ... Th17 cells is also strongly associated rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a chronic disorder with symptoms include chronic joint ...
"Is pesticide exposure a cause of obstructive airways disease?". European Respiratory Review. 23 (132): 180-92. doi:10.1183/ ... Alavanja MC, Hoppin JA, Kamel F (2004). "Health effects of chronic pesticide exposure: cancer and neurotoxicity". Annu Rev ... Once sick, wild birds may neglect their young, abandon their nests, and become more susceptible to predators or disease. ... They are particularly vulnerable to several type of diseases, insects, mites, and parasitic worms. In 2003, in California alone ...
Reversible airways diseases, particularly asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) Bradycardia (. ... Quickly stopping the medication in those with coronary artery disease may worsen symptoms. It may worsen the symptoms of asthma ...
... in patients with chronic obstructive airways disease". Br J Clin Pharmacol. 26 (6): 709-713. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2125.1988. ... "Archives of Disease in Childhood. 101 (4): 365-70. doi:10.1136/archdischild-2015-309522. PMC 4819633. PMID 26768830.. ... "PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases. 10 (7): e0004879. doi:10.1371/journal.pntd.0004879. PMC 4965027. PMID 27467600.. ... Eyes: chronic use may predispose to cataract and retinopathy.. *Vulnerability to infection: By suppressing immune reactions ( ...
Unencapsulated H. influenzae is often observed in the airways of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). ... August 2007). "Haemophilus influenzae induces neutrophil necrosis: a role in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease?". Am. J. ... Investigational Vaccine GSK2838504A When Administered to Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Patients With Persistent ... Naturally acquired disease caused by H. influenzae seems to occur in humans only. In infants and young children, H. influenzae ...
She had been suffering from asthma, reactive airways dysfunction syndrome, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and ... gastroesophageal reflux disease; she believed that the cause of these ailments was her exposure to toxic substances at "Ground ...
... hypothyroidism chronic obstructive airway disease aplastic anemia reticulocytosis (commonly from hemolysis or a recent history ... liver disease myeloproliferative disease myelodysplastic syndrome which most commonly presents with macrocytic anemia chronic ... Gastrointestinal diseases that may cause macrocytosis include celiac disease (severe sensitivity to gluten from wheat and other ... grains that causes intestinal damage) and Crohn's disease (inflammatory bowel disease that can affect any part of the ...
In obstructive diseases (asthma, COPD, chronic bronchitis, emphysema) FEV1 is diminished because of increased airway resistance ... to diagnose and differentiate between obstructive lung disease and restrictive lung disease[5] ... may be a more sensitive parameter than FEV1 in the detection of obstructive small airway disease.[14][15] However, in the ... and FEV1/VC as indicators of obstructive disease.[16][17] More rarely, forced expiratory flow may be given at intervals defined ...
There is also some use of heliox in conditions of the medium airways (croup, asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease ... Currently, heliox is mainly used in conditions of large airway narrowing (upper airway obstruction from tumors or foreign ... In the small airways where flow is laminar, resistance is proportional to gas viscosity and is not related to density and so ... In the large airways where flow is turbulent, resistance is proportional to density, so heliox has a significant effect. Heliox ...
... a rare and life-threatening form of non-reversible obstructive lung disease in which the bronchioles (small airway branches) ... Chronic industrial exposure to diacetyl fumes, such as in the microwave popcorn production industry, has been associated with ... "Diacetyl-induced lung disease". Toxicol Rev. 25 (4): 261-272. doi:10.2165/00139709-200625040-00006. PMID 17288497. Food portal ...
Although asthma is a chronic obstructive condition, it is not considered as a part of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, as ... Unlike these diseases, the airway obstruction in asthma is usually reversible; however, if left untreated, the chronic ... Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease can coexist with asthma and can occur as a complication of chronic asthma. After the age ... Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease". Applied therapeutics: the clinical use of drugs (9th ed.). Philadelphia: Lippincott ...
Sep 1984). "Bitolterol compared to isoproterenol in advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease". Chest. 86 (3): 404-8. doi: ... A preliminary review of its pharmacological properties and therapeutic efficacy in reversible obstructive airways disease". ... In these disorders there is a narrowing of the airways (bronchi and their ramifications) that carry air to the lungs. Muscle ...
The underlying causes include: Increased airways resistance (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, suffocation) ... such as in chronic bronchitis) Neuromuscular problems (Guillain-Barré syndrome, motor neuron disease) Deformed (kyphoscoliosis ... Bakke, SA; Botker, MT; Riddervold, IS; Kirkegaard, H; Christensen, EF (22 November 2014). "Continuous positive airway pressure ... in acute neuromuscular disease); this form can also cause type 2 respiratory failure if severe Diffusion problem (oxygen cannot ...
... role in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease". Am. J. Physiol. Lung Cell Mol. Physiol. 293 (2): L375-82. doi:10.1152/ajplung. ... Expression of TSLP is enhanced under asthma-like conditions (aka Airway HyperResponsiveness or AHR model in the mouse), ... expression is increased in asthmatic airways and correlates with expression of Th2-attracting chemokines and disease severity ... Lee HC, Ziegler SF (2007). "Inducible expression of the proallergic cytokine thymic stromal lymphopoietin in airway epithelial ...
2004). "The Nature of Small-Airway Obstruction in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease". N. Engl. J. Med. 350 (26): 2645-53. ... obstructive. acute. Acute bronchitis. chronic. COPD Chronic bronchitis. Acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis. Acute ... early-onset chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Risk to relatives for airflow obstruction and chronic bronchitis". Am. J. ... 2008). "A 4-year trial of tiotropium in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease". N. Engl. J. Med. 359 (15): 1543-54. doi:10.1056 ...
Wheezing is caused by the airways being too narrow. This can happen because of diseases like asthma or chronic obstructive ... If the airways are too narrow, the oxygen the body needs cannot get through. This can become a medical emergency. ... For example, if a person has pneumonia, mucus can build up in their bronchi and the bronchi's airways, and cause rhonchi.[3] ... "Diseases and Conditions: Wheezing". Cleveland Clinic. 15 April 2013. Retrieved 30 September 2015.. ...
... chronic bronchitis, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and chronic obstructive airways disease), vibration white ... "Personal injury is defined to include 'bodily injury, mental anguish, shock, sickness, disease or disability.' Property damage ... and conditions that are often classified as industrial disease cases, including asbestosis and peritoneal mesothelioma, chest ...
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), also known as chronic obstructive airways disease (COAD) or chronic airflow ... Obstructive lung disease is a category of respiratory disease characterized by airway obstruction. Many obstructive diseases of ... Types of obstructive lung disease include; asthma, bronchiectasis, bronchitis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD ... Following is an overview of the main obstructive lung diseases. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is mainly a combination ...
... bronchiectasis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are all obstructive lung diseases characterised by airway ... Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease includes chronic bronchitis and previously termed emphysema, can be related to smoking or ... Some types of chronic lung diseases are classified as restrictive lung disease, because of a restriction in the amount of lung ... Many obstructive lung diseases are managed by avoiding triggers (such as dust mites or smoking), with symptom control such as ...
Inhaled corticosteroids (e.g., for treatment of asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), are not intended to be ... CS1 maint: Extra text: authors list (link) Inhaled steroids in asthma optimizing effects in the airways. [S.l.]: Marcel Dekker ... or immunocompromising diseases. However, sometimes it can be chronic and intermittent, even lasting for many years. Chronicity ... It is often described as being "a disease of the diseased", occurring in the very young, the very old, or the very sick. ...
Historically this poisoning is mentioned over the millennia as mad honey disease. The ST-elevations in the ECG were a sign of ... After extensive work-up had excluded other causes of recurrent pneumonia and immunodeficiency, a non-obstructive middle lobe ... MLS is characterised by chronic hypoventilation and atelectasis of the middle lobe, facilitating secretion accumulation, ... without any visible airway obstruction. ... period of convalescence from a previous admission to a chronic ...
Miners phthisis was prototypical of such diseases. This and related conditions (e.g., grinders rot·) were associated with ... Airway-obstruction; Airway-resistance; Diseases; Occupational-exposure; Lung-disease; Occupational-health; Occupational-hazards ... defined chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This fit in with the British hypothesis, which viewed COPD and asthma ... with or without superimposed tubercular disease). Clinical syndromes consistent with chronic bronchitis or airway obstruction, ...
Dissociation of lung function and airway inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.. Lapperre TS1, Snoeck-Stroband ... Dissociation of lung function and airway inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: is it a real or statistical ... Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is defined by progressive, irreversible airflow limitation and an inflammatory ... We aimed to evaluate whether airflow limitation, airway responsiveness, and airway inflammation are separate entities ...
Human airway branch variation and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease Message Subject (Your Name) has sent you a message from ... Human airway branch variation and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Benjamin M. Smith, Hussein Traboulsi, John H. M. ... The human airway tree is a filter of noxious particulate matter, the primary cause of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease ( ... Susceptibility to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) beyond cigarette smoking is incompletely understood, although ...
... populations with inhalational lung injury and/or airway diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. ... Many "Survivors" in the WTC clinical program have a clinical syndrome characterized by chronic obstruction in small airways and ... This study will test the hypothesis that persistent symptoms in WTC "Survivors" are associated with abnormal small airways ...
Small-airway obstruction and emphysema in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.. McDonough JE1, Yuan R, Suzuki M, Seyednejad N ... The major sites of obstruction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are small airways (,2 mm in diameter). We wanted ... of small airways per lung pair in patients with stage 1 disease on the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease ( ... as judged by scoring on the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) scale, in isolated lungs removed from ...
Bacteria have been isolated from the lower airway of stable COPD patients, and airway inflammation has been related to ... is characterized by an accelerated decline in lung function and progressive airway inflammation. ... Airway bacterial load and FEV1 decline in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2003 ... Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by an accelerated decline in lung function and progressive airway ...
It has been reported that the EAT volume is increased in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, ... the square root of airway wall area of a hypothetical airway with an internal perimeter of 10 mm (√Aaw at Pi10) and the EAT ... A chest CT was used for the quantification of the emphysematous lesions, airway lesions, and EAT. These lesions were assessed ... Because EAT is also an independent predictor of CVD risk, these data suggest a mechanistic link between the airway predominant ...
... measurement in asthma and chronic obstructive airway disease (COAD). Authors. *. Gibson,. * Airway Research Centre, Respiratory ... chronic obstructive airway disease (COAD), bronchiectasis and healthy controls. The ratio of supernatant to pellet ECP was ... Osama Eltboli, Christopher E Brightling, Eosinophils as diagnostic tools in chronic lung disease, Expert Review of Respiratory ... as a biochemical marker of sputum eosinophil number and activation in subjects with asthma and other airway diseases. Methods ...
Increased histamine airway hyper-responsiveness predicts mortality from COPD. Although this trend was more pronounced in ... Histamine airway hyper-responsiveness and mortality from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a cohort study Lancet. 2000 Oct ... 246 died from cardiovascular disease, 54 from lung cancer, and 21 from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD]). ... Background: Smoking and airway lability, which is expressed by histamine airway hyper-responsiveness, are known risk factors ...
Reproducibility of walking test results in chronic obstructive airways disease. Message subject: (Your Name) has forwarded a ...
... is a compensatable disease. Miners are compensated for in-life respiratory disability and for findings at autopsy of COAD, ... In South Africa chronic obstructive airway disease (COAD), which could be due to working in a dusty atmosphere in scheduled ... Objectives: In South Africa chronic obstructive airway disease (COAD), which could be due to working in a dusty atmosphere in ... Correlation between autopsy findings for chronic obstructive airways disease and in-life disability in South African gold ...
Disease of the airways in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. M.G. Cosio Piqueras, M.G. Cosio ... Disease of the airways in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease Message Subject (Your Name) has sent you a message from ... Progression of small airway abnormalities in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Once the pathological changes in the ... Site and nature of airway obstruction in chronic obstructive lung disease. N Engl J Med 1968;278:1355-1360. ...
... double-blind crossover investigation in 12 patients with non-asthmatic chronic obstructive lung disease and co-existing stable ... Effects of single oral doses of bisoprolol and atenolol on airway function in nonasthmatic chronic obstructive lung disease and ... Adverse effect of propranolol on airway function in nonasthmatic chronic obstructive lung disease. Chest 79: 540-544Google ... Acute effects of oral metoprolol on ventilatory function in patients with chronic obstructive lung disease. Acta Ther 8: 5-16 ...
Sul-121 inhibits airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness in experimental models of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. ... Sul-121 inhibits airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness in experimental models of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, ... Sul-121 inhibits airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness in experimental models of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. ... Sul-121 inhibits airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness in experimental models of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. ...
Lower Airway Bacterial Colonization Patterns and Species-Specific Interactions in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. David ... Airway inflammation and bronchial bacterial colonization in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Am J Respir Crit Care Med ... A persistent and diverse airway microbiota present during chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations. Omics 14:9-59. ... Lower Airway Bacterial Colonization Patterns and Species-Specific Interactions in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease ...
... 1993) Eosinophilic and neutrophilic inflammation in asthma, chronic bronchitis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. J ... 1993) Airway inflammation in smokers with nonobstructive and obstructive chronic bronchitis. Am Rev Respir Dis 148:1226-1232, . ...
... affected the likelihood of a subsequent diagnosis of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). We ... affected the likelihood of a subsequent diagnosis of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). We ... we assessed how a diagnosis of obstructive airways disease (OAD) ... we assessed how a diagnosis of obstructive airways disease (OAD ... which together are categorized as obstructive airways disease (OAD); upper respiratory diseases that were predominantly chronic ...
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive. Pathologic Processes. Lung Diseases, Obstructive. Lung Diseases. Respiratory Tract ... Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or COPD is a chronic disease, which means that it cannot be cured, but that inhalers ... Suppress Small Airways Inflammation in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)?. The safety and scientific validity of ... In COPD, the airways become inflamed which can cause coughing and make the airways tighten. This inflammation is the root of ...
Antibacterial Defense of Human Airway Epithelial Cells from Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Patients Induced by Acute ... to an increased susceptibility to microbial infection in smokers and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD ... Antimicrobial proteins and peptides (AMPs) are a central component of the antibacterial activity of airway epithelial cells. It ... Our findings demonstrate that the antibacterial activity of cultured airway epithelial cells induced by acute bacterial ...
Background Chronic airway inflammation and hypersensitivity to bacterial infection may contribute to lung cancer pathogenesis. ... Promotion of lung carcinogenesis by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease-like airway inflammation in a K-ras-induced mouse ... Decramer M, Janssens W, Miravitlles M. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Lancet. 2012;379:1341-51.CrossRefPubMedGoogle ... End-stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: the cigarette is burned out but inflammation rages on. Am J Respir Crit Care ...
Bilateral Tension Pneumothorax Following Induction of Anesthesia in Two Patients with Chronic Obstructive Airway Disease. ... Bilateral Tension Pneumothorax Following Induction of Anesthesia in Two Patients with Chronic Obstructive Airway Disease ... Bilateral Tension Pneumothorax Following Induction of Anesthesia in Two Patients with Chronic Obstructive Airway Disease ... Bilateral Tension Pneumothorax Following Induction of Anesthesia in Two Patients with Chronic Obstructive Airway Disease. ...
Airway remodelling in smokers with or without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and the effects of inhaled ... Soltani Abhari, A 2010 , Airway remodelling in smokers with or without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and the ... Airway remodelling is defined as structural changes occurring in chronic inflammatory diseases of the airways. Our knowledge ... Basement membrane and vascular remodelling in smokers and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a cross-sectional study, ...
The patients were divided to three groups (GOLD stage II, III and IV) according to the severity of disease. Results. ... Oxidants/antioxidants imbalance is responsible for disease development. The study was designed to assess oxidative stress and ... Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), due to its effect on ... Role of Nf-Κappa and HDCA and Implication of Oxidative Stress in Airway Inflammation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease ...
... hospital management, asthmatic patients, chronic obstructive airways disease, Nursing, Statistics, Pulmonary and Respiratory ... Hospital management of asthmatic-patients compared with those given a diagnostic label of chronic obstructive airways disease. ... hospital management of asthmatic-patients compared with those given a diagnostic label of chronic obstructive airways disease. ...
  • Induced sputum is a useful way to monitor airway inflammation in asthma, but cell counts are time-consuming and labour intensive. (wiley.com)
  • The aim of this study was to evaluate a novel processing method using eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) as a biochemical marker of sputum eosinophil number and activation in subjects with asthma and other airway diseases. (wiley.com)
  • Examination of induced sputum has been used for some years as a diagnostic technique to investigate lower airway inflammation. (bmj.com)
  • 1-3 With sputum induction, samples can be obtained from the lower airways with minimal discomfort to the patient. (bmj.com)
  • The importance of determining which disease process is causing the sputum is that treatment for allergic airway disease involves systemic corticosteroid administration which will lower the horse's immune system and significantly worsen any bacterial infection the horse may have! (blogspot.com)
  • Clinically it is characterised by chronic cough, excessive sputum production, exertional breathlessness, chronic sinusitis and Pseudomonas colonisation 9 . (ersjournals.com)
  • More than 6% had a missing branch in the lower airway, 16% had an extra branch, and more than 4% had a combination of these variations or rarer patterns. (nih.gov)
  • Genome-wide methylation and gene expression analysis were performed on small airway epithelial DNA and RNA obtained from the same patient during bronchoscopy, using Illumina's Infinium HM27 and Affymetrix's Genechip Human Gene 1.0 ST arrays. (ubc.ca)
  • I also aimed to study the effects of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) on these airway changes. (edu.au)
  • Results from this study will form the foundation for future research aimed at expanding understanding of the effects of inhaled corticosteroids on the upper airway, as well as developing means to prevent or counteract them. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Furthermore, in a 16-week observational inhaled fluticasone (FP) treatment study, the investigators observed increased upper airway (UAW) collapsibility during sleep, as measured by the critical closing pressure (Pcrit), paralleling the improvement in lower airways obstruction, with the largest Pcrit deterioration in the subject with most sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) at baseline. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Our growing portfolio of partnerships in respiratory diseases includes collaborations with world-leading academic institutions as well as biotech partnerships and innovative scientific crowdsourcing projects. (boehringer-ingelheim.com)
  • Scientists working in our research and development center for respiratory diseases in Germany are working with their academic and industry partners to offer patients and doctors improved therapies with high efficacy, few side effects and convenient dosage forms and regimens. (boehringer-ingelheim.com)
  • The occupational burden of nonmalignant respiratory diseases: an official American Thoracic Society and European Respiratory Society statement. (cdc.gov)
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (cdc.gov)
  • Saving Lives, Protecting People Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (cdc.gov)
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) cannot attest to the accuracy of a non-federal website. (cdc.gov)
  • The conclusions, findings, and opinions expressed by authors contributing to this journal do not necessarily reflect the official position of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Public Health Service, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or the authors' affiliated institutions. (cdc.gov)
  • The lung airways of 1 in 4 people don't follow the standard branching pattern (left). (nih.gov)
  • Characterization of airway changes on computed tomography has been challenging due to the complexity of the recurring branching patterns, and this can be better measured using fractal dimensions. (jci.org)
  • We demonstrate that in vivo central airway branch variants are present in 26.5% of the general population, are unchanged over 10 y, and exhibit strong familial aggregation. (cdc.gov)
  • Obese patients and those with OSA using continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) machines may not tolerate laparoscopy due to effects of pneumoperitoneum and Trendelenburg position, and should be counseled about potential for conversion to open surgery. (exxcellence.org)