Dysthymic Disorder: Chronically depressed mood that occurs for most of the day more days than not for at least 2 years. The required minimum duration in children to make this diagnosis is 1 year. During periods of depressed mood, at least 2 of the following additional symptoms are present: poor appetite or overeating, insomnia or hypersomnia, low energy or fatigue, low self esteem, poor concentration or difficulty making decisions, and feelings of hopelessness. (DSM-IV)Depression: Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.Depressive Disorder: An affective disorder manifested by either a dysphoric mood or loss of interest or pleasure in usual activities. The mood disturbance is prominent and relatively persistent.Depressive Disorder, Major: Marked depression appearing in the involution period and characterized by hallucinations, delusions, paranoia, and agitation.Psychotherapy: A generic term for the treatment of mental illness or emotional disturbances primarily by verbal or nonverbal communication.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Antidepressive Agents: Mood-stimulating drugs used primarily in the treatment of affective disorders and related conditions. Several MONOAMINE OXIDASE INHIBITORS are useful as antidepressants apparently as a long-term consequence of their modulation of catecholamine levels. The tricyclic compounds useful as antidepressive agents (ANTIDEPRESSIVE AGENTS, TRICYCLIC) also appear to act through brain catecholamine systems. A third group (ANTIDEPRESSIVE AGENTS, SECOND-GENERATION) is a diverse group of drugs including some that act specifically on serotonergic systems.Cognitive Therapy: A direct form of psychotherapy based on the interpretation of situations (cognitive structure of experiences) that determine how an individual feels and behaves. It is based on the premise that cognition, the process of acquiring knowledge and forming beliefs, is a primary determinant of mood and behavior. The therapy uses behavioral and verbal techniques to identify and correct negative thinking that is at the root of the aberrant behavior.Psychiatric Status Rating Scales: Standardized procedures utilizing rating scales or interview schedules carried out by health personnel for evaluating the degree of mental illness.Combined Modality Therapy: The treatment of a disease or condition by several different means simultaneously or sequentially. Chemoimmunotherapy, RADIOIMMUNOTHERAPY, chemoradiotherapy, cryochemotherapy, and SALVAGE THERAPY are seen most frequently, but their combinations with each other and surgery are also used.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Depression, Postpartum: Depression in POSTPARTUM WOMEN, usually within four weeks after giving birth (PARTURITION). The degree of depression ranges from mild transient depression to neurotic or psychotic depressive disorders. (From DSM-IV, p386)Cortical Spreading Depression: The decrease in neuronal activity (related to a decrease in metabolic demand) extending from the site of cortical stimulation. It is believed to be responsible for the decrease in cerebral blood flow that accompanies the aura of MIGRAINE WITH AURA. (Campbell's Psychiatric Dictionary, 8th ed.)Long-Term Synaptic Depression: A persistent activity-dependent decrease in synaptic efficacy between NEURONS. It typically occurs following repeated low-frequency afferent stimulation, but it can be induced by other methods. Long-term depression appears to play a role in MEMORY.Anxiety: Feeling or emotion of dread, apprehension, and impending disaster but not disabling as with ANXIETY DISORDERS.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Anxiety Disorders: Persistent and disabling ANXIETY.Personality Inventory: Check list, usually to be filled out by a person about himself, consisting of many statements about personal characteristics which the subject checks.Stress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.Comorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.Antidepressive Agents, Second-Generation: A structurally and mechanistically diverse group of drugs that are not tricyclics or monoamine oxidase inhibitors. The most clinically important appear to act selectively on serotonergic systems, especially by inhibiting serotonin reuptake.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors: Compounds that specifically inhibit the reuptake of serotonin in the brain.Affect: The feeling-tone accompaniment of an idea or mental representation. It is the most direct psychic derivative of instinct and the psychic representative of the various bodily changes by means of which instincts manifest themselves.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Psychometrics: Assessment of psychological variables by the application of mathematical procedures.Depression, Chemical: The decrease in a measurable parameter of a PHYSIOLOGICAL PROCESS, including cellular, microbial, and plant; immunological, cardiovascular, respiratory, reproductive, urinary, digestive, neural, musculoskeletal, ocular, and skin physiological processes; or METABOLIC PROCESS, including enzymatic and other pharmacological processes, by a drug or other chemical.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Citalopram: A furancarbonitrile that is one of the SEROTONIN UPTAKE INHIBITORS used as an antidepressant. The drug is also effective in reducing ethanol uptake in alcoholics and is used in depressed patients who also suffer from tardive dyskinesia in preference to tricyclic antidepressants, which aggravate this condition.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: Categorical classification of MENTAL DISORDERS based on criteria sets with defining features. It is produced by the American Psychiatric Association. (DSM-IV, page xxii)Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Interview, Psychological: A directed conversation aimed at eliciting information for psychiatric diagnosis, evaluation, treatment planning, etc. The interview may be conducted by a social worker or psychologist.Sertraline: A selective serotonin uptake inhibitor that is used in the treatment of depression.Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Bipolar Disorder: A major affective disorder marked by severe mood swings (manic or major depressive episodes) and a tendency to remission and recurrence.Adaptation, Psychological: A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Life Change Events: Those occurrences, including social, psychological, and environmental, which require an adjustment or effect a change in an individual's pattern of living.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Psychological Tests: Standardized tests designed to measure abilities, as in intelligence, aptitude, and achievement tests, or to evaluate personality traits.Suicide: The act of killing oneself.Depressive Disorder, Treatment-Resistant: Failure to respond to two or more trials of antidepressant monotherapy or failure to respond to four or more trials of different antidepressant therapies. (Campbell's Psychiatric Dictionary, 9th ed.)Fluoxetine: The first highly specific serotonin uptake inhibitor. It is used as an antidepressant and often has a more acceptable side-effects profile than traditional antidepressants.Antidepressive Agents, Tricyclic: Substances that contain a fused three-ring moiety and are used in the treatment of depression. These drugs block the uptake of norepinephrine and serotonin into axon terminals and may block some subtypes of serotonin, adrenergic, and histamine receptors. However the mechanism of their antidepressant effects is not clear because the therapeutic effects usually take weeks to develop and may reflect compensatory changes in the central nervous system.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Electroconvulsive Therapy: Electrically induced CONVULSIONS primarily used in the treatment of severe AFFECTIVE DISORDERS and SCHIZOPHRENIA.Suicidal Ideation: A risk factor for suicide attempts and completions, it is the most common of all suicidal behavior, but only a minority of ideators engage in overt self-harm.Neuronal Plasticity: The capacity of the NERVOUS SYSTEM to change its reactivity as the result of successive activations.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Synaptic Transmission: The communication from a NEURON to a target (neuron, muscle, or secretory cell) across a SYNAPSE. In chemical synaptic transmission, the presynaptic neuron releases a NEUROTRANSMITTER that diffuses across the synaptic cleft and binds to specific synaptic receptors, activating them. The activated receptors modulate specific ion channels and/or second-messenger systems in the postsynaptic cell. In electrical synaptic transmission, electrical signals are communicated as an ionic current flow across ELECTRICAL SYNAPSES.Social Support: Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.Electric Stimulation: Use of electric potential or currents to elicit biological responses.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Mood Disorders: Those disorders that have a disturbance in mood as their predominant feature.Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic: A class of traumatic stress disorders with symptoms that last more than one month. There are various forms of post-traumatic stress disorder, depending on the time of onset and the duration of these stress symptoms. In the acute form, the duration of the symptoms is between 1 to 3 months. In the chronic form, symptoms last more than 3 months. With delayed onset, symptoms develop more than 6 months after the traumatic event.Synapses: Specialized junctions at which a neuron communicates with a target cell. At classical synapses, a neuron's presynaptic terminal releases a chemical transmitter stored in synaptic vesicles which diffuses across a narrow synaptic cleft and activates receptors on the postsynaptic membrane of the target cell. The target may be a dendrite, cell body, or axon of another neuron, or a specialized region of a muscle or secretory cell. Neurons may also communicate via direct electrical coupling with ELECTRICAL SYNAPSES. Several other non-synaptic chemical or electric signal transmitting processes occur via extracellular mediated interactions.Inbreeding: The mating of plants or non-human animals which are closely related genetically.Child of Impaired Parents: Child with one or more parents afflicted by a physical or mental disorder.Hippocampus: A curved elevation of GRAY MATTER extending the entire length of the floor of the TEMPORAL HORN of the LATERAL VENTRICLE (see also TEMPORAL LOBE). The hippocampus proper, subiculum, and DENTATE GYRUS constitute the hippocampal formation. Sometimes authors include the ENTORHINAL CORTEX in the hippocampal formation.Excitatory Postsynaptic Potentials: Depolarization of membrane potentials at the SYNAPTIC MEMBRANES of target neurons during neurotransmission. Excitatory postsynaptic potentials can singly or in summation reach the trigger threshold for ACTION POTENTIALS.Paroxetine: A serotonin uptake inhibitor that is effective in the treatment of depression.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Cognition Disorders: Disturbances in mental processes related to learning, thinking, reasoning, and judgment.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Neuropsychological Tests: Tests designed to assess neurological function associated with certain behaviors. They are used in diagnosing brain dysfunction or damage and central nervous system disorders or injury.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Emotions: Those affective states which can be experienced and have arousing and motivational properties.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Fatigue: The state of weariness following a period of exertion, mental or physical, characterized by a decreased capacity for work and reduced efficiency to respond to stimuli.United StatesSuicide, Attempted: The unsuccessful attempt to kill oneself.Personality Assessment: The determination and evaluation of personality attributes by interviews, observations, tests, or scales. Articles concerning personality measurement are considered to be within scope of this term.Geriatric Assessment: Evaluation of the level of physical, physiological, or mental functioning in the older population group.Self Concept: A person's view of himself.Mother-Child Relations: Interaction between a mother and child.Serotonin Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins: Sodium chloride-dependent neurotransmitter symporters located primarily on the PLASMA MEMBRANE of serotonergic neurons. They are different than SEROTONIN RECEPTORS, which signal cellular responses to SEROTONIN. They remove SEROTONIN from the EXTRACELLULAR SPACE by high affinity reuptake into PRESYNAPTIC TERMINALS. Regulates signal amplitude and duration at serotonergic synapses and is the site of action of the SEROTONIN UPTAKE INHIBITORS.Somatoform Disorders: Disorders having the presence of physical symptoms that suggest a general medical condition but that are not fully explained by a another medical condition, by the direct effects of a substance, or by another mental disorder. The symptoms must cause clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other areas of functioning. In contrast to FACTITIOUS DISORDERS and MALINGERING, the physical symptoms are not under voluntary control. (APA, DSM-V)Mental Health: The state wherein the person is well adjusted.Cyclohexanols: Monohydroxy derivatives of cyclohexanes that contain the general formula R-C6H11O. They have a camphorlike odor and are used in making soaps, insecticides, germicides, dry cleaning, and plasticizers.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Mianserin: A tetracyclic compound with antidepressant effects. It may cause drowsiness and hematological problems. Its mechanism of therapeutic action is not well understood, although it apparently blocks alpha-adrenergic, histamine H1, and some types of serotonin receptors.Pain: An unpleasant sensation induced by noxious stimuli which are detected by NERVE ENDINGS of NOCICEPTIVE NEURONS.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Adjustment Disorders: Maladaptive reactions to identifiable psychosocial stressors occurring within a short time after onset of the stressor. They are manifested by either impairment in social or occupational functioning or by symptoms (depression, anxiety, etc.) that are in excess of a normal and expected reaction to the stressor.Sleep Disorders: Conditions characterized by disturbances of usual sleep patterns or behaviors. Sleep disorders may be divided into three major categories: DYSSOMNIAS (i.e. disorders characterized by insomnia or hypersomnia), PARASOMNIAS (abnormal sleep behaviors), and sleep disorders secondary to medical or psychiatric disorders. (From Thorpy, Sleep Disorders Medicine, 1994, p187)Interpersonal Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more persons.Affective Disorders, Psychotic: Disorders in which the essential feature is a severe disturbance in mood (depression, anxiety, elation, and excitement) accompanied by psychotic symptoms such as delusions, hallucinations, gross impairment in reality testing, etc.Activities of Daily Living: The performance of the basic activities of self care, such as dressing, ambulation, or eating.Neural Inhibition: The function of opposing or restraining the excitation of neurons or their target excitable cells.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders: Disorders characterized by impairment of the ability to initiate or maintain sleep. This may occur as a primary disorder or in association with another medical or psychiatric condition.Long-Term Potentiation: A persistent increase in synaptic efficacy, usually induced by appropriate activation of the same synapses. The phenomenological properties of long-term potentiation suggest that it may be a cellular mechanism of learning and memory.Self Report: Method for obtaining information through verbal responses, written or oral, from subjects.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Geriatric Psychiatry: A subspecialty of psychiatry concerned with the mental health of the aged.Nortriptyline: A metabolite of AMITRIPTYLINE that is also used as an antidepressive agent. Nortriptyline is used in major depression, dysthymia, and atypical depressions.Models, Psychological: Theoretical representations that simulate psychological processes and/or social processes. These include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Caregivers: Persons who provide care to those who need supervision or assistance in illness or disability. They may provide the care in the home, in a hospital, or in an institution. Although caregivers include trained medical, nursing, and other health personnel, the concept also refers to parents, spouses, or other family members, friends, members of the clergy, teachers, social workers, fellow patients.Psychotherapy, Brief: Any form of psychotherapy designed to produce therapeutic change within a minimal amount of time, generally not more than 20 sessions.Cognition: Intellectual or mental process whereby an organism obtains knowledge.Psychotherapy, Group: A form of therapy in which two or more patients participate under the guidance of one or more psychotherapists for the purpose of treating emotional disturbances, social maladjustments, and psychotic states.Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Seasonal Affective Disorder: A syndrome characterized by depressions that recur annually at the same time each year, usually during the winter months. Other symptoms include anxiety, irritability, decreased energy, increased appetite (carbohydrate cravings), increased duration of sleep, and weight gain. SAD (seasonal affective disorder) can be treated by daily exposure to bright artificial lights (PHOTOTHERAPY), during the season of recurrence.Pregnancy Complications: Conditions or pathological processes associated with pregnancy. They can occur during or after pregnancy, and range from minor discomforts to serious diseases that require medical interventions. They include diseases in pregnant females, and pregnancies in females with diseases.Neurotic Disorders: Disorders in which the symptoms are distressing to the individual and recognized by him or her as being unacceptable. Social relationships may be greatly affected but usually remain within acceptable limits. The disturbance is relatively enduring or recurrent without treatment.Grief: Normal, appropriate sorrowful response to an immediate cause. It is self-limiting and gradually subsides within a reasonable time.Anhedonia: Inability to experience pleasure due to impairment or dysfunction of normal psychological and neurobiological mechanisms. It is a symptom of many PSYCHOTIC DISORDERS (e.g., DEPRESSIVE DISORDER, MAJOR; and SCHIZOPHRENIA).Imipramine: The prototypical tricyclic antidepressant. It has been used in major depression, dysthymia, bipolar depression, attention-deficit disorders, agoraphobia, and panic disorders. It has less sedative effect than some other members of this therapeutic group.Helplessness, Learned: Learned expectation that one's responses are independent of reward and, hence, do not predict or control the occurrence of rewards. Learned helplessness derives from a history, experimentally induced or naturally occurring, of having received punishment/aversive stimulation regardless of responses made. Such circumstances result in an impaired ability to learn. Used for human or animal populations. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Pain Measurement: Scales, questionnaires, tests, and other methods used to assess pain severity and duration in patients or experimental animals to aid in diagnosis, therapy, and physiological studies.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Substance-Related Disorders: Disorders related to substance abuse.Affective Symptoms: Mood or emotional responses dissonant with or inappropriate to the behavior and/or stimulus.Mental Health Services: Organized services to provide mental health care.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Outpatients: Persons who receive ambulatory care at an outpatient department or clinic without room and board being provided.Age of Onset: The age, developmental stage, or period of life at which a disease or the initial symptoms or manifestations of a disease appear in an individual.Double-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Personality: Behavior-response patterns that characterize the individual.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Panic Disorder: A type of anxiety disorder characterized by unexpected panic attacks that last minutes or, rarely, hours. Panic attacks begin with intense apprehension, fear or terror and, often, a feeling of impending doom. Symptoms experienced during a panic attack include dyspnea or sensations of being smothered; dizziness, loss of balance or faintness; choking sensations; palpitations or accelerated heart rate; shakiness; sweating; nausea or other form of abdominal distress; depersonalization or derealization; paresthesias; hot flashes or chills; chest discomfort or pain; fear of dying and fear of not being in control of oneself or going crazy. Agoraphobia may also develop. Similar to other anxiety disorders, it may be inherited as an autosomal dominant trait.Hypothalamo-Hypophyseal System: A collection of NEURONS, tracts of NERVE FIBERS, endocrine tissue, and blood vessels in the HYPOTHALAMUS and the PITUITARY GLAND. This hypothalamo-hypophyseal portal circulation provides the mechanism for hypothalamic neuroendocrine (HYPOTHALAMIC HORMONES) regulation of pituitary function and the release of various PITUITARY HORMONES into the systemic circulation to maintain HOMEOSTASIS.Serotonin: A biochemical messenger and regulator, synthesized from the essential amino acid L-TRYPTOPHAN. In humans it is found primarily in the central nervous system, gastrointestinal tract, and blood platelets. Serotonin mediates several important physiological functions including neurotransmission, gastrointestinal motility, hemostasis, and cardiovascular integrity. Multiple receptor families (RECEPTORS, SEROTONIN) explain the broad physiological actions and distribution of this biochemical mediator.Therapy, Computer-Assisted: Computer systems utilized as adjuncts in the treatment of disease.Neurons: The basic cellular units of nervous tissue. Each neuron consists of a body, an axon, and dendrites. Their purpose is to receive, conduct, and transmit impulses in the NERVOUS SYSTEM.Problem Solving: A learning situation involving more than one alternative from which a selection is made in order to attain a specific goal.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Self-Assessment: Appraisal of one's own personal qualities or traits.Receptors, N-Methyl-D-Aspartate: A class of ionotropic glutamate receptors characterized by affinity for N-methyl-D-aspartate. NMDA receptors have an allosteric binding site for glycine which must be occupied for the channel to open efficiently and a site within the channel itself to which magnesium ions bind in a voltage-dependent manner. The positive voltage dependence of channel conductance and the high permeability of the conducting channel to calcium ions (as well as to monovalent cations) are important in excitotoxicity and neuronal plasticity.Pituitary-Adrenal System: The interactions between the anterior pituitary and adrenal glands, in which corticotropin (ACTH) stimulates the adrenal cortex and adrenal cortical hormones suppress the production of corticotropin by the anterior pituitary.Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Resilience, Psychological: The human ability to adapt in the face of tragedy, trauma, adversity, hardship, and ongoing significant life stressors.Disability Evaluation: Determination of the degree of a physical, mental, or emotional handicap. The diagnosis is applied to legal qualification for benefits and income under disability insurance and to eligibility for Social Security and workmen's compensation benefits.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Excitatory Amino Acid Antagonists: Drugs that bind to but do not activate excitatory amino acid receptors, thereby blocking the actions of agonists.Behavior, Animal: The observable response an animal makes to any situation.Linear Models: Statistical models in which the value of a parameter for a given value of a factor is assumed to be equal to a + bx, where a and b are constants. The models predict a linear regression.Internal-External Control: Personality construct referring to an individual's perception of the locus of events as determined internally by his or her own behavior versus fate, luck, or external forces. (ERIC Thesaurus, 1996).Receptors, Metabotropic Glutamate: Cell surface proteins that bind glutamate and act through G-proteins to influence second messenger systems. Several types of metabotropic glutamate receptors have been cloned. They differ in pharmacology, distribution, and mechanisms of action.Psychiatry: The medical science that deals with the origin, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of mental disorders.Veterans: Former members of the armed services.Patient Compliance: Voluntary cooperation of the patient in following a prescribed regimen.Psychotropic Drugs: A loosely defined grouping of drugs that have effects on psychological function. Here the psychotropic agents include the antidepressive agents, hallucinogens, and tranquilizing agents (including the antipsychotics and anti-anxiety agents).Demography: Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.Apathy: Lack of emotion or emotional expression; a disorder of motivation that persists over time.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Dementia: An acquired organic mental disorder with loss of intellectual abilities of sufficient severity to interfere with social or occupational functioning. The dysfunction is multifaceted and involves memory, behavior, personality, judgment, attention, spatial relations, language, abstract thought, and other executive functions. The intellectual decline is usually progressive, and initially spares the level of consciousness.Swimming: An activity in which the body is propelled through water by specific movement of the arms and/or the legs. Swimming as propulsion through water by the movement of limbs, tail, or fins of animals is often studied as a form of PHYSICAL EXERTION or endurance.Antimanic Agents: Agents that are used to treat bipolar disorders or mania associated with other affective disorders.Motor Activity: The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.Factor Analysis, Statistical: A set of statistical methods for analyzing the correlations among several variables in order to estimate the number of fundamental dimensions that underlie the observed data and to describe and measure those dimensions. It is used frequently in the development of scoring systems for rating scales and questionnaires.Statistics as Topic: The science and art of collecting, summarizing, and analyzing data that are subject to random variation. The term is also applied to the data themselves and to the summarization of the data.Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic: Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.Action Potentials: Abrupt changes in the membrane potential that sweep along the CELL MEMBRANE of excitable cells in response to excitation stimuli.Chi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Research Design: A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an hypothesis can be tested properly.Social Adjustment: Adaptation of the person to the social environment. Adjustment may take place by adapting the self to the environment or by changing the environment. (From Campbell, Psychiatric Dictionary, 1996)Parenting: Performing the role of a parent by care-giving, nurturance, and protection of the child by a natural or substitute parent. The parent supports the child by exercising authority and through consistent, empathic, appropriate behavior in response to the child's needs. PARENTING differs from CHILD REARING in that in child rearing the emphasis is on the act of training or bringing up the children and the interaction between the parent and child, while parenting emphasizes the responsibility and qualities of exemplary behavior of the parent.Odds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Receptor, Serotonin, 5-HT1A: A serotonin receptor subtype found distributed through the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM where they are involved in neuroendocrine regulation of ACTH secretion. The fact that this serotonin receptor subtype is particularly sensitive to SEROTONIN RECEPTOR AGONISTS such as BUSPIRONE suggests its role in the modulation of ANXIETY and DEPRESSION.Hydrocortisone: The main glucocorticoid secreted by the ADRENAL CORTEX. Its synthetic counterpart is used, either as an injection or topically, in the treatment of inflammation, allergy, collagen diseases, asthma, adrenocortical deficiency, shock, and some neoplastic conditions.Patch-Clamp Techniques: An electrophysiologic technique for studying cells, cell membranes, and occasionally isolated organelles. All patch-clamp methods rely on a very high-resistance seal between a micropipette and a membrane; the seal is usually attained by gentle suction. The four most common variants include on-cell patch, inside-out patch, outside-out patch, and whole-cell clamp. Patch-clamp methods are commonly used to voltage clamp, that is control the voltage across the membrane and measure current flow, but current-clamp methods, in which the current is controlled and the voltage is measured, are also used.Sick Role: Set of expectations that exempt persons from responsibility for their illness and exempt them from usual responsibilities.Child Abuse: Abuse of children in a family, institutional, or other setting. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.Rats, Wistar: A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.Washington
Fiona Byrne (24 March 2009). "Chantelle Newbery battling chronic depression". The Telegraph (Australia). Retrieved 19 October ... Newbery told Australian magazine Woman's Day that she was admitting herself to a psychiatric hospital for severe depression. ...
He suffered from chronic depression. On May 8, 2014, Lamela was found dead at his parents' house. The coroner announced a heart ...
He showed that the pathology of borderline personality disorder, including chronic depression and self harm, is linked to ... Neurocognition in acute and chronic depression. Biological Psychiatry, vol 30, pp 305-309, 1991. Burgess, J. Wesley. Cognitive ... The relationship of depression and cognitive impairment to self-injury. Psychiatry Research, vol 38, pp 77-87, 1991 Burgess, J ... The Depression Answer Book. Sourcebooks, 2009. Burgess, Wes. The Mental Status Examination. 2nd Edition. Volume 1 of the Mental ...
"Does depression contribute to the aging process?". Medical Xpress. Retrieved 20 September 2017. "Depression and chronic stress ... contributed to the body of research which supports considering telomere length as a biomarker of increased levels of chronic ...
doi:10.1016/S0165-0327(00)00347-5. PMID 11172870 "Dysthymic disorder and chronic depression". Psychologyinfo.com. Retrieved ... is a type of chronic mood disorder widely considered to be a more chronic but milder or subthreshold form of bipolar disorder. ... Since depression can be triggered or exacerbated by life events and circumstances, the diagnosing clinician must determine when ... The diagnosis requires that there be periods of both hypomania and depression and that periods of normal mood not last longer ...
She has also suffered from chronic depression. Grayson is an avid gamer, having spent much time playing Champions Online, ...
Rush, A.; Khatami, M.; Beck, A. (1975). "Cognitive and Behavior Therapy in Chronic Depression". Behavior Therapy. 6 (3): 398- ... In Chapter 2, "Symptomatology of Depression," he describes certain "cognitive manifestations" of depression, including low self ... Dissatisfied with the conventional Freudian treatment of depression, he concluded that there was no empirical evidence for the ... In his book, Beck provided a comprehensive and empirically supported look at depression - its potential causes, symptoms, and ...
Kimmel, Paul L (2002). "Depression in patients with chronic renal disease". Journal of Psychosomatic Research. 53 (4): 951-6. ... Patients with ESRD and other chronic diseases often suffer from depression and it often goes undiagnosed. Studies suggest that ... A review of treatments for anxiety and depression in dialysis patients cited STI as an economical way to alleviate depression ... If depression is a system consisting of various symptoms, when one of the symptoms improves, the entire trajectory of the ...
Howells struggled with chronic depression throughout his adult life. He frequently discussed depression in his performances ( ... The Great Depression, 2004). In a review, Howells described his investment in intimate participatory performance: 'I went into ... for example, in Adrienne: The Great Depression, and in interviews. He committed suicide on the weekend of 16-17 March 2014 in ...
She suffered from dysthymia, a chronic form of depression; the lack of encouragement-sometimes outright discouragement-she ...
Depression, chronic stress, bipolar disorder, etc. are considered mood disorders. It has been suggested that such disorders ... Delgado, P (2000). "Depression: the case for a monoamine deficiency". Journal of Clinical Psychiatry. 61: 7-11. Mood in ... This effect is most marked in persons with an eveningeness type (so called night-owls) and people suffering from depression. ... Long term disturbances of mood such as clinical depression and bipolar disorder are considered mood disorders. Mood is an ...
Nevertheless, MBSR can have a beneficial effect helping with the depression and psychological distress associated with chronic ... Teasdale, John D.; Segal, Zindel V. (2007), The Mindful Way Through Depression: Freeing Yourself from Chronic Unhappiness, ... notably chronic pain (McCracken et al. 2007), stress (Grossman et al. 2004), anxiety and depression (Hofmann et al. 2010), ... The Mindful Way through Depression: Freeing Yourself from Chronic Unhappiness. Guilford Press, ISBN 978-1-59385-128-6 Williams ...
Depression; Chronic illness; Nutritional deficiency; Alcohol and substance misuse; Functional and social dependency; Social ... Clinical depression, a common cause Neglect Pathways Courses - Out of the Shadows "FindArticles.com - CBSi". findarticles.com. ... Treatment may involve treating the cause of the individual's self-neglect, with treatments such as those for depression, ...
... perfectionism and depression in chronic fatigue syndrome. Meads, DM; Doward, LC; McKenna, SP; Fisk, J; Twiss, J; Eckert, B ( ... perfectionism and depression in chronic fatigue syndrome. A structural equation modeling approach". Comprehensive psychiatry. ...
Kamei J, Ohsawa M, Hayashi SS, Nakanishi Y (February 2011). "Effect of chronic pain on morphine-induced respiratory depression ... and worsening the respiratory depression produced by opioid analgesic drugs, which appears to be partly 5-HT4 mediated and can ...
"MIF-1 is active in a chronic stress animal model of depression". Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior. 32 (3): 737-42. doi: ... Rotzinger S, Lovejoy DA, Tan LA (April 2010). "Behavioral effects of neuropeptides in rodent models of depression and anxiety ... Ehrensing RH, Kastin AJ, Wurzlow GF, Michell GF, Mebane AH (August 1994). "Improvement in major depression after low ... "MIF-1 potentiates the action of tricyclic antidepressants in an animal model of depression". Peptides. 12 (5): 915-8. doi: ...
Nonetheless, chronic SSM may increase risk for depression, anxiety, and substance abuse. It has also been noted that patients ... For patients with severe depression resulting from the fear of having insomnia, electroconvulsive therapy appears to be a safe ... Thus, it appears that not all chronic insomniacs underestimate their sleep duration, and that sleep misperception is a clinical ... Alternatively, some people may report excessive daytime sleepiness or chronic disabling sleepiness, while no sleep disorder has ...
Meeks, et al., Chronic pain and depression among geriatric psychiatry inpatients, Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2007 Nov 27. Akechi ... Many studies have shown that pain and depression are potential risk factors for suicidal risk in medical patients. Acute ...
"Controlled trial of bright light and negative air ions for chronic depression". Psychol Med. 35: 945-55. doi:10.1017/ ...
Chronic stage-continued, severe delusions along with chronic psychiatric depression. The Cotard syndrome withdraws the ... while a severe case is characterized by intense delusions of negation and chronic psychiatric depression. The case of ... When WI was treated for depression, his delusions of his own death diminished in a month. In November 2016, the Daily Mirror ... His mental health history was of a boy expressing themes of death, chronic sadness, decreased physical activity in playtime, ...
... is used to treat depression, anxiety, chronic pain, and nausea. White Durban - a sativa-dominant hybrid strain ...
Pazderka-Robinson, H., Morrison, J., FLOR-HENRY, P. (2004). Electrodermal dissociation of chronic fatigue and depression: ... depression, multiple personality, chronic fatigue, fibromyalgia, and transsexualism. Also, he has investigated in a similar way ... in depression, schizophrenia, mania, psychopathy, sexual deviation, hysteria, multiple personality, obsessive compulsive ... study of the EEGs from unmedicated males with depression. Psychiatry Research: Neuroimaging 130(2): 191 - 207. Koles, Z.J., ...
Professor Akiskal rose to prominence with his integrative theory of depression. Subsequently he established chronic depressions ... His clinical expertise ranges from dysthymia to bipolar spectrum disorders, as well as comorbidity, resistant depression, ... manic depression). Born in Lebanon to Armenian parents, he received his M.D. from the American University of Beirut in 1969. He ... the German Anna Monika Prize for Depression, the NARSAD Prize for Affective Disorders, the 2002 Jean Delay Prize for ...
In addition, HEG has shown promise at alleviating depression, stress and chronic anxiety. There is also work done by Dr. Luis ... A four-year study of 100 chronic migraine sufferers found that after as few as six 30-minute training sessions, 90% of patients ... doi:10.1300/J184v08n03_02 Amen, D. & Routh, L. (2003). Healing anxiety and depression. Putnam: New York.. ...
On 18 November 2005, Blythe committed suicide; he had been suffering from depression and chronic fatigue syndrome for several ...
A chronic lack of nutritious food can cause various illnesses, and will eventually lead to starvation. When this happens in a ... These include depression, food allergies, ingestion of certain chemicals, bulimia, anorexia nervosa, pituitary gland ...
Seasonal affective disorder a form of depression that often occurs during winter months. Learn how the condition is associated ... Substance Use Worsens Depression. The inability to handle stress can cause people to sink deeper into depression. According to ... Continuous or chronic stress can result in addiction. In addition, people recovering from substance abuse disorders may relapse ... Depression and other mood disorders can affect a persons circadian rhythm, the biological cycle that influences sleepiness and ...
When a person has been resistant to every form of depression treatment, is it possible that their illness stems from a ... Dont keep depressions secrets.. Finding the roots of depression is illuminating, but its not enough. Were all just looking ... Depression or Chronic Shame?. Psych Central. Retrieved on August 14, 2020, from https://psychcentral.com/blog/depression-or- ... Depression. Overview Symptoms Causes Treatment Quiz FAQ In-depth Look Support Groups Blogs Books Library Resources. ...
A study by the American Heart Association shows long term depression may double stroke risk in adults over 50, even after ... If your older loved one is among the millions of Americans who struggle with chronic depression, beware: They have an extremely ... Study: Ongoing, chronic depression leads to 110% increase in stroke risk for adults over 50 ... Reducing depression symptoms doesnt reduce risk for stroke, according to study. *Even two years after depression symptoms ...
Depression is treatable condition: Lesson for physicians. The first-hand account by a patient with chronic depression has many ... I highly appreciate that the BMJ has picked up the case of chronic depression, but it. may also lead to divergent messages to ... Holmes, Through the wasteland: chronic depression (1). During. my training I spent some time on the rotational scheme in ... chronic depression. BMJ 2011;342:doi:10.1136/bmj.d93 (Published 11 April 2011) ...
Researchers believe they have discovered a biophysical link between inflammation in the brain caused by chronic pain and the ... "Brain inflammation links chronic pain with depression." Medical News Today. MediLexicon, Intl., 10 Jun. 2015. Web.. 20 Feb. ... Chronic pain is also strongly associated with the development of other conditions such as depression, anxiety and substance ... McIntosh, J. (2015, June 10). "Brain inflammation links chronic pain with depression." Medical News Today. Retrieved from. ...
The patient first manifested chronic depression in 1972 when she attempted suicide. She was admitted to a county asylum, where ... To share more peoples experience of depression go to: www.healthtalkonline.org/mental_health/Depression ... Through the wasteland: chronic depression. BMJ 2011; 342 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.d93 (Published 11 April 2011) Cite ... Clearly honesty about depression was unproductive.. I am now in a position when normal life exceeds depressive periods. I view ...
Many Mass Killers Have Had Chronic Depression Audie Cornish talks about the psychological profile of people who commit mass ... Many Mass Killers Have Had Chronic Depression. Listen · 7:02 7:02. ... Many Mass Killers Have Had Chronic Depression. Listen · 7:02 7:02. ... LEVIN: You know, most mass killers have suffered some kind of chronic depression and frustration. Over a long period of time, ...
The DSM-IVrecognizes several forms of chronic depression. Chronic depressions differ from nonchronic... ... A significant proportion of patients with depressive disorders suffer from chronic conditions. ... The DSM-IV recognizes several forms of chronic depression. Chronic depressions differ from nonchronic major depressive disorder ... Kocsis JH: Pharmacotherapy for chronic depression. J Clin Psychol 2003, 59:885-892.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar ...
Therapy, pain medication and meditation are a few ways to help manage depression. ... Many people suffering from chronic pain may develop depression. ... The Depression-Chronic Pain Link. Science shows that treating ... Studies have found that chronic pain and depression are based in the same area of the brain and share the same ... The following treatments can help if you suffer from chronic pain and depression. Many patients benefit from a combination of ...
As many as half of those with chronic pain or with neuropathic pain disorders, such as fibromyalgia, have depression as ... For many who suffer depression, chronic pain is a frequent fellow traveler. ... For many who suffer depression, chronic pain is a frequent fellow traveler. As many as half of those with chronic pain or with ... Depression and chronic pain are distinct but similar disorders. But both may arise from some faulty wiring in their shared ...
About 50 percent of people who have chronic pain also have depression, according to Robert D. Kerns, Ph.D, National Program ... Its important to treat both chronic pain and depression, Kerns said. "Many people with pain and depression say things like If ... Home » Depression » Living with Chronic Pain and Depression. .fn{margin:-2px 0 0 0;font-size:90%!important}.time-read{color:# ... Living with Chronic Pain and Depression. By Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Last updated: 8 Oct 2018. ~ 4 min read ...
... pain and depression may involve the same nerves and neurotransmitters means that antidepressants can improve both chronic pain ... and depression. a lot of evidence shows that tricy ... The fact that chronic pain and depression may involve the same ... More Answers On Depression. *How does cognitive therapy help in treating chronic pain and depression? ... From: Chronic Pain and Depression: Managing Pain When Youre Depressed WebMD Medical Reference ...
... low-grade form of depression that lasts for two years. Many people with chronic depression have ongoing symptoms. ... www.healthcentral.com/condition/chronic-depression. DepressionDepression TypesChronic Depression. Lets Talk About Chronic ... More Info on Depression. DepressionDepression Types. Chronic Depression*Depression & Sex *Communication Barriers When Dealing ... What Exactly Is Chronic Depression?. First things first. "Chronic depression" isnt technically a diagnosis in the DSM-5, the ...
... is an enduring form of depression that is characterized by having a constantly depressed mood for at least two years. ... What Sets Chronic Depression Apart From Clinical Depression?. Dysthymia is an enduring form of depression that is characterized ... Depression can be a long-lasting disorder, stretching on for weeks, months or even years. In some people, this condition ... A] person with dysthymia tends to believe that depression is part of his or her character. The person with dysthymia may not ...
Ive suffered depression for years but I dont think my therapist is helping. I dont feel I can talk to my psychiatrist and ... What can I do about chronic depression?. I have suffered from chronic depression for over ten years and I am currently going ... I have suffered from chronic depression for over ten years and I am currently going through my third major bout of depression. ... My depression has no cause that I can identify, so he just gets cross when I have nothing to discuss. But discussing how good ...
I have chronic moderate depression and panic/anxiety disorder which I take other meds for, but I take seroquel to treat my ... Anxiety & Panic Disorders Bipolar Disorder Breast Cancer Chronic Pain Crohns Disease Depression Diabetes Fibromyalgia GERD & ... On Disability for: Chronic Migraines, serious Back and Knee problems (will need surgery eventually), moderate Depression, ... Current Problem: Moderate Depression, Chronic back pain, Mysterious Internal GI Bleeding, possible ulcer in location of Gastric ...
Title: Treating Chronic Depression with Acupressure. Summary: In Traditional Chinese Medicine there already exists a ... using acupressure in treating chronic depression? First to reduce the physical symptoms of depression. Second, to adjust the ... Treating Chronic Depression with Acupressure. By Wolfgang Luckmann, LMT. In Traditional Chinese Medicine there already exists a ... How then to treat a typical case of chronic depression where there is a deficiency of qi and blood? The Spleen nourishes the ...
Learn about the interrelationship between depression and chronic back pain and how patients can recognize the signs of ... Depression is by far the most common emotion associated with chronic back pain. ... Diagnosis of Depression and Chronic Back Pain: Depression Questionnaire * Depression and Chronic Pain Video - Treatment, ... Depression and Chronic Pain Video. Depression is by far the most common emotion associated with chronic back pain. The type of ...
Young people with chronic or severe forms of depression in their early teens have a higher risk of developing marijuana-use ... "The findings suggest that if we can prevent or reduce chronic depression during early adolescence, we may reduce the prevalence ... Depression, also known as clinical depression or major depressive disorder, is a common but serious illness that affects mood, ... The authors note that cumulative depression "was defined as the sum of depression symptom counts from grades 7-9." ...
Psychosocial coping resources have been found to protect against depressive symptoms in people with and without chronic ... Chronic diseases and depression: The modifying role of psychosocial resources. *Bisschop M ... Therefore, the aim of the study was to estimate the direct and buffer effects of psychosocial resources on depression, and to ... Psychosocial coping resources have been found to protect against depressive symptoms in people with and without chronic ...
Up to half of people enduring pain for three months or longer also suffer from depression or another mood disorder, research ... The Link Between Chronic Pain and Depression. consumerreports.org - By Teresa Carr ... Up to half of people enduring pain for three months or longer also suffer from depression or another mood disorder, research ...
... 11.11.2011. People with recurrent depressions or those exposed to chronic ... Depression »biological aging »blood cell »depressive disorder »depressive disorders »dexamethasone suppression test »stress ... Further reports about: , Depression , biological aging , blood cell , depressive disorder , depressive disorders , ... Short telomeres in depression and the general population are associated with a hypocortisolemic state. Biol Psychiatry. doi: ...
Also known as chronic depression, dysthymia is a depressive disorder that can be life-long. Visit HealthyPlace.com for more ... Chronic stress and illness are associated with chronic depression (dysthymia) and it seems to run in families, occurring more ... People who suffer from chronic depression often experience life-long depression. About 6% of people will experience dysthymia ... Dysthymia is often called chronic depression due to its duration. For a diagnosis of dysthymia, a person must suffer from at ...
Why is depression common in people who have a chronic illness?. Depression is one of the most common complications of chronic ... Depression, disability, and chronic illness form a vicious circle. Chronic illness can bring on bouts of depression, which, in ... Chronic Illness and Depression An estimated one-third of individuals with a chronic illness or condition experience symptoms of ... Depression caused by chronic illness can aggravate the illness, causing a vicious cycle to develop. Depression is especially ...
because depression in people with chronic pain frequently goes undiagnosed, it often goes untreated. pain symptoms and ... More Answers On Depression. *What are problems that individuals with both depression and chronic pain have? ... Harvard Health Publications: "Depression and Pain." National Institute of Mental Health: "Depression and Chronic Pain." ... Harvard Health Publications: "Depression and Pain." National Institute of Mental Health: "Depression and Chronic Pain." ...
  • Depression is known to be related to unhealthy behaviors that increase cardiovascular risk, such as physical inactivity and smoking, but Glymour doesn't believe these fully explain their findings. (cnn.com)
  • The findings suggest that if we can prevent or reduce chronic depression during early adolescence, we may reduce the prevalence of cannabis-use disorder. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • While our research investigates structural neuroplasticity in depression in response to ECT, our findings are considered to be of much broader interest to the field," Joshi added. (deccanherald.com)
  • However, their findings are equally supportive of 'standard' Cognitive Therapy for chronic depression. (behavior.net)
  • Previous studies have linked depression and inflammation, particularly in individuals who have experienced early childhood adversity, but overall, findings have been inconsistent. (eurekalert.org)
  • Dr. Miller commented on their findings: "What's important about this study is that it identifies a group of people who are prone to have depression and inflammation at the same time. (eurekalert.org)
  • Further research is necessary, to extend the findings beyond female adolescents and particularly in individuals with more severe, long-term depression. (eurekalert.org)
  • However, findings such as these may eventually help doctors and clinicians better manage depression and medical illness for particularly vulnerable patients. (eurekalert.org)
  • In Knit for Peace's own survey, their findings rang true to the research: 86 percent of respondents said that knitting helped them relax while roughly 30 percent claimed that it helped reduce anxiety and blood pressure, as well as counter depression. (marthastewart.com)
  • The findings indicate that accelerated cell aging does not occur in all depressed individuals, but is dependent upon how long someone is depressed, particularly if that depression goes untreated. (scienceblog.com)
  • of education's effect on risk of depression after controlling for a Our findings suggest that the social forces that constrain education may thorough set of confounders and mediators. (cdc.gov)
  • Additionally, our findings support other research that advance the study of social determinants of depression. (cdc.gov)
  • Published in the June 2016 issue of Quality of Life Research , their findings suggest that "psychological distress impacts a person's quality of life as much, or more, than having a chronic condition. (unityrehab.com)
  • These findings provide the best evidence to date that depression is an important risk factor that may influence whether patients adhere to their medications," said Dr. Walid F. Gellad, the study's senior author and a natural scientist at RAND, a nonprofit research organization. (medicalxpress.com)