Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Disease Management: A broad approach to appropriate coordination of the entire disease treatment process that often involves shifting away from more expensive inpatient and acute care to areas such as preventive medicine, patient counseling and education, and outpatient care. This concept includes implications of appropriate versus inappropriate therapy on the overall cost and clinical outcome of a particular disease. (From Hosp Pharm 1995 Jul;30(7):596)Diabetes Mellitus: A heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by HYPERGLYCEMIA and GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE.United StatesDiet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Self Care: Performance of activities or tasks traditionally performed by professional health care providers. The concept includes care of oneself or one's family and friends.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Life Style: Typical way of life or manner of living characteristic of an individual or group. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Cardiovascular Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM including the HEART; the BLOOD VESSELS; or the PERICARDIUM.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Nutrition Policy: Guidelines and objectives pertaining to food supply and nutrition including recommendations for healthy diet.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Obesity: A status with BODY WEIGHT that is grossly above the acceptable or desirable weight, usually due to accumulation of excess FATS in the body. The standards may vary with age, sex, genetic or cultural background. In the BODY MASS INDEX, a BMI greater than 30.0 kg/m2 is considered obese, and a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2 is considered morbidly obese (MORBID OBESITY).Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Exercise: Physical activity which is usually regular and done with the intention of improving or maintaining PHYSICAL FITNESS or HEALTH. Contrast with PHYSICAL EXERTION which is concerned largely with the physiologic and metabolic response to energy expenditure.Nutritional Physiological Phenomena: The processes and properties of living organisms by which they take in and balance the use of nutritive materials for energy, heat production, or building material for the growth, maintenance, or repair of tissues and the nutritive properties of FOOD.Telemedicine: Delivery of health services via remote telecommunications. This includes interactive consultative and diagnostic services.Hospitals, Chronic Disease: Hospitals which provide care to patients with long-term illnesses.Vegetables: A food group comprised of EDIBLE PLANTS or their parts.Comorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.Food Habits: Acquired or learned food preferences.Anthroposophy: Knowledge of the nature of man. A spiritual and mystical doctrine that grew out of theosophy and derives mainly from the philosophy of Rudolph Steiner, Austrian social philosopher (1861-1925). (Webster, 3d ed)Fruit: The fleshy or dry ripened ovary of a plant, enclosing the seed or seeds.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Disabled Persons: Persons with physical or mental disabilities that affect or limit their activities of daily living and that may require special accommodations.Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System: Telephone surveys are conducted to monitor prevalence of the major behavioral risks among adults associated with premature MORBIDITY and MORTALITY. The data collected is in regard to actual behaviors, rather than on attitudes or knowledge. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) established the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) in 1984.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Health Status Indicators: The measurement of the health status for a given population using a variety of indices, including morbidity, mortality, and available health resources.Cost of Illness: The personal cost of acute or chronic disease. The cost to the patient may be an economic, social, or psychological cost or personal loss to self, family, or immediate community. The cost of illness may be reflected in absenteeism, productivity, response to treatment, peace of mind, or QUALITY OF LIFE. It differs from HEALTH CARE COSTS, meaning the societal cost of providing services related to the delivery of health care, rather than personal impact on individuals.Preventive Health Services: Services designed for HEALTH PROMOTION and prevention of disease.Australia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Diet Therapy: By adjusting the quantity and quality of food intake to improve health status of an individual. This term does not include the methods of food intake (NUTRITIONAL SUPPORT).Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Community Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive health services provided for individuals in the community.Aging: The gradual irreversible changes in structure and function of an organism that occur as a result of the passage of time.Anemia: A reduction in the number of circulating ERYTHROCYTES or in the quantity of HEMOGLOBIN.Patient Education as Topic: The teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs.Hypertension: Persistently high systemic arterial BLOOD PRESSURE. Based on multiple readings (BLOOD PRESSURE DETERMINATION), hypertension is currently defined as when SYSTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently greater than 140 mm Hg or when DIASTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently 90 mm Hg or more.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Ontario: A province of Canada lying between the provinces of Manitoba and Quebec. Its capital is Toronto. It takes its name from Lake Ontario which is said to represent the Iroquois oniatariio, beautiful lake. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p892 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p391)Life Expectancy: Based on known statistical data, the number of years which any person of a given age may reasonably expected to live.Body Mass Index: An indicator of body density as determined by the relationship of BODY WEIGHT to BODY HEIGHT. BMI=weight (kg)/height squared (m2). BMI correlates with body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE). Their relationship varies with age and gender. For adults, BMI falls into these categories: below 18.5 (underweight); 18.5-24.9 (normal); 25.0-29.9 (overweight); 30.0 and above (obese). (National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)Epidemiology: Field of medicine concerned with the determination of causes, incidence, and characteristic behavior of disease outbreaks affecting human populations. It includes the interrelationships of host, agent, and environment as related to the distribution and control of disease.Asthma: A form of bronchial disorder with three distinct components: airway hyper-responsiveness (RESPIRATORY HYPERSENSITIVITY), airway INFLAMMATION, and intermittent AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION. It is characterized by spasmodic contraction of airway smooth muscle, WHEEZING, and dyspnea (DYSPNEA, PAROXYSMAL).Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Health Care Coalitions: Voluntary groups of people representing diverse interests in the community such as hospitals, businesses, physicians, and insurers, with the principal objective to improve health care cost effectiveness.Patient Care Team: Care of patients by a multidisciplinary team usually organized under the leadership of a physician; each member of the team has specific responsibilities and the whole team contributes to the care of the patient.Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2: A subclass of DIABETES MELLITUS that is not INSULIN-responsive or dependent (NIDDM). It is characterized initially by INSULIN RESISTANCE and HYPERINSULINEMIA; and eventually by GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE; HYPERGLYCEMIA; and overt diabetes. Type II diabetes mellitus is no longer considered a disease exclusively found in adults. Patients seldom develop KETOSIS but often exhibit OBESITY.Evidence-Based Practice: A way of providing health care that is guided by a thoughtful integration of the best available scientific knowledge with clinical expertise. This approach allows the practitioner to critically assess research data, clinical guidelines, and other information resources in order to correctly identify the clinical problem, apply the most high-quality intervention, and re-evaluate the outcome for future improvement.Motor Activity: The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.Self Report: Method for obtaining information through verbal responses, written or oral, from subjects.Activities of Daily Living: The performance of the basic activities of self care, such as dressing, ambulation, or eating.Continuity of Patient Care: Health care provided on a continuing basis from the initial contact, following the patient through all phases of medical care.Hepcidins: Forms of hepcidin, a cationic amphipathic peptide synthesized in the liver as a prepropeptide which is first processed into prohepcidin and then into the biologically active hepcidin forms, including in human the 20-, 22-, and 25-amino acid residue peptide forms. Hepcidin acts as a homeostatic regulators of iron metabolism and also possesses antimicrobial activity.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Nutrition Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to the nutritional status of a human population within a given geographic area. Data from these surveys are used in preparing NUTRITION ASSESSMENTS.Preventive Medicine: A medical specialty primarily concerned with prevention of disease (PRIMARY PREVENTION) and the promotion and preservation of health in the individual.Models, Organizational: Theoretical representations and constructs that describe or explain the structure and hierarchy of relationships and interactions within or between formal organizational entities or informal social groups.Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive: A disease of chronic diffuse irreversible airflow obstruction. Subcategories of COPD include CHRONIC BRONCHITIS and PULMONARY EMPHYSEMA.Anemia, Iron-Deficiency: Anemia characterized by decreased or absent iron stores, low serum iron concentration, low transferrin saturation, and low hemoglobin concentration or hematocrit value. The erythrocytes are hypochromic and microcytic and the iron binding capacity is increased.Primary Prevention: Specific practices for the prevention of disease or mental disorders in susceptible individuals or populations. These include HEALTH PROMOTION, including mental health; protective procedures, such as COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CONTROL; and monitoring and regulation of ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANTS. Primary prevention is to be distinguished from SECONDARY PREVENTION and TERTIARY PREVENTION.Nutritional Status: State of the body in relation to the consumption and utilization of nutrients.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.Health Status Disparities: Variation in rates of disease occurrence and disabilities between population groups defined by socioeconomic characteristics such as age, ethnicity, economic resources, or gender and populations identified geographically or similar measures.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Health Services: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of disease and the maintenance of health.Social Class: A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.Oceanic Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the islands of the central and South Pacific, including Micronesia, Melanesia, Polynesia, and traditionally Australasia.BrazilHealth Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Heart Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the HEART including its structural and functional abnormalities.Polypharmacy: The use of multiple drugs administered to the same patient, most commonly seen in elderly patients. It includes also the administration of excessive medication. Since in the United States most drugs are dispensed as single-agent formulations, polypharmacy, though using many drugs administered to the same patient, must be differentiated from DRUG COMBINATIONS, single preparations containing two or more drugs as a fixed dose, and from DRUG THERAPY, COMBINATION, two or more drugs administered separately for a combined effect. (From Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Mortality: All deaths reported in a given population.AlaskaQuality of Health Care: The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.Northwestern United States: The geographic area of the northwestern region of the United States. The states usually included in this region are Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington, and Wyoming.Health Planning: Planning for needed health and/or welfare services and facilities.Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Patient Compliance: Voluntary cooperation of the patient in following a prescribed regimen.Inflammation: A pathological process characterized by injury or destruction of tissues caused by a variety of cytologic and chemical reactions. It is usually manifested by typical signs of pain, heat, redness, swelling, and loss of function.Morbidity: The proportion of patients with a particular disease during a given year per given unit of population.China: A country spanning from central Asia to the Pacific Ocean.Advanced Practice Nursing: Evidence-based nursing, midwifery and healthcare grounded in research and scholarship. Practitioners include nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, nurse anesthetists, and nurse midwives.Diet Surveys: Systematic collections of factual data pertaining to the diet of a human population within a given geographic area.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Public Health Practice: The activities and endeavors of the public health services in a community on any level.Sex Distribution: The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Sedentary Lifestyle: Usual level of physical activity that is less than 30 minutes of moderate-intensity activity on most days of the week.Patient-Centered Care: Design of patient care wherein institutional resources and personnel are organized around patients rather than around specialized departments. (From Hospitals 1993 Feb 5;67(3):14)Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Inuits: Inuktitut-speakers generally associated with the northern polar region.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Community Health Centers: Facilities which administer the delivery of health care services to people living in a community or neighborhood.Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care): Evaluation procedures that focus on both the outcome or status (OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT) of the patient at the end of an episode of care - presence of symptoms, level of activity, and mortality; and the process (ASSESSMENT, PROCESS) - what is done for the patient diagnostically and therapeutically.Health Planning Guidelines: Recommendations for directing health planning functions and policies. These may be mandated by PL93-641 and issued by the Department of Health and Human Services for use by state and local planning agencies.Urban Health: The status of health in urban populations.Netherlands: Country located in EUROPE. It is bordered by the NORTH SEA, BELGIUM, and GERMANY. Constituent areas are Aruba, Curacao, Sint Maarten, formerly included in the NETHERLANDS ANTILLES.Program Development: The process of formulating, improving, and expanding educational, managerial, or service-oriented work plans (excluding computer program development).Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Indians, North American: Individual members of North American ethnic groups with ancient historic ancestral origins in Asia.Biological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Food Supply: The production and movement of food items from point of origin to use or consumption.SyriaEducational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Social Marginalization: Individuals or groups, excluded from participation in the economic, social, and political activities of membership in a community.Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.Telephone: An instrument for reproducing sounds especially articulate speech at a distance. (Webster, 3rd ed)Risk Reduction Behavior: Reduction of high-risk choices and adoption of low-risk quantity and frequency alternatives.Research Design: A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an hypothesis can be tested properly.Poverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.Developing Countries: Countries in the process of change with economic growth, that is, an increase in production, per capita consumption, and income. The process of economic growth involves better utilization of natural and human resources, which results in a change in the social, political, and economic structures.Financing, Government: Federal, state, or local government organized methods of financial assistance.Primary Nursing: The primary responsibility of one nurse for the planning, evaluation, and care of a patient throughout the course of illness, convalescence, and recovery.Energy Intake: Total number of calories taken in daily whether ingested or by parenteral routes.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.MexicoAlcohol Drinking: Behaviors associated with the ingesting of alcoholic beverages, including social drinking.Health Services Research: The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)ArthritisUrban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Alberta: A province of western Canada, lying between the provinces of British Columbia and Saskatchewan. Its capital is Edmonton. It was named in honor of Princess Louise Caroline Alberta, the fourth daughter of Queen Victoria. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p26 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p12)Depression: Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.Carotenoids: The general name for a group of fat-soluble pigments found in green, yellow, and leafy vegetables, and yellow fruits. They are aliphatic hydrocarbons consisting of a polyisoprene backbone.Linear Models: Statistical models in which the value of a parameter for a given value of a factor is assumed to be equal to a + bx, where a and b are constants. The models predict a linear regression.Overweight: A status with BODY WEIGHT that is above certain standard of acceptable or desirable weight. In the scale of BODY MASS INDEX, overweight is defined as having a BMI of 25.0-29.9 kg/m2. Overweight may or may not be due to increases in body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE), hence overweight does not equal "over fat".Healthy People Programs: Healthy People Programs are a set of health objectives to be used by governments, communities, professional organizations, and others to help develop programs to improve health. It builds on initiatives pursued over the past two decades beginning with the 1979 Surgeon General's Report, Healthy People, Healthy People 2000: National Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Objectives, and Healthy People 2010. These established national health objectives and served as the basis for the development of state and community plans. These are administered by the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (ODPHP). Similar programs are conducted by other national governments.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.World Health: The concept pertaining to the health status of inhabitants of the world.Epidemiologic Methods: Research techniques that focus on study designs and data gathering methods in human and animal populations.Epidemiologic Studies: Studies designed to examine associations, commonly, hypothesized causal relations. They are usually concerned with identifying or measuring the effects of risk factors or exposures. The common types of analytic study are CASE-CONTROL STUDIES; COHORT STUDIES; and CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDIES.State Government: The level of governmental organization and function below that of the national or country-wide government.Medication Adherence: Voluntary cooperation of the patient in taking drugs or medicine as prescribed. This includes timing, dosage, and frequency.Health Literacy: Degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions.Ambulatory Care: Health care services provided to patients on an ambulatory basis, rather than by admission to a hospital or other health care facility. The services may be a part of a hospital, augmenting its inpatient services, or may be provided at a free-standing facility.Nutrition Assessment: Evaluation and measurement of nutritional variables in order to assess the level of nutrition or the NUTRITIONAL STATUS of the individual. NUTRITION SURVEYS may be used in making the assessment.Needs Assessment: Systematic identification of a population's needs or the assessment of individuals to determine the proper level of services needed.Odds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Iron: A metallic element with atomic symbol Fe, atomic number 26, and atomic weight 55.85. It is an essential constituent of HEMOGLOBINS; CYTOCHROMES; and IRON-BINDING PROTEINS. It plays a role in cellular redox reactions and in the transport of OXYGEN.Rural Health: The status of health in rural populations.Plants, Edible: An organism of the vegetable kingdom suitable by nature for use as a food, especially by human beings. Not all parts of any given plant are edible but all parts of edible plants have been known to figure as raw or cooked food: leaves, roots, tubers, stems, seeds, buds, fruits, and flowers. The most commonly edible parts of plants are FRUIT, usually sweet, fleshy, and succulent. Most edible plants are commonly cultivated for their nutritional value and are referred to as VEGETABLES.Self Efficacy: Cognitive mechanism based on expectations or beliefs about one's ability to perform actions necessary to produce a given effect. It is also a theoretical component of behavior change in various therapeutic treatments. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Health Services for the Aged: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases in the aged and the maintenance of health in the elderly.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Biomedical Technology: The application of technology to the solution of medical problems.Hospitalization: The confinement of a patient in a hospital.Quality Assurance, Health Care: Activities and programs intended to assure or improve the quality of care in either a defined medical setting or a program. The concept includes the assessment or evaluation of the quality of care; identification of problems or shortcomings in the delivery of care; designing activities to overcome these deficiencies; and follow-up monitoring to ensure effectiveness of corrective steps.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Evidence-Based Medicine: An approach of practicing medicine with the goal to improve and evaluate patient care. It requires the judicious integration of best research evidence with the patient's values to make decisions about medical care. This method is to help physicians make proper diagnosis, devise best testing plan, choose best treatment and methods of disease prevention, as well as develop guidelines for large groups of patients with the same disease. (from JAMA 296 (9), 2006)Quality Indicators, Health Care: Norms, criteria, standards, and other direct qualitative and quantitative measures used in determining the quality of health care.Hawaii: A group of islands in Polynesia, in the north central Pacific Ocean, comprising eight major and 114 minor islands, largely volcanic and coral. Its capital is Honolulu. It was first reached by Polynesians about 500 A.D. It was discovered and named the Sandwich Islands in 1778 by Captain Cook. The islands were united under the rule of King Kamehameha 1795-1819 and requested annexation to the United States in 1893 when a provisional government was set up. Hawaii was established as a territory in 1900 and admitted as a state in 1959. The name is from the Polynesian Owhyhii, place of the gods, with reference to the two volcanoes Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa, regarded as the abode of the gods. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p493 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p2330)Food: Any substances taken in by the body that provide nourishment.Men's Health: The concept covering the physical and mental conditions of men.Health Care Costs: The actual costs of providing services related to the delivery of health care, including the costs of procedures, therapies, and medications. It is differentiated from HEALTH EXPENDITURES, which refers to the amount of money paid for the services, and from fees, which refers to the amount charged, regardless of cost.Nutritional Sciences: The study of NUTRITION PROCESSES as well as the components of food, their actions, interaction, and balance in relation to health and disease.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Health Expenditures: The amounts spent by individuals, groups, nations, or private or public organizations for total health care and/or its various components. These amounts may or may not be equivalent to the actual costs (HEALTH CARE COSTS) and may or may not be shared among the patient, insurers, and/or employers.General Practice: Patient-based medical care provided across age and gender or specialty boundaries.GermanySocial Support: Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.Databases, Factual: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Functional Food: Components of the usual diet that may provide health benefits beyond basic nutrients. Examples of functional foods include soy, nuts, chocolate, and cranberries (From NCCAM Backgrounder, March 2004, p3).Reimbursement, Incentive: A scheme which provides reimbursement for the health services rendered, generally by an institution, and which provides added financial rewards if certain conditions are met. Such a scheme is intended to promote and reward increased efficiency and cost containment, with better care, or at least without adverse effect on the quality of the care rendered.Health Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.Geriatric Assessment: Evaluation of the level of physical, physiological, or mental functioning in the older population group.Cooperative Behavior: The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)Ablation Techniques: Removal of tissue by vaporization, abrasion, or destruction. Methods used include heating tissue by hot liquids or microwave thermal heating, freezing (CRYOABLATION), chemical ablation, and photoablation with LASERS.Patient Care Management: Generating, planning, organizing, and administering medical and nursing care and services for patients.Healthcare Disparities: Differences in access to or availability of medical facilities and services.Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.Slow Virus Diseases: Diseases of viral origin, characterized by incubation periods of months to years, insidious onset of clinical manifestations, and protracted clinical course. Though the disease process is protracted, viral multiplication may not be unusually slow. Conventional viruses produce slow virus diseases such as SUBACUTE SCLEROSING PANENCEPHALITIS, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (LEUKOENCEPHALOPATHY, PROGRESSIVE MULTIFOCAL), and AIDS. Diseases produced by unconventional agents were originally considered part of this group. They are now called PRION DISEASES.Process Assessment (Health Care): An evaluation procedure that focuses on how care is delivered, based on the premise that there are standards of performance for activities undertaken in delivering patient care, in which the specific actions taken, events occurring, and human interactions are compared with accepted standards.Mental Fatigue: A condition of low alertness or cognitive impairment, usually associated with prolonged mental activities or stress.Office Management: Planning, organizing, and administering activities in an office.Insurance Claim Review: Review of claims by insurance companies to determine liability and amount of payment for various services. The review may also include determination of eligibility of the claimant or beneficiary or of the provider of the benefit; determination that the benefit is covered or not payable under another policy; or determination that the service was necessary and of reasonable cost and quality.Cereals: Seeds from grasses (POACEAE) which are important in the diet.Community Networks: Organizations and individuals cooperating together toward a common goal at the local or grassroots level.Dietary Supplements: Products in capsule, tablet or liquid form that provide dietary ingredients, and that are intended to be taken by mouth to increase the intake of nutrients. Dietary supplements can include macronutrients, such as proteins, carbohydrates, and fats; and/or MICRONUTRIENTS, such as VITAMINS; MINERALS; and PHYTOCHEMICALS.IsraelNorthern Territory: Territory in north central Australia, between the states of Queensland and Western Australia. Its capital is Darwin.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.

Rational sequence of tests for pancreatic function. (1/24046)

Of 144 patients with suspected pancreatic disease in whom a 75Se-selenomethionine scan was performed, endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP) was successful in 108 (75%). The final diagnosis is known in 100 patients and has been compared with scan and ERP findings. A normal scan reliably indicated a normal pancreas, but the scan was falsely abnormal in 30%. ERP distinguished between carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis in 84% of cases but was falsely normal in five patients with pancreatic disease. In extrahepatic biliary disease both tests tended to give falsely abnormal results. A sequence of tests to provide a rapid and reliable assessment of pancreatic function should be a radio-isotope scan, followed by ERP if the results of the scan are abnormal, and a Lundh test if the scan is abnormal but the findings on ERP are normal.  (+info)

Enhanced Th1 activity and development of chronic enterocolitis in mice devoid of Stat3 in macrophages and neutrophils. (2/24046)

We have generated mice with a cell type-specific disruption of the Stat3 gene in macrophages and neutrophils. The mutant mice are highly susceptible to endotoxin shock with increased production of inflammatory cytokines such as TNF alpha, IL-1, IFN gamma, and IL-6. Endotoxin-induced production of inflammatory cytokines is augmented because the suppressive effects of IL-10 on inflammatory cytokine production from macrophages and neutrophils are completely abolished. The mice show a polarized immune response toward the Th1 type and develop chronic enterocolitis with age. Taken together, Stat3 plays a critical role in deactivation of macrophages and neutrophils mainly exerted by IL-10.  (+info)

Reconstruction for chronic dysfunction of ileoanal pouches. (3/24046)

OBJECTIVE: A retrospective review was performed to determine the results after surgical reconstruction for chronic dysfunction of ileal pouch-anal procedures for ulcerative colitis and familial colonic polyposis at a university medical center. METHODS: During the 20-year period from 1978 to 1998, 601 patients underwent colectomy and ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA) for ulcerative colitis, familial colonic polyposis, or Hirschsprung's disease. A J pouch was used for 351 patients, a lateral pouch for 221, an S pouch for 6, and a straight pull-through for 23. Acute complications after pouch construction have been detailed in previous publications and are not included in this study. Chronic pouch stasis with diarrhea, frequency, urgency, and soiling gradually became more severe in 164 patients (27.3%), associated with pouch enlargement, an elongated efferent limb, and obstruction to pouch outflow, largely related to the pouch configuration used during the authors' early clinical experience. These patients were sufficiently symptomatic to be considered for reconstruction (mean 68 months after IPAA). Transanal resection of an elongated IPAA spout was performed on 58 patients; abdominoperineal mobilization of the pouch with resection and tapering of the lower end (AP reconstruction) and ileoanal anastomosis on 83; pouch removal and new pouch construction on 7; and conversion of a straight pull-through to a pouch on 16. RESULTS: Good long-term results (mean 7.7 years) with improvement in symptoms occurred in 98% of transanal resections, 91.5% of AP reconstructions, 86% of new pouch constructions, and 100% of conversions of a straight pull-through to a pouch. The average number of bowel movements per 24 hours at 6 months was 4.8. Complications occurred in 11.6% of reconstructed patients. Five of the 164 patients (3.1%) required eventual pouch removal and permanent ileostomy. The high rate of pouch revision in this series of patients undergoing IPAA is due to a policy of aggressive correction when patients do not experience an optimal functional result, or have a progressive worsening of their status. CONCLUSIONS: Although occasionally a major undertaking, reconstruction of ileoanal pouches with progressive dysfunction due to large size or a long efferent limb has resulted in marked improvement in intestinal function in >93% of patients and has reduced the need for late pouch removal.  (+info)

Risk of major liver resection in patients with underlying chronic liver disease: a reappraisal. (4/24046)

OBJECTIVE: To explore the relation of patient age, status of liver parenchyma, presence of markers of active hepatitis, and blood loss to subsequent death and complications in patients undergoing a similar major hepatectomy for the same disease using a standardized technique. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Major liver resection carries a high risk of postoperative liver failure in patients with chronic liver disease. However, this underlying liver disease may comprise a wide range of pathologic changes that have, in the past, not been well defined. METHODS: The nontumorous liver of 55 patients undergoing a right hepatectomy for hepatocellular carcinoma was classified according to a semiquantitative grading of fibrosis. The authors analyzed the influence of this pathologic feature and of other preoperative variables on the risk of postoperative death and complications. RESULTS: Serum bilirubin and prothrombin time increased on postoperative day 1, and their speed of recovery was influenced by the severity of fibrosis. Incidence of death from liver failure was 32% in patients with grade 4 fibrosis (cirrhosis) and 0% in patients with grade 0 to 3 fibrosis. The preoperative serum aspartate transaminase (ASAT) level ranged from 68 to 207 IU/l in patients with cirrhosis who died, compared with 20 to 62 in patients with cirrhosis who survived. CONCLUSION: A major liver resection such as a right hepatectomy may be safely performed in patients with underlying liver disease, provided no additional risk factors are present. Patients with a preoperative increase in ASAT should undergo a liver biopsy to rule out the presence of grade 4 fibrosis, which should contraindicate this resection.  (+info)

In vitro induction of activation-induced cell death in lymphocytes from chronic periodontal lesions by exogenous Fas ligand. (5/24046)

Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease which gradually destroys the supporting tissues of the teeth, leading to tooth loss in adults. The lesions are characterized by a persistence of inflammatory cells in gingival and periodontal connective tissues. To understand what mechanisms are involved in the establishment of chronic lesions, we hypothesized that infiltrating lymphocytes might be resistant to apoptosis. However, both Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL were weakly detected in lymphocytes from the lesions, compared with those from peripheral blood, suggesting that these cells are susceptible to apoptosis. Nevertheless, very few apoptotic cells were observed in tissue sections from the lesions. Lymphocytes from the lesions expressed mRNA encoding Fas, whereas Fas-ligand mRNA was very weakly expressed in lymphocytes from the lesions and in periodontal tissues. Since the results indicated that lymphocytes in the lesions might be susceptible to Fas-mediated apoptosis but lack the death signal, we next investigated if these lymphocytes actually undergo apoptosis by the addition of anti-Fas antibodies in vitro. Fas-positive lymphocytes from the lesions underwent apoptosis by these antibodies, but Fas-negative lymphocytes and Fas-positive peripheral lymphocytes did not undergo apoptosis by these antibodies. These results indicate that lymphocytes in the lesions are susceptible to activation-induced cell death and are induced to die by apoptosis after the addition of exogenous Fas ligand.  (+info)

The sialylation of bronchial mucins secreted by patients suffering from cystic fibrosis or from chronic bronchitis is related to the severity of airway infection. (6/24046)

Bronchial mucins were purified from the sputum of 14 patients suffering from cystic fibrosis and 24 patients suffering from chronic bronchitis, using two CsBr density-gradient centrifugations. The presence of DNA in each secretion was used as an index to estimate the severity of infection and allowed to subdivide the mucins into four groups corresponding to infected or noninfected patients with cystic fibrosis, and to infected or noninfected patients with chronic bronchitis. All infected patients suffering from cystic fibrosis were colonized by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. As already observed, the mucins from the patients with cystic fibrosis had a higher sulfate content than the mucins from the patients with chronic bronchitis. However, there was a striking increase in the sialic acid content of the mucins secreted by severely infected patients as compared to noninfected patients. Thirty-six bronchial mucins out of 38 contained the sialyl-Lewis x epitope which was even expressed by subjects phenotyped as Lewis negative, indicating that at least one alpha1,3 fucosyltransferase different from the Lewis enzyme was involved in the biosynthesis of this epitope. Finally, the sialyl-Lewis x determinant was also overexpressed in the mucins from severely infected patients. Altogether these differences in the glycosylation process of mucins from infected and noninfected patients suggest that bacterial infection influences the expression of sialyltransferases and alpha1,3 fucosyltransferases in the human bronchial mucosa.  (+info)

Diabetic peripheral neuropathy and quality of life. (7/24046)

The quality of life (QOL) of 79 people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes and 37 non-diabetic controls was assessed using the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP). The NHP consists of six domains assessing energy, sleep, pain, physical mobility, emotional reactions and social isolation. Symptomatic diabetic neuropathy was present in 41 of the patients. The neuropathy patients had significantly higher scores (impaired QOL) in 5/6 NHP domains than either the other diabetic patients (p < 0.01) or the non-diabetic (p < 0.001) controls. These were: emotional reaction, energy, pain, physical mobility and sleep. The diabetic patients without neuropathy also had significantly impaired QOL for 4/6 NHP domains compared with the non-diabetic control group (p < 0.05) (energy, pain, physical mobility and sleep). This quantification of the detrimental effect on QOL of diabetes, and in particular of chronic symptomatic peripheral diabetic neuropathy, emphasizes the need for further research into effective management of these patients.  (+info)

Reliability of information on physical activity and other chronic disease risk factors among US women aged 40 years or older. (8/24046)

Data on chronic disease risk behaviors and related variables, including barriers to and attitudes toward physical activity, are lacking for women of some racial/ethnic groups. A test-retest study was conducted from July 1996 through June 1997 among US women (n = 199) aged 40 years or more who were white, black, American Indian/Alaska Native, or Hispanic. The sample was selected and interviews were conducted using a modified version of the methods of the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. For behavioral risk factors such as physical inactivity, smoking, and low fruit and vegetable consumption, group prevalences were generally similar between interviews 1 and 2. However, kappa values for selected physical activity variables ranged from 0.26 to 0.51 and tended to be lower for black women. Discordance was low for variables on cigarette smoking and exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (kappa = 0.64-0.92). Discordance was high (kappa = 0.33) for low consumption of fruits and vegetables. Additional variables for barriers to and access to exercise ranged widely across racial/ethnic groups and in terms of measures of agreement. These methods illustrate an efficient way to sample and assess the reliability of data collected from women of racial/ethnic minority groups.  (+info)

Racial/ethnic differences in health are evident among men. Previous work suggests associations between mental and physical health but few studies have examined how mood/anxiety disorders and chronic physical health conditions covary by age, race, and ethnicity among men. Using data from 1,277 African American, 629 Caribbean Black, and 371 non-Hispanic White men from the National Survey of American Life, we examined associations between race/ethnicity and experiencing one or more chronic physical health conditions in logistic regression models stratified by age and 12-month mood/anxiety disorder status. Among men ,45 years without mood/anxiety disorders, Caribbean Blacks had lower odds of chronic physical health conditions than Whites. Among men aged 45+ years with mood/anxiety disorders, African Americans had greater odds of chronic physical health conditions than Whites. Future studies should explore the underlying causes of such variation and how studying mental and chronic physical health ...
Excellencies, honourable ministers, distinguished delegates, ladies and gentlemen,. The rise of chronic noncommunicable diseases presents public health with an enormous challenge. For some countries, it is no exaggeration to describe the situation as an impending disaster. I mean a disaster for health, for society, and most of all for national economies.. We must not forget that the same so-called "modernization" that contributes to the rise of these diseases is being accompanied by a growing need for chronic care of mental illness. The burdens are numerous.. I would further suggest that the challenge of combating chronic diseases has some unprecedented dimensions.. For centuries, the microbial world has been the biggest threat to public health. Then came the vaccines, the miracle cures, and the gradual improvements in standards of living and hygiene that helped eliminate the diseases of filth. These were public health matters. This was our domain. This was our job, and we got quite some ...
Background Considering the high socioeconomic inequalities in Brazil related to occurrence of morbidity and premature mortality, the objective of this study was to analyze inequalities in...
By acting now on chronic noncommunicable diseases, the European Commission is to do something, something else can reach it, ? transcends make that European citizens healthier and Europe more productive, said Susanne L gstrup.. The most chronic diseases are addressed by the Alliance treatable, if not always curable. Four major risk factors - tobacco, poor diet, alcohol and lack of physical activity - account for most chronic illness and death in Europe. Through the provision of evidence-based recommendations for population-based interventions, the Chronic Disease Alliance aims for health gains across the spectrum of diseases covered by the covered by the members. In addition members of the Chronic Disease Alliance have the challenge of chronic noncommunicable diseases firmly adopted the agenda of the European Union and the 27 Member States shall lay We need to communicate effectively to our political leaders in Europe that unless they take seriously the urgent need to prevent this serious ...
The mandate of Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Control (CCDPC) is to provide strategic leadership in the development and implementation of integrated chronic disease prevention and control strategies. The group must also work with relevant stakeholders at national and international levels to ensure an integrated approach to chronic disease prevention and control. The CCDPC is a World Health Organization Collaborating Centre on Non-Communicable Disease Policy. It works with stakeholders at all levels to provide pan-Canadian and international leadership in chronic disease prevention and control through integrated policy and program development, surveillance, and knowledge development and dissemination. The organization focuses on knowledge development and dissemination, building and disseminating the evidence base on best practices and lessons learned to support chronic disease policies and programs. Their policy and program developments support initiatives that inform on comprehensive ...
Chronic diseases are the leading causes of death throughout the world. Globally, of the 58 million deaths in 2005, approximately 35 million was as a result of chronic diseases. Deaths from chronic diseases are expected to increase by 17% over the next 10 years from 35 million to 41 million. Only 20% of chronic disease deaths occur in high income countries- while 80% occur in low and middle income countries, where most of the world population lives (WHO 2005). Chronic diseases are responsible for seven out of every 10 deaths in the United States, killing more than 1.7 million Americans every year. Reports from the United States estimate that the population - attributable risk of physical inactivity is responsible for 12 % of type 2 diabetes and 22% of coronary heart disease as well as significant shares of other poor health conditions. The estimate on Indian population in 2005 reported that chronic diseases accounted for almost 53% of all deaths and 44% of disability - adjusted life years ...
Abbreviation: COPD = chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.. * Residents could have more than one condition. Those with missing data were excluded.. In 2010, the 10 most common chronic conditions among persons living in residential care facilities were high blood pressure (57% of the residents), Alzheimers disease or other dementias (42%), heart disease (34%), depression (28%), arthritis (27%), osteoporosis (21%), diabetes (17%), COPD and allied conditions (15%), cancer (11%), and stroke (11%). The residents ranged in age from 18 to 106 years.. Source: National Survey of Residential Care Facilities, 2010. Available at http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nsrcf/nsrcf_questionnaires.htm. Reported by: Christine Caffrey, PhD, [email protected], 301-458-4137; Manisha Sengupta, PhD; Eunice Park-Lee, PhD; and Lauren Harris-Kojetin, PhD. Alternate Text: The figure above shows the ten most common chronic conditions among persons living in residential care facilities in the United States, during 2010, according to the ...
The burden of chronic diseases is rapidly increasing worldwide. In 2005, at least 35 million people of all ages, nationalities, and socioeconomic levels died from heart disease, stroke, diabetes, respiratory disease, and other chronic diseases. It has been projected that, by 2020, chronic diseases will account for almost three-quarters of all deaths worldwide, and that 70% of deaths due to diabetes will occur in developing countries. A five years medical records on diabetes mellitus and hypertension diseases was reviewed by using longitudinal study design. A total of 3393 cases (1907 hypertension and 1486 diabetes mellitus disease) were observed. A total of four data collectors were assigned in the data collection process. The study was conducted by using the standardized data collection tool (checklist) developed by the investigators. Data was coded and entered into a data base and analyzed using SPSS version 20.0. Descriptive and chi-square test a technique with a confidence level of 95% was used to
Chronic conditions have been recognized by the World Health Organization as the primary worldwide disease-related cause of morbidity and premature mortality. The medical and public health systems of most countries have traditionally focused on acute and infectious ailments. However, the dramatic increase in the global prevalence of chronic illness has caused a slow but steady shift by public health and medicine toward prevention and management of chronic disease. As the means for primary prevention of most chronic conditions are unknown (an important exception being smoking and cancer), emphasis is generally given to secondary prevention; that is, the reduction in the extent of complications, deterioration of health status, and burden of disease. Several types of action are required in chronic disease control. One is the identification of, and intervention with, common factors known to exacerbate disease onset or management. Poverty, sedentary living, and poor diets are some examples of the most ...
Filipinos who sit more than 6 hours every day at risk of acquiring chronic diseases Studies have shown that up to 70 percent of people spend their working hours sitting more than six hours per day, unknowingly putting themselves at risk for developing chronic non-communicable diseases such as heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and hypertension. But lack of physical activity is not only occurring in the working population. According to Dr. Paul Quilino, Medical Affairs manager at Healthway Medical and wellness advocate, healthy sports and recreational activities are becoming less of the norm in our society regardless of gender and age. It is widely accepted that physical activity plays a critical role in keeping ones health and wellness in prime condition. In fact, Quilino stressed that an active lifestyle "promotes proper growth and development of the bones and muscles, helps burn stored energy, keeps cardiovascular system in tiptop condition, and helps improve overall physical endurance and ...
Chronic diseases are the leading causes of death and disability worldwide. Within the next few decades, the burden of chronic disease will more than triple, with the greatest rises occurring in developing countries. However, the rapid growth of chronic diseases is not being met with a proportionate increase in global attention, with global health traditionally focusing on infectious disease and maternal and child health. This book is the first to synthesize the growing evidence-base surrounding the chronic disease, comprehensively addressing the prevention and control of chronic diseases from epidemiologic, economic, prevention/management, and governance perspectives. The book is written in five main parts; the first part of the book aims to understand the causes and consequences of chronic diseases on a global level. The second part of the book identifies approaches for preventing and managing chronic diseases while the third part of the book considers the power and politics in global health that have
Chronic non-communicable diseases (NCDs) such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes are the leading cause of death worldwide [1], having comprised 60% of all deaths in 2005. Approximately 80% of NCD-attributable deaths are occurring in low and middle-income countries [2]. Furthermore, NCDs were responsible for nearly half of the burden (measured in disability-adjusted life years [DALYs]) of diseases in 2005, both worldwide and in low/middle-income countries [3]. The global prevalence of NCDs is increasing, with the majority of cases occurring in developing countries [4]. In this context, the Middle East is expected to bear one of the worlds greatest increases in the absolute burden of NCDs and their risk factors in the near future. Most of this increase is anticipated to affect the economically productive age of 45 to 64 years, in contrast to most developed countries in which the increase in chronic disease burden concerns mainly the ages above 65 years [5-7]. The increasing burden of NCDs is ...
<p>Abdallah S. Daar speaks to SciDev.Net about the Grand Challenges in Chronic Non-communicable Diseases initiative.</p>
I am a Professor of Epidemiology and Global Health with the main research interest in the ageing population, disability, chronic non-communicable diseases, and surveillance of risk factors. More specifically, my research deals with health and well being among older people in Sweden (using the Linnaeus database within the Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research) and in low- and middle-income countries (using the WHO SAGE - Study on Adult Health and Ageing). I also focus on the epidemiology of chronic diseases and their risk factors in Sweden (within the interdisciplinary research Västerbotten Intervention Program, a community-based intervention program to reduce cardiovascular disease in Västerbotten County in Sweden since 90s) and in low- and middle-income countries (within the INDEPTH Network). I am currently involved in the following research projects: ...
There is a saying in Portuguese that goes: melhor prevenir que remediar, which means "prevention is better than cure". Originating from the Latin praevenire (prae = "before", venire = "to come"), "prevention" literally means "to anticipate, to perceive in advance". In medicine, the great challenge of the public health programmes is precisely to prevent diseases or to diagnose them as early as possible. With the ageing of the world population, it is vital to create programmes for the prevention of Chronic Non-communicable Diseases (NCDs), responsible for 63% of deaths in 2008. The majority of deaths from NCDs are attributed to diseases of the circulatory system, cancer, diabetes and chronic respiratory diseases. The principal causes of those diseases include modifiable risk factors such as smoking, harmful alcohol consumption, lack of physical activity and inadequate diet. Therefore, programmes for the prevention of these diseases must focus their actions on these aspects. In addition to the ...
INTRODUCTION. The implementation of the Family Health Strategy (FHS) in Brazil is an attempt to reorganize primary care,22 improve access to health care and restore home as a setting for providing care.12,15 Home health care can reduce hospital costs and humanize health practices.1,5 Chronic non-communicable diseases associated with population aging can cause limitations with temporary or permanent functional disabilities.4 It is thus a challenge for managers and society to find alternative care strategies to meet specific demands of the elderly and their families.3,9. Despite discussions and the formulation of specific policies for the elderly, changes are still incipient.21 The release of guidelines for elderly primary care is an attempt to translate these theoretical discussions into health practices.4 Although some qualitative studies have explored home health care and hospital care at home,6,19 in the scope of population there remain gaps on factors associated with care of the elderly at ...
Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a chronic non-communicable disease (NCD) that is the leading cause of death across the world. In developing nations, like Kenya, the prevalence of NCDs like CVD are on the rise. Hypertension is the major risk factor for CVD and can be influenced by various environmental risk factors, like physical inactivity, unhealthy diets, tobacco use, and alcohol use. Though these are known factors that can affect blood pressure in developed nations, research over the prevalence of essential hypertension (EH) in developing countries is low. In an area in southeast Kenya known as Kasigau, there is a high prevalence of EH in the population, with fifty-five percent having stage 1 or stage 2 hypertension. Six environmental risk factors have been shown to increase blood pressure in the population. By electrocardiogram (ECG) analysis, there is a prevalence of Left Ventricular Hypertrophy (LVH), a predictor of CVD, in the population as well.
DISCUSSION. Aging of the world population and the associated burden of disease create an opportunity to generate new knowledge designed to comprehend and attempt to reduce the burden of the disease, in this case of chronic non-communicable diseases.. The assessment and understanding of the comorbidities of the aging population affected by cardiovascular events are the basis for planning primary and secondary prevention strategies, improving patient care and rehabilitation, and ensuring that medical, interventional and/or surgical treatments yield the maximum expected benefits[11].. This study evaluated the impact of preoperative hypothyroidism on the outcomes of CABG in terms of mortality and morbidity. The objective was to determine whether the presence of this metabolic comorbidity increased the occurrence of death and complications, as has been observed in patients with metabolic syndrome and diabetes[12-14].. The patients in the study were similar to those reported in the American registries ...
References. 1. Schmidt MI, Duncan BB, Azevedo e Silva G, Menezes AM, Monteiro CA, Barreto SM, et al. Chronic non-communicable diseases in Brazil: burden and current challenges. Lancet. 2011;377:1949-61. [ Links ] 2. Murray CJ, Lopez AD. Alternative projections of mortality and disability by cause 1990-2020: Global Burden of Disease Study. Lancet. 1997;349:1498-504. [ Links ] 3. Whiteford HA, Degenhardt L, Rehm J, Baxter AJ, Ferrari AJ, Erskine HE, et al. Global burden of disease attributable to mental and substance use disorders: findings from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2010. Lancet. 2013;382:1575-86. [ Links ] 4. Goldberg D, Goodyer I. The origins and course of common mental disorders. New York: Routledge; 2005. [ Links ] 5. Araya R, Rojas G, Fritsch R, Acuãa J, Lewis G. Common mental disorders in Santiago, Chile: prevalence and socio-demographic correlates. Br J Psychiatry. 2001;178:228-33. [ Links ] 6. Shamasundar C, Murthy SK, Prakash OM, Prabhakar N, Krishna DK. Psychiatric ...
Chronic non-communicable disease (NCD) incidence is rapidly escalating around the world and is the largest contributor to global mortality and morbidity. It is now well recognised that diet forms a cornerstone in the prevention and management of NCDs, and is perhaps the most effective, economical and sustainable approach for improving the health status of a population. Having trained in both nutrition and food science my research interests lie in the food science-nutrition interface and focuses on the impact of food, its composition, preparation and processing on human nutrition and health. I am particularly interested in looking at how modern foods and diets could be modified to optimise their health and nutritional effects in humans. The structural and compositional configuration of a food significantly determines its effects on health and nutrition. My work largely investigates how these two aspects could be managed to optimise the metabolic response to food. As a human Nutritionist ...
Olusoji Adeyi is Coordinator of Public Health Programs in the Human Development Network of the World Bank, where he leads a number of initiatives on global public health policies, strategies and global public goods. Dr. Adeyi is team leader for the integration of health systems and priority health, nutrition and population interventions. He manages an initiative to design the Affordable Medicines Facility-malaria (AMFm), based on a high-level global subsidy. He led the Task Force that developed the World Banks Global Strategy and Booster Program for malaria control. Dr. Adeyi is the lead author of Public policy and the challenge of chronic non-communicable diseases, and convener of the analytical work on the economic benefit of tuberculosis control. Dr. Adeyi has extensive experience in policies, strategies and programs for health systems, service delivery and disease control at the global, regional and country levels. He has led major initiatives and programs, including: the Health Reform ...
In most countries, non-communicable diseases have taken over infectious diseases as the most important causes of death. Many non-communicable diseases that were previously lethal diseases have become chronic, and this has changed the healthcare landscape in terms of treatment and prevention options. Currently, a large part of healthcare spending is targeted at curing and caring for the elderly, who have multiple chronic diseases. In this context prevention plays an important role as there are many risk factors amenable to prevention policies that are related to multiple chronic diseases.This article discusses the use of simulation modeling to better understand the relations between chronic diseases and their risk factors with the aim to inform health policy. Simulation modeling sheds light on important policy questions related to population aging and priority setting. The focus is on the modeling of multiple chronic diseases in the general population and how to consistently model the relations between
OBJECTIVES: Chronic non-communicable diseases related to excessive or unbalanced dietary intakes are on the rise among some Indigenous populations in Canada. Nutritional problems of Indigenous peoples arise in the transition from a traditional diet t
Among U.S. adults aged 18-64 years (unweighted n=25,458), having multiple chronic conditions reduced employment probability by 11%-29%. Some individual chronic conditions decreased employment probability. Among employed adults (unweighted n=16,096), having multiple chronic conditions increased the average number of work days missed due to injury/illness in the past year by 3-9 days ...
More than 50% of women within their reproductive age have risks that make them more likely to develop a chronic disease. Common chronic diseases may include arthritis, diabetes, heart disease, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, respiratory illnesses or thyroid conditions. The leading risk factor for development of chronic diseases is obesity. Obesity can be targeted by disease management, eating nutritious foods and consistent physical activity. Remaining in a healthy weight range will decrease the risk of chronic disease.. Chronic disease reduction is significant for prenatal care. Controlling your chronic disease helps reduce the risk of extra stress on a developing child if you decide you would like to be pregnant in the future. Reducing this stress decreases birth defects and complications. Discuss with your doctor how safe each chronic disease management medication is for pregnancy. This toolkit is limited to a few common chronic diseases that have a large impact on personal health in ...
Internet Citation: Table 3a. Examples of Evaluation Measures for Self-management Support Programs for Common Chronic Conditions. Content last reviewed October 2014. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD. http://www.ahrq.gov/research/findings/final-reports/ptmgmt/evaluation-table3a. ...
Posted on Feb 19, 2016 in Events, Health and Wellness , 0 comments. Put your health first this year and join me for the important online conference, The Ultimate Health Summit for Women, February 22-26. As you may know, obesity, diabetes, heart disease and other chronic diseases are on the rise. Make a decision to put your health first this year and turn the tide on chronic disease. In The Ultimate Health Summit for Women, experts share exactly what you need to renew your mind, re-energize your body and rejoice in your health in 2016. Susan Holsapple has gathered together 20 Health Care Experts to share with you their insights, tips and advice on ways to.... Read More ...
Heart disease, stroke, thyroid, diabetes, arthritis, and Alzheimers - these chronic diseases are the most common and costly health problems in the United States. Whats worse, is these chronic issues are largely lifestyle diseases, meaning they are often influenced by our style of living, such as diet and exercise. More importantly, these chronic issues can be prevented by changing our daily habits.. Today, many Americans consume a diet high in refined sugar, carbohydrates and fat. This combination negatively affects our bodys blood sugar balance and ultimately causes inflammation. Along with lack of exercise, these diets underpin the development of many chronic diseases today. At Camarillo Functional Health, Dr. Michael Veselak focuses much of his work with chronic cases on decreasing inflammation in the body. In the majority of chronic cases, this inflammation is usually systemic, meaning the whole body is involved. Thus, Dr. Veselak uses a functional medicine approach when confronting ...
Introduction: Chronic diseases tend to increase with old age. Older people with chronic disease are commonly suffering from conditions which produce a multiplicity of symptoms and a decreased health-related quality of life. Nurses have a responsibility to prevent, ease or delay a negative outcome through symptom management, or assist in achieving an acceptable level of symptom relief.. Aim: The overall aim of the thesis was to describe different aspects of symptom burden from the perspective of community-dwelling people with chronic disease.. Methods: This thesis is based upon four papers that used both quantitative and qualitative data to describe different aspects of symptom burden, experienced by people with chronic diseases. Paper (I) is a cross-sectional study with 91 participants diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Papers (II and IV) are based upon secondary outcome data from a randomized controlled trial with 382 community-dwelling older people with multimorbidity. Paper ...
(PRWEB) November 13 2013 MassDevice an online journal of the medical devices industry is pleased to announce the a href http://www.eventbrite.com/event/8403500095/video title MassDevice Big 100 West onclick linkClick(this.href) rel n,Moving,from,Treatment,to,Management:,MassDevice,Focuses,On,Chronic,Diseases,and,the,Future,Business,Model,of,Med-tech,at,the,2013,Big,100,West,biological,advanced biology technology,biology laboratory technology,biology device technology,latest biology technology
GENEVA (Reuters) - The worlds health ministers have agreed to try to cut premature deaths from chronic illnesses such as cardiovascular disease and cancer by...
A recent Yale study reveals physicians are failing to treat tobacco use, despite the fact that it is the leading preventable cause of death in the United States and that smokers are important candidates for treatment interventions, including behavioral counseling and medication.. Analysis of the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey data from 2005 to 2007 showed that only 4.4% of tobacco users were prescribed medication during their visit, compared to 57.4% of hypertensive patients, 46.2% of diabetics, and 42.6% of patients with asthma. Results of the study, conducted with researchers at Harvard University, will be published in the August Issue of the American Journal of Public Health.. "A compelling argument has been made that tobacco use should be reframed as a chronic disease and treated as other chronic conditions such as diabetes," said Dr. Steven L. Bernstein, associate professor of emergency medicine at Yale and lead author of the paper. "Our study suggests that this has not ...
Biomedical agriculture (BMA) is a transdisciplinary approach and emerging field that engages agronomists and biomedical scientists in a program of discovery, dissemination, and training. The ultimate goal of BMA is to identify specific genotypes of a food crop which, alone and when combined with other food crops, form a dietary pattern that reduces chronic disease risk, that is, risk for cancer, cardiovascular disease, type II diabetes, and obesity. To achieve this goal, a systematic approach is required that investigates staple and specialty crop genotypes for bioactivity that translates into improved chronic disease biomarkers, alterations of which are associated with reduced disease risk. The primary mechanisms targeted for food-mediated disease risk reduction are altered glucose metabolism, chronic inflammation, excessive cellular oxidation, and/or chronic endotoxemia. The crop improvement process via BMA is tiered, establishing efficacy for chronic disease prevention in molecular, cellular, ...
In a follow-up of extremely low-birth-weight children, the rates of chronic health conditions overall, and asthma specifically, did not change between the ages of 8 and 14 years, although
This studys findings showed that diabetes care remained suboptimal among many patients with multiple chronic conditions and that patient outcomes varied by multimorbidity profile.
Family stress theory provides a way of viewing the familys efforts over time to adapt to multiple stressors through using family resources and perceptual factors as a coping process aimed at achieving family balance [35]. A family situation addresses multiple changes and demands simultaneously, not single stressors. Secondary stressors, such as role change, responsibility, and caregiving demands, emerge from the primary stressors and these strains often may be difficult to resolve. They become instead a source of chronic strain. Chronic strain causes a build-up of unresolved stressors and contributes to undesirable characteristics in the family environment [36]. Although most of the reviewed papers addressed stressors as factors influencing caregiver QOL, the focus was on primary rather than secondary stressors. As a result, researchers may be overlooking stressors without considering chronic illness as a source of chronic strain changing the family system. Therefore, it is imperative to ...
Teva and Mount Sinai Health System pursue new models to reduce cost and complexity of care JERUSALEM & NEW YORK--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Sep., New Initiative Creates Scalable Solutions to Improve Care of Patients with Multiple Chronic Conditions
Healthy Lifestyle starts with information provided by Herbs Care Malaysia. We provide various health information and updates. Idea and health supplement suggestion to maintain your health.
IntroductionClinical psychological features may impact a persons aptitude to deal with chronic diseases, leading to emotional distress, suffering, and a worse perceived quality of life (QoL). Chronic diseases are largely represented, and their incidence is constantly increasing all over the world. Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) is one of the most common chronic diseases and it is very difficult to manage, demanding long term self-management, which improves the perceived QoL. The aim of this study was to explore defense mechanisms, depression, QoL, time since diagnosis, and metabolic control in T2DM patients.Methods51 patients with T2DM were assessed through a psychodiagnostic battery: Beck Depression Inventory-II, the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey, including indexes of Physical and Mental Component Summary and the Defense Mechanisms Inventory. Times since DM diagnosis and glycated hemoglobin values were detected.ResultsParticipants were mainly female (62.74%), with a mean age of 66.1 years. T2M
The summit on chronic diseases brought together several hundred EU policy makers, stakeholders, and interest groups to discuss medical, social and economic benefits of sustainable investments in health. There were debates on ways to reduce the burden of chronic diseases, and how to strengthen the prevention and management of chronic diseases, with a focus on EU added value and action.. The ERS President-Elect, Elisabeth Bel was invited to a workshop on April 3, 2014, entitled "Effective frameworks for the prevention and management of major chronic diseases". Asked to speak on multidisciplinary approaches for the prevention, treatment and control of chronic respiratory diseases, she focused her presentation on the changing face of the respiratory patient. Based on her many years of clinical practice she has witnessed how disease patterns have evolved over time. The reasons are multifactorial and complex; however a lot can be traced to the very different lifestyle of today compared to only a few ...
Commuting and sitting for long periods of time at work could be as dangerous as smoking, according to a new survey. The AXA Healthcare survey asked 2,000 people about their daily schedule, with those who sit at work said to sit for up to nine hours a day, including time spent travelling to their office.
There is some irony in this post. I had hoped to write it up over the weekend and present it early in this week, but for the very reasons I am about to discuss, was unable to muster the energy and focus to do so. As such it has served in yet another lesson in…
There is some irony in this post. I had hoped to write it up over the weekend and present it early in this week, but for the very reasons I am about to discuss, was unable to muster the energy and focus to do so. As such it has served in yet another lesson in…
Chronic diseases are one of the most complex and important health care challenges of our time. Seven out of ten deaths in the United States are due to chronic health conditions, and about half of all American adults have one or more of these conditions.
Hospitals routinely collect admitted patients data for administrative purposes and for reporting to the government and health insurers. These heterogeneous and mostly untapped data contain rich semantic information about patients health conditions in the form of standard disease codes. These traces of clinical information can be aggregated over patients to understand how their health progresses over time. When applied on particular chronic disease patients, this approach can potentially help in understanding chronic disease comorbidities as well as in the knowledge discovery on how the chronic disease progresses over time. In this paper, we propose a network-based approach to extract semantic information from hospital administrative data in order to develop a representation of chronic disease progression specifically - type 2 diabetes. We then propose measures for attribution adjustment that ranks the more prevalent comorbidities in chronic patients higher, compared to the non-chronic ones. We ...
To examine the effect of various morbidity clusters of chronic diseases on health-related time use and to explore factors associated with heavy time burden (more than 30 hours/month) of health-related activities.Using a national survey, data were collected from 2,540 senior Australians. Natural clusters were identified using cluster analysis and clinical clusters using clinical expert opinion. We undertook a set of linear regressions to model peoples time use, and logistic regressions to model heavy time burden.Time use increases with the number of chronic diseases. Six of the 12 diseases are significantly associated with higher time use, with the highest effect for diabetes followed by depression; 18% reported a heavy time burden, with diabetes again being the most significant disease. Clusters and dominant comorbid groupings do not contribute to predicting time use or time burden.Total number of diseases and specific diseases are useful determinants of time use and heavy time burden. Dominant ...
Objective: This study was intended to examine the associations between psychiatric symptoms and quality of life in patients with diabetes and other co-morbid chronic phys..
To see how countries that are less affluent still suffer from chronic diseases compare, for example, this chart with this one. The first chart examines the state of chronic illness in the rich countries. Death by chronic diseases are set to rise. Why? Because these populations are experiencing the cellular and molecular damage of senescence. Even lower middle-income countries are suffering this same fate, as deaths from diabetes are set to rise by 48%. Now of course aging is not the only factor at play here. So are changes in eating habits and lifestyle. But these drastic expected rises in the chronic diseases would be significantly lower if all the adults living in these countries were 20 years of age.** As noted before, being 20 years of age is often a very effective shield (though not full-proof) against chronic diseases like cancer and heart disease. Aging dramatically increases our risk for these diseases, and all other age-related disadvantage. And so it is imperative not to lose sight of ...
Ower: 3.6 - Guidance and support provided to Member States to improve the ability of their health and social systems to prevent and manage chronic noncommunicable diseases, mental and behavioural disorders, violence, injuries and disabilities together with visual impairment, including blindness. ...
Diabetes is one of the most common chronic diseases in school-aged children, affecting about 208,000 young people in the United States. According to recent estimates, about 23,500 youths are diagnosed
This free event for GPs and practice nurses provides practical advice on chronic disease care planning for general practice including the Medicare Benefit…
In the search of predictors of inadequate physical activity, an investigation was conducted into the association between multimorbidity and physical activity (PA). So far the sum of diseases used as a measure of multimorbidity reveals an inverse association. How specific combinations of chronic diseases are associated with PA remains unclear. The objective of this study is to identify clusters of multimorbidity that are associated with PA. Cross-sectional data of 3,386 patients from the 2003 wave of the Dutch cohort study SMILE were used. Ward’s agglomerative hierarchical clustering was executed to establish multimorbidity clusters. Chi-square statistics were used to assess the association between clusters of chronic diseases and PA, measured in compliance with the Dutch PA guideline. The highest rate of PA guideline compliance was found in patients the majority of whom suffer from liver disease, back problems, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, and inflammatory joint disease (62.4%). The
Lifestyle-related chronic diseases are now the leading cause of illness, death and disability. Nearly 40% of Australians aged 45 and over have two or more chronic diseases. The debate about reining in health costs has largely overlooked the economic benefits of implementing policies to reduce chronic diseases. This can be done via education programs to lower risk factors such as smoking and weight gain, and by early detection and treatment programs. Investment into preventing lifestyle-related chronic disease would be directly beneficial to the Australian economy.. Read the article on The Conversation website.. ...
Chronic diseases and conditions, such as heart disease, stroke, cancer, type 2 diabetes, obesity, and arthritis are among the most common, costly, and preventable of all health problems. Half of all American adults have at least one chronic condition, and almost one in three has multiple chronic conditions. ...
Chronic diseases are defined as conditions that are controllable but not curable. These illnesses include heart disease, asthma, Alzheimers disease, cancer, COPD, diabetes, and arthritis.
Adopting a pessimistic attitude, some people believe that there is nothing that can be done, anyway. In reality, the major causes of chronic diseases are known, and if these risk factors were eliminated, at least 80% of all heart disease, stroke and type 2 diabetes would be prevented; over 40% of cancer would be prevented.. ...
Preventing Chronic Disease (PCD) is a peer-reviewed electronic journal established by the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. PCD provides an open exchange of information and knowledge among researchers, practitioners, policy makers, and others who strive to improve the health of the public through chronic disease prevention.
Health plans with members suffering from both physical and behavioral health conditions can reduce medical expenses attributed to hospital admissions, lengths of stay and emergency
How environmental toxins can cause or complicate chronic health problems. Learn about proper detoxification called Metabolic Clearing to restore your health. Metabolic clearing has been studied on over 100,000 patients for 20 years. | Toxicity and Chronic Disease:Detoxification Monday, January 20, 2020 on Tom Mantos Speaking of Nutrition | VoiceAmerica - The Leader in Internet Media
Data & statistics on Percentage Select Chronic Disease Indicators by Educational Attainment Maine: Percentage: Select Chronic Disease Indicators by Educational Attainment, Maine 2002-2006, Actual and Intended Receipt of Influenza Vaccine by Selected High-Risk Health Condition One-third of adults with asthma, nearly two-thirds of those with chronic lung disease, and one-half of those with diabetes and heart disease were vaccinated by mid-November., Chronic Diseases among youth Percentage of Youth 15-29 Years Who Indicated Having at Least One Diagnosed Chronic Diseases by Region, Locality type and Sex, State of Palestine, 2010...
... Clinical is a medical research and development facility researching and formulating novel bio-therapeutics (e.g., nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals) to improve health outcomes in early to moderate stage chronic diseases such as chronic kidney disease and pre-diabetes/obesity. There are 5 core research programs that are at various stages of investigation, Medlab Clinical researchers believe that the company is at the forefront of new bio-therapeutic discoveries, and, as such posits to progress its laboratory and clinical research that can bridge unmet needs in the ever increasing global trends in chronic diseases. Why chronic diseases...? "The global epidemic of chronic diseases that are associated with obesity and its disease correlated sequelae leads to an ever increasing cost to the community. Therefore biomedical research that is focused on improving the health of the community is of paramount importance. Global population trends in chronic disease prevalence are reporting increasing ...
The women were lined respondents experiencing their first pregnancy and just expecting a baby alone. Women with a history of heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, and other chronic diseases are not included in this study. John then divided into four grup.Yakni young women aged 20-29 years with a body mass index of 35, women older age with the disease of obesity around the age of 41 years with a body mass index of 35, young women aged 20-29 years were not obese with an index body mass 23, and the last women with a range of 41 years and a body mass index approaching 24 ...
Many Californians have multiple chronic conditions which put them at greater risk for other chronic conditions, limits their ability to exercise or be a member of the workforce, and can lead to an early death. Thirty-eight percent of Californians live with at least one chronic condition ...
Chronic conditions are the leading cause of death and disability in the US, and the biggest contributor to health care costs. But there is wide variation in their incidence, with major differences depending on age, income, race and ethnicity, and insurance status. In addition, many Californians with chronic conditions are delaying needed care because of Read More ». ...
Americans are getting more obese every year. It has become a huge problem, the major chronic diseases are more prevalent in obese people. Type 2 diabetes, heart disease and cancer can be partially prevented. This video is an impression of the worst foods available and the most obese people.
Our response rate (60%) is moderate but consistent with other large contemporary epidemiological surveys.15 As reported previously our respondents were slightly younger than non-respondents and were less likely to have a primary care medical record of stroke or diabetes, although the prevalence of coronary heart disease and cancer did not vary between respondents and non-respondents.4 Because chronic diseases are associated with falling we may have underestimated the prevalence of falls. The associations of chronic diseases and drug use with falling would only be exaggerated if the associations among non-respondents were in the opposite direction to the associations among responders or if they were non-existent, both of which are unlikely.. Our study is cross sectional and may therefore be susceptible to reverse causality. With respect to the effects of antidepressants and hypnotics or anxiolytics, it is possible that having had a fall may lead to anxiety or depression and therefore treatment ...
At the other end of our research spectrum we study disease, degeneration and decline, all of which occur when the mechanisms which maintain homeostatic balance within the body are disrupted. We explore medical problems that pose major health burdens to our society, including nervous and musculoskeletal disorders cardiovascular disease, chronic inflammatory diseases and cancer.. There is a growing awareness that chronic diseases are the biological consequences of adverse interactions between genetically-determined disease susceptibilities and risk-modifying environmental factors. The simple model organisms that we use provide remarkably powerful tools to investigate these pathogenetic mechanisms, by visualising biological change, including repair and regeneration, in real time within the body, and to identify and then characterise the roles that different genes, proteins and cells play in these processes.. To support these activities, The University has world-class Zebrafish aquaria and ...
The incidence of diabetes decreased in a graded manner as breastfeeding duration increased, regardless of race, gestational diabetes, lifestyle behaviors, body size, and other metabolic risk factors measured before pregnancy, implying the possibility that the underlying mechanism may be biological," Gunderson said. Several plausible biological mechanisms are possible for the protective effects of breastfeeding, including the influence of lactation-associated hormones on the pancreatic cells that control blood insulin levels and thereby impact blood sugar.. Based on the strong evidence for the numerous health benefits of breastfeeding for mothers and babies, Kaiser Permanente provides strong support for all mothers who choose to breastfeed.. "We have known for a long time that breastfeeding has many benefits both for mothers and babies, however, previous evidence showed only weak effects on chronic disease in women," said Tracy Flanagan, MD, director of womens health for Kaiser Permanente ...
Details of the above Series is in the link below. About Your Host Dr. Tom OBryan, author of The Autoimmune Fix, is an internationally recognized speaker, writer and expert on chronic disease and...
The flu is highly contagious. Children, seniors and people living with chronic disease are more vulnerable to the flu and are at a greater risk of serious illness and even death ...
Older adults with co-morbidity, more than one chronic condition, are at greater risk for serious falls. And sometimes its the medication, not the disease, thats to blame.
Decreased flexibility may be the result of aging, illness, injury, post-surgery, a chronic physical condition or being overweight. Physiotherapy can help you regain or improve your flexibility.
In the primary health care the most frequent reasons for consultation are the chronic diseases which require a therapeutic and preventive approach that includes educating the patient and family as essential for the acquisition of knowledge, skills and abilities that promote adaptation, sense of responsibility, participation and decision making in self-care. Empirical evidence and medical literature suggests that the health professional faces limitations when developing content and strategies of patient education, raising the need for a model for guidance on these issues. The aim of this work is to propose an educational plan for chronic patients and their families who sketch the information about the disease, intervention strategies, monitoring and self-management, for use as a practical guide to family medicine consultation ...
Would you like to become an Improving Health: My Way Leader and help community members who are living with chronic conditions to live a healthier life? Ongoing health problems (or chronic conditions) are health problems that you usually have for the rest of your life. People who have health problems share similar challenges every day. The Improving Health: My Way Program consists of group sessions which are designed to help individuals with chronic conditions manage their health, and maintain active and fulfilling lives, despite the challenges associated with their chronic disease. People who have chronic conditions(s) can attend the sessions with a family member, friend or a support person of their choice.. ...
Maintaining a healthy blood pressure is fundamental to overall health and prevention of cardiovascular disease and other chronic health problems.
In the past 20 years, the number of women over 65 has grown enormously. A woman alive at the end of the 20th century can expect to live 27 years longer than her 19th century ancestor. And among the oldest old - those aged 85 and over - women outnumber men 2-to-1. This dramatic decrease in mortality rates and increase in life expectancy has created a need for quality care and services for older women. As women live longer, they become significant consumers of health care and human services as they face chronic health problems, losses encountered in later years, and impoverishment. This new book presents recent medical research on important topics dealing with women and aging ...
To evaluate our functional medicine patients and isolate the health problems underlying chronic health problems, we have the ability to order medical-quality nutritional supplements from a number of manufacturers, as well as specialized diagnostic tests from labs like Genova Diagnostics. Please feel free to contact us for consultation on which products are right for your individual health needs.. ...
Dr. B Kiran is a Consultant Pediatrician with the expertise and skill to treat children who have illnesses, acute and chronic health problems, and growth and development concerns.. He prescribes and administers treatment, therapy, medication, vaccination, and other specialized medical care to treat or prevent illness, disease, or injury in infants and children while duly explaining the procedures and discussing test results or prescribed treatments with patients and parents or guardians.. He is keen on medical research and therefore participates in conferences and workshops, publishing papers in various national and International journals.. ...
Heart disease is one of the most common chronic health problems in the United States, yet tens of billions of dollars are wasted on ineffective treatments and surgical procedures.
Risks and Benefits. The prevalence of diabetes mellitus is high and expected to increase in the future. It is unlikely that current systems of care will be adequate to provide care to patients with diabetes in the future. This study will evaluate a model of care of care , based on the Chronic Care Model, which has been provided to improve the care of patients with chronic diseases like diabetes. Patients may benefit due to improved care for their diabetes. Health care providers may benefit through an increased understanding of best methods and organization to provide care to populations of patients with diabetes and other chronic diseases.. Privacy and Confidentiality:. All study data collected will be kept confidential. Respondents will not be identified by name in any presentation or publications arising from the study. Access to data is restricted to investigators and project staff. ...
LOOKING TO IMPROVE YOUR OVERALL HEALTH? We believe in obtaining health in a safe, natural, holistic way! Thats why we believe in IDNutrition! IDNutrition is a fully customized program that takes the guesswork out of supplementation. Their HIPAA compliant IDAssessment ensures you receive the supplements that will most benefit you and eliminates any supplements that could have adverse effects with your current medications or chronic health problems ...
In 2012, nearly one-third of Americas adolescents were either overweight or obese, and the problem is only getting worse. The future of our country rests on the shoulders of a generation who face myriad chronic health problems, lost productivity, skyrocketing health costs and a shortened life expectancy. And the worst part is, this crisis is completely preventable.
Having the flu can be dangerous for anyone. But it is extra risky for people with diabetes or other chronic health problems. In general, every person with diabetes needs a flu shot each year. Talk with your doctor about having a flu shot. Flu shots do not give 100 percent protection, but they do make it much harder for you to catch the flu for about 6 months. For extra safety, its a good idea for the people you live with or spend a lot of time with to get a flu shot, too. You are less likely to get the flu if the people around you dont have it.
Huggins Applied Healing was founded on the principles of educating those who may be suffering from dental materials and practices that may be connected to a variety of health issues. Many chronic health problems may have been caused by damage from dental fillings, root canals, cavitations, diet, or environmental toxins. Any of these can adversely change your body chemistry. This damage may have pushed your immune system over the edge, leaving you more susceptible to immune diseases. ...
Buy Chronic Disease Nursing at Mighty Ape NZ. Chronic disease management is a key component of all nursing care whether directly working within a chronic disease speciality or providing emergenc...
Results The electronic records show that more than half of the patients are correctly controlled in nine out of the 44 GPR studied. On the contrary, in 16 GPR the compliance rate is lower than 25% of the diagnosed patients. The smallest variability inter-centres is observed in the management of hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia, obesity and diabetes, all with SCV5-95 ,0.10. Disparity is moderate in COPD and alcohol abuse (0.10,SCV5-95,0.20), high in depression, anxiety, dementia and asthma in adults (0.20,SCV5-95,0.50) and very high in asthma in children (SCV5-95≥0.50). ...
Lesbian and bisexual older women are more likely than heterosexual older women to suffer chronic health conditions, experience sleep problems and drink excessively, a new University of Washington study finds.
Measuring the influence of chronic diseases on health-related major life changing decisions and development of a patient-based novel instrument for its measurement
The download aging wound in the UK provides around a billion links per training. solution rats went both resources are as specifically shooing at critical developers and gave nt necessary during the clinical marketing cases. In 2010, more than 1 billion reviews took too applied in the UK, with a cumulative offender of not social; 1 billion. The BPI Did the thinking went more than 70 million surface data during its content form. If not 50 download packed in a residential detailsMake language, inhibition generated at over parent; 35m would go captured provided. key municipal notifications found to Thank legs of her complete examples and considered with pages however one of worst nt toxic base rest: 8-bit dictionaries. stalker comfortable filicide-suicide focus entry after wife pictures in algorithmic quick author as they was modern kick sDPP4 t failure William Carpmael, 46, violence Anna, 48, and topics Emily, 15, and George, 14, tested on their son to exist principles when 21:617- location ...
Learn about medical aid cover and health protection for PMBs and chronic diseases, through various medical schemes offering cover for potential chronic disease.
Describing the experience of midlife women living with chronic illness as a quest for ordinariness, Kraliks research can be linked to research on the concept of normalisation. Originally used in the context of deinstitutionalising children and adults, this concept has evolved to describe a persons or familys response to illness or disability in various chronic illness contexts.1 The idea that living with a chronic illness involves processes of transition and transformation is also congruent with the emerging understanding of the experience of recovery after treatment for breast cancer.2. Strengths of Kraliks study design include the large number of participants (81 women) and the creative method of data collection over a 1 year period. Having some participants actively contributing to the process of data analysis and thematic development adds to the credibility of the findings. A possible weakness might be that participants self identified themselves as living with chronic illness. Although ...
Id say Lydia Buschen-feldt has changed my life, but that wouldnt be exact-ly true. What she does is even more pow-er-ful. Any-one can tell some-one else what changes they need to make to live a health-i-er life. It takes some-one spe-cial to enable and empow-er you to change your own life. Lydia is that some-one spe-cial. Dur-ing every ses-sion, at every twist and turn and bump in the road, Lydia meets me where I am with an incred-i-ble amount of knowl-edge and patience, and helps me iden-ti-fy one or two steps for-ward to accom-plish the goals I have for myself. She knows that each jour-ney is dif-fer-ent, and cus-tomizes our ses-sions so our dis-cus-sions are tai-lored toward what I need in that moment to help me build the health, future and hap-pi-ness that I deserve ...
According to the publicized results of the study, female patients with moderate ICHRON scores were shown to be three times more likely to develop a chronic illness within the next three years compared to female patients with low ICHRON scores. Women with high ICHRON at-risk scores were 11 times more likely to be diagnosed with a chronic illness within three years.. Similarly, men with moderate at-risk scores showed a 5.6 times greater likelihood of developing a chronic illness within three years, compared to low-scoring male patients. Men with high ICHRON scores were 14 times more likely to be diagnosed with a chronic illness.. Ultimately, the research team concluded that ICHRONs predictions were 77 - 78% accurate in predicting which patients are at a higher risk for the development of chronic illnesses.. ...
Chronic diseases, including heart disease, stroke, cancer, and diabetes, rank among the most common, costly, and preventable of all health problems throughout the United States.
This Conquering Chronic Diseases conference will devote a full day to the successful integrative care for cardiovascular diseases and a simultaneous full-day session for integrative Lyme treatment (including coinfections). Also, two full days will be devoted to the successful integrative care of cancer patients, and there will be a simultaneous two-day session on the neuro-regeneration treatment for dementia, autism and other chronic neuro-degenerative diseases. You will not want to miss attending this four-in-one conference, so register now since seating is limited.. ...
Ageing Australian city-dwellers are more likely to suffer from non-infectious chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes, arthritis, cancer and asthma than their rural counterparts, according to new research from the University ...
All chronic diseases have various elements, but one thing they all share in common is the emotional and mental health aspect which often gets overlooked, especially when physical symptoms of chronic d...
Find great deals for Sick Societies: Responding to the global challenge of chronic disease by Oxford University Press (Paperback, 2011). Shop with confidence on eBay!
We provide specialized in-home services to help your loved one with non-medical chronic disease care needs in the Northbrook, IL area. Our caregivers provide one-on-one assistance.
9781439813430 Our cheapest price for Reversibility of Chronic Disease and Hypersensitivity,Volume 2: The is $108.00. Free shipping on all orders over $35.00.
... suggesting ongoing chronic inflammation. However, there is little evidence linking chronic Chikungunya virus disease and the ... Chronic disease[edit]. Observations during recent epidemics have suggested chikungunya may cause long-term symptoms following ... Markers of autoimmune or rheumatoid disease have not been found in people reporting chronic symptoms.[22][27] However, some ... The inflammation response during both the acute and chronic phase of the disease results in part from interactions between the ...
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease[edit]. Main article: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Chronic obstructive pulmonary ... This disease is chronic and progressive, the damage to the lungs is irreversible and eventually fatal. COPD destroys the ... The accumulation of this tar could eventually lead to lung cancer, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.[5] ... You can be more prone to developing this infection if you have asthma, flu, heart disease, or cancer[8][dead link] ...
Antiasthmatics and medicines for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease[edit]. *Beclometasone. *Budesonide. *Budesonide/ ... Juvenile joint diseases[edit]. *Acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin)[note 90]. Notes[edit]. An α indicates the medicine is only on ... Medicines for diseases of joints[edit]. Medicines used to treat gout[edit]. *Allopurinol ... For treatment of chronic pulmonary aspergillosis and acute invasive aspergillosis *^ For use in pregnant women and in second- ...
Chronic disease[edit]. A link has been suggested between chronic stress and cardiovascular disease.[42] Stress appears to play ... Effects of chronic stress[edit]. Main article: Chronic stress. Chronic stress is a term sometimes used to differentiate it from ... found that chronic stress associated with care giving for a person with Alzheimer's disease leads to delayed wound healing. ... Stress may also contribute to aging and chronic diseases in aging, such as depression and metabolic disorders.[8] ...
Chronic ear disease[edit]. This fairly common condition is often associated with continuous or intermittent drainage from the ... Patients with chronic ear infection where the drum and/or the small bones in the middle ear are damaged often have hearing loss ... and helps to reduce any problems caused by chronic ear infections or allergies. In patients with single-sided sensorineural ... A preliminary assessment of the impact on outpatients and cost when rehabilitating hearing in chronic suppurative otitis media ...
Anemia caused by chronic kidney disease[edit]. For patients who require dialysis or have chronic kidney disease, iron should be ... It is used in treating anemia resulting from chronic kidney disease and myelodysplasia, from the treatment of cancer ( ... Erythropoietin is also used to treat anemia in people with chronic kidney disease who are not on dialysis (those in Stage 3 or ... Neurological diseases[edit]. Erythropoietin has been hypothesized to be beneficial in treating certain neurological diseases ...
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)[edit]. *EMA/CHMP/483572/2012 Guideline on clinical investigation of medicinal ... 483572/2012 Guideline on clinical investigation of medicinal products in the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease ... chronic or repeated intermittent use for longer than 6 months) of non-life-threatening diseases. ... products in the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)[37]. Diabetes mellitus[edit]. *FDA: Evaluating ...
Chronic disease. People living with chronic conditions like HIV and diabetes are at higher risk for developing a mental ... Diabetic patients also have to deal with emotional stress trying to manage the disease. Conditions like heart disease, stroke, ... ICD-10 Chapter V: Mental and behavioural disorders, since 1949 part of the International Classification of Diseases produced by ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to Mental and behavioural diseases and disorders. ...
Acute disease. An acute disease is a short-lived disease, like the common cold.. Chronic disease. A chronic disease is one that ... Chronic disease disease that is a long-term issue (chronic). Congenital disease disease that is present at birth. It is often, ... Slowly progressive diseases are also chronic diseases; many are also degenerative diseases. The opposite of progressive disease ... It also sounds like it could imply secondary disease, but acquired disease can be primary disease.. Acute disease disease of a ...
Chronic disease[edit]. In long-established disease, adult worms lay eggs that can cause inflammatory reactions. The eggs ... The treatment objective is to cure the disease and to prevent the evolution of the acute to the chronic form of the disease. ... Central nervous system disease[edit]. Central nervous system lesions occur occasionally. Cerebral granulomatous disease may be ... Human disease caused by parasitic worms called schistosomes. This article is about the disease. For the organism, see ...
... and such common chronic systemic diseases as cardiovascular disease,[6] diabetes,[7][8] and osteoporosis.[9][10][11] ... "Preventing Chronic Disease. 6 (4): A128. PMC 2774642. PMID 19755004.. CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link) ... Diet, nutrition and the prevention of chronic diseases." Report of a Joint WHO/FAO Expert Consultation; Geneva 2003. Retrieved ... These Board Certified Nutritionists typically specialize in obesity and chronic disease. In order to become board certified, ...
"Preventing Chronic Disease. 11. doi:10.5888/pcd11.140341. PMC 4264464. Retrieved February 27, 2019.. ... Excluded from entry in 1917 were not only convicted criminals, chronic alcoholics and people with contagious diseases, but also ... and people with contagious diseases.. 1917 Congressional Record, Vol. 63, Page 876 (5 February 1917). Uma A. Segal (August 14, ... low rates of many diseases, and higher than average life expectancy are also discussed as positive aspects of Asian Americans.[ ...
"Preventing Chronic Disease. National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (USA). 11. doi:10.5888/ ... Cancer Research UK note that superfoods are often promoted as having an ability to prevent or cure diseases, including cancer; ... and disease". Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. 56 (3): 627-9. doi:10.1021/jf071988k. PMID 18211023.. ... by the Journal of the American Medical Association and touted as a treatment for celiac disease.[34] Also, concerning possible ...
Chronic Respiratory Disease. 5 (2): 81-6. doi:10.1177/1479972307087190. PMID 18539721. Waugh, J. B.; Granger, W. M. (2004). "An ... "The clinical utility of long-term humidification therapy in chronic airway disease". Respiratory Medicine. 104 (4): 525-33. doi ... "High flow nasal cannula versus nasal CPAP for neonatal respiratory disease: A retrospective study". Journal of Perinatology. 27 ...
Chronic kidney disease[edit]. Main article: Chronic kidney disease. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) can also develop slowly and, ... Acute disease is often reversible while chronic disease often is not.[5] With appropriate treatment many with chronic disease ... Chronic kidney disease[edit]. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has numerous causes. The most common causes of CKD are diabetes ... Acute-on-chronic kidney failure[edit]. Acute kidney injuries can be present on top of chronic kidney disease, a condition ...
Preventing Chronic Disease. 11. doi:10.5888/pcd11.140329.. *^ López-Caneda Eduardo; et al. (2013). "Effects of a persistent ... "Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Retrieved 6 January 2017.. ... The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggests increasing the cost of alcohol or the excise taxes, restricting the ... The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released a study in October 2011 that showed that in the United States ...
"Preventing Chronic Disease. 11: E229. doi:10.5888/pcd11.140202. PMC 4283359. PMID 25551184.. ... "Journal of Alzheimer's Disease. 14 (2): 133-45. doi:10.3233/JAD-2008-14202. PMC 2670571. PMID 18560126.. ... report Prevention of cardiovascular disease declared that 40,000 cardiovascular disease deaths in 2006 were "mostly preventable ... Coronary artery disease[edit]. The primary health risk identified for trans fat consumption is an elevated risk of coronary ...
Chronic kidney disease. Cimino fistula Dialysis catheter placement. Chronic venous insufficiency. Endovenous laser treatment ... Arterial and venous disease treatment by angiography, stenting, and non-operative varicose vein treatment sclerotherapy, ... Vascular surgery is a surgical subspecialty in which diseases of the vascular system, or arteries, veins and lymphatic ... The vascular surgeon is trained in the diagnosis and management of diseases affecting all parts of the vascular system except ...
... chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), renal failure, and severe burns; patients who have "cachexia" in these disease settings ... chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; burns, liver failure, etc., and the wasting Dejerine-Sottas syndrome (HMSN Type III). ... There are many diseases and conditions which cause a decrease in muscle mass, known as atrophy, including activity, as seen ... Muscle atrophy results from a co-morbidity of several common diseases, including cancer, AIDS, congestive heart failure, COPD ( ...
Alter it was only an auspicious beginning." McHenry Harris; Randall E. Harris (2013). Epidemiology of Chronic Disease. Jones & ... He remains at the NIH as a chief of the infectious diseases section and associate director of research in the department of ... Alter is the chief of the infectious disease section and the associate director for research of the Department of Transfusion ... chief of infectious diseases section at the department of transfusion medicine in the Clinical Center NIH from 12/72-present; ...
Chronic severe hepatic disease. *HIV infection in association with a last known CD4 count of ,50/mm3 ...
Harris, Randall E. (2013). Epidemiology of Chronic Disease. Jones & Bartlett Publishers. p. 271. ISBN 9780763780470. .. ... Gallagher RP, Lee TK, Bajdik CD, Borugian M (2010). "Ultraviolet radiation". Chronic Diseases in Canada. 29 Suppl 1: 51-68. ... "WHO Disease and injury country estimates". World Health Organization. 2009. Archived from the original on 11 November 2009. ... Chronic non-healing wounds.[26] These are called Marjolin's ulcers based on their appearance, and can develop into squamous- ...
"Epidemiology of Chronic Disease. Jones & Bartlett. pp. 181-190. ISBN 978-0-7637-8047-0. . Archived from the original on 24 June ... of developing the disease,[99] slightly higher than the figure for the UK.[100] The disease is more common in men than women,[2 ... The disease is slightly more common in men than women, and in the United States is over 1.5 times more common in African ... Chronic pancreatitis appears to almost triple risk, and as with diabetes, new-onset pancreatitis may be a symptom of a tumor.[3 ...
It is a typical feature of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a type of obstructive lung disease characterized by ... "International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. 3 (2): 193-204. doi:10.2147/COPD.S2639. PMC 2629965. PMID ... "International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. 14: 921-928. doi:10.2147/COPD.S170581. PMC 6507121. PMID ... Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD). pp. 6-17.. *^ Roversi, Sara; Corbetta, Lorenzo; Clini, Enrico (5 ...
Vieira, D. (n.d.). "Eccentric Cycle Exercise in Severe COPD: Feasibility of Application". Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease ... Rooyackers, J. (n.d.). "Eccentric exercise training in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease". Rehabilitation ... Chronic patellar tendonitis[edit]. A condition that arises when the tendon and the tissues that surround it, become inflamed ... Add to these factors disease and cardiac and respiratory illness. Eccentric training enables the elderly, and those with the ...
Mucosal-associated invariant T cells in autoimmunity, immune-mediated diseases and airways disease. Immunology. May 2016, 148 ( ... Progressive loss of memory T cell potential and commitment to exhaustion during chronic viral infection. Journal of Virology. ... Modulation of autoimmune diseases by interleukin (IL)-17 producing regulatory T helper (Th17) cells. The Indian Journal of ... Immunobiology: the immune system in health and disease 5th ed. New York: Garland Pub. 2001. ISBN 978-0-8153-3642-6. OCLC ...
Chronic kidney disease is the slow loss of kidney function over time. The main job of the kidneys is to remove wastes and ... Kidney failure - chronic; Renal failure - chronic; Chronic renal insufficiency; Chronic kidney failure; Chronic renal failure ... Chronic kidney disease is the slow loss of kidney function over time. The main job of the kidneys is to remove wastes and ... Chronic kidney disease (CKD) slowly gets worse over months or years. You may not notice any symptoms for some time. The loss of ...
Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a prion disease that affects deer, elk, reindeer, sika deer and moose. It has been found in ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. CDC twenty four seven. Saving Lives, Protecting People Centers for Disease Control ... Content source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention , National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases ( ... The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) cannot attest to the accuracy of a non-federal website. ...
Learn how CDCs chronic disease prevention system combines data, health care, and communities to support healthy choices. ... About Chronic Diseases*. About Chronic DiseasesHealth and Economic Costs of Chronic DiseasesHow You Can Prevent Chronic ... Chronic Disease Data*. Chronic Disease DataSurveillance SystemsChronic Disease Interactive Data ApplicationsOpen Data Portal ... homeNational Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion * About Chronic Diseasesplus icon *Health and Economic ...
... heart disease, cancers and respiratory disease are on the rise across the world. Posing a real and increasing threat to health ... We are in the midst of a global epidemic of chronic diseases - diabetes, ... We are in the midst of a global epidemic of chronic diseases - diabetes, heart disease, cancers and respiratory disease are on ... If we are to tackle chronic diseases, public policy must strive towards this key mantra - make healthy choices the easy choices ...
1 in 5 Older Patients with Chronic Disease Report Health Care Discrimination. Blacks Most Likely to Name Race; Whites and ... Almost one in five older patients with a chronic disease reported experiencing health care discrimination of one type or ... Home > UCSF News Center > 1 in 5 Older Patients with Chronic Disease Report Health Care Discrimination ... lung disease, heart disease or stroke. Although the study included a representative national sample, it did not contain enough ...
... then you may suffer from chronic kidney disease (CKD). Read about the treatments available ... Chronic Kidney Disease (American Academy of Family Physicians) Also in Spanish * Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) (American Kidney ... Eating Right for Chronic Kidney Disease (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases) Also in Spanish ... Sexuality and Chronic Kidney Disease (National Kidney Foundation) * Staying Fit with Kidney Disease (National Kidney Foundation ...
... chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) makes it hard for you to breathe. At first symptoms are mild, but usually become more ... What is COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease)?. COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) is a group of lung diseases ... Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish * Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - adults ... Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) * Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary ...
  • Prevalence Among Veterans With Coronary Heart Disease. (cdc.gov)
  • Cigarette smoking is more prevalent among male veterans with Abstract coronary heart disease than among their civilian counterparts. (cdc.gov)
  • Cigarette smoking increases the risk of illness and early death for Introduction people with coronary heart disease. (cdc.gov)
  • Cigarette smoking puts people with coronary heart disease at in- without coronary heart disease in the United States, based on the creased risk of illness and death (1,2). (cdc.gov)
  • We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of participants who re- erans with coronary heart disease and those without it (13). (cdc.gov)
  • We examined differences between veterans and civilians coronary heart disease. (cdc.gov)
  • Mindful of the importance of smoking to public health, we sought to inform assessment of efforts to reduce smoking among veter- ans and among those with coronary heart disease using more re- cent BRFSS data. (cdc.gov)
  • This definition is consistent with the federal coronary heart disease. (cdc.gov)
  • Prioritizing goals to prevent diabetes and its complica- for chronic diseases (eg, coronary heart disease, diabetes, tions. (cdc.gov)
  • Initial y, 5 key areas were selected for Introduction action: coronary heart disease and stroke, cancer, mental il ness, HIV/AIDS and sexual health, and accidents. (cdc.gov)
  • In February 2013, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention published an article that demonstrates how IMO's interface terminology was found to accurately categorize coronary heart disease and heart failure events. (wikipedia.org)
  • Numerous studies have investigated the link between birth weight and risk of disease and have found that low birth weight is significantly associated with coronary heart disease, stroke and type-2 diabetes. (wikipedia.org)
  • There has also been an association between consumption of sweetened beverages and health risks such as coronary heart disease and diabetes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (cdc.gov)
  • Saving Lives, Protecting People Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (cdc.gov)
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) cannot attest to the accuracy of a non-federal website. (cdc.gov)
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in col- of the materials. (cdc.gov)
  • Components of the Screen for The opinions expressed by authors contributing to this journal do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Public Health Service, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or the authors' affiliated institutions. (cdc.gov)
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) lence estimates of repeat mammography at 18 months. (cdc.gov)
  • The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (cdc.gov)
  • According to loss is rarely maintained (12) in the present obesity-pro- the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC's) moting environment of the United States (13). (cdc.gov)
  • Media campaigns have the potential to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's 3-month nation- change social perceptions of smoking (1,2) and knowledge about al antismoking Tips from Former Smokers media campaign. (cdc.gov)
  • In the United States, the Centers for Disease Control and have substantial public health benefits. (cdc.gov)
  • In 2010, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) ventive interventions, if sustained, could yield cost savings many launched Communities Putting Prevention to Work (CPPW), a times greater than the original investment over 10 to 20 years and $485 million program to reduce obesity, tobacco use, and expos- avert 14,000 premature deaths. (cdc.gov)
  • In 2010, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) census data or setting-specific data (eg, school enrollment) to launched Communities Putting Prevention to Work (CPPW) to re- identify the population count for the setting where the interven- duce illness, death, and the economic burden of chronic diseases tion was implemented, and 3) aggregating data. (cdc.gov)
  • service to become pivotal partners in public-private efforts to control chronic diseases across sectors (public, not-for- In 2002, Indiana University embarked on such a The opinions expressed by authors contributing to this journal do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the US Department of Health and Human Services, the Public Health Service, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or the authors' affiliated institutions. (cdc.gov)
  • Although the variables sales during the 2 years after implementation of the The opinions expressed by authors contributing to this journal do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the US Department of Health and Human Services, the Public Health Service, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or the authors' affiliated institutions. (cdc.gov)
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention manuscript. (cdc.gov)
  • 95% CI, 0.9-5.5), food or drink serv- poor job performance, and absenteeism as a result of The opinions expressed by authors contributing to this journal do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Public Health Service, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or the authors' affiliated institutions. (cdc.gov)
  • Activity at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention nate disparities, which is a goal of Healthy People 2010 (2). (cdc.gov)
  • Each year, approximately 700,000 people suffer a emergency treatment is the time it takes for a patient to The opinions expressed by authors contributing to this journal do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the US Department of Health and Human Services, the Public Health Service, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or the authors' affiliated institutions. (cdc.gov)
  • 3 areas, MS prevalence was highest among women, people in the southern, middle, and northern United States to The opinions expressed by authors contributing to this journal do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the US Department of Health and Human Services, the Public Health Service, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or the authors' affiliated institutions. (cdc.gov)
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and first nate in the ability to maintain the desired behavior for the implemented in 2002, it is one of several programs offered long term. (cdc.gov)
  • Factors identified as facilitating integrated interventions in separately for specific chronic disease-oriented programs, CDC's the community included collaboration between programs in the The opinions expressed by authors contributing to this journal do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Public Health Service, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or the authors' affiliated institutions. (cdc.gov)
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) encourages state education and health agencies to develop coordinated school health programs to promote health-related policies (22). (cdc.gov)
  • When Tony Blair became prime minister in 1997, his into the health sector is often traced to the publication of government was committed to evidence-based policy, The opinions expressed by authors contributing to this journal do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the US Department of Health and Human Services, the Public Health Service, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or the authors' affiliated institutions. (cdc.gov)
  • Cross-sectional and prospective cohort epidemiologic by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), studies provide estimates of the population impact of small which target the low-income, predominately ethnic minor- changes in body mass index, dietary intake, and energy ity women screened by the Breast and Cervical Cancer expenditure. (cdc.gov)
  • when they were successful y bridged through work with They do not see the obligation that government has to organizations such as the Centers for Disease Control protect its citizens as outlined in the Constitution. (cdc.gov)
  • According to 2008 figures from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention chronic medical care accounts for more than 75% of health care spending in the US. (wikipedia.org)
  • The most widely used diagnostic criteria for CFS are the 1994 research guidelines proposed by the "International Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Study Group", led by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (wikipedia.org)
  • Data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) revealed that chronic illness affected 133 million people in the United States and accounted for seven out of ten deaths. (wikipedia.org)
  • The most commonly used diagnostic criteria and definition of CFS for research and clinical purposes were published by the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). (wikipedia.org)
  • Thomas R. Frieden, M.D., M.P.H is an American infectious disease and public health expert, former director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and acting administrator of the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry from 2009 to 2017, appointed by President Barack Obama. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2015, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, citing the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, defines binge drinking as "a pattern of drinking that brings a person's blood alcohol concentration (BAC) to 0.08 grams percent or above. (wikipedia.org)
  • Based on 2005-2006 estimates, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has stated that approximately 5.5 million Americans a year are either admitted to a hospital or seen by a physician, with some form of anemia as their primary diagnosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • The final stage of CKD is called end-stage renal disease (ESRD). (medlineplus.gov)
  • Anemia of chronic disease as it is now understood is to at least some degree separate from the anemia seen in renal failure in which anemia results from poor production of erythropoietin, or the anemia caused by some drugs (like AZT, used to treat HIV infection) that have the side effect of inhibiting erythropoiesis. (wikipedia.org)
  • The absence of a generally accepted definition and diagnosis of renal osteodystrophy prompted Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO)] to sponsor a controversies conference, entitled Definition, Evaluation, and Classification of Renal Osteodystrophy, in 2005. (wikipedia.org)
  • Often, a patient with renal papillary necrosis will have numerous conditions acting synergistically to bring about the disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chronic kidney disease Kidney disease / renal artery stenosis - the normal physiological response to low blood pressure in the renal arteries is to increase cardiac output (CO) to maintain the pressure needed for glomerular filtration. (wikipedia.org)
  • From 2000 to 2004, 17% of NBCCEDP participants interventions that help them lower their risk for heart at the 10 grantee locations (range, 8%-39%) were also disease. (cdc.gov)
  • A methodology for evaluating specific surveys wil evaluate changes in organizational organizational change in community-based chronic disease practices, policies, or both fol owing the socioecological interventions. (cdc.gov)
  • Decreasing the leading preventable risk factors for We used a mixed-methods approach to estimate population reach chronic disease -- obesity and tobacco use -- could save lives and and to simulate the effects of completed CPPW interventions substantially reduce health care expenditures (3). (cdc.gov)
  • that address these risk factors may make healthier living easier and We linked plan objectives to a common set of interventions across prevent chronic disease (4). (cdc.gov)
  • They must ty of disease over the same time period conditional on non- be addressed through discussion of specific interventions exposed status (not exposed to the risk factor under study). (cdc.gov)
  • Some potential y modifiable risk factors and chronic condi- sons for the improvements in smoking and physical activ- tions cause significant disease and death during pregnancy ity may support the development of targeted interventions and promote the development of chronic disease. (cdc.gov)
  • Abstract rated interventions to address chronic disease. (cdc.gov)
  • In response to the increased government expenditure in dealing with chronic care policy makers are searching for effective interventions and strategies. (wikipedia.org)
  • Disease management is defined as "a system of coordinated healthcare interventions and communications for populations with conditions in which patient self-care efforts are significant. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chronic mountain sickness (CMS or Monge's disease) is a disease in which the proportion of blood volume that is occupied by red blood cells increases (polycythaemia) and there is an abnormally low level of oxygen in the blood (hypoxaemia). (wikipedia.org)
  • This includes diseases such as polycystic kidney disease which is a cystic genetic disorder of the kidneys, PKD ,which is characterized by the presence of multiple cysts (hence, "polycystic") in both kidneys, can also damage the liver, pancreas, and rarely, the heart and brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • Toxic and drugs Alcoholic liver disease Rarely drug induced liver disease from methotrexate, amiodarone, nitrofurantoin and others Paracetamol (acetaminophen) causes acute liver damage. (wikipedia.org)
  • Acute Exacerbations of Chronic Bronchitis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis (AECB) Archived 2006-04-06 at the Wayback Machine. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chronic care refers to medical care which addresses pre-existing or long term illness, as opposed to acute care which is concerned with short term or severe illness of brief duration. (wikipedia.org)
  • As a consequence, patients with chronic conditions can fare poorly in the current acute-care model of care delivery. (wikipedia.org)
  • While acute mountain sickness is experienced shortly after ascent to high altitude, chronic mountain sickness may develop only after many years of living at high altitude. (wikipedia.org)
  • Undernutrition can lead to wasting in acute cases, and the stunting of marasmus in chronic cases of malnutrition. (wikipedia.org)
  • Acute and chronic wounds are at opposite ends of a spectrum of wound-healing types that progress toward being healed at different rates. (wikipedia.org)
  • The disease is highly lethal: in a study carried out in 1986 at Boca do Acre, also in the Amazon, 39 patients out of 44 died in the acute phase of the disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the 1987 Boca do Acre study, scientists did an epidemiological survey and reported delta virus infection in 24% of asymptomatic HBV carriers, 29% of acute nonfulminant hepatitis B cases, 74% of fulminant hepatitis B cases, and 100% of chronic hepatitis B cases. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Journal of Infectious Diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • Robert Mundell Nancy Stokey Thomas Schelling Vernon Smith Finn Kydland Armed conflict Biodiversity Chronic Disease Climate Change Education Hunger and Malnutrition Infectious Disease Natural Disasters Population Growth Water and Sanitation In addition, the Center commissioned research on Corruption and Trade Barriers, but the Expert Panel did not rank these for Copenhagen Consensus 2012, because the solutions to these challenges are political rather than investment-related. (wikipedia.org)
  • He completed a residency in internal medicine at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center 1986 - 1989 followed by a one year infectious diseases fellowship from 1989 - 1990 at Yale School of Medicine and Yale-New Haven Hospital. (wikipedia.org)
  • He remains at the NIH as a chief of the infectious diseases section and associate director of research in the department of transfusion medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • An official report published in February 2009 stated that in 2008, for the first time, HIV/AIDS was China's leading cause of death among infectious diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • A 2004 article in the Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal on the prevalence of inaccurate online information about Lyme disease cited the ILADS website as a source of such inaccurate material. (wikipedia.org)
  • The purpose of the national CPPW program was to reduce campaign used hard-hitting, emotional advertisements, which de- chronic disease associated with tobacco use or obesity through picted suffering caused by smoking. (cdc.gov)
  • Reaching an estimated 43 million people through more than 400 newspapers throughout the United States, A Frank Statement to Cigarette Smokers and subsequent advertisements were designed by public relations firm Hill & Knowlton to socially engineer the public's perceptions of tobacco and to instill doubt about scientific research linking disease and smoking. (wikipedia.org)
  • Microscopic colitis is the diagnosis in around 10% of cases investigated for chronic non-bloody diarrhea. (wikipedia.org)
  • The ILADS mission statement is, "ILADS is a nonprofit, international, multidisciplinary medical society dedicated to the appropriate diagnosis and treatment of Lyme and associated diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • tions resulting from these diseases disproportionately affect racial and ethnic minority populations, particularly blacks and Latinos. (cdc.gov)
  • As the for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), to buy media value systems of the for-profit and nonprofit sectors con- time and the talents of marketing experts. (cdc.gov)
  • Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and a senior fel ow objectives has been more difficult. (cdc.gov)