Chromosomal Position Effects: The effects on gene expression that depend on the location of a gene with respect to its neighboring genes and region of chromosome. Stable position effects are sequence dependent. Variegated position effects depend on whether the gene is located in or adjacent to HETEROCHROMATIN or EUCHROMATIN.Eye Color: Color of the iris.Chromosome Mapping: Any method used for determining the location of and relative distances between genes on a chromosome.Chromosomes: In a prokaryotic cell or in the nucleus of a eukaryotic cell, a structure consisting of or containing DNA which carries the genetic information essential to the cell. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)Transgenes: Genes that are introduced into an organism using GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUES.Aneuploidy: The chromosomal constitution of cells which deviate from the normal by the addition or subtraction of CHROMOSOMES, chromosome pairs, or chromosome fragments. In a normally diploid cell (DIPLOIDY) the loss of a chromosome pair is termed nullisomy (symbol: 2N-2), the loss of a single chromosome is MONOSOMY (symbol: 2N-1), the addition of a chromosome pair is tetrasomy (symbol: 2N+2), the addition of a single chromosome is TRISOMY (symbol: 2N+1).Recombination, Genetic: Production of new arrangements of DNA by various mechanisms such as assortment and segregation, CROSSING OVER; GENE CONVERSION; GENETIC TRANSFORMATION; GENETIC CONJUGATION; GENETIC TRANSDUCTION; or mixed infection of viruses.X Chromosome: The female sex chromosome, being the differential sex chromosome carried by half the male gametes and all female gametes in human and other male-heterogametic species.Chromosome Banding: Staining of bands, or chromosome segments, allowing the precise identification of individual chromosomes or parts of chromosomes. Applications include the determination of chromosome rearrangements in malformation syndromes and cancer, the chemistry of chromosome segments, chromosome changes during evolution, and, in conjunction with cell hybridization studies, chromosome mapping.Chromosome Inversion: An aberration in which a chromosomal segment is deleted and reinserted in the same place but turned 180 degrees from its original orientation, so that the gene sequence for the segment is reversed with respect to that of the rest of the chromosome.Integrases: Recombinases that insert exogenous DNA into the host genome. Examples include proteins encoded by the POL GENE of RETROVIRIDAE and also by temperate BACTERIOPHAGES, the best known being BACTERIOPHAGE LAMBDA.Plants: Multicellular, eukaryotic life forms of kingdom Plantae (sensu lato), comprising the VIRIDIPLANTAE; RHODOPHYTA; and GLAUCOPHYTA; all of which acquired chloroplasts by direct endosymbiosis of CYANOBACTERIA. They are characterized by a mainly photosynthetic mode of nutrition; essentially unlimited growth at localized regions of cell divisions (MERISTEMS); cellulose within cells providing rigidity; the absence of organs of locomotion; absence of nervous and sensory systems; and an alternation of haploid and diploid generations.Mice, Transgenic: Laboratory mice that have been produced from a genetically manipulated EGG or EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.Triticum: A plant genus of the family POACEAE that is the source of EDIBLE GRAIN. A hybrid with rye (SECALE CEREALE) is called TRITICALE. The seed is ground into FLOUR and used to make BREAD, and is the source of WHEAT GERM AGGLUTININS.Molecular Biology: A discipline concerned with studying biological phenomena in terms of the chemical and physical interactions of molecules.Plants, Genetically Modified: PLANTS, or their progeny, whose GENOME has been altered by GENETIC ENGINEERING.Glucan 1,3-beta-Glucosidase: An exocellulase with specificity for 1,3-beta-D-glucasidic linkages. It catalyzes hydrolysis of beta-D-glucose units from the non-reducing ends of 1,3-beta-D-glucans, releasing GLUCOSE.Biological Science Disciplines: All of the divisions of the natural sciences dealing with the various aspects of the phenomena of life and vital processes. The concept includes anatomy and physiology, biochemistry and biophysics, and the biology of animals, plants, and microorganisms. It should be differentiated from BIOLOGY, one of its subdivisions, concerned specifically with the origin and life processes of living organisms.Foot Deformities, Congenital: Alterations or deviations from normal shape or size which result in a disfigurement of the foot occurring at or before birth.Translocation, Genetic: A type of chromosome aberration characterized by CHROMOSOME BREAKAGE and transfer of the broken-off portion to another location, often to a different chromosome.Limb Deformities, Congenital: Congenital structural deformities of the upper and lower extremities collectively or unspecified.Genes, Developmental: Genes that determine the fate of a cell or CELLS in a region of the embryo during EMBRYONIC DEVELOPMENT.Portraits as Topic: Graphic representations, especially of the face, of real persons, usually posed, living or dead. (From Thesaurus for Graphic Materials II, p540, 1995)Chromosomal Instability: An increased tendency to acquire CHROMOSOME ABERRATIONS when various processes involved in chromosome replication, repair, or segregation are dysfunctional.Drosophila melanogaster: A species of fruit fly much used in genetics because of the large size of its chromosomes.Drosophila Proteins: Proteins that originate from insect species belonging to the genus DROSOPHILA. The proteins from the most intensely studied species of Drosophila, DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER, are the subject of much interest in the area of MORPHOGENESIS and development.Drosophila: A genus of small, two-winged flies containing approximately 900 described species. These organisms are the most extensively studied of all genera from the standpoint of genetics and cytology.DNA-Directed DNA Polymerase: DNA-dependent DNA polymerases found in bacteria, animal and plant cells. During the replication process, these enzymes catalyze the addition of deoxyribonucleotide residues to the end of a DNA strand in the presence of DNA as template-primer. They also possess exonuclease activity and therefore function in DNA repair.DNA Replication: The process by which a DNA molecule is duplicated.Telomere: A terminal section of a chromosome which has a specialized structure and which is involved in chromosomal replication and stability. Its length is believed to be a few hundred base pairs.Telomere Homeostasis: Maintenance of TELOMERE length. During DNA REPLICATION, chromosome ends loose some of their telomere sequence (TELOMERE SHORTENING.) Various cellular mechanism are involved in repairing, extending, and recapping the telomere ends.Telomere Shortening: The loss of some TELOMERE sequence during DNA REPLICATION of the first several base pairs of a linear DNA molecule; or from DNA DAMAGE. Cells have various mechanisms to restore length (TELOMERE HOMEOSTASIS.) Telomere shortening is involved in the progression of CELL AGING.Telomerase: An essential ribonucleoprotein reverse transcriptase that adds telomeric DNA to the ends of eukaryotic CHROMOSOMES.Size Perception: The sensory interpretation of the dimensions of objects.Body Size: The physical measurements of a body.Telomere-Binding Proteins: Proteins that specifically bind to TELOMERES. Proteins in this class include those that perform functions such as telomere capping, telomere maintenance and telomere stabilization.Enhancer Elements, Genetic: Cis-acting DNA sequences which can increase transcription of genes. Enhancers can usually function in either orientation and at various distances from a promoter.Terminal Repeat Sequences: Nucleotide sequences repeated on both the 5' and 3' ends of a sequence under consideration. For example, the hallmarks of a transposon are that it is flanked by inverted repeats on each end and the inverted repeats are flanked by direct repeats. The Delta element of Ty retrotransposons and LTRs (long terminal repeats) are examples of this concept.HIV Long Terminal Repeat: Regulatory sequences important for viral replication that are located on each end of the HIV genome. The LTR includes the HIV ENHANCER, promoter, and other sequences. Specific regions in the LTR include the negative regulatory element (NRE), NF-kappa B binding sites , Sp1 binding sites, TATA BOX, and trans-acting responsive element (TAR). The binding of both cellular and viral proteins to these regions regulates HIV transcription.Retroelements: Elements that are transcribed into RNA, reverse-transcribed into DNA and then inserted into a new site in the genome. Long terminal repeats (LTRs) similar to those from retroviruses are contained in retrotransposons and retrovirus-like elements. Retroposons, such as LONG INTERSPERSED NUCLEOTIDE ELEMENTS and SHORT INTERSPERSED NUCLEOTIDE ELEMENTS do not contain LTRs.Repetitive Sequences, Nucleic Acid: Sequences of DNA or RNA that occur in multiple copies. There are several types: INTERSPERSED REPETITIVE SEQUENCES are copies of transposable elements (DNA TRANSPOSABLE ELEMENTS or RETROELEMENTS) dispersed throughout the genome. TERMINAL REPEAT SEQUENCES flank both ends of another sequence, for example, the long terminal repeats (LTRs) on RETROVIRUSES. Variations may be direct repeats, those occurring in the same direction, or inverted repeats, those opposite to each other in direction. TANDEM REPEAT SEQUENCES are copies which lie adjacent to each other, direct or inverted (INVERTED REPEAT SEQUENCES).Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.PubMed: A bibliographic database that includes MEDLINE as its primary subset. It is produced by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), part of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. PubMed, which is searchable through NLM's Web site, also includes access to additional citations to selected life sciences journals not in MEDLINE, and links to other resources such as the full-text of articles at participating publishers' Web sites, NCBI's molecular biology databases, and PubMed Central.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.BooksPublishing: "The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.MEDLINE: The premier bibliographic database of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. MEDLINE® (MEDLARS Online) is the primary subset of PUBMED and can be searched on NLM's Web site in PubMed or the NLM Gateway. MEDLINE references are indexed with MEDICAL SUBJECT HEADINGS (MeSH).Serial Publications: Publications in any medium issued in successive parts bearing numerical or chronological designations and intended to be continued indefinitely. (ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983, p203)Awards and PrizesCanada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Ontario: A province of Canada lying between the provinces of Manitoba and Quebec. Its capital is Toronto. It takes its name from Lake Ontario which is said to represent the Iroquois oniatariio, beautiful lake. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p892 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p391)Genomics: The systematic study of the complete DNA sequences (GENOME) of organisms.Chromosome Segregation: The orderly segregation of CHROMOSOMES during MEIOSIS or MITOSIS.

Role for perinuclear chromosome tethering in maintenance of genome stability. (1/41)

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Stwl modifies chromatin compaction and is required to maintain DNA integrity in the presence of perturbed DNA replication. (2/41)

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Telomeric position effect--a third silencing mechanism in eukaryotes. (3/41)

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Corepressive action of CBP on androgen receptor transactivation in pericentric heterochromatin in a Drosophila experimental model system. (4/41)

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Linker histone H1 is essential for Drosophila development, the establishment of pericentric heterochromatin, and a normal polytene chromosome structure. (5/41)

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The sea urchin sns5 insulator protects retroviral vectors from chromosomal position effects by maintaining active chromatin structure. (6/41)

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Developmentally regulated MAPK pathways modulate heterochromatin in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. (7/41)

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Drosophila mini-white model system: new insights into positive position effects and the role of transcriptional terminators and gypsy insulator in transgene shielding. (8/41)

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*Biodiversity

Wahl, GM; Robert de Saint Vincent B; Derose, ML (1984). "Effect of chromosomal position on amplification of transfected genes ... Effect of diversity on flood regulation (In a survey of the literature, the investigators could not find any studies) Effect of ... doi:10.1111/j.1461-0248.2004.00671.x. Allen A. P.; Gillooly J. F.; Savage V. M.; Brown J. H. (2006). "Kinetic effects of ... 2001). "Effects of sampling standardization on estimates of Phanerozoic marine diversification". Proceedings of the National ...

*Insulated neighborhood

Kellum, R; Schedl, P (8 March 1991). "A position-effect assay for boundaries of higher order chromosomal domains". Cell. 64 (5 ... element of the chicken beta-globin domain serves as an insulator in human erythroid cells and protects against position effect ... Chromosomal alterations such as translocations, deletions and tandem duplications intersecting with insulated neighborhood ... Geyer, PK; Corces, VG (October 1992). "DNA position-specific repression of transcription by a Drosophila zinc finger protein". ...

*Heterochromatin protein 1

"Mutation in a heterochromatin-specific chromosomal protein is associated with suppression of position-effect variegation in ... was originally discovered by Tharappel C James and Sarah Elgin in 1986 as a factor in the phenomenon known as position effect ... Epigenetics nucleosome Heterochromatin James TC, Elgin SC (November 1986). "Identification of a nonhistone chromosomal protein ... and chromosomal-context-dependent manner". Nature Genetics. 23 (4): 457-61. doi:10.1038/70579. PMID 10581035. Teif V.B.; Kepper ...

*Position effect

These phenotypes are often due to a chromosomal translocation such that the color gene is now close to a region of ... Position effect is the effect on the expression of a gene when its location in a chromosome is changed, often by translocation ... Position effects on gene expression in two different eucaryotic organisms". Molecular biology of the cell (4th ed.). New York: ... Position effect is also used to describe the variation of expression exhibited by identical transgenes that insert into ...

*Microevolution

... they occupy consistent chromosomal positions, they may be polygenic or based on few genes, they may display additive, dominant ... The effect of genetic drift is larger in small populations, and smaller in large populations. Vigorous debates wage among ... Due to the damaging effects that mutations can have on cells, organisms have evolved mechanisms such as DNA repair to remove ... In organisms that use chromosomal crossover to exchange DNA and recombine genes, errors in alignment during meiosis can also ...

*RASGRP1

... mouse and human cDNA sequences and chromosomal positions". Mamm Genome. 10 (4): 358-61. doi:10.1007/s003359901001. PMID ... The drug was able to reverse certain effects of the mutation RASGRP1. GRCh38: Ensembl release 89: ENSG00000172575 - Ensembl, ...

*Hally Jolivette Sax

She often collaborated with Karl on chromosomal studies, especially those related to the effects of radiation and chemicals on ... She worked for a year for the U.S. Department of Agriculture (1914-15) before taking up a position as an instructor of botany ... Radiomimetic effects on Veratrum (1968, with Karl Sax and Wayne Binns) Effects of sonic energy on chromosomes (1970, with Karl ... 1884 - March 20, 1979), was an American botanist known for her work on the chromosomal structure of plant species and how it is ...

*SIM2

Meng, X; Shi, J; Peng, B; Zou, X; Zhang, C. "Effect of mouse Sim2 gene on the cell cycle of PC12 cell". Cell Biology ... SIM2 maps within the so-called Down syndrome chromosomal region, specifically on the q arm of chromosome 21, band 22.2. Based ... on the mapping position, its potential function as transcriptional repressor and similarity to Drosophila sim, it is proposed ... When the SIM2 gene is tranfected into PC12 cells, it effects the normal cycle of cell maturation. SIM2 inhibits the expression ...

*Position-effect variegation

Six second chromosomal mus mutations were isolated with wm4. A copy of wild-type white gene was placed adjascent to ... PEV is a position effect because the change in position of a gene from its original position to somewhere near a ... "position-effect"". Tartof, Kenneth D.; Hobbs, Cheryl; Jones, Marilyn (1984-07-01). "A structural basis for variegating position ... Position-effect variegation (PEV) is a variegation caused by the silencing of a gene in some cells through its abnormal ...

*BESS domain

Reuter G, Giarre M, Farah J, Gausz J, Spierer A, Spierer P (March 1990). "Dependence of position-effect variegation in ... Zhao K, Hart CM, Laemmli UK (June 1995). "Visualization of chromosomal domains with boundary element-associated factor BEAF-32 ... the phantom of the modifier of position-effect variegation Su(var)3-7". Int. J. Dev. Biol. 46 (1): 167-71. PMID 11902679. This ...

*Sarah Elgin

Wallrath, LL; Elgin, SCR (1995-05-15). "Position effect variegation in Drosophila is associated with an altered chromatin ... Silver, L M; Elgin, S C (February 1976). "A method for determination of the in situ distribution of chromosomal proteins". Proc ... this phenomenon is known as Position-effect variegation. Nuclease digestion assays have confirmed that the eye phenotypes are ... She continued to isolate and characterize nonhistone chromosomal proteins but started studying Drosophila. After her postdoc, ...

*Intragenomic conflict

Green-beard effect Gardner, Andy; Úbeda, Francisco (2017-11-06). "The meaning of intragenomic conflict". Nature Ecology & ... Transposons are autonomous replicating genes that encode the ability to move to new positions in the genome and therefore ... The best-studied examples include the neocentromeres (knobs) of maize, as well as several chromosomal rearrangements in mammals ... R. W. Beeman; K. S. Friesen; R. E. Denell (1992). "Maternal-effect selfish genes in flour beetles" (PDF). Science. 256 (5053): ...

*Apical ectodermal ridge

The Hox genes are "physically linked in four chromosomal clusters (Hoxa, Hoxb, Hoxc, Hoxd), and their physical position on the ... This means that although Shh signaling is required, its effects change over time as the mesoderm is primed to respond to it ... The position of the limb bud, and hence the AER, is specified by the expression boundaries of Hox genes in the embryonic trunk ... At these positions, the induction of cell outgrowth is thought to be mediated by a positive feedback loop of fibroblast growth ...

*Limb bud

The Hox genes are "physically linked in four chromosomal clusters (Hoxa, Hoxb, Hoxc, Hoxd), and their physical position on the ... This means that although Shh signaling is required, its effects change over time as the mesoderm is primed to respond to it ... Within the limb bud, expression also varies as a function of the position along the anterior-posterior axis. Such is the case ... Though limbs emerge at different locations in different species, their position always correlates with the level of Hox gene ...

*RpoS

The position of the first site upstream of the major rpoS promoter corresponds to a "classical activator" similarly found in ... The regulatory effect in this case is RpoS down regulation of SCOT expression in response to oxidative stress in B. ... Transcription of rpoS in E. coli is mainly regulated by the chromosomal rpoSp promoter. rpoSp promotes transcription of rpoS ... the lac promoter thereby suggesting that its effects on transcription are activating (Lange and Hengge-Aronis, 1994); in ...

*Z-DNA

The toxic effect of ethidium bromide on trypanosomas is caused by shift of their kinetoplastid DNA to Z-form. The shift is ... In mammalian cells, the presence of such sequences was found to produce large genomic fragment deletions due to chromosomal ... Because of this property, Z-DNA is hypothesized to code for nucleosome positioning. Since the placement of nucleosomes ...

*INPP1

This enzyme removes the phosphate group at position 1 of the inositol ring from the polyphosphates inositol 1,4-bisphosphate ... Male and female animals underwent a standardized phenotypic screen to determine the effects of deletion. Twenty four tests were ... and chromosomal localization of human inositol polyphosphate 1-phosphatase". Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 90 (12): 5833-7. doi: ...

*Advanced maternal age

... and that the children have chromosomal abnormalities. The corresponding paternal age effect is less pronounced. In present ... On the other hand, advanced maternal age is associated with a more stable family environment, higher socio-economic position, ... Down syndrome is the most common chromosomal birth defect, and a woman's risk of having a baby with Down syndrome is: At age 20 ... The variability in definitions is in part explained by the effects of increasing age occurring as a continuum rather than as a ...

*MYH9

Ford HL, Silver DL, Kachar B, Sellers JR, Zain SB (December 1997). "Effect of Mts1 on the structure and activity of nonmuscle ... chromosomal localization, and upregulation during myeloid differentiation". Blood. 78 (7): 1826-33. PMID 1912569. Saez CG, ... "Large tidal volume ventilation improves pulmonary gas exchange during lower abdominal surgery in Trendelenburg's position". ... Moos C, Feng IN (October 1980). "Effect of C-protein on actomyosin ATPase". Biochimica et Biophysica Acta. 632 (2): 141-9. doi: ...

*Microbeam

Experiments performed at microbeam facilities have since shown the existence of a bystander effect. A bystander effect is any ... Cell positioning must have high spatial resolution and reproducibility in order that the ion beam hit the target with a high ... Many biological endpoints have been studied including oncogenic transformation, apoptosis, mutations, and chromosomal ... it is necessary to be able to extrapolate from the effects of multiple traversals to the effects of single traversals of a ...

*SALL1

... detection of a SALL1 mutation hot spot and evidence for a position effect in one patient". Human Mutation. 14 (5): 377-86. doi: ... Buck A, Archangelo L, Dixkens C, Kohlhase J (2000). "Molecular cloning, chromosomal localization, and expression of the murine ... "Detection of heterozygous SALL1 deletions by quantitative real time PCR proves the contribution of a SALL1 dosage effect in the ...

*Deleted in Colorectal Cancer

DCC would fall into the chromosomal instability category. The chromosomal region of 18q has shown consistent LOH for nearly ... In a cancer state, the absence of DCC prevents the gradient from having an effect on the cell, making it more likely to ... into the mechanisms of DCC signaling and in-vitro studies of DCC modifications have solidified DCC's tumour suppressor position ... As the 18q chromosomal deletions were never resolved to be related solely to another gene, DCC was rapidly reaccepted as a ...

*Leonidas D. Marinelli

Indeed, it was in the Manhattan District that modern day radiation protection effects, born in the early days of x-ray and ... A detector, usually a glass GM tube designed for gamma counting, was positioned in the central tube while the beaker was filled ... in 1942 with the production of chromosomal breaks in plant cells and with the theory of time distribution of radiation ... In 1948 he moved to the Argonne National Laboratory, with a position on the University of Chicago faculty. Here, with John Rose ...

*Chromatin bridge

This effect is created when sticky ends of chromosomes remain connected to one another, even after mitosis. A chromatin bridge ... This instability, defined as frequent changes in chromosomal structure and number, may be the basis of the development of ... Because microtubules maintain the positions of the chromosomes during mitosis, they appear to be densely pinched between the ... As a result, several forms of chromosomal aberrations occur, including, but not limited to, binucleated cells, multipolar ...

*Recombinant inbred strain

The precision with which these recombinations are mapped is a function of the number and position of the genotypes used to type ... the small number of strains only made it feasible to map quantitative traits with very large effects (quasi-Mendelian loci). ... the greater the power and resolution with which phenotypes can be mapped to chromosomal locations. The first set of eight ... For an RI strain to be useful for mapping purposes, the approximate position of recombinations along each chromosome need to be ...

*Senescence

... especially with a view to the possible genetically adverse effects of cloning. The successive shortening of the chromosomal ... High position in the food chain, intelligence and cooperativeness all reduce extrinsic mortality in species. Another ... Han J, Mistriotis P, Lei P, Wang D, Liu S, Zhao R, Andreadis S (Dec 2012). "Nanog Reverses the Effects of Organismal Aging on ... But, because many more individuals are alive at young ages than at old ages, even small positive effects early can be strongly ...
Deleteriousness scores show different position effects among TSS classes.BCS values are plotted on the same region for rare (black line), mid1 (red line), mid2
Nuclear topology, in particular, the 3D landscape of the genome within the nucleus, has come into focus as a regulator of genome activity [1] with heterochromatin as a key player [2-4]. First evidence that heterochromatin might be a silencing compartment was provided by Muellers position effect variegation (PEV) experiments in 1930 [5], demonstrating that rearrangement of genes near the heterochromatin in Drosophila causes gene silencing. Position effect variegation affects genes on the same chromosome (cis) as well as genes on different chromosomes (trans) [6]. Moreover, the effects of heterochromatin on gene activity were suggested in, e.g., mouse [7-9], Drosophila melanogaster [10], Caenorhabditis elegans [11], Saccharomyces cerevisiae [12] Schizosaccharomyces pombe [13] and in Plasmodium falciparum [14], and seem to be an evolutionarily conserved feature [15, 16].. Heterochromatin can be found in essentially all eukaryotes, but its distribution and composition differ from species to ...
Geneticists use maps to describe the location of a particular gene on a chromosome. One type of map uses the cytogenetic location to describe a genes position. The cytogenetic location is based on a distinctive pattern of bands created when chromosomes are stained with certain chemicals. Another type of map uses the molecular location, a…
热塑性管道系统 埋地无压污水用接头 通过估计密封压力对热塑弹性塑料(TPE)密封接头的长时间密封性能的 ...
Nucleic Acids Res. 2013 Feb 1;41(3):1406-15. doi: 10.1093/nar/gks1286. Epub 2012 Dec 14. Evaluation Studies; Research Support, Non-U.S. Govt
PubMed comprises more than 30 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.
Heterochromatin, Drosophila, Drosophila Melanogaster, Chromatin, Gene, Chromosome, Genome, Histone, Proteins, Chromosomes, Maintenance, Methylation, Mutations, Position Effect Variegation, Egg, Lysine, Plays, Role, Chromosome 4, Euchromatin
Transcription steps are marked by different modifications of the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII). Phosphorylation of Ser5 and Ser7 by cyclin-dependent kinase 7 (CDK7) as part of TFIIH marks initiation, whereas phosphorylation of Ser2 by CDK9 marks elongation. These processes are thought to take place in localized transcription foci in the nucleus, known as transcription factories, but it has been argued that the observed clusters/foci are mere fixation or labeling artifacts. We show that transcription factories exist in living cells as distinct foci by live-imaging fluorescently labeled CDK9, a kinase known to associate with active RNAPII. These foci were observed in different cell types derived from CDK9-mCherry knock-in mice. We show that these foci are very stable while highly dynamic in exchanging CDK9. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) coupled with deep sequencing (ChIP-seq) data show that the genome-wide binding sites of CDK9 and initiating RNAPII overlap on transcribed genes.
Friedreichs ataxia (FRDA) is caused by a GAA repeat expansion in the Frataxin gene causing its repression which resembles the archetypal epigenetic phenomenon of Position Effect Variegation and hence can be modulated by chromatin modifiers The investigators have now confirmed that a similar form of silencing occurs in cells from FRDA patients. Based on these findings histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors which can overcome such silencing have been identified. The investigators have extended this result by showing that the classical Class III HDAC inhibitor, nicotinamide, can relieve silencing in cells from patients. Nicotinamide is a vitamin and a registered drug and has been previously administered to humans with no significant ill effects.. In the interventional study, the investigators will perform pharmacodynamic studies on nicotinamide in humans with FRDA to investigate whether the investigators can upregulate Frataxin and if so, to determine an optimum dosing regimen. Nicotinamide will be ...
Friedreichs ataxia (FRDA) is caused by a GAA repeat expansion in the Frataxin gene causing its repression which resembles the archetypal epigenetic phenomenon of Position Effect Variegation and hence can be modulated by chromatin modifiers The investigators have now confirmed that a similar form of silencing occurs in cells from FRDA patients. Based on these findings histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors which can overcome such silencing have been identified. The investigators have extended this result by showing that the classical Class III HDAC inhibitor, nicotinamide, can relieve silencing in cells from patients. Nicotinamide is a vitamin and a registered drug and has been previously administered to humans with no significant ill effects.. In the interventional study, the investigators will perform pharmacodynamic studies on nicotinamide in humans with FRDA to investigate whether the investigators can upregulate Frataxin and if so, to determine an optimum dosing regimen. Nicotinamide will be ...
A new study investigating the three-dimensional human genome (the nucleome) in the context of time and gene expression revealed unimaginable complexity and precision. The authors of the research paper, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, wrote at the beginning of their report, The human genome is a beautiful example of a dynamical system in three dimensions.1 The results of their research spectacularly vindicated this opening statement.. Inside a cells nucleus, the human genome functions in three dimensions, with each different chromosome occupying specific regions and conformations according to its cell type. For example, the 3D structure of a liver-cell nucleus is different than that of a brain cell. In addition, genes that are co-regulated in the same type of cellular process are often brought together in specific locations inside the nucleus called transcription factories, even if on different chromosomes.2,3,4 These transcription factories make and process ...
The image shows the cellular organization of chromosomes in the nucleus; you can observe that in the interchromatin space there is a transcription factory (in the picture: RNA transcripts) ,while around this region there are more than one active locus( of different chromosomes).Then,since the chromosomes are so close ,could happen that a traslocation appear between these active loci ...
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Variegation is the appearance of differently coloured zones in the leaves, and sometimes the stems, of plants. Variegated leaves occur rarely in nature. Species with variegated individuals are sometimes found in the understory of tropical rainforests, and this habitat is the source of a number of variegated house plants. The term is also sometimes used to refer to colour zonation in flowers, minerals, and the skin, fur, feathers or scales of animals. Because the variegation is due to the presence of two kinds of plant tissue, propagating the plant must be by a vegetative method of propagation that preserves both types of tissue in relation to each other. Typically, stem cuttings, bud and stem grafting, and other propagation methods that results in growth from leaf axil buds will preserve variegation. Cuttings with complete variegation may be difficult if not impossible to propagate. Root cuttings will not usually preserve variegation, since the new stem tissue is derived from a particular tissue ...
The trait value measured by mRNA or proteins is always a product of single gene with a specific chromosomal location. Expression QTL are empirically divided into two classes cis and trans. We identify cis-QTL region in which eQTL region is mapped to approximate location of their gene-of-origin i.e when both eQTL and gene position overlap, the eQTL is considered to be cis-regulated. While trans eQTL region are those regions which are far from the location of their gene-of-origin i.e if the eQTL and gene location are non-overlapping, eQTL is considered to be trans-acting. Any eQTL identified can be either cis regulated or trans regulated. The polymorphism of the regulatory elements directly regulates the abudance of a gene transcript. The combination of whole genome-wide association studies with the measurement of global gene expression allows the systematic identification of eQTL. Xcelris has developed a pipeline where we simultaneously assay gene expression along with the genetic variation on a ...
To elucidate the physiological basis for variegation in im seedlings, we established an in vivo, nondestructive assay to quantify the extent of variegation as a function of developmental time (Figures 3 and 4). We showed that both the rate of development of the variegated phenotype as well as the overall extent of variegation in im seedlings were strongly dependent upon growth irradiance with no variegation detected at a growth irradiance of 50 μmol photons m−2 s−1 at 25°C and an 8-h photoperiod (Figures 3B and 4A). However, our results clearly indicate that the expression of the variegated phenotype cannot be explained as a simple irradiance effect since growth at the same low irradiance combined with low temperature (12°C) (Figures 3C, 4D, and 4H) resulted in a significant increase in variegation of im seedlings.. As a consequence, the development of variegation in im seedlings appears to be a complex interaction of irradiance and temperature. We show that the extent of variegation in ...
Yeast telomeric DNA is assembled into a nonnucleosomal chromatin structure known as the telosome, which is thought to influence the transcriptional repression of genes placed in its vicinity, a phenomenon called telomere position effect (TPE). The product of the RAP1 gene, Rap1p, is a component of the telosome. We show that the fraction of cells exhibiting TPE can be substantially reduced by expressing large amounts of a deletion derivative of Rap1p that is unable to bind DNA, called Rap1 delta BBp, or by introducing extra telomeres on a linear plasmid, presumably because both compete in trans with telomeric chromatin for factor(s) important for TPE. This reduction in TPE, observed in three different strains, was demonstrated for two different genes, each assayed at a different telomere. In contrast, the addition of internal tracts of telomeric DNA on a circular plasmid had very little effect on TPE. The product of the SIR3 gene, Sir3p, appears to be limiting for TPE. Overexpression of Sir3p ...
CHROMATIN structure can influence transcriptional activity by mediating the accessibility of regulatory factors and polymerase to the gene and surrounding DNA. Active genes have a more open or euchromatic structure, while inactive loci have a more condensed nucleosome arrangement that shares many features with constitutively heterochromatic regions of the genome. Constitutive heterochromatin can modify the structure and activity of a euchromatic gene when repositioned next to it by a chromosomal-break event. This change, called position-effect variegation (PEV), was first observed in Drosophila upon isolation of chromosomal a rearrangement that moved the white gene close to the pericentric heterochromatin of the X chromosome and gave a mosaic eye phenotype. Subsequent studies of PEV and related phenomena in other organisms have led to the view that the silencing is due to the progression of heterochromatin along the chromosome to inactivate genes on the same DNA molecule (in cis) (reviewed in ...
Damir Baranasic, Timo Oppermann, Miriam Cheaib, John Cullum, Helmut Schmidt, Martin Simon: Genomic Characterization of Variable Surface Antigens Reveals a Telomere Position Effect as a Prerequisite for RNA Interference-Mediated Silencing in Paramecium tetraurelia. mBio 10/2014; 5(6). Martin Simon, Helmut Plattner: Unicellular Eukaryotes as Models in Cell and Molecular Biology: Critical Appraisal of Their Past and Future Value.. International review of cell and molecular biology 01/2014; 309C:141-198.. Miriam Cheaib, Martin Simon: Dynamic chromatin remodelling of ciliate macronuclear DNA as determined by an optimized chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) method for Paramecium tetraurelia. Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology 02/2013.. Martin C Simon, Jürgen Kusch: Communicative functions of GPI-anchored surface proteins in unicellular eukaryotes. Critical Reviews in Microbiology 06/2012.. Alexandra Müller, Christine Klöppel, Megan Smith-Valentine, Judith Van Houten, Martin Simon: Selective ...
The X-IV translocation, [...], is shown to contain the wild-type allele, [...], at the white locus. This [...] has been replaced with a mutant gene, w, and a comparison of R([...])/w with R(w)/w[...] shows the former to give a variegated white phenotype while the latter is completely wild-type. It is concluded that the white variegation is due to an instability in the action of [...] when it is located in the rearranged chromosome ...
Produced while McClintock was a National Research Council fellow at the University of Missouri, this paper resulted from observations she made after receiving correspondence from researchers at Berkeley on the existence of unusual variegations in some plants. McClintock argued that variegations must have resulted from sister-strand exchanges after ring chromosomes formed early in plant development ...
Background: Hereditary canine glaucoma destroys vision in members of several dog breeds. In a previous study, the researchers collected DNA samples from large families of Basset Hounds and Bouvier des Flandres and smaller families of Dandie Dinmont Terriers and Welsh Terriers. Objective: The researchers are using these DNA samples and appropriate gene-mapping strategies to determine the chromosomal positions of the mutations responsible for glaucoma in Basset Hounds and Bouvier des Flandres. They will then use the available canine genome sequence to examine the genes that are located within these chromosomal positions to find the mutations responsible for glaucoma in these two breeds. Next they will devise DNA tests to validate the identified potential glaucoma-causing mutations; and, if the suspected mutations prove to be valid, they will immediately make the DNA tests available to breeders of Basset Hounds and Bouvier des Flandres. Finally, they will determine if the genes that contain the
It has recently been demonstrated that JIL-1 can interact directly with Su(var)3-9, and can potentially regulate the function of that protein by phosphorylating it at residue S191 (Boeke et al., 2010). However, phosphorylation of Su(var)3-9 by JIL-1 did not affect the enzymatic activity of Su(var)3-9 or its ability to repress transcription (Boeke et al., 2010) - furthermore, the direct protein-protein interaction is mediated by the C-terminus of JIL-1 (Boeke et al., 2010). As expression of the ΔCTD, which lacks this interaction domain, prevented heterochromatic spreading in a JIL-1 mutant background, it is unlikely that phosphorylation of Su(var)3-9 by JIL-1 is involved in regulating the role of Su(var)3-9 in PEV. However, an interesting possibility is that direct interactions between JIL-1 and Su(var)3-9 can contribute to other aspects of the JIL-1 null phenotype. For example, in genetic interaction assays monitoring the lethality as well as the polytene chromosome morphology defects ...
China Virgin TPR/TPE/TPV Granules/Pellets TPE Raw Material Virgin TPE Granules, Find details about China Tr Raw Material/TPR Granule for Shoes TPE Tr, TPE/TPR Granules from Virgin TPR/TPE/TPV Granules/Pellets TPE Raw Material Virgin TPE Granules - Lanzhou Qianmiaonuo Trading Co., Ltd.
Component of the gypsy chromatin insulator complex which is required for the function of the gypsy chromatin insulator and other endogenous chromatin insulators. Chromatin insulators are regulatory elements which establish independent domains of transcriptional activity within eukaryotic genomes. Insulators have two defining properties; they can block the communication between an enhancer and a promoter when placed between them and can also buffer transgenes from position effect variegation (PEV). Insulators are proposed to structure the chromatin fiber into independent domains of differing transcriptional potential by promoting the formation of distinct chromatin loops. This chromatin looping may involve the formation of insulator bodies, where homotypic interactions between individual subunits of the insulator complex could promote the clustering of widely spaced insulators at the nuclear periphery. Within the gypsy insulator complex, this protein may directly bind to insulator DNA at sites distinct
Silencing/ DNA methylation/Imprinting 1. Silencing mechanisms Sir2/ HP1/HP1 and DNA methylation budding yeast, fission yeast, mammals/plants 2. Insulators (boundary elements/ enhancer blocker Position effect variegation 3. DNA methylation de novo, maintenance , CpG islands functions methods of study 4. DNA demethylation plants mammals 4. Imprinting Silencing creates large domains of chromatin that are compacted and less accessible to DNA-binding proteins Silencers Silencing proteins Sir2 HP1 Polycomb group (PcG) proteins DNA Methylation noncoding RNAs Boundary elements S.c. S.p. A.th.D.m. Mamma Hypoacetyl. H3/H4 H3K9 me HP1 DNA methyl. - + + + + + - + + + +* + + + + - + - + Polycomb - - + + + Sir2 + + + + + * present but binds H3K27me notH3K9me Heterochromatin Condensed, deeply staining Regular nucleosome spacing; DNA mostly associated with histone core Gene poor Late replicating Localized at nuclear periphery Chromatin in silenced regions Tight nucleosome arrays (short linkers) Presence of ...
Regulation of gene expression by alterations in chromatin structure is a universal mechanism in eukaryotic cells, responsible for maintaining patterns of gene expression throughout the development of multicellular organisms (Orlando and Paro, 1995), for position effect variegation in flies (Henikoff, 1992) and for the variable expression of foreign genes integrated into mammalian chromosomes (Martin and Whitelaw, 1996). In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, gene repression at the silent mating type loci (HML and HMR) and the variegated expression of genes inserted near the poly(TG1-3) tracts at telomeres reflect a chromatin‐dependent silencing mechanism in which the accessibility of a chromosomal domain to DNA‐modifying enzymes is significantly reduced (reviewed in Thompson et al., 1993). This transcriptionally silent domain spreads inward from telomeres and is limited by the dosage of components required to form the silenced chromatin state, similar to the spread of centromeric ...
BACKGROUND Heterochromatin has been reported to be a major silencing compartment during development and differentiation. Prominent heterochromatin compartments are located at the nuclear periphery and inside the nucleus (e.g., pericentric heterochromatin). Whether the position of a gene in relation to some or all heterochromatin compartments matters remains a matter of debate, which we have addressed in this study. Answering this question demanded solving the technical challenges of 3D measurements and the large-scale morphological changes accompanying cellular differentiation. RESULTS Here, we investigated the proximity effects of the nuclear periphery and pericentric heterochromatin on gene expression and additionally considered the effect of neighboring genomic features on a genes nuclear position. Using a well-established myogenic in vitro differentiation system and a differentiation-independent heterochromatin remodeling system dependent on ectopic MeCP2 expression, we first identified ...
In this weeks press round up, we focus on a Kenyan who still bears the scars of the 2007/08 PEV - physical and otherwise - and why the impulse of distrust among PEV victims still persists in Kenya.
The TPE 2003 conference programme featured expert presentations on key market trends, new application developments and the very latest material innovations.
SUV39: The Su(var)3-9 gene was originally identified in a genetic screen as a suppressor of position effect variegation in Drosophila. This was the first hint that the Su(var)3-9 protein might be involved in regulating chromatin structure. In mice, there are two highly related homologues of the Drosophila Su(var)3-9, Suv39h1 and Suv39h2. Following the identification of Suv39h1 as a lysine methyltransferase capable of methylating Lys9 of histone H3 (H3K9), confirmation that this protein can modulate chromatin architecture came with the finding that it creates a specific binding site for the heterochromatin protein HP1. As Suv39h1 and HP1 interact, it is thought that Suv39h1 methylating H3 K9, and then HP1 binding to the methylated H3, forms a positive feedback loop allowing HP1 and H3 K9 methylation to spread along chromatin, generating repressive heterochromatin in the process. (1) Reference ...
Cell Sciences carries an extensive range of native proteins, recombinant proteins and synthetic proteins, as well as peptides, lysates and more.
Erasmus MC. Transcription Factors and Genomic Architecture. Recommended Readings. Empirical Articles. Ghamari, A., van de Corput, M. P., Thongjuea, S., van Cappellen, W. A., van IJcken, W., van Haren, J., … & Grosveld, F. G. (2013). In vivo live imaging of RNA polymerase II transcription factories in primary cells. Genes & Development, 27(7), 767-777. doi:10.1101/gad.216200.113. Mylona, A., Andrieu-Soler, C., Thongjuea, S., Martella, A., Soler, E., Jorna, R., … & Grosveld, F. (2013). Genome-wide analysis shows that Ldb1 controls essential hematopoietic genes/pathways in mouse early development and reveals novel players in hematopoiesis. Blood, 121(15), 2902-2913. doi:10.1182/blood-2012-11-467654. Nuez, B., Michalovich, D., Bygrave, A., Ploemacher, R., & Grosveld, F. (1995). Defective haematopoiesis in fetal liver resulting from inactivation of the EKLF gene. Nature, 375(6529), 316-318.. Soler, E., Andrieu-Soler, C., de Boer, E., Bryne, J. C., Thongjuea, S., Stadhouders, R., … & Grosveld, ...
The TPE 2003 conference programme featured expert presentations on key market trends, new application developments and the very latest material innovations.

There are different mechanisms through which chromosomal position effect - Free Catalogue of Papers for StudentsThere are different mechanisms through which chromosomal position effect - Free Catalogue of Papers for Students

There are different mechanisms through which chromosomal position effect. January 27, 2019 admin 0 Comment ... There are different mechanisms through which chromosomal position effect (CPE) can result in developing human abnormalities: ... A) Burkitts lymphoma t(8;14)(q24;q32) can be developed due to chromosomal translocations juxtaposing the c-myc gene on ... Pathogenesis associated with CPE can be found in various cancers, or constitutional pathologies, in which chromosomal ...
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Mutation in a heterochromatin-specific chromosomal protein is associated with suppression of position-effect variegation in...Mutation in a heterochromatin-specific chromosomal protein is associated with suppression of position-effect variegation in...

Mutation in a heterochromatin-specific chromosomal protein is associated with suppression of position-effect variegation in ... Mutation in a heterochromatin-specific chromosomal protein is associated with suppression of position-effect variegation in ... Mutation in a heterochromatin-specific chromosomal protein is associated with suppression of position-effect variegation in ... Mutation in a heterochromatin-specific chromosomal protein is associated with suppression of position-effect variegation in ...
more infohttps://www.pnas.org/content/87/24/9923?ijkey=b49950a661d984cf855ed86ece575ca185d7b00f&keytype2=tf_ipsecsha

Booktopia - New Comprehensive Biochemistry - Vol 38, Volume 38 by Makrides, 9780444513717. Buy this book online.Booktopia - New Comprehensive Biochemistry - Vol 38, Volume 38 by Makrides, 9780444513717. Buy this book online.

Chromatin insulators and position effects. p. 381. Introduction. p. 381. Chromosomal position effects. p. 382. ... Transcriptional hotspot targeting, chromosomal locus amplification and episomal expression strategies. p. 458. ...
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Relationship between effective lens position and axial position of a thick intraocular lens.Relationship between effective lens position and axial position of a thick intraocular lens.

... corneal power and effective lens position (ELP) on the distance between the ant... ... Chromosomal Position Effects. The effects on gene expression that depend on the location of a gene with respect to its ... Stable position effects are sequence dependent. Variegated position effects depend on whether the gene is located in or ... An interferon beta-1 subtype that has a methionine at position 1, a cysteine at position 17, and is glycosylated at position 80 ...
more infohttps://www.bioportfolio.com/resources/pmarticle/2070606/Relationship-between-effective-lens-position-and-axial-position-of-a-thick-intraocular.html

Embryonic Lethality and Tumorigenesis Caused by Segmental Aneuploidy on Mouse Chromosome 11 | GeneticsEmbryonic Lethality and Tumorigenesis Caused by Segmental Aneuploidy on Mouse Chromosome 11 | Genetics

1996 Somatic reversion of chromosomal position effects in Drosophila melanogaster. Genetics 144: 657-670. ... While there are several possible explanations for this, such as imprinting or position effects, the most likely explanation is ... FISH analysis of chromosomal rearrangements: To characterize some of the chromosomal rearrangements in more detail, we ... Generation of chromosomal deficiencies, inversions, and duplications: The strategy to generate the chromosomal rearrangements ...
more infohttp://www.genetics.org/content/150/3/1155

Altweb: Publications: Articles: Reducing Animal Research at the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical DefenseAltweb: Publications: Articles: Reducing Animal Research at the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense

Insulation of transgenes from chromosomal position effects. Transgenic Animals: Generation and Use (ed. L.M. Houdebine), pp. ... Thus, it might be possible to eliminate position effects by incorporating insulators, which are portions of DNA which act as ... This can be due to pleiotropic effects of the gene itself, or may result from epistatic effects -- interactions with endogenous ... a position effect) can also affect gene expression (49), especially if it is integrated close to endogenous DNA control regions ...
more infohttp://altweb.jhsph.edu/pubs/ecvam/ecvam28.html

Rare instances of Cre-mediated deletion product maintained in transgenic wheat, Plant Molecular Biology | 10.1023/A...Rare instances of Cre-mediated deletion product maintained in transgenic wheat, Plant Molecular Biology | 10.1023/A...

Somatic reversion of chromosomal position effects in Drosophila melanogaster Ahmad, K.; Golic, K. G. ... A repeated chromosomal DNA sequence is amplified as a circular extrachromosomal molecule in rice ... What is surprising is that the DNA is not degraded, but remains in the cells as an extra-chromosomal circular molecule. http:// ...
more infohttps://www.deepdyve.com/lp/springer_journal/rare-instances-of-cre-mediated-deletion-product-maintained-in-DG0YQtmDUg

Long-Range Repression by Multiple Polycomb Group (PcG) Proteins Targeted by Fusion to a Defined DNA-Binding Domain in...Long-Range Repression by Multiple Polycomb Group (PcG) Proteins Targeted by Fusion to a Defined DNA-Binding Domain in...

1993 The su(Hw) protein insulates expression of the Drosophila melanogaster white gene from chromosomal position-effects. EMBO ... In total, the effects of the three PcG proteins tethered at nearly 40 chromosomal sites within the Drosophila genome were ... To assess the effects of different genomic environments, reporter transposons integrated at nearly 40 chromosomal sites were ... Effects of tethered PcG proteins on basal white gene expression: Effects of targeted PcG proteins were first examined using ...
more infohttps://www.genetics.org/content/158/1/291?ijkey=ff0d08aec7e635f812ff10d5ada241a5d77d27ec&keytype2=tf_ipsecsha

SHFM1 locus limb malformation aetiology | Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological SciencesSHFM1 locus limb malformation aetiology | Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences

Their transcriptional regulation is thought to be under chromosomal position-effect controls. Many of these genes encode ... However, the mechanisms for controlling the expression of DLX gene by position effects, tissue-specific expression and the ... Nearly all studies have hypothesized a position-effect control to explain this paradox such that the genomic rearrangements ... have been explained by the position-effect dysregulation hypothesis, but the q11 breakpoint of the t(7q11.21;9p12) ...
more infohttp://rstb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/371/1710/20150415

In situ dissection of the Fab-7 region of the bithorax complex into a chromatin domain boundary and a Polycomb-response element...In situ dissection of the Fab-7 region of the bithorax complex into a chromatin domain boundary and a Polycomb-response element...

1991) A position-effect assay for boundaries of higher order chromosomal domains. Cell 64, 941-950. ... 1993) The su(Hw) protein insulates expression of the Drosophila melanogasterwhite gene from chromosomal position-effects. EMBO ... element of the chicken beta-globin domain serves as an insulator in human erythroid cells and protects against position effect ... 1995) Regulatory regions of the homeotic gene proboscipedia are sensitive to chromosomal pairing. Genetics 140, 643-658. ...
more infohttps://dev.biologists.org/content/124/9/1809?ijkey=6593cdcbe86071c6a3793571907e6aa48ba2700e&keytype2=tf_ipsecsha

Author: Russell, David W. - PubAg Search ResultsAuthor: 'Russell, David W.' - PubAg Search Results

The effects of chromosomal position and neighboring genomic elements on gene targeting in human cells remain largely unexplored ... To investigate this relationship, we utilized lipidomic and transcriptomic methods to evaluate the effect of diet and LDL ... A 300-kb chromosomal domain .... DOI:. 10.1073/pnas.1117032109. PubMed:. 22733778. PubMed Central:. PMC3396480. http://dx.doi. ... based proviral targets present at different chromosomal locations and containing mutations in the neomycin phosphotransferase ( ...
more infohttps://pubag.nal.usda.gov/?q=%22Russell%2C+David+W.%22&search_field=author&sort=date-desc

Histone Modification of Stress Responsive Regulatory Regions, a Bioinformatics StudyHistone Modification of Stress Responsive Regulatory Regions, a Bioinformatics Study

... protein insulates expression of the Drosophila melanogaster white gene from chromosomal position effects. Embo J 12 435 442. ... Karpen, G .H. (1994). Position effect variegation and the new biology of heterochromatin. Curr Opin Genet Dev 4 281 291. Kel, A ... reporter/marker genes located close to centromere, i.e. position effect variegation (PEV) (reviewed in (Girton and Johansen, ... Loss of function alleles of the JIL 1 histone H3S10 kinase enhance position effect variegation at pericentric sites in ...
more infohttp://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0046123/00001

The RGBarrier assay: the parallel study of gene regulatory element performance at defined chromosomal locations  - Enlighten:...The RGBarrier assay: the parallel study of gene regulatory element performance at defined chromosomal locations - Enlighten:...

Chromosomal silencing, insulator, chromatin barrier, barrier assay, chromosomal position effect, stable cell lines.. ... a phenomenon known as chromosomal position effect (CPE). It is not always feasible to target transgene integration to ... The defined chromosomal contexts of the RGBarrier assays will allow for detailed mechanistic studies of chromosomal silencing ... This assay can be scaled up to test tens of new putative barrier elements in the same chromosomal context in parallel. ...
more infohttp://theses.gla.ac.uk/7606/

Loss of Pol32 in Drosophila melanogaster causes chromosome instability and suppresses variegation<...Loss of Pol32 in Drosophila melanogaster causes chromosome instability and suppresses variegation<...

In addition we found that pol32 mutantssuppress position effect variegation, suggesting a role for Pol32 in chromatin ... In addition we found that pol32 mutantssuppress position effect variegation, suggesting a role for Pol32 in chromatin ... In addition we found that pol32 mutantssuppress position effect variegation, suggesting a role for Pol32 in chromatin ... In addition we found that pol32 mutantssuppress position effect variegation, suggesting a role for Pol32 in chromatin ...
more infohttps://moh-it.pure.elsevier.com/en/publications/loss-of-pol32-in-drosophila-melanogaster-causes-chromosome-instab

The Biotechnology BubbleThe Biotechnology Bubble

Wahl, G.M., de Saint Vincent, B.R. & DeRose, M.L. (1984). Effect of chromosomal position on amplification of transfected genes ... Devlen, R.H., Yesaki, T.Y., Donaldson, E.M. and Hew, C.L. (1995). Transmission and phenotypic effects of an antifreeze GH gene ... Hilbeck, A., Baumgartner, M., Fried, P.M. and Bigler, F. (1997). Effects of transgenic Bacillus thuringiensis-corn-fed prey on ... So, the same gene will have very different effects from individual to individual, because other genes are different. There is ...
more infohttp://www.i-sis.org.uk/bubble3.php

Ho and Tappeser ArticleHo and Tappeser Article

Wahl, G.M., de Saint Vincent, B.R. and DeRose, M.L. (1984). Effect of chromosomal position on amplification of transfected ... Transgressing species integrity results in unpredictable physiological effects. Transgenic vectors themselves can cause severe ... The insertion of foreign genes into the host genome has long been known to have many harmful and fatal effects including cancer ... 1. Toxic or allergenic effects due to transgene products or products from interactions with host genes. 2. Spread of transgenes ...
more infohttp://online.sfsu.edu/repstein/GEessays/Transgenic%20Transgression%20of%20Species%20integrity%20and%20Species%20Boundaries.htm

Table of Contents | Molecular and Cellular BiologyTable of Contents | Molecular and Cellular Biology

Expression of a foreign gene in a line of transgenic mice is modulated by a chromosomal position effect. R al-Shawi, J Kinnaird ...
more infohttps://mcb.asm.org/content/10/3

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Effect of chromosomal position on amplification of transfected genes in animal cells *Geoffrey M. Wahl ... Rights & permissionsfor article Effect of chromosomal position on amplification of transfected genes in animal cells . Opens in ...
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Fincham VJ[au] - PubMed - NCBIFincham VJ[au] - PubMed - NCBI

Transcription of Rous sarcoma proviruses in rat cells is determined by chromosomal position effects that fluctuate and can ... analysis of the formation and integration of viral DNA and the effects of conditional and nonconditional mutations in src. ...
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Biodiversity - WikipediaBiodiversity - Wikipedia

Wahl, GM; Robert de Saint Vincent B; Derose, ML (1984). "Effect of chromosomal position on amplification of transfected genes ... Effect of diversity on flood regulation (In a survey of the literature, the investigators could not find any studies) Effect of ... doi:10.1111/j.1461-0248.2004.00671.x. Allen A. P.; Gillooly J. F.; Savage V. M.; Brown J. H. (2006). "Kinetic effects of ... 2001). "Effects of sampling standardization on estimates of Phanerozoic marine diversification". Proceedings of the National ...
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School of Medicine - Fingerprint
     - Nazarbayev UniversitySchool of Medicine - Fingerprint - Nazarbayev University

Fingerprint The fingerprint is based on mining the text of the research documents related to the associated persons. Based on that an index of weighted terms is created, which defines the key subjects of research unit. ...
more infohttps://research.nu.edu.kz/en/organisations/school-of-medicine/fingerprints/

Pamela Geyer | Department of BiochemistryPamela Geyer | Department of Biochemistry

... protein insulates expression of the Drosophila melanogaster white gene from chromosomal position-effects. The EMBO journal, 12( ... Parnell, T. J., Grade, S. K., Geyer, P. K. & Wallrath, L. L. (2003). Position-effect variegation in human genetic disease. ... Scott, K. S., Geyer, P. K. (1995). Effects of the su(Hw) insulator protein on the expression of the divergently transcribed ... Geyer, P. K., Vitalini, M. W. & Wallrath, L. L. (2011). Nuclear organization: taking a position on gene expression. Current ...
more infohttps://medicine.uiowa.edu/biochemistry/node/1711

The Genetic Architecture of Maize Flowering Time | ScienceThe Genetic Architecture of Maize Flowering Time | Science

Heat map for DS QTL effects by chromosomal position and allele donor. Of the QTLs, 69% had both positive and negative effects ... the largest effect DS QTL allele had an additive effect of only 1.7 days (Fig. 2A), whereas the largest ASI effect was 0.4 days ... The dispersion of heritable effects across 50 to 100 of these small-effect QTLs may permit the adaptation to a wide range of ... We identified no individual QTLs at which allelic effects are determined by geographic origin or large effects for epistasis or ...
more infohttp://science.sciencemag.org/content/325/5941/714?ijkey=be3e2cb2e85d00ece054a792550e014e1f8e6e98&keytype2=tf_ipsecsha

Analysis of genetic mosaics in developing and adult Drosophila tissues | DevelopmentAnalysis of genetic mosaics in developing and adult Drosophila tissues | Development

1983) The effect of chromosomal position on the expression of the Drosophila xanthine dehydrogenase gene. Cell 34, 47-57. ... 1989) Effect on eye development of dominant mutations in Drosophila homologue of the EGF receptor. Nature 340, 150-153. ...
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In Vivo Performance of Genetically Encoded Indicators of Neural Activity in Flies | Journal of NeuroscienceIn Vivo Performance of Genetically Encoded Indicators of Neural Activity in Flies | Journal of Neuroscience

Spradling AC, Rubin GM (1983) The effect of chromosomal position on the expression of the Drosophila xanthine dehydrogenase ... Examples for the effect of background subtraction and bleach correction on the signal amplitudes are given in Figures 4 and 5. ... 3K), an effect also seen by Yu et al. (2003). An additional drawback was that Camg1-expressing NMJs were not visible because of ... 1B-D), presumably depending on the chromosomal location of the P-element (Spradling and Rubin, 1983). Most fly lines containing ...
more infohttps://www.jneurosci.org/content/25/19/4766?ijkey=6752188483640ca1b2fdd3c49161539537b912e5&keytype2=tf_ipsecsha
  • In many cases, somatic cells that suffer chromosomal damage that is deleterious to a cell may simply cause that cell to be lost from the organism and be replaced by cells from the same lineage with intact genomes. (genetics.org)
  • Understanding these mechanisms will be of paramount importance for the design of specific solutions for overcoming chromosomal silencing in specific transgenic applications. (gla.ac.uk)
  • Transgenic technology transgresses both species integrity and species boundaries, leading to unexpected, systemic effects on the physiology of the transgenic organisms produced as well as the balanced ecological relationships on which biodiversity depends. (sfsu.edu)
  • What is surprising is that the DNA is not degraded, but remains in the cells as an extra-chromosomal circular molecule. (deepdyve.com)
  • Conversely, biodiversity positively impacts human health in a number of ways, although a few negative effects are studied. (wikipedia.org)
  • These reporters constituted naive sensors of PcG effects, as bona fide PcG response elements (PREs) were absent from the constructs. (genetics.org)
  • ZnF-PcG proteins tethered as far as 3.0 kb away from the target promoter produced silencing, indicating that these effects were long range. (genetics.org)