Chromosomes: In a prokaryotic cell or in the nucleus of a eukaryotic cell, a structure consisting of or containing DNA which carries the genetic information essential to the cell. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)Chromosome Mapping: Any method used for determining the location of and relative distances between genes on a chromosome.Chromosome Banding: Staining of bands, or chromosome segments, allowing the precise identification of individual chromosomes or parts of chromosomes. Applications include the determination of chromosome rearrangements in malformation syndromes and cancer, the chemistry of chromosome segments, chromosome changes during evolution, and, in conjunction with cell hybridization studies, chromosome mapping.X Chromosome: The female sex chromosome, being the differential sex chromosome carried by half the male gametes and all female gametes in human and other male-heterogametic species.Chromosome Aberrations: Abnormal number or structure of chromosomes. Chromosome aberrations may result in CHROMOSOME DISORDERS.Sex Chromosomes: The homologous chromosomes that are dissimilar in the heterogametic sex. There are the X CHROMOSOME, the Y CHROMOSOME, and the W, Z chromosomes (in animals in which the female is the heterogametic sex (the silkworm moth Bombyx mori, for example)). In such cases the W chromosome is the female-determining and the male is ZZ. (From King & Stansfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Chromosomes, Human, Pair 1: A specific pair of human chromosomes in group A (CHROMOSOMES, HUMAN, 1-3) of the human chromosome classification.Chromosomes, Human: Very long DNA molecules and associated proteins, HISTONES, and non-histone chromosomal proteins (CHROMOSOMAL PROTEINS, NON-HISTONE). Normally 46 chromosomes, including two sex chromosomes are found in the nucleus of human cells. They carry the hereditary information of the individual.Chromosomes, Bacterial: Structures within the nucleus of bacterial cells consisting of or containing DNA, which carry genetic information essential to the cell.Chromosome Segregation: The orderly segregation of CHROMOSOMES during MEIOSIS or MITOSIS.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 7: A specific pair of GROUP C CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 11: A specific pair of GROUP C CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 17: A specific pair of GROUP E CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 6: A specific pair GROUP C CHROMSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Chromosome Deletion: Actual loss of portion of a chromosome.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 9: A specific pair of GROUP C CHROMSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 21: A specific pair of GROUP G CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Chromosomes, Plant: Complex nucleoprotein structures which contain the genomic DNA and are part of the CELL NUCLEUS of PLANTS.Chromosomes, Fungal: Structures within the nucleus of fungal cells consisting of or containing DNA, which carry genetic information essential to the cell.Chromosomes, Human, 6-12 and X: The medium-sized, submetacentric human chromosomes, called group C in the human chromosome classification. This group consists of chromosome pairs 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, and 12 and the X chromosome.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 2: A specific pair of human chromosomes in group A (CHROMOSOMES, HUMAN, 1-3) of the human chromosome classification.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 16: A specific pair of GROUP E CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 22: A specific pair of GROUP G CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Chromosome Pairing: The alignment of CHROMOSOMES at homologous sequences.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 13: A specific pair of GROUP D CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Chromosomes, Mammalian: Complex nucleoprotein structures which contain the genomic DNA and are part of the CELL NUCLEUS of MAMMALS.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 4: A specific pair of GROUP B CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 10: A specific pair of GROUP C CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 19: A specific pair of GROUP F CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 8: A specific pair of GROUP C CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Chromosomes, Human, Y: The human male sex chromosome, being the differential sex chromosome carried by half the male gametes and none of the female gametes in humans.Chromosome Disorders: Clinical conditions caused by an abnormal chromosome constitution in which there is extra or missing chromosome material (either a whole chromosome or a chromosome segment). (from Thompson et al., Genetics in Medicine, 5th ed, p429)Chromosomes, Artificial, Bacterial: DNA constructs that are composed of, at least, a REPLICATION ORIGIN, for successful replication, propagation to and maintenance as an extra chromosome in bacteria. In addition, they can carry large amounts (about 200 kilobases) of other sequence for a variety of bioengineering purposes.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 12: A specific pair of GROUP C CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 5: One of the two pairs of human chromosomes in the group B class (CHROMOSOMES, HUMAN, 4-5).Chromosomes, Human, X: The human female sex chromosome, being the differential sex chromosome carried by half the male gametes and all female gametes in humans.Chromosome Painting: A technique for visualizing CHROMOSOME ABERRATIONS using fluorescently labeled DNA probes which are hybridized to chromosomal DNA. Multiple fluorochromes may be attached to the probes. Upon hybridization, this produces a multicolored, or painted, effect with a unique color at each site of hybridization. This technique may also be used to identify cross-species homology by labeling probes from one species for hybridization with chromosomes from another species.Chromosomes, Human, 1-3: The large, metacentric human chromosomes, called group A in the human chromosome classification. This group consists of chromosome pairs 1, 2, and 3.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 15: A specific pair of GROUP D CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Karyotyping: Mapping of the KARYOTYPE of a cell.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 14: A specific pair of GROUP D CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 18: A specific pair of GROUP E CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 20: A specific pair of GROUP F CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence: A type of IN SITU HYBRIDIZATION in which target sequences are stained with fluorescent dye so their location and size can be determined using fluorescence microscopy. This staining is sufficiently distinct that the hybridization signal can be seen both in metaphase spreads and in interphase nuclei.Chromosomes, Human, 16-18: The short, submetacentric human chromosomes, called group E in the human chromosome classification. This group consists of chromosome pairs 16, 17, and 18.Chromosomes, Artificial, Yeast: Chromosomes in which fragments of exogenous DNA ranging in length up to several hundred kilobase pairs have been cloned into yeast through ligation to vector sequences. These artificial chromosomes are used extensively in molecular biology for the construction of comprehensive genomic libraries of higher organisms.Genetic Linkage: The co-inheritance of two or more non-allelic GENES due to their being located more or less closely on the same CHROMOSOME.Chromosomes, Human, 13-15: The medium-sized, acrocentric human chromosomes, called group D in the human chromosome classification. This group consists of chromosome pairs 13, 14, and 15.Chromosome Breakage: A type of chromosomal aberration involving DNA BREAKS. Chromosome breakage can result in CHROMOSOMAL TRANSLOCATION; CHROMOSOME INVERSION; or SEQUENCE DELETION.Chromosomes, Human, 21-22 and Y: The short, acrocentric human chromosomes, called group G in the human chromosome classification. This group consists of chromosome pairs 21 and 22 and the Y chromosome.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Ring Chromosomes: Aberrant chromosomes with no ends, i.e., circular.Genetic Markers: A phenotypically recognizable genetic trait which can be used to identify a genetic locus, a linkage group, or a recombination event.Chromosome Inversion: An aberration in which a chromosomal segment is deleted and reinserted in the same place but turned 180 degrees from its original orientation, so that the gene sequence for the segment is reversed with respect to that of the rest of the chromosome.Chromosome Positioning: The mechanisms of eukaryotic CELLS that place or keep the CHROMOSOMES in a particular SUBNUCLEAR SPACE.Chromosomes, Human, 4-5: The large, submetacentric human chromosomes, called group B in the human chromosome classification. This group consists of chromosome pairs 4 and 5.X Chromosome Inactivation: A dosage compensation process occurring at an early embryonic stage in mammalian development whereby, at random, one X CHROMOSOME of the pair is repressed in the somatic cells of females.Centromere: The clear constricted portion of the chromosome at which the chromatids are joined and by which the chromosome is attached to the spindle during cell division.Meiosis: A type of CELL NUCLEUS division, occurring during maturation of the GERM CELLS. Two successive cell nucleus divisions following a single chromosome duplication (S PHASE) result in daughter cells with half the number of CHROMOSOMES as the parent cells.Chromosomes, Insect: Structures within the CELL NUCLEUS of insect cells containing DNA.Translocation, Genetic: A type of chromosome aberration characterized by CHROMOSOME BREAKAGE and transfer of the broken-off portion to another location, often to a different chromosome.Hybrid Cells: Any cell, other than a ZYGOTE, that contains elements (such as NUCLEI and CYTOPLASM) from two or more different cells, usually produced by artificial CELL FUSION.Chromosome Structures: Structures which are contained in or part of CHROMOSOMES.Chromosomes, Human, 19-20: The short, metacentric human chromosomes, called group F in the human chromosome classification. This group consists of chromosome pairs 19 and 20.Aneuploidy: The chromosomal constitution of cells which deviate from the normal by the addition or subtraction of CHROMOSOMES, chromosome pairs, or chromosome fragments. In a normally diploid cell (DIPLOIDY) the loss of a chromosome pair is termed nullisomy (symbol: 2N-2), the loss of a single chromosome is MONOSOMY (symbol: 2N-1), the addition of a chromosome pair is tetrasomy (symbol: 2N+2), the addition of a single chromosome is TRISOMY (symbol: 2N+1).Metaphase: The phase of cell nucleus division following PROMETAPHASE, in which the CHROMOSOMES line up across the equatorial plane of the SPINDLE APPARATUS prior to separation.Mitosis: A type of CELL NUCLEUS division by means of which the two daughter nuclei normally receive identical complements of the number of CHROMOSOMES of the somatic cells of the species.Recombination, Genetic: Production of new arrangements of DNA by various mechanisms such as assortment and segregation, CROSSING OVER; GENE CONVERSION; GENETIC TRANSFORMATION; GENETIC CONJUGATION; GENETIC TRANSDUCTION; or mixed infection of viruses.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Microsatellite Repeats: A variety of simple repeat sequences that are distributed throughout the GENOME. They are characterized by a short repeat unit of 2-8 basepairs that is repeated up to 100 times. They are also known as short tandem repeats (STRs).Lod Score: The total relative probability, expressed on a logarithmic scale, that a linkage relationship exists among selected loci. Lod is an acronym for "logarithmic odds."Pedigree: The record of descent or ancestry, particularly of a particular condition or trait, indicating individual family members, their relationships, and their status with respect to the trait or condition.Crosses, Genetic: Deliberate breeding of two different individuals that results in offspring that carry part of the genetic material of each parent. The parent organisms must be genetically compatible and may be from different varieties or closely related species.Cloning, Molecular: The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.DNA: A deoxyribonucleotide polymer that is the primary genetic material of all cells. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms normally contain DNA in a double-stranded state, yet several important biological processes transiently involve single-stranded regions. DNA, which consists of a polysugar-phosphate backbone possessing projections of purines (adenine and guanine) and pyrimidines (thymine and cytosine), forms a double helix that is held together by hydrogen bonds between these purines and pyrimidines (adenine to thymine and guanine to cytosine).Alleles: Variant forms of the same gene, occupying the same locus on homologous CHROMOSOMES, and governing the variants in production of the same gene product.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Nucleic Acid Hybridization: Widely used technique which exploits the ability of complementary sequences in single-stranded DNAs or RNAs to pair with each other to form a double helix. Hybridization can take place between two complimentary DNA sequences, between a single-stranded DNA and a complementary RNA, or between two RNA sequences. The technique is used to detect and isolate specific sequences, measure homology, or define other characteristics of one or both strands. (Kendrew, Encyclopedia of Molecular Biology, 1994, p503)Models, Genetic: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of genetic processes or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Trisomy: The possession of a third chromosome of any one type in an otherwise diploid cell.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Nondisjunction, Genetic: The failure of homologous CHROMOSOMES or CHROMATIDS to segregate during MITOSIS or MEIOSIS with the result that one daughter cell has both of a pair of parental chromosomes or chromatids and the other has none.Kinetochores: Large multiprotein complexes that bind the centromeres of the chromosomes to the microtubules of the mitotic spindle during metaphase in the cell cycle.Chromosomes, Artificial, Human: DNA constructs that are composed of, at least, all elements, such as a REPLICATION ORIGIN; TELOMERE; and CENTROMERE, required for successful replication, propagation to and maintainance in progeny human cells. In addition, they are constructed to carry other sequences for analysis or gene transfer.Telomere: A terminal section of a chromosome which has a specialized structure and which is involved in chromosomal replication and stability. Its length is believed to be a few hundred base pairs.Blotting, Southern: A method (first developed by E.M. Southern) for detection of DNA that has been electrophoretically separated and immobilized by blotting on nitrocellulose or other type of paper or nylon membrane followed by hybridization with labeled NUCLEIC ACID PROBES.Genotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.Genes: A category of nucleic acid sequences that function as units of heredity and which code for the basic instructions for the development, reproduction, and maintenance of organisms.Chromosome Walking: A technique with which an unknown region of a chromosome can be explored. It is generally used to isolate a locus of interest for which no probe is available but that is known to be linked to a gene which has been identified and cloned. A fragment containing a known gene is selected and used as a probe to identify other overlapping fragments which contain the same gene. The nucleotide sequences of these fragments can then be characterized. This process continues for the length of the chromosome.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Chromosomal Proteins, Non-Histone: Nucleoproteins, which in contrast to HISTONES, are acid insoluble. They are involved in chromosomal functions; e.g. they bind selectively to DNA, stimulate transcription resulting in tissue-specific RNA synthesis and undergo specific changes in response to various hormones or phytomitogens.Haplotypes: The genetic constitution of individuals with respect to one member of a pair of allelic genes, or sets of genes that are closely linked and tend to be inherited together such as those of the MAJOR HISTOCOMPATIBILITY COMPLEX.Repetitive Sequences, Nucleic Acid: Sequences of DNA or RNA that occur in multiple copies. There are several types: INTERSPERSED REPETITIVE SEQUENCES are copies of transposable elements (DNA TRANSPOSABLE ELEMENTS or RETROELEMENTS) dispersed throughout the genome. TERMINAL REPEAT SEQUENCES flank both ends of another sequence, for example, the long terminal repeats (LTRs) on RETROVIRUSES. Variations may be direct repeats, those occurring in the same direction, or inverted repeats, those opposite to each other in direction. TANDEM REPEAT SEQUENCES are copies which lie adjacent to each other, direct or inverted (INVERTED REPEAT SEQUENCES).Spindle Apparatus: A microtubule structure that forms during CELL DIVISION. It consists of two SPINDLE POLES, and sets of MICROTUBULES that may include the astral microtubules, the polar microtubules, and the kinetochore microtubules.Quantitative Trait Loci: Genetic loci associated with a QUANTITATIVE TRAIT.Chromosomal Instability: An increased tendency to acquire CHROMOSOME ABERRATIONS when various processes involved in chromosome replication, repair, or segregation are dysfunctional.Evolution, Molecular: The process of cumulative change at the level of DNA; RNA; and PROTEINS, over successive generations.Chromosome Fragility: Susceptibility of chromosomes to breakage leading to translocation; CHROMOSOME INVERSION; SEQUENCE DELETION; or other CHROMOSOME BREAKAGE related aberrations.DNA Probes: Species- or subspecies-specific DNA (including COMPLEMENTARY DNA; conserved genes, whole chromosomes, or whole genomes) used in hybridization studies in order to identify microorganisms, to measure DNA-DNA homologies, to group subspecies, etc. The DNA probe hybridizes with a specific mRNA, if present. Conventional techniques used for testing for the hybridization product include dot blot assays, Southern blot assays, and DNA:RNA hybrid-specific antibody tests. Conventional labels for the DNA probe include the radioisotope labels 32P and 125I and the chemical label biotin. The use of DNA probes provides a specific, sensitive, rapid, and inexpensive replacement for cell culture techniques for diagnosing infections.Chromosome Duplication: An aberration in which an extra chromosome or a chromosomal segment is made.DNA, Satellite: Highly repetitive DNA sequences found in HETEROCHROMATIN, mainly near centromeres. They are composed of simple sequences (very short) (see MINISATELLITE REPEATS) repeated in tandem many times to form large blocks of sequence. Additionally, following the accumulation of mutations, these blocks of repeats have been repeated in tandem themselves. The degree of repetition is on the order of 1000 to 10 million at each locus. Loci are few, usually one or two per chromosome. They were called satellites since in density gradients, they often sediment as distinct, satellite bands separate from the bulk of genomic DNA owing to a distinct BASE COMPOSITION.Drosophila melanogaster: A species of fruit fly much used in genetics because of the large size of its chromosomes.Diploidy: The chromosomal constitution of cells, in which each type of CHROMOSOME is represented twice. Symbol: 2N or 2X.Plasmids: Extrachromosomal, usually CIRCULAR DNA molecules that are self-replicating and transferable from one organism to another. They are found in a variety of bacterial, archaeal, fungal, algal, and plant species. They are used in GENETIC ENGINEERING as CLONING VECTORS.Heterozygote: An individual having different alleles at one or more loci regarding a specific character.Chromatids: Either of the two longitudinally adjacent threads formed when a eukaryotic chromosome replicates prior to mitosis. The chromatids are held together at the centromere. Sister chromatids are derived from the same chromosome. (Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)Multigene Family: A set of genes descended by duplication and variation from some ancestral gene. Such genes may be clustered together on the same chromosome or dispersed on different chromosomes. Examples of multigene families include those that encode the hemoglobins, immunoglobulins, histocompatibility antigens, actins, tubulins, keratins, collagens, heat shock proteins, salivary glue proteins, chorion proteins, cuticle proteins, yolk proteins, and phaseolins, as well as histones, ribosomal RNA, and transfer RNA genes. The latter three are examples of reiterated genes, where hundreds of identical genes are present in a tandem array. (King & Stanfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Genetic Variation: Genotypic differences observed among individuals in a population.DNA-Binding Proteins: Proteins which bind to DNA. The family includes proteins which bind to both double- and single-stranded DNA and also includes specific DNA binding proteins in serum which can be used as markers for malignant diseases.Mosaicism: The occurrence in an individual of two or more cell populations of different chromosomal constitutions, derived from a single ZYGOTE, as opposed to CHIMERISM in which the different cell populations are derived from more than one zygote.DNA Replication: The process by which a DNA molecule is duplicated.Polyploidy: The chromosomal constitution of a cell containing multiples of the normal number of CHROMOSOMES; includes triploidy (symbol: 3N), tetraploidy (symbol: 4N), etc.Abnormalities, MultipleDNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.Gene Deletion: A genetic rearrangement through loss of segments of DNA or RNA, bringing sequences which are normally separated into close proximity. This deletion may be detected using cytogenetic techniques and can also be inferred from the phenotype, indicating a deletion at one specific locus.Polymorphism, Genetic: The regular and simultaneous occurrence in a single interbreeding population of two or more discontinuous genotypes. The concept includes differences in genotypes ranging in size from a single nucleotide site (POLYMORPHISM, SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE) to large nucleotide sequences visible at a chromosomal level.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Sequence Homology, Nucleic Acid: The sequential correspondence of nucleotides in one nucleic acid molecule with those of another nucleic acid molecule. Sequence homology is an indication of the genetic relatedness of different organisms and gene function.Polytene Chromosomes: Extra large CHROMOSOMES, each consisting of many identical copies of a chromosome lying next to each other in parallel.Escherichia coli: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.Nuclear Proteins: Proteins found in the nucleus of a cell. Do not confuse with NUCLEOPROTEINS which are proteins conjugated with nucleic acids, that are not necessarily present in the nucleus.Gene Dosage: The number of copies of a given gene present in the cell of an organism. An increase in gene dosage (by GENE DUPLICATION for example) can result in higher levels of gene product formation. GENE DOSAGE COMPENSATION mechanisms result in adjustments to the level GENE EXPRESSION when there are changes or differences in gene dosage.Prophase: The first phase of cell nucleus division, in which the CHROMOSOMES become visible, the CELL NUCLEUS starts to lose its identity, the SPINDLE APPARATUS appears, and the CENTRIOLES migrate toward opposite poles.Interphase: The interval between two successive CELL DIVISIONS during which the CHROMOSOMES are not individually distinguishable. It is composed of the G phases (G1 PHASE; G0 PHASE; G2 PHASE) and S PHASE (when DNA replication occurs).Cell Cycle Proteins: Proteins that control the CELL DIVISION CYCLE. This family of proteins includes a wide variety of classes, including CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASES, mitogen-activated kinases, CYCLINS, and PHOSPHOPROTEIN PHOSPHATASES as well as their putative substrates such as chromatin-associated proteins, CYTOSKELETAL PROTEINS, and TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS.Saccharomyces cerevisiae: A species of the genus SACCHAROMYCES, family Saccharomycetaceae, order Saccharomycetales, known as "baker's" or "brewer's" yeast. The dried form is used as a dietary supplement.Loss of Heterozygosity: The loss of one allele at a specific locus, caused by a deletion mutation; or loss of a chromosome from a chromosome pair, resulting in abnormal HEMIZYGOSITY. It is detected when heterozygous markers for a locus appear monomorphic because one of the ALLELES was deleted.Karyotype: The full set of CHROMOSOMES presented as a systematized array of METAPHASE chromosomes from a photomicrograph of a single CELL NUCLEUS arranged in pairs in descending order of size and according to the position of the CENTROMERE. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Cosmids: Plasmids containing at least one cos (cohesive-end site) of PHAGE LAMBDA. They are used as cloning vehicles.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Cytogenetic Analysis: Examination of CHROMOSOMES to diagnose, classify, screen for, or manage genetic diseases and abnormalities. Following preparation of the sample, KARYOTYPING is performed and/or the specific chromosomes are analyzed.Chromatin: The material of CHROMOSOMES. It is a complex of DNA; HISTONES; and nonhistone proteins (CHROMOSOMAL PROTEINS, NON-HISTONE) found within the nucleus of a cell.Cytogenetics: A subdiscipline of genetics which deals with the cytological and molecular analysis of the CHROMOSOMES, and location of the GENES on chromosomes, and the movements of chromosomes during the CELL CYCLE.Transcription, Genetic: The biosynthesis of RNA carried out on a template of DNA. The biosynthesis of DNA from an RNA template is called REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION.Genome, Human: The complete genetic complement contained in the DNA of a set of CHROMOSOMES in a HUMAN. The length of the human genome is about 3 billion base pairs.Gene Rearrangement: The ordered rearrangement of gene regions by DNA recombination such as that which occurs normally during development.Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length: Variation occurring within a species in the presence or length of DNA fragment generated by a specific endonuclease at a specific site in the genome. Such variations are generated by mutations that create or abolish recognition sites for these enzymes or change the length of the fragment.Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.DNA Transposable Elements: Discrete segments of DNA which can excise and reintegrate to another site in the genome. Most are inactive, i.e., have not been found to exist outside the integrated state. DNA transposable elements include bacterial IS (insertion sequence) elements, Tn elements, the maize controlling elements Ac and Ds, Drosophila P, gypsy, and pogo elements, the human Tigger elements and the Tc and mariner elements which are found throughout the animal kingdom.DNA Primers: Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide: A single nucleotide variation in a genetic sequence that occurs at appreciable frequency in the population.Chromosome Fragile Sites: Specific loci that show up during KARYOTYPING as a gap (an uncondensed stretch in closer views) on a CHROMATID arm after culturing cells under specific conditions. These sites are associated with an increase in CHROMOSOME FRAGILITY. They are classified as common or rare, and by the specific culture conditions under which they develop. Fragile site loci are named by the letters "FRA" followed by a designation for the specific chromosome, and a letter which refers to which fragile site of that chromosome (e.g. FRAXA refers to fragile site A on the X chromosome. It is a rare, folic acid-sensitive fragile site associated with FRAGILE X SYNDROME.)Genetic Predisposition to Disease: A latent susceptibility to disease at the genetic level, which may be activated under certain conditions.Sequence Tagged Sites: Short tracts of DNA sequence that are used as landmarks in GENOME mapping. In most instances, 200 to 500 base pairs of sequence define a Sequence Tagged Site (STS) that is operationally unique in the human genome (i.e., can be specifically detected by the polymerase chain reaction in the presence of all other genomic sequences). The overwhelming advantage of STSs over mapping landmarks defined in other ways is that the means of testing for the presence of a particular STS can be completely described as information in a database.Sequence Homology, Amino Acid: The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.Spermatocytes: Male germ cells derived from SPERMATOGONIA. The euploid primary spermatocytes undergo MEIOSIS and give rise to the haploid secondary spermatocytes which in turn give rise to SPERMATIDS.Monosomy: The condition in which one chromosome of a pair is missing. In a normally diploid cell it is represented symbolically as 2N-1.Genes, X-Linked: Genes that are located on the X CHROMOSOME.Sex Chromosome Disorders: Clinical conditions caused by an abnormal sex chromosome constitution (SEX CHROMOSOME ABERRATIONS), in which there is extra or missing sex chromosome material (either a whole chromosome or a chromosome segment).Genes, Dominant: Genes that influence the PHENOTYPE both in the homozygous and the heterozygous state.Genome: The genetic complement of an organism, including all of its GENES, as represented in its DNA, or in some cases, its RNA.Sequence Alignment: The arrangement of two or more amino acid or base sequences from an organism or organisms in such a way as to align areas of the sequences sharing common properties. The degree of relatedness or homology between the sequences is predicted computationally or statistically based on weights assigned to the elements aligned between the sequences. This in turn can serve as a potential indicator of the genetic relatedness between the organisms.Cell Nucleus: Within a eukaryotic cell, a membrane-limited body which contains chromosomes and one or more nucleoli (CELL NUCLEOLUS). The nuclear membrane consists of a double unit-type membrane which is perforated by a number of pores; the outermost membrane is continuous with the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM. A cell may contain more than one nucleus. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)Genes, Recessive: Genes that influence the PHENOTYPE only in the homozygous state.Genes, Bacterial: The functional hereditary units of BACTERIA.Azure Stains: PHENOTHIAZINES with an amino group at the 3-position that are green crystals or powder. They are used as biological stains.Contig Mapping: Overlapping of cloned or sequenced DNA to construct a continuous region of a gene, chromosome or genome.DNA Restriction Enzymes: Enzymes that are part of the restriction-modification systems. They catalyze the endonucleolytic cleavage of DNA sequences which lack the species-specific methylation pattern in the host cell's DNA. Cleavage yields random or specific double-stranded fragments with terminal 5'-phosphates. The function of restriction enzymes is to destroy any foreign DNA that invades the host cell. Most have been studied in bacterial systems, but a few have been found in eukaryotic organisms. They are also used as tools for the systematic dissection and mapping of chromosomes, in the determination of base sequences of DNAs, and have made it possible to splice and recombine genes from one organism into the genome of another. EC 3.21.1.Homozygote: An individual in which both alleles at a given locus are identical.Philadelphia Chromosome: An aberrant form of human CHROMOSOME 22 characterized by translocation of the distal end of chromosome 9 from 9q34, to the long arm of chromosome 22 at 22q11. It is present in the bone marrow cells of 80 to 90 per cent of patients with chronic myelocytic leukemia (LEUKEMIA, MYELOGENOUS, CHRONIC, BCR-ABL POSITIVE).Chromosome Breakpoints: The locations in specific DNA sequences where CHROMOSOME BREAKS have occurred.Gene Duplication: Processes occurring in various organisms by which new genes are copied. Gene duplication may result in a MULTIGENE FAMILY; supergenes or PSEUDOGENES.Exons: The parts of a transcript of a split GENE remaining after the INTRONS are removed. They are spliced together to become a MESSENGER RNA or other functional RNA.Chromosomes, Archaeal: Structures within the nucleus of archaeal cells consisting of or containing DNA, which carry genetic information essential to the cell.Haploidy: The chromosomal constitution of cells, in which each type of CHROMOSOME is represented once. Symbol: N.Ploidies: The degree of replication of the chromosome set in the karyotype.Genetic Loci: Specific regions that are mapped within a GENOME. Genetic loci are usually identified with a shorthand notation that indicates the chromosome number and the position of a specific band along the P or Q arm of the chromosome where they are found. For example the locus 6p21 is found within band 21 of the P-arm of CHROMOSOME 6. Many well known genetic loci are also known by common names that are associated with a genetic function or HEREDITARY DISEASE.Hybridization, Genetic: The genetic process of crossbreeding between genetically dissimilar parents to produce a hybrid.Drosophila: A genus of small, two-winged flies containing approximately 900 described species. These organisms are the most extensively studied of all genera from the standpoint of genetics and cytology.Genome, Plant: The genetic complement of a plant (PLANTS) as represented in its DNA.Base Pairing: Pairing of purine and pyrimidine bases by HYDROGEN BONDING in double-stranded DNA or RNA.Gene Amplification: A selective increase in the number of copies of a gene coding for a specific protein without a proportional increase in other genes. It occurs naturally via the excision of a copy of the repeating sequence from the chromosome and its extrachromosomal replication in a plasmid, or via the production of an RNA transcript of the entire repeating sequence of ribosomal RNA followed by the reverse transcription of the molecule to produce an additional copy of the original DNA sequence. Laboratory techniques have been introduced for inducing disproportional replication by unequal crossing over, uptake of DNA from lysed cells, or generation of extrachromosomal sequences from rolling circle replication.DNA, Fungal: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of fungi.Genomic Imprinting: The variable phenotypic expression of a GENE depending on whether it is of paternal or maternal origin, which is a function of the DNA METHYLATION pattern. Imprinted regions are observed to be more methylated and less transcriptionally active. (Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Sex Chromatin: In the interphase nucleus, a condensed mass of chromatin representing an inactivated X chromosome. Each X CHROMOSOME, in excess of one, forms sex chromatin (Barr body) in the mammalian nucleus. (from King & Stansfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Genes, Lethal: Genes whose loss of function or gain of function MUTATION leads to the death of the carrier prior to maturity. They may be essential genes (GENES, ESSENTIAL) required for viability, or genes which cause a block of function of an essential gene at a time when the essential gene function is required for viability.DNA, Neoplasm: DNA present in neoplastic tissue.DNA, Complementary: Single-stranded complementary DNA synthesized from an RNA template by the action of RNA-dependent DNA polymerase. cDNA (i.e., complementary DNA, not circular DNA, not C-DNA) is used in a variety of molecular cloning experiments as well as serving as a specific hybridization probe.Histones: Small chromosomal proteins (approx 12-20 kD) possessing an open, unfolded structure and attached to the DNA in cell nuclei by ionic linkages. Classification into the various types (designated histone I, histone II, etc.) is based on the relative amounts of arginine and lysine in each.Intellectual Disability: Subnormal intellectual functioning which originates during the developmental period. This has multiple potential etiologies, including genetic defects and perinatal insults. Intelligence quotient (IQ) scores are commonly used to determine whether an individual has an intellectual disability. IQ scores between 70 and 79 are in the borderline range. Scores below 67 are in the disabled range. (from Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1992, Ch55, p28)Microtubules: Slender, cylindrical filaments found in the cytoskeleton of plant and animal cells. They are composed of the protein TUBULIN and are influenced by TUBULIN MODULATORS.Transcription Factors: Endogenous substances, usually proteins, which are effective in the initiation, stimulation, or termination of the genetic transcription process.Syndrome: A characteristic symptom complex.Pachytene Stage: The stage in the first meiotic prophase, following ZYGOTENE STAGE, when CROSSING OVER between homologous CHROMOSOMES begins.DNA, Plant: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of plants.Sister Chromatid Exchange: An exchange of segments between the sister chromatids of a chromosome, either between the sister chromatids of a meiotic tetrad or between the sister chromatids of a duplicated somatic chromosome. Its frequency is increased by ultraviolet and ionizing radiation and other mutagenic agents and is particularly high in BLOOM SYNDROME.Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.Chromosomes, Artificial: DNA constructs that are composed of, at least, elements such as a REPLICATION ORIGIN; TELOMERE; and CENTROMERE, that are required for successful replication, propagation to and maintenance in progeny cells. In addition, they are constructed to carry other sequences for analysis or gene transfer.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Gene Library: A large collection of DNA fragments cloned (CLONING, MOLECULAR) from a given organism, tissue, organ, or cell type. It may contain complete genomic sequences (GENOMIC LIBRARY) or complementary DNA sequences, the latter being formed from messenger RNA and lacking intron sequences.Nucleic Acid Conformation: The spatial arrangement of the atoms of a nucleic acid or polynucleotide that results in its characteristic 3-dimensional shape.Introns: Sequences of DNA in the genes that are located between the EXONS. They are transcribed along with the exons but are removed from the primary gene transcript by RNA SPLICING to leave mature RNA. Some introns code for separate genes.Quantitative Trait, Heritable: A characteristic showing quantitative inheritance such as SKIN PIGMENTATION in humans. (From A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Triticum: A plant genus of the family POACEAE that is the source of EDIBLE GRAIN. A hybrid with rye (SECALE CEREALE) is called TRITICALE. The seed is ground into FLOUR and used to make BREAD, and is the source of WHEAT GERM AGGLUTININS.Genes, Y-Linked: Genes that are located on the Y CHROMOSOME.Biological Evolution: The process of cumulative change over successive generations through which organisms acquire their distinguishing morphological and physiological characteristics.Euchromatin: Chromosome regions that are loosely packaged and more accessible to RNA polymerases than HETEROCHROMATIN. These regions also stain differentially in CHROMOSOME BANDING preparations.Genomic Library: A form of GENE LIBRARY containing the complete DNA sequences present in the genome of a given organism. It contrasts with a cDNA library which contains only sequences utilized in protein coding (lacking introns).Sex Determination Processes: The mechanisms by which the SEX of an individual's GONADS are fixed.

UCP4, a novel brain-specific mitochondrial protein that reduces membrane potential in mammalian cells. (1/1138)

Uncoupling proteins (UCPs) are a family of mitochondrial transporter proteins that have been implicated in thermoregulatory heat production and maintenance of the basal metabolic rate. We have identified and partially characterized a novel member of the human uncoupling protein family, termed uncoupling protein-4 (UCP4). Protein sequence analyses showed that UCP4 is most related to UCP3 and possesses features characteristic of mitochondrial transporter proteins. Unlike other known UCPs, UCP4 transcripts are exclusively expressed in both fetal and adult brain tissues. UCP4 maps to human chromosome 6p11.2-q12. Consistent with its potential role as an uncoupling protein, UCP4 is localized to the mitochondria and its ectopic expression in mammalian cells reduces mitochondrial membrane potential. These findings suggest that UCP4 may be involved in thermoregulatory heat production and metabolism in the brain.  (+info)

NKp44, a triggering receptor involved in tumor cell lysis by activated human natural killer cells, is a novel member of the immunoglobulin superfamily. (2/1138)

Surface receptors involved in natural killer (NK) cell triggering during the process of tumor cell lysis have recently been identified. Of these receptors, NKp44 is selectively expressed by IL-2- activated NK cells and may contribute to the increased efficiency of activated NK cells to mediate tumor cell lysis. Here we describe the molecular cloning of NKp44. Analysis of the cloned cDNA indicated that NKp44 is a novel transmembrane glycoprotein belonging to the Immunoglobulin superfamily characterized by a single extracellular V-type domain. The charged amino acid lysine in the transmembrane region may be involved in the association of NKp44 with the signal transducing molecule killer activating receptor-associated polypeptide (KARAP)/DAP12. These molecules were found to be crucial for the surface expression of NKp44. In agreement with data of NKp44 surface expression, the NKp44 transcripts were strictly confined to activated NK cells and to a minor subset of TCR-gamma/delta+ T lymphocytes. Unlike genes coding for other receptors involved in NK cell triggering or inhibition, the NKp44 gene is on human chromosome 6.  (+info)

The predisposition to type 1 diabetes linked to the human leukocyte antigen complex includes at least one non-class II gene. (3/1138)

The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) complex, encompassing 3.5 Mb of DNA from the centromeric HLA-DPB2 locus to the telomeric HLA-F locus on chromosome 6p21, encodes a major part of the genetic predisposition to develop type 1 diabetes, designated "IDDM1." A primary role for allelic variation of the class II HLA-DRB1, HLA-DQA1, and HLA-DQB1 loci has been established. However, studies of animals and humans have indicated that other, unmapped, major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-linked genes are participating in IDDM1. The strong linkage disequilibrium between genes in this complex makes mapping a difficult task. In the present paper, we report on the approach we have devised to circumvent the confounding effects of disequilibrium between class II alleles and alleles at other MHC loci. We have scanned 12 Mb of the MHC and flanking chromosome regions with microsatellite polymorphisms and analyzed the transmission of these marker alleles to diabetic probands from parents who were homozygous for the alleles of the HLA-DRB1, HLA-DQA1, and HLA-DQB1 genes. Our analysis, using three independent family sets, suggests the presence of an additional type I diabetes gene (or genes). This approach is useful for the analysis of other loci linked to common diseases, to verify if a candidate polymorphism can explain all of the association of a region or if the association is due to two or more loci in linkage disequilibrium with each other.  (+info)

Murine p38-delta mitogen-activated protein kinase, a developmentally regulated protein kinase that is activated by stress and proinflammatory cytokines. (4/1138)

The p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) play a crucial role in stress and inflammatory responses and are also involved in activation of the human immunodeficiency virus gene expression. We have isolated the murine cDNA clones encoding p38-delta MAPK, and we have localized the p38-delta gene to mouse chromosome 17A3-B and human chromosome 6p21.3. By using Northern and in situ hybridization, we have examined the expression of p38-delta in the mouse adult tissues and embryos. p38-delta was expressed primarily in the lung, testis, kidney, and gut epithelium in the adult tissues. Although p38-delta was expressed predominantly in the developing gut and the septum transversum in the mouse embryo at 9.5 days, its expression began to be expanded to many specific tissues in the 12.5-day embryo. At 15.5 days, p38-delta was expressed virtually in most developing epithelia in embryos, suggesting that p38-delta is a developmentally regulated MAPK. Interestingly, p38-delta and p38-alpha were similar serine/threonine kinases but differed in substrate specificity. Overall, p38-delta resembles p38-gamma, whereas p38-beta resembles p38-alpha. Moreover, p38-delta is activated by environmental stress, extracellular stimulants, and MAPK kinase-3, -4, -6, and -7, suggesting that p38-delta is a unique stress-responsive protein kinase.  (+info)

A genome search identifies major quantitative trait loci on human chromosomes 3 and 4 that influence cholesterol concentrations in small LDL particles. (5/1138)

Small, dense LDL particles are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. To identify the genes that influence LDL size variation, we performed a genome-wide screen for cholesterol concentrations in 4 LDL size fractions. Samples from 470 members of randomly ascertained families were typed for 331 microsatellite markers spaced at approximately 15 cM intervals. Plasma LDLs were resolved by using nondenaturing gradient gel electrophoresis into 4 fraction sizes (LDL-1, 26.4 to 29.0 nm; LDL-2, 25.5 to 26.4 nm; LDL-3, 24.2 to 25.5 nm; and LDL-4, 21.0 to 24.2 nm) and cholesterol concentrations were estimated by staining with Sudan Black B. Linkage analyses used variance component methods that exploited all of the genotypic and phenotypic information in the large extended pedigrees. In multipoint linkage analyses with quantitative trait loci for the 4 fraction sizes, only LDL-3, a fraction containing small LDL particles, gave peak multipoint log10 odds in favor of linkage (LOD) scores that exceeded 3.0, a nominal criterion for evidence of significant linkage. The highest LOD scores for LDL-3 were found on chromosomes 3 (LOD=4.1), 4 (LOD=4.1), and 6 (LOD=2.9). In oligogenic analyses, the 2-locus LOD score (for chromosomes 3 and 4) increased significantly (P=0.0012) to 6.1, but including the third locus on chromosome 6 did not significantly improve the LOD score (P=0.064). Thus, we have localized 2 major quantitative trait loci that influence variation in cholesterol concentrations of small LDL particles. The 2 quantitative trait loci on chromosomes 3 and 4 are located in regions that contain the genes for apoD and the large subunit of the microsomal triglyceride transfer protein, respectively.  (+info)

Linkage of Crohn's disease to the major histocompatibility complex region is detected by multiple non-parametric analyses. (6/1138)

BACKGROUND: There is evidence for genetic susceptibility to Crohn's disease, and a tentative association with tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and HLA class II alleles. AIMS: To examine the potential of genetic linkage between Crohn's disease and the MHC region on chromosome 6p. METHODS: TNF microsatellite markers and, for some families, additional HLA antigens were typed for 323 individuals from 49 Crohn's disease multiplex families to generate informative haplotypes. Non-parametric linkage analysis methods, including sib pair and affected relative pair methods, were used. RESULTS: Increased sharing of haplotypes was observed in affected sib pairs: 92% (48/52) shared one or two haplotypes versus an expected 75% if linkage did not exist (p=0.004). After other affected relative pairs were included, the significance level reached 0.001. The mean proportion of haplotype sharing was increased for both concordant affected (pi=0.60, p=0.002) and unaffected sib pairs (pi=0.58, p=0. 031) compared with the expected value (pi=0.5). In contrast, sharing in discordant sib pairs was significantly decreased (pi=0.42, p=0. 007). Linear regression analysis using all three types of sib pairs yielded a slope of -0.38 at p=0.00003. It seemed that the HLA effect was stronger in non-Jewish families than in Jewish families. CONCLUSIONS: All available analytical methods support linkage of Crohn's disease to the MHC region in these Crohn's disease families. This region is estimated to contribute approximately 10-33% of the total genetic risk to Crohn's disease.  (+info)

Genetic linkage of IgA deficiency to the major histocompatibility complex: evidence for allele segregation distortion, parent-of-origin penetrance differences, and the role of anti-IgA antibodies in disease predisposition. (7/1138)

Immunoglobulin A (IgA) deficiency (IgAD) is characterized by a defect of terminal lymphocyte differentiation, leading to a lack of IgA in serum and mucosal secretions. Familial clustering, variable population prevalence in different ethnic groups, and a predominant inheritance pattern suggest a strong genetic predisposition to IgAD. The genetic susceptibility to IgAD is shared with a less prevalent, but more profound, defect called "common variable immunodeficiency" (CVID). Here we show an increased allele sharing at 6p21 in affected members of 83 multiplex IgAD/CVID pedigrees and demonstrate, using transmission/diseqilibrium tests, family-based associations indicating the presence of a predisposing locus, designated "IGAD1," in the proximal part of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). The recurrence risk of IgAD was found to depend on the sex of parents transmitting the defect: affected mothers were more likely to produce offspring with IgAD than were affected fathers. Carrier mothers but not carrier fathers transmitted IGAD1 alleles more frequently to the affected offspring than would be expected under random segregation. The differential parent-of-origin penetrance is proposed to reflect a maternal effect mediated by the production of anti-IgA antibodies tentatively linked to IGAD1. This is supported by higher frequency of anti-IgA-positive females transmitting the disorder to children, in comparison with female IgAD nontransmitters, and by linkage data in the former group. Such pathogenic mechanisms may be shared by other MHC-linked complex traits associated with the production of specific autoantibodies, parental effects, and a particular MHC haplotype.  (+info)

Suppression of tumorigenicity in human ovarian cancer cell lines is controlled by a 2 cM fragment in chromosomal region 6q24-q25. (8/1138)

Multiple distinct regions of chromosome 6 are frequently affected by losses of heterozygosity in primary human ovarian carcinomas. We introduced a normal human chromosome 6 into HEY and SKOV-3 ovarian carcinoma cell lines using microcell-mediated chromosome transfer techniques to further investigate the role of this chromosome in ovarian tumorigenesis. The exogenous chromosome was stably propagated in the recipient cells based on fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses with a chromosome 6 painting probe. The tumorigenicity of HEY and SKOV-3 cells was completely suppressed after transfer of chromosome 6, but not after transfer of a chromosome 11q13-qter fragment used as control. Using 46 polymorphic microsatellite markers, the region bounded by D6S1649 and D6S1564 was found to be commonly deleted in HEY: chromosome 6 tumorigenic revertant clones. The boundaries of the commonly deleted region could be further narrowed down to a 2 cM (based on the Whitehead genetic map) or 0.36 megabase (based on gdb mapping data) region between D6S1637 and D6S1564 after transferring the exogenous chromosome from revertants into mouse L cells and performing allelic deletion mapping studies against this mouse background. We conclude that this region contains a tumor suppressor gene important for the control of ovarian tumor development.  (+info)

Looking for online definition of Cytovillin or what Cytovillin stands for? Cytovillin is listed in the Worlds largest and most authoritative dictionary database of abbreviations and acronyms
THE SYNDROME of transient diabetes mellitus in the newborn has been well documented by Cornblath and Schwartz1 who collected and summarized 15 case reports. Asi
Chromosome 5p15.33 has been identified as a lung cancer susceptibility locus, however the underlying causal mechanisms were not fully elucidated. Previous fine-mapping studies of this locus have relied on imputation or investigated a small number of known, common variants. This study represents a significant advance over previous research by investigating a large number of novel, rare variants, as well as their underlying mechanisms through telomere length. Variants for this fine-mapping study were identified through a targeted deep sequencing (average depth of coverage greater than 4000x) of 576 individuals. Subsequently, 4652 SNPs, including 1108 novel SNPs, were genotyped in 5164 cases and 5716 controls of European ancestry. After adjusting for known risk loci, rs2736100 and rs401681, we identified a new, independent lung cancer susceptibility variant in LPCAT1: rs139852726 (OR = 0.46, P = 4.73x10(-9)), and three new adenocarcinoma risk variants in TERT: rs61748181 (OR = 0.53, P = ...
Fine-mapping of chromosome 5p15.33 based on a targeted deep sequencing and high density genotyping identifies novel lung cancer susceptibility loci ...
Type 1 diabetes is a complex heterogeneous disease for which there is a small number of genes with large effects (i.e., HLA) and a large number of genes with small effects (11). There are probably many genetic forms of type 1 diabetes, and most forms are influenced by genes within the HLA region on chromosome 6p21 (IDDM1). Certain combinations of HLA alleles are found to be associated with each other on the same chromosome with a frequency greater than expected, and, consequently, they are not randomly distributed within the general population. This phenomenon is known as linkage disequilibrium, and it is quantified by the difference between the observed and the expected frequencies of certain combinations of alleles. It is the combination of these alleles on single chromosomes (haplotypes) and combinations of both chromosomes (one from each parent: genotype) that predominantly determines diabetes risk.. The principal genes localized within the MHC code for human leukocyte antigens, or HLA, two ...
6q24-related transient neonatal diabetes mellitus, a type of diabetes that occurs in infants, is caused by the overactivity (overexpression) of certain genes in a region of the long (q) arm of chromosome 6 called 6q24. People inherit two copies of their genes, one from their mother and one from their father. Usually both copies of each gene are active, or "turned on," in cells. In some cases, however, only one of the two copies is normally turned on. Which copy is active depends on the parent of origin: some genes are normally active only when they are inherited from a persons father; others are active only when inherited from a persons mother. This phenomenon is known as genomic imprinting.. The 6q24 region includes paternally expressed imprinted genes, which means that normally only the copy of each gene that comes from the father is active. The copy of each gene that comes from the mother is inactivated (silenced) by a mechanism called methylation.. There are three ways that overexpression ...
Shihong Du, Qimin Qin, Qiao Wang, Haijian Ma: Evaluating structural and topological consistency of complex regions with broad boundaries in multi-resolution spatial databases. Inf. Sci. 178(1): 52-68 (2008 ...
IREB2 is a gene that produces iron regulatory protein 2 (IRP2), which is critical to intracellular iron homeostasis and which relates to the rate of cellular proliferation. IREB2 lies in a lung cancer susceptibility locus. The aims were to assess 1) the relationship between iron loading, cell proliferation and IRP2 expression in lung cancer; 2) the potential of iron related pathways as therapeutic targets; and 3) the relevance of IRP2 in operated lung cancer patients.. Cells of two nonsmall cell cancer (NSCLC) lines and primary bronchial epithelial cells (PBECs) were cultured with and without iron; and proliferation, apoptosis and migration were assessed. Reverse transcriptase PCR and Western blot were used to assess expression of iron homeostasis genes/proteins. Iron chelation and knockdown of IREB2 were used in vitro to explore therapeutics. A cohort of operated NSCLC patients was studied for markers of systemic iron status, tumour IRP2 staining and survival.. Iron loading caused cell ...
SOTO GARCIA, Mavys et al. Presentation of three cases with North Carolina macular dystrophy. Rev Cubana Oftalmol [online]. 2012, vol.25, n.1, pp.155-160. ISSN 0864-2176.. The ophthalmological characteristics of three patients, two male siblings and their father, with diagnosis of North Carolina macular dystrophy were presented. This is a genetic dysfunction that causes congenital or early onset macular degeneration. It is characterized by a dominant autosomal heredity, with complete penetrance, genetically mapped in the chromosome 6q16. The lesions are mainly stationary. The funduscopic manifestations vary. The type of lesion is mainly stationary whereas funduscopic manifestations are varied. The dysciform lesion in the macular area and decrease of the macular thicness according to the macular coloboma prevailed, with identical particularities in the three patients. The visual acuity varied from 0.6 to 0.2.. Palabras clave : Macular dystrophy; North Carolina; dominant autosomial; chromosome; ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Genome-wide association study identified the human leukocyte antigen region as a novel locus for plasma beta-2 microglobulin. AU - Tin, Adrienne. AU - Astor, Brad C.. AU - Boerwinkle, Eric. AU - Hoogeveen, Ron C.. AU - Coresh, Josef. AU - Kao, Wen Hong Linda. PY - 2013/6. Y1 - 2013/6. N2 - Beta-2 microglobulin (B2M) is a component of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecule and has been studied as a biomarker of kidney function, cardiovascular diseases and mortality. Little is known about the genes influencing its levels directly or through glomerular filtration rate (GFR). We conducted a genome-wide association study of plasma B2M levels in 6738 European Americans from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study to identify novel loci for B2M and assessed its association with known estimated GFR (eGFR) loci. We identified 2 genome-wide significant loci. One was in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region on chromosome 6 (lowest p value = 1.8 × 10 -23 for ...
Fanconi-Bickel syndrome, caused by mutations in SLC2A2 encoding the glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2), is characterized by generalized proximal renal tubular dysfunction manifesting in late infancy. We describe phenotypic heterogeneity of Fanconi-Bickel syndrome in three siblings, including early and atypical presentation with transient neonatal diabetes mellitus in one. The second-born of a non-consanguineous couple, evaluated for polyuria and growth retardation, had rickets, hepatomegaly and proximal tubular dysfunction from 4 to 6 months of age. A male sibling, who expired at 4 months, also had hepatomegaly and growth retardation. The third sibling had polyuria, glucosuria and mild proteinuria on day 3 of life. Hyperglycemia was detected 2 weeks later, which required therapy with insulin for 3 months. Mild metabolic acidosis was present at 2 weeks; hypercalciuria, phosphaturia and aminoaciduria were seen at 6 months. Sanger sequencing showed a homozygous missense mutation in SLC2A2 (exon 7, ...
After the recent discovery that common genetic variation in 15q24-25.1 influences inherited risk of lung cancer (3-7), we identified a second sequence variant at 15q24-25.1 associated with familial lung cancer (8) and further validated this new association in large sporadic lung cancer populations. We showed that these two genetic variants on 15q24-25.1 have independent genetic effects on lung cancer risk. The second variant on 15q24-25.1, marked by rs481134, explains an additional 13.2% of the population attributable risk for lung cancer. These results further confirm the complexity of the chromosomal region 15q24-25.1 underlying lung cancer susceptibility.. Interestingly, the second variant did not show association with lung cancer in single-marker analysis. However, haplotype analysis of SNPs rs1051730 and rs481134 provided stronger evidence for association with lung cancer. SNPs rs1051730 and rs481134 are in moderate LD (r2 = 0.30), which can mask or change the genetic effects of those loci ...
Complete information for MCDR3 gene (Genetic Locus), Macular Dystrophy, Retinal 3, including: function, proteins, disorders, pathways, orthologs, and expression. GeneCards - The Human Gene Compendium
Results An association between SNP rs3802842 on chromosome 11q23.1 and rs16892766 on chromosome 8q23.3 and the risk of developing CRC and age of diagnosis was found in MLH1 mutation carriers. Female MLH1 mutation carriers harbouring the homozygous variant genotype for SNP rs3802842 have the highest risk of developing CRC. When the number of risk alleles for the two SNPs combined was analysed, a difference of 24 years was detected between individuals carrying three risk alleles and those carrying no risk alleles. ...
Food Sources Most infant formulas usually contain vegetable oils that provide about 10в15 major fatty acids (43). A3. ПппппDisease basal laminar drusen Doyne honeycomb retinal dystrophy (malattia leventinese) Sorsby fundus dystrophy central areolar choroidal dystrophy AMD-like late-onset maculopathy North Carolina macular dystrophy OMIM Mode of phenotype inheritance number 126700 AR Associated gene CFH EFEMP1 (fibulin-3) TIMP3 peripherinRDS peripherinRDS unknown (MCDR1 locus) Reference(s) this thesis 182 183 this thesis 143 184 пппп126600 136900 215500 - 136550 Kamagra kaufen in der apotheke AD AD AD AD пппппппппAD, autosomal dominant; AMD.
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Free, official coding info for 2018 ICD-10-CM P70.2 - includes detailed rules, notes, synonyms, ICD-9-CM conversion, index and annotation crosswalks, DRG grouping and more.
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Author Summary Recent genome-wide analysis has revealed that the way in which genes are arranged on chromosomes and the conformation of these chromosomes are crucial for the regulation of gene expression. Reflecting this arrangement, clusters of genes which are regulated together have been discovered. We have identified a previously unreported transcriptional activity hub spanning ESR1, the gene encoding the important breast cancer biomarker oestrogen receptor. Genetic variants immediately upstream of ESR1 have recently been linked to breast cancer risk. We found that three open reading frames within this region are tightly co-expressed with ESR1. We investigated the function of these genes and discovered that one of these co-expressed genes, C6ORF211, affects proliferation in cultured cells and is correlated with proliferation in breast tumours. Another of the genes, C6ORF97, is negatively correlated with proliferation in breast tumours and predicts for outcome on the anti-oestrogen drug tamoxifen.
Read "Genetic mapping of 10 microsatellites in the t complex region of mouse Chromosome 17, Mammalian Genome" on DeepDyve, the largest online rental service for scholarly research with thousands of academic publications available at your fingertips.
Identification of a new prostate cancer susceptibility locus on chromosome 8q24 (P = 1.3 x 10(-10), heterozygote OR = 1.17, 95% CI 1.10-1.24; homozygote OR = 1.33, 95% CI 1.21-1.45). See the entry for rs4242382, which states, "A joint-odds analysis indicates that rs4242382(A;A) individuals have increased prostate cancer odds of 3.15x or 1.77x if they are also carrying 2 or 1 rs620861(C) alleles, respectively." ...
The mini OTSC® System Set consists of an applicator cap with a mounted clip, thread, thread retriever and a hand wheel for clip release.. The mini OTSC® clip is delivered by means of an applicator cap mounted to the tip of endoscopes. By turning the hand wheel, the white application ring is pulled towards the distal end of the cap and the clip is released.. The mini OTSC® clip for flexible endoscopy is a superelastic Nitinol® device for compression and approximation of tissue in the digestive tract.. Based on its unique design the clip closes itself and firmly anchors the tissue to be compressed for hemorrhage or closure of a GI organ wall lesion. Due to its smart material properties, the mini OTSC® clip delivers constant force at the application site securing the therapeutic effect. The mini OTSC® clip is made of a biocompatible and MR conditional material and can remain in the body as a longterm implant. ...
Obesity causes dysfunction in major metabolic tissues. The glucose-fatty acid cycle, also known as the Randle hypothesis, provides the first basic concept for h...
CCHCR1 (Coiled-Coil α-Helical Rod protein 1), within the major psoriasis susceptibility locus PSORS1, is a plausible candidate gene with the psoriasis associated risk allele CCHCR1*WWCC. Although its expression pattern in psoriatic skin differs from healthy skin and its overexpression influences cell proliferation in transgenic mice, its role as a psoriasis effector gene has remained unsettled. The 5′-region of the gene contains a SNP (rs3130453) that controls a 5′-extended open reading frame and thus the translation of alternative isoforms. We have now compared the function of two CCHCR1 isoforms: the novel longer isoform 1 and the previously studied isoform 3. In samples of Finnish and Swedish families, the allele generating only isoform 3 shows association with psoriasis (P|10−7). Both isoforms localize at the centrosome, a cell organelle playing a role in cell division. In stably transfected cells the isoform 3 affects cell proliferation and with the CCHCR1*WWCC allele, also apoptosis.
NACHT leucine-rich repeat- and PYD-containing (NLRP)3 protein controls the inflammasome by regulating caspase-1 activity and interleukin (IL)-1 beta processing. The contribution of IL-1 beta in the pathogenesis of psoriasis is well recognized. Polymorphisms in NLRP3 and caspase recruitment domaincontaining protein (CARD)8, a negative regulator of caspase-1 activity, have been associated with susceptibility to common inflammatory diseases, such as Crohns disease and rheumatoid arthritis. To investigate the role for genetic variants in the NLRP3 inflammasome in psoriasis susceptibility. In a patient sample comprising 1988 individuals from 491 families and 1002 healthy controls, genotypes for four selected single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in NLRP3 (three SNPs) and CARD8 (one SNP) were determined by TaqMan (R) Allelic Discrimination. Using the transmission disequilibrium test (TDT), a significant increase in the transmission of the NLRP3 rs10733113G genotype to a subgroup of patients with more ...
NACHT leucine-rich repeat- and PYD-containing (NLRP)3 protein controls the inflammasome by regulating caspase-1 activity and interleukin (IL)-1 beta processing. The contribution of IL-1 beta in the pathogenesis of psoriasis is well recognized. Polymorphisms in NLRP3 and caspase recruitment domaincontaining protein (CARD)8, a negative regulator of caspase-1 activity, have been associated with susceptibility to common inflammatory diseases, such as Crohns disease and rheumatoid arthritis. To investigate the role for genetic variants in the NLRP3 inflammasome in psoriasis susceptibility. In a patient sample comprising 1988 individuals from 491 families and 1002 healthy controls, genotypes for four selected single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in NLRP3 (three SNPs) and CARD8 (one SNP) were determined by TaqMan (R) Allelic Discrimination. Using the transmission disequilibrium test (TDT), a significant increase in the transmission of the NLRP3 rs10733113G genotype to a subgroup of patients with more ...
Forms of leukemia can be found on six different chromosomes. Acute leukemias can be found on chromosomes 1, 2, and 13, T-Cell developmental leukemia is found on chromosomes 3 and X, and the cause of myelogenous leukemia is in a protein coded for in chromosome 11 at 11p11.9. Chromosome 11 contains 134 million bases. Chromosome 11 has been identified with 151 diseases. Only chromosomes 1, 2, and X contain more currently identified diseases. Chromosome 11 has the most cancerous conditions of all of the chromosomes associated with it ...
in PLoS Genetics (2007), 3(4), 538-543. To identify novel susceptibility loci for Crohn disease (CD), we undertook a genome-wide association study with more than 300,000 SNPs characterized in 547 patients and 928 controls. We found three ... [more ▼]. To identify novel susceptibility loci for Crohn disease (CD), we undertook a genome-wide association study with more than 300,000 SNPs characterized in 547 patients and 928 controls. We found three chromosome regions that provided evidence of disease association with p-values between 10(-6) and 10(-9). Two of these (IL23R on Chromosome 1 and CARD15 on Chromosome 16) correspond to genes previously reported to be associated with CD. In addition, a 250-kb region of Chromosome 5p13.1 was found to contain multiple markers with strongly suggestive evidence of disease association (including four markers with p , 10(-7)). We replicated the results for 5p13.1 by studying 1,266 additional CD patients, 559 additional controls, and 428 trios. Significant ...
Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a childhood onset disorder, for which there is good evidence that genetic factors contribute to the aetiology. Recently reported linkage findings suggested evidence of a susceptibility locus on chromosome 16p13 (maximum LOD score of 4.2, P=5 x 10(-6 …
Describes rare forms of diabetes that result from mutations in a single gene. Discusses diagnosis, genetic testing, and counseling.
Genes are carried on chromosomes and the two that are important in PKD are chromosomes 16 and 4. I am not going to deal with the specifics of inheritance - this is best explained on the PKD Foundation web page. The relevant facts are that: 85% people…
NOL5A兔多克隆抗体(ab74783)可与人样本反应并经WB, IHC实验严格验证。中国75%以上现货,所有产品均提供质保服务,可通过电话、电邮或微信获得本地专属技术支持。
The chapters are numbered for the pairs of human chromosomes, one pair being the X and Y sex chromosomes, so the numbering goes ... The book devotes one chapter to each pair of human chromosomes. Since one (unnumbered) chapter is required to discuss the sex ... the chapters matching the 23 pairs of human chromosomes, and notes that Genome is the third of Ridley's books that "tries to ... The impact of stress on the human body is described starting with the creation of hormones by the CYP17 gene on chromosome 10. ...
The chromosome encodes 5,674 potential protein-coding open reading frames. This genome may have undergone numerous gene ... Strains of this species have been isolated from human brain abscesses. N. farcinica contains a 6 million base pair genome with ... Holm, P (July 1975). "Seven cases of human nocardiosis caused by Nocardia farcinica". Sabouraudia. 13 (2): 161-9. doi:10.1080/ ...
For comparison, the diploid human genome has 20,000-25,000 genes (represented twice) on 23 chromosome pairs. There is a high ... Dictyostelium shares many molecular features with macrophages, the human host of Legionella. The cytoskeletal composition of D ... Tandem repeats of trinucleotides are abundant in Dictyostelium, which in humans cause Trinucleotide repeat disorders. Sexual ... 6 (7): e1001013. doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1001013. PMC 2895654 . PMID 20617172. O'Day DH, Keszei A (May 2012). "Signalling and ...
... is essential for homologous chromosome pairing in meiosis during spermatogenesis. Targeted inactivation of FKBP6 in mice ... Mutations in this gene have been associated with male infertility in humans. FKBP6 is deleted in Williams syndrome, however ... 2003). "Essential role of Fkbp6 in male fertility and homologous chromosome pairing in meiosis". Science. 300 (5623): 1291-5. ... PDB: 3B7X​; "RCSB Protein Data Bank - Structure Summary for 3B7X - Crystal structure of human FK506-Binding Protein 6". ...
CTNS is located on the p arm of human chromosome 17, at position 13.2.[5] It spans base pairs 3,636,468 and 3,661,542, and ... "Human PubMed Reference:". National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine.. .mw-parser-output ... "American Journal of Human Genetics. 63 (5): 1352-62. doi:10.1086/302118. PMC 1377545. PMID 9792862.. ... "American Journal of Human Genetics. 69 (4): 712-21. doi:10.1086/323484. PMC 1226058. PMID 11505338.. ...
Schäfer BW, Mattei MG (July 1993). "The human paired domain gene PAX7 (Hup1) maps to chromosome 1p35-1p36.2". Genomics. 17 (1 ... Paired box protein Pax-7 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the PAX7 gene. Pax-7 plays a role in neural crest ... Pilz AJ, Povey S, Gruss P, Abbott CM (March 1993). "Mapping of the human homologs of the murine paired-box-containing genes". ... PAX7 protein, human at the US National Library of Medicine Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) PAX7 human gene location in the UCSC ...
The gene C1orf74 is a protein-encoding gene on chromosome 1 in humans. It is also known as URLC4 in humans. The locus of this ... C1orf74 is 2229 base pairs long. The gene contains two exons. C1orf74 is downstream of the gene interferon regulatory factor 6 ... "C1orf74 chromosome 1 open reading frame 74 [Homo sapiens (human)]". NCBI Gene. NCBI. Retrieved 8 May 2015. "Homo sapiens ... May 2006). "The DNA sequence and biological annotation of human chromosome 1". Nature. 441 (7091): 315-21. doi:10.1038/ ...
Human PTCHD4 is located on the negative strand of chromosome 6, at 6p12.3. From there, it covers 190,350 base pairs, which ... Check date values in: ,access-date= (help) "The Human Protein Atlas". The Human Protein Atlas. Retrieved 2015. Check date ... "The Human Gene Compendium". Gene Cards. Retrieved 2015. Check date values in: ,access-date= (help) "National Center for ... Sequenced distant orthologs of human PTCHD4 have been found as far back in evolution as mold, which shows a conservation of 16 ...
The gene is located on chromosome 19 at p13.3 on the forward strand. The gene is 4041 base pairs in length and contains 29 ... ANKRD24 has no human paralogs. Orthologous proteins are found in other organisms. The following table represents some of the ... Ankyrin repeat domain-containing protein 24 is a protein in humans that is coded for by the ANKRD24 gene. The gene is also ... The protein's function in humans is currently unknown. ANKRD24 is in the protein family that contains ankyrin-repeat domains. ...
In humans, aldolase B is encoded by the ALDOB gene located on chromosome 9. The gene is 14,500 base pairs long and contains 9 ... 1988). "Human aldolase B gene: characterization of the genomic aldolase B gene and analysis of sequences required for multiple ... Ali M, Sebastio G, Cox TM (1994). "Identification of a novel mutation (Leu 256→Pro) in the human aldolase B gene associated ... Aldolase B at the US National Library of Medicine Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) Human ALDOB genome location and ALDOB gene ...
2003). "The DNA sequence and analysis of human chromosome 6". Nature. 425 (6960): 805-11. doi:10.1038/nature02055. PMID ... "A novel divergently transcribed human histone H2A/H2B gene pair". DNA Seq. 1 (6): 409-13. doi:10.3109/10425179109020799. PMID ... Histone H2B type 1-O is a protein that in humans is encoded by the HIST1H2BO gene. Histones are basic nuclear proteins that are ... 2006). "Monoubiquitination of human histone H2B: the factors involved and their roles in HOX gene regulation". Mol. Cell. 20 (4 ...
2003). "The DNA sequence and analysis of human chromosome 6". Nature. 425 (6960): 805-11. doi:10.1038/nature02055. PMID ... "A novel divergently transcribed human histone H2A/H2B gene pair". DNA Seq. 1 (6): 409-13. doi:10.3109/10425179109020799. PMID ... 1999). "The human H2A and H2B histone gene complement". Biol. Chem. 380 (1): 7-18. doi:10.1515/BC.1999.002. PMID 10064132. Deng ... Histone H2A type 1 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the HIST1H2AM gene. Histones are basic nuclear proteins that are ...
The human gene TMEM8A is found on chromosome 16 at the band 16p13.3. The span of this gene on chromosome 16 spans from base ... pair 420,773 to 437,113 making this gene 16,340 base pairs in length. This gene is found on the minus strand of the chromosome ... There are two paralogs for TMEM8A found in humans, C9orf127 and TMEM8C. Both of these paralogs are found on Chromosome 9. The ... December 2004). "The sequence and analysis of duplication-rich human chromosome 16". Nature. 432 (7020): 988-94. doi:10.1038/ ...
DARC protein, human at the US National Library of Medicine Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) Duffy at BGMUT Blood Group Antigen ... The gene was first localised to chromosome 1 in 1968, and was the first blood system antigen to be localised. It is a single ... The mouse gene has two exons (100 and 1064 nucleotides in length respectively), separated by a 461 base pair intron. In the ... The ancestral form of extant DARC alleles in humans appears to be the FY*B allele. The gene appears to be under strong ...
In a common situation a human cell has one pair of identical chromosomes on chromosome 1. With the 1q21.1 CNVs one chromosome ... Meiosis is the process of dividing cells in humans. In meiosis, the chromosome pairs splits and a representative of each pair ... In this way the number of chromosomes will be halved in each cell, while all the parts on the chromosome (genes) remain, after ... 1q21.1 copy number variations (CNVs) are rare aberrations of human chromosome 1. ...
In humans, lactoferrin gene LTF is located on the third chromosome in the locus 3q21-q23. In oxen, the coding sequence consists ... insertions and mutations of stop codons affect the coding part and its length varies between 2,055 and 2,190 nucleotide pairs. ... Human colostrum ("first milk") has the highest concentration, followed by human milk, then cow milk (150 mg/L). Lactoferrin is ... lactoferrin shows potent activity against both human immunodeficiency virus and human cytomegalovirus replication in vitro". J ...
... is from base pair 50,384,290 to base pair 50,418,018 on chromosome 19.[26] The mouse orthologue maps to mouse chromosome 7.[27] ... in human Homo sapiens Mus musculus Saccharomyces cerevisiae Schizosaccharomyces pombe A (catalytic) p125 POLD1-Chr 19q13.3 ... Table 1: Gene names and chromosomal locations for the various subunits of polymerase delta in human, mouse, budding and fission ... Figure 2: Conserved motifs in the exonuclease domain of human p125. Motifs I to III are conserved in the B-family of ...
In humans LPAR6 mutations result in a wooly hair phenotype. The Cornish Rex is a genetic mutation that originated from a litter ... A gene on chromosome A1, the lysophosphatidic acid receptor 6 (LPAR6), was identified to have a 4 base pair deletion. This ... PLOS One, 2013 Jun 27;8(6) Observer Sunday supplement science column 'A New Look In Cats' 31 January 1965 pp4-5. ...
The human TBR1 gene is located on the q arm of the positive strand of chromosome 2. It is 8,954 base pairs in length. TBR1 is ... "Identification of a novel gene on chromosome 7q11.2 interrupted by a translocation breakpoint in a pair of autistic twins". ... Orthologs of the human TBR1 gene have been identified in chimpanzee, dog, cow, rat, mouse, and zebrafish. In mice, TBR1 has ... It was discovered that Tbr-1 is expressed by postmitotic cortical neurons in mice and in humans. One target gene of TBR1 in the ...
The human TMCO6 is found on chromosome 5 (position 5q31.3). The entire gene spans 5568 base pairs on the positive strand of ... 1,925 base pair mRNA sequence. Variant 2 is the second longest at 1,907 base pairs in length and also consists of 12 exons. ... Variant 3 has a total length of 1,614 base pairs and differs from variant 1 because it lacks two consecutive exons. It has an ... TMCO6 is expressed in liver tissue and is found during the fetal stage of development in humans. Orthologs of the TMCO6 protein ...
In humans, the gene is 51,558 base pairs long. The transcript that produces the longest protein of 140 amino acids is ... "GeneCards: The Human Gene Compendium". Retrieved 8 February 2015. "Homo sapiens chromosome 6 open reading frame 201 (C6orf201) ... "The DNA sequence and analysis of human chromosome 6". Nature. 425 (6960): 805-11. doi:10.1038/nature02055. PMID 14574404. "EST ... is a protein that in humans is encoded by the C6orf201 gene. In humans this gene encodes for a nuclear protein that is ...
This gene is found on the plus strand of chromosome 17 at locus 17q11.2. It spans from base pairs 31,254,928 to 31,272,124. ... "Toward a catalog of human genes and proteins: sequencing and analysis of 500 novel complete protein coding human cDNAs". Genome ... This missing region corresponds to 85 base pairs near the end of the 5' UTR. Variant one is more abundant than Variant two with ... Transmembrane protein 98 is a single-pass membrane protein that in humans is encoded by the TMEM98 gene. The function of this ...
Transmembrane protein 261 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the TMEM261 gene located on chromosome 9. TMEM261 is also ... TMEM261 is located at 9p24.1, its length is 91,891 base pairs (bp) on the reverse strand. Its neighbouring gene is PTPRD ... "9ORF123 chromosome 9 open reading frame 123". BioGRID: Database of Protein and Genetic Interactions. TyersLab. She X, Rohl CA, ... "The Human Protein Atlas:TMEM261". "EST profile: TMEM261". UniGene. National Library of Medicine. Wu J, et al. (2012). " ...
In humans the TIGAR gene, known as C12orf5, is found on chromosome 12p13-3, and consists of 6 exons. The C12orf5 mRNA is 8237 ... base pairs in length. Jen and Cheung first discovered the c12orf5 gene whilst using computer based searches to find novel p53- ... "NCBI Summary C12orf5 chromosome 12 open reading frame 5". Madan E, Gogna R, Kuppusamy P, Bhatt M, Pati U, Mahdi AA (July 2012 ... The second is found just prior to the first exon, binds p53 with low affinity, and is conserved between mice and humans. TIGAR ...
... a member of the paired box-containing class of developmental control genes, is mapped to human chromosome 20p11.2 by in situ ... Paired box protein Pax-1 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the PAX1 gene. This gene is a member of the paired box (PAX ... 1989). "Conservation of the paired domain in metazoans and its structure in three isolated human genes". EMBO J. 8 (4): 1183-90 ... 2002). "The DNA sequence and comparative analysis of human chromosome 20". Nature. 414 (6866): 865-71. doi:10.1038/414865a. ...
This article on a gene on human chromosome 2 is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.. *v ... "Clustering of two fragile sites and seven homeobox genes in human chromosome region 2q31→q32.1". Cytogenet. Cell Genet. 90 (1-2 ... Homeobox protein Hox-D8 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the HOXD8 gene.[5][6][7] ... Goodman FR (2003). "Limb malformations and the human HOX genes". Am. J. Med. Genet. 112 (3): 256-65. doi:10.1002/ajmg.10776. ...
Bulkiest Human Sequence Packs Medical Arsenal DNA Protein Analysis Of Human Chromosome 6, Counts 166,880,988 Base Pairs, Covers ...
A specific pair of human chromosomes in group A (CHROMOSOMES, HUMAN, 1-3) of the human chromosome classification. ... Human, Pair 3" by people in Harvard Catalyst Profiles by year, and whether "Chromosomes, Human, Pair 3" was a major or minor ... "Chromosomes, Human, Pair 3" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicines controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH ( ... Below are the most recent publications written about "Chromosomes, Human, Pair 3" by people in Profiles. ...
The chapters are numbered for the pairs of human chromosomes, one pair being the X and Y sex chromosomes, so the numbering goes ... The book devotes one chapter to each pair of human chromosomes. Since one (unnumbered) chapter is required to discuss the sex ... the chapters matching the 23 pairs of human chromosomes, and notes that Genome is the third of Ridleys books that "tries to ... The impact of stress on the human body is described starting with the creation of hormones by the CYP17 gene on chromosome 10. ...
Chromosome Mapping. Chromosomes, Human, Pair 6 / genetics*. Female. Humans. Male. Pedigree. Grant Support. ... Previous Document: The chromosome 6 sequencing project at the Sanger Centre.. Next Document: Isolation and characterisation of ... 7702208 - A genetic and physical map of bovine chromosome 3.. 2888718 - Isolation of a polymorphic genomic clone from ... 2035528 - Uniparental heterodisomy for chromosome 14 in a phenotypically abnormal familial balanc.... ...
Chromosome A chromosome is a structure that occurs within cells and that contains the cells genetic material. That genetic ... With 46 chromosomes, humans fall well within this average.. The 46 human chromosomes are arranged in 23 pairs. One pair of the ... chromosomes align in pairs. In a normal human karyotype, there are 22 pairs of autosomal chromosomes and two sex chromosomes (X ... chromosomes align in pairs. In a normal human karyotype, there are 22 pairs of autosomal chromosomes and two sex chromosomes (X ...
... is caused by expansion of an unstable CAG triplet repeat located on the short arm of chromosome 6. Precise mapping has shown a ... Chromosome Mapping. Chromosomes, Human, Pair 6*. Female. Haplotypes. Humans. Japan. Linkage Disequilibrium. Male. Pedigree. ... Spinocerebellar ataxia 1 (SCA1) is caused by expansion of an unstable CAG triplet repeat located on the short arm of chromosome ... 6. Precise mapping has shown a positional relationship to closely linked markers in the order of D6S109-D6S274-D6S288-SCA1- ...
Chromosome Deletion*. Chromosomes, Human, Pair 6*. Humans. In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence / methods. Leukemia, Lymphocytic ... Dual-color FISH was performed using a chromosome 6 centromere probe (CEP6) and a probe for 6q21 (RP11-91C23). The latter probe ...
Chromosome Mapping. Chromosomes, Human, Pair 2. Chromosomes, Human, Pair 6. Genetic Linkage*. Genome, Human. Humans. Huntington ... We discovered two novel loci on chromosome 2. Chromosome 2p25 (logarithm of the odds ratio (LOD)=4.29) and 2q35 (LOD=3.39) may ... A third linkage peak on chromosome 6q22 (LOD=2.48) may confirm the most promising locus from a previous genome scan. Two other ... 7182125 - Chromosome polymorphism in the rainbow trout (salmo gairdneri richardson).. 4040175 - Isolation and characterization ...
We report 16 patients with the t(6;9), of whom 13 had AML, 2 had myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), and 1 had chronic myeloid leuk ... 6;9) (p22;q34) is a rare but defined subset with a poor prognosis. ... Chromosomes, Human, Pair 9*. Female. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation. Humans. Karyotyping. Leukemia, Myeloid / genetics ... Next Document: Three rearrangements of chromosome 5 in a patient with myelodysplastic syndrome: an atypical deletio.... ...
5. Students could work independently, in pairs, threes, or fours. You can provide a Information/Worksheet packet for each team ... 3. Encourage students to invert a chimp chromosome and place it next to the corresponding human chromosome, alining their ... Human Evolution Patterns. SEE "Chromosome Connections: Compelling Clues to Common Ancestry". Article by Larry Flammer published ... CHROMOSOME FUSION. This is a logical extension of any chromosome comparison lab. Students test the hypothesis that our ...
G-banding ideogram of human chromosome 1 in resolution 850 bphs. Band length in this diagram is proportional to base-pair ... Chromosome 1 is the designation for the largest human chromosome. Humans have two copies of chromosome 1, as they do with all ... See also: Category:Genes on human chromosome 1.. The following is a partial list of genes on human chromosome 1. For complete ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to Human chromosome 1.. *. National Institutes of Health. "Chromosome 1". Genetics Home ...
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 15 / ultrastructure. Chromosomes, Human, Pair 17 / ultrastructure. Chromosomes, Human, Pair 21 / ... Chromosomes, Human, Pair 3 / ultrastructure. Chromosomes, Human, Pair 7. Cytarabine / administration & dosage. Daunorubicin / ... Humans. Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute / drug therapy, etiology*, genetics. Leukemia, Promyelocytic, Acute / drug therapy*, genetics ... 6-Mercaptopurine / administration & dosage. Adult. Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating / administration & dosage, adverse effects ...
We report a case of ring chromosome 6 presenting with growth and mental retardation, cerebral dysgenesis, eye malformations, ... Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and microsatellite genotyping demonstrated segmental deletions of less than 6 Mb o … ... Chromosomes, Human, Pair 6 / genetics* * DNA-Binding Proteins / genetics* * Eye Abnormalities / genetics* ... FOXC1 Gene Deletion Is Associated With Eye Anomalies in Ring Chromosome 6 Am J Med Genet A. 2004 Jan 30;124A(3):280-7. doi: ...
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 6 * Cohort Studies * DNA-Binding Proteins / genetics* * DNA-Binding Proteins / metabolism ...
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 6 * Cloning, Molecular * Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p21 * Cyclins / physiology* ... Introduction of WAF1 cDNA suppressed the growth of human brain, lung, and colon tumor cells in culture. Using a yeast enhancer ... The WAF1 gene was localized to chromosome 6p21.2, and its sequence, structure, and activation by p53 was conserved in rodents. ... whose induction was associated with wild-type but not mutant p53 gene expression in a human brain tumor cell line. ...
In each human cell, the DNA is packaged in 23 pairs of chromosomes. In some WM cells, a piece of a chromosome is missing. This ... a piece of one chromosome becomes attached to a different chromosome. Chromosome changes like these can cause oncogenes to be ... The most common chromosome defect seen in WM is a deletion of part of chromosome 6. Its not clear exactly which genes this ... Another type of chromosome defect in WM is called a translocation. In a translocation, ...
Humans normally have 46 chromosomes in each cell, divided into 23 pairs. Two copies of chromosome 6, one copy inherited from ... Breakthrough chromosome imaging could aid in development of new treatments Chromosomes, each containing hundreds or thousands ... Chromosome 6 likely contains between 1,100 and 1,600 genes.. Genes on chromosome 6 are among the estimated 20,000 to 25,000 ... Chromosome scanner that protects against cancer identified In a new study, researchers from the University of Copenhagen have ...
... human organ systems, botany, zoology and other topics ... There are 23 pairs of chromosomes in each human cell.. 6. The ... 5. The number of chromosomes in a human cell is _______.. 2 4 23 46. Answer: Answer: 46. ... During the anaphase, longitudinal splitting of the chromosomes occurs.. 14. The interphase and mitosis together constitute the ... The nuclear membrane is formed around the newly-formed sets of daughter chromosomes during the telophase.. True. False Answer: ...
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 13 - genetics Chromosomes, Human, Pair 9 - genetics Genes, Recessive Genetic Linkage Humans Phenotype ... Chromosomes, Human, Pair 11 - genetics Chromosomes, Human, Pair 9 - genetics Female Finland Genetic markers Genetic ... Chromosomes, Human, Pair 9 - genetics Cohort Studies DNA Mutational Analysis De Lange Syndrome - genetics Female Humans Male ... Chromosome Mapping Chromosomes, Human, Pair 9 - genetics Comorbidity Genetic Linkage Genetic markers Genetic Predisposition to ...
DNA is wrapped together to form chromosomes. Most cells have 23 pairs of chromosomes, for a total of 46. ... Genes are sections or segments of DNA carried on chromosomes that determine specific human characteristics (like height and ... The launch of precision medicine came when the international Human Genome Project successfully sequenced the human genome - " ... Sequencing means figuring out the exact order of base pairs in a segment of DNA. Bases are the "building blocks" of DNA that ...
1a ) were evaluated in LD-PCR using human-rodent monochromosomal DNA. A 10-kb band can be detected only on chromosome 7 as ... b) Evaluation of the U6198-L6186 primer pair on DNA extracted from human-rodent monochromosomal cell lines. M, molecular mass; ... Conservation of the ERVWE1 locus in the human population. (a) Schematic representation of the human ERVWE1 locus including ... Other cell lines were as follows: LC5, human lung fibroblasts; HeLa, human epithelioid carcinoma cells (ATCC CCL2); TELCeB6 ...
Chromosome. A chromosome is like a packet of coiled up DNA. Humans have 23 pairs of chromosomes. They are in the nucleus of ... It coils up tightly inside chromosomes. DNA is a double helix made from two strands which are joined together by pairs of bases ... Researchers found the part of a human chromosome that has the gene for making insulin. ... The insulin produced by genetic engineering is identical to human insulin which is an added advantage of this process. ...
... of the human genome. The finished sequence comprises 166,880,988 base pairs, representing the largest chromosome sequenced so ... The DNA sequence and analysis of human chromosome 6.. Mungall AJ, Palmer SA, Sims SK, Edwards CA, Ashurst JL, Wilming L, Jones ... Considering our results together with those previous reports that antibodies recognizing human CD101 modulate human T-cell and ... and sequence mining of the human orthologous region to generate an integrated map of the Idd10 region on mouse chromosome 3. We ...
Chromosome 5 is one of the 23 pairs of chromosomes in humans. People normally have two copies of this chromosome. Chromosome 5 ... A ring chromosome occurs when both ends of a broken chromosome are reunited. G-banding ideograms of human chromosome 5 "Human ... See also: Category:Genes on human chromosome 5. The following is a partial list of genes on human chromosome 5. For complete ... Chromosome 5 is the 5th largest human chromosome, yet has one of the lowest gene densities. This is partially explained by ...
The human leukocyte antigen lies on chromosome 6, with the exception of the gene for β2-microglobulin (which is located on ... See also: Category:Genes on human chromosome 6. The following is a partial list of genes on human chromosome 6. For complete ... The following are some of the genes located on p-arm (short arm) of human chromosome 6: ADTRP: encoding protein Androgen- ... October 2003). "The DNA sequence and analysis of human chromosome 6". Nature. 425 (6960): 805-11. doi:10.1038/nature02055. PMID ...
  • The XY sex-determination system is the sex-determination system found in humans , most other mammals , some insects ( Drosophila ), some snakes, and some plants ( Ginkgo ). (wikipedia.org)
  • There are differences in amino acid sequences: 8 in Homo sapiens, 6 in Mus musculus, 6 in Capra hircus, 10 in Bos taurus and 20 in Sus scrofa. (wikipedia.org)
  • Introduction of WAF1 cDNA suppressed the growth of human brain, lung, and colon tumor cells in culture. (nih.gov)
  • It represents about 8% of the total DNA in human cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • In some WM cells, a piece of a chromosome is missing. (cancer.org)
  • Scientists at Johns Hopkins say they have found that people born with abnormally short chromosome endcaps, or telomeres, have immune system cells that age and die prematurely. (news-medical.net)
  • Chromosomes, each containing hundreds or thousands of genes, act like a detailed instruction manual for how cells should develop and behave. (news-medical.net)
  • Most cells have 23 pairs of chromosomes, for a total of 46. (kidshealth.org)
  • Such a hypothesis was supported by the observations that an anti-Env-W polyclonal antibody was able to inhibit heterologous fusion between a BeWo cell line and COS reporter cells ( 4 ) and that anti-ERVWE1 antisens oligonucleotides were able to inhibit primary human trophoblast cell fusion and differentiation ( 8 ). (pnas.org)
  • Since the binding of DNA by histones interferes with this access, cells have evolved specific mechanism to destabilize nucleosomes in chromosome regions that must be transcribed. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Introduction All living organisms are composed of cells, each no wider than a human hair. (nap.edu)
  • G6PD deficiency is the lack of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (an enzyme present in red blood cells) in the blood, which can cause a type of anemia known as hemolytic anemia. (nyhq.org)
  • The movement is very obvious in the cells on the right side of this frame, which are actively pairing and synapsing their chromosomes, while the motion has slowed in the later-stage cells to the left, which have completed pairing and synapsis. (healthcanal.com)
  • A specific translocation involving chromosome 4 and chromosome 14 is commonly found in multiple myeloma, which is a cancer that starts in cells of the bone marrow. (nih.gov)
  • is still limited by the number of Each gamete has only one different types of cells we can chromosome from the original develop them into. (getrevising.co.uk)
  • One pair are the sex cells females are XX males are XY (the Y chromosome is shorter than the X). (getrevising.co.uk)
  • We have previously shown by chromosome transfer technique that chromosome 6 alters the phenotype of a variety of tumour cells and SV40 immortalized cells. (nih.gov)
  • Similar effects were also seen on cloning efficiency and anchorage-independent growth of cells expressing RNaseT2 (Figs 6 and 7). (nih.gov)
  • In a new study, however, scientists have demonstrated the movement of chromosomes within cells also may play a role in human traits and health. (phys.org)
  • For every gene to be expressed in human cells, the distant regions of the chromosome must come into contact. (phys.org)
  • The researchers hope to continue studying the dynamics of different types of chromosomes and exploring whether abnormal cells, like cancer cells , have different dynamics. (phys.org)
  • An image of the dividing cells is taken when the chromosomes are all visible, and the individual chromosomes are cut out of the picture and rearranged on a separate medium based on size. (wikibooks.org)
  • Human chorionic gonadotropin potentially affects pregnancy outcome in women with recurrent implantation failure by regulating the homing preference of regulatory T cells. (nih.gov)
  • MAC-1) subunit of the leukocyte integrin family forms a noncovalently associated heterodimeric structure with the CD18 (beta) subunit on the surface of human granulocytes and monocyte/macrophages, where it enables these myeloid cells to participate in a variety of adherence-related activities. (pnas.org)
  • TIGAR is a recently discovered enzyme that primarily functions as a regulator of glucose breakdown in human cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Where needed, I'm using human cells for dicussion. (biology-online.org)
  • the spermatogonia divide to form sperm cells, and 23 of your 46 chromosomes are randomly selected to get into each sperm. (biology-online.org)
  • Following its purification from various sources including calf thymus, human placenta, and HeLa cells, its activity was implicated in DNA repair. (wikipedia.org)
  • The list of organisms by chromosome count describes ploidy or numbers of chromosomes in the cells of various plants, animals, protists, and other living organisms. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chromosome 2 is the second-largest human chromosome, spanning more than 242 million base pairs (the building material of DNA) and representing almost 8% of the total DNA in human cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • The paired box gene 4 is involved in pancreatic islet development and mouse studies have demonstrated a role for this gene in differentiation of insulin-producing beta cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • With the insertion of a YAC into yeast cells, they can be propagated as linear artificial chromosomes, cloning the inserted regions of DNA in the process. (wikipedia.org)
  • A lung cancer study also showed that MGC50722 was expressed in CD4+ T-Cells of normal human tissue samples. (wikipedia.org)
  • Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and microsatellite genotyping demonstrated segmental deletions of less than 6 Mb on 6p and 1-2 Mb on 6q. (nih.gov)
  • A systematic fluorescence in situ hybridization comparison of macaque and human synteny organization disclosed five additional macaque evolutionary new centromeres (ENCs) for a total of nine ENCs. (sciencemag.org)
  • Sequenced distant orthologs of human PTCHD4 have been found as far back in evolution as mold, which shows a conservation of 16% identity. (wikipedia.org)
  • PSORT II also predicted two possible vacuolar signaling motifs-KLPK and TLPK-in humans that were also conserved in close orthologs such as vertebrates and amphibians, but not in distant orthologs like insects or plants. (wikipedia.org)
  • The promoter is conserved in 12 of 12 orthologs and codes for 6 relevant transcripts. (wikipedia.org)
  • [6] An international collaborative effort finally succeeded in isolating CTNS by positional cloning in 1998. (wikipedia.org)
  • A bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) is a DNA construct, based on a functional fertility plasmid (or F-plasmid), used for transforming and cloning in bacteria, usually E. coli. (wikipedia.org)
  • The development and applications of the bacterial artificial chromosome cloning system" (PDF). (wikipedia.org)
  • This gene belong to the RAET1 family which consists of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-related genes located in a cluster on chromosome 6q24.2-q25.3. (bio-rad.com)
  • As a consequence, contractions of the D4Z4 region can lead to FSHD1, whereas mutations to SMCHD1 (chromosome 18) mutations causing hypomethylation of D4Z4 lead to FSHD2. (news-medical.net)
  • Encoded there as well are the mutations and variations that cause or increase susceptibility to many diseases responsible for much human suffering. (nap.edu)
  • Mutations in this gene have been associated with male infertility in humans. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mutations in the human gene may contribute to the condition of Klippel-Feil syndrome, which is the failure of the vertebrae to segment near the top of the spine and possibly further down with symptoms including a short, immovable neck and a low hairline on the back of the head. (wikipedia.org)
  • Of the remaining 6, 3 were synonymous and 3 non synonymous mutations. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mutations in human PHOX2B cause a rare disease of the visceral nervous system (dysautonomia): congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (associated with respiratory arrests during sleep and, occasionally, wakefulness), Hirschsprung's disease (partial agenesis of the enteric nervous system), ROHHAD, and tumours of the sympathetic ganglia. (wikipedia.org)