A genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria occurring in soil and water. Its organisms are generally nonpathogenic, but some species do cause infections of mammals, including humans.
Infections caused by bacteria that show up as pink (negative) when treated by the gram-staining method.
Discarded electronic devices containing valuable and sometimes hazardous materials such as LEAD, NICKEL, CADMIUM, and MERCURY. (from http://www.epa.gov/osw/conserve/materials/ecycling/faq.htm#impact accessed 4/25/2010)
Cyclic esters of acylated BUTYRIC ACID containing four carbons in the ring.
A phenomenon where microorganisms communicate and coordinate their behavior by the accumulation of signaling molecules. A reaction occurs when a substance accumulates to a sufficient concentration. This is most commonly seen in bacteria.
One of the FURANS with a carbonyl thereby forming a cyclic lactone. It is an endogenous compound made from gamma-aminobutyrate and is the precursor of gamma-hydroxybutyrate. It is also used as a pharmacological agent and solvent.

Effective method for activity assay of lipase from Chromobacterium viscosum. (1/183)

A method was devised for activity assay of the lipase [triacylglycerol acyl-hydrolase, EC 3.1.1.3] excreted from Chromobacterium viscosum into the culture medium; olive oil emulsified with the aid of Adekatol 45-S-8 (a non-ionic detergent, the ethoxylate of linear sec-alcohols having chain lengths of 10--16 carbon atoms) was used as the substrate. This method was specifically effective for Chromobacterium lipase acitvity assay, and was approximately twice as sensitive as the conventional method, in which polyvinyl alcohol is used for the emulsification of the substrate.  (+info)

Two cases of Chromobacterium violaceum infection after injury in a subtropical region. (2/183)

Chromobacterium violaceum is a gram-negative rod and is isolated from soil and water in tropical and subtropical regions. The species have pigmented and nonpigmented colony types. Infections caused by nonpigmented strains are rare. We report on two cases of infection caused by both pigmented and nonpigmented strains of C. violaceum. Two 24-year-old Korea Airline stewardesses were admitted to Inha University Hospital, Inchon, South Korea, on 9 August 1997, 3 days after an airplane accident in Guam. Both had multiple lacerations on exposed parts of their bodies. There was swelling, tenderness, and pus discharge. The wounds contained many small fragments of stones and weeds. A pigmented strain was isolated from the left hand and a nonpigmented strain was isolated from the left knee of one patient. For the other patient only a nonpigmented strain was isolated from a foot wound. The nonpigmented colonies from the left-knee and the left-foot wounds did not produce any pigment even after an extended period of incubation. The biochemical characteristics were the same for each strain except for oxidase and indole reactions. The pigmented strain was oxidase negative and indole positive, whereas the nonpigmented strains were oxidase positive and indole negative. The patients were successfully treated by debridement and with appropriate antibiotics.  (+info)

Molecular dynamics of microbial lipases as determined from their intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence. (3/183)

We have studied the intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of the lipases from Chromobacterium viscosum (CVL), Pseudomonas species (PSL), and Rhizopus oryzae (ROL) in aqueous buffer, zwitterionic detergent micelles, and isopropanol-water mixtures. It was the purpose of this study to obtain information about biophysical properties of the respective enzymes under conditions that modulate enzyme activities and stereoselectivities to a significant extent. According to their decay-associated emission spectra, CVL tryptophans are located in the hydrophobic interior of the protein. In contrast, the PSL and ROL tryptophans are probably confined to the core and the surface of the lipase. From the tryptophan lifetime distributions it can be concluded that the conformation of CVL is not much affected by detergent or organic solvent (isopropanol). Accordingly, CVL is enzymatically active in these systems and most active in the presence of isopropanol. In contrast, ROL and PSL show high conformational mobility, depending on the solvent, because their lifetime distributions are very different in the presence and absence of detergent or isopropanol. Time-resolved anisotropy studies provided evidence that the lipases exhibit very high internal molecular flexibility. This peculiar feature of lipases is perhaps the key to the great differences in activity and stereoselectivity observed in different reaction media. Furthermore, information about self-association of the lipases in different solvents could be obtained. PSL, but not CVL and ROL, forms aggregates in water. Lipase aggregation can be reversed by the addition of detergent or isopropanol, which competes for the hydrophobic surface domains of this protein. This dissociation could efficiently contribute to the increase in lipase activity in the presence of a detergent or isopropanol.  (+info)

Cloning, molecular analysis, and expression of the polyhydroxyalkanoic acid synthase (phaC) gene from Chromobacterium violaceum. (4/183)

The polyhydroxyalkanoic acid synthase gene from Chromobacterium violaceum (phaC(Cv)) was cloned and characterized. A 6.3-kb BamHI fragment was found to contain both phaC(Cv) and the polyhydroxyalkanoic acid (PHA)-specific 3-ketothiolase (phaA(Cv)). Escherichia coli strains harboring this fragment produced significant levels of PHA synthase and 3-ketothiolase, as judged by their activities. While C. violaceum accumulated poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) or poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) when grown on a fatty acid carbon source, Klebsiella aerogenes and Ralstonia eutropha (formerly Alcaligenes eutrophus), harboring phaC(Cv), accumulated the above-mentioned polymers and, additionally, poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate) when even-chain-length fatty acids were utilized as the carbon source. This finding suggests that the metabolic environments of these organisms are sufficiently different to alter the product range of the C. violaceum PHA synthase. Neither recombinant E. coli nor recombinant Pseudomonas putida harboring phaC(Cv) accumulated significant levels of PHA. Sequence analysis of the phaC(Cv) product shows homology with several PHA synthases, most notably a 48% identity with that of Alcaligenes latus (GenBank accession no. AAD10274).  (+info)

Chromobacteriosis in a Chinese red panda (Ailurus fulgens styani). (5/183)

An adult Chinese red panda (Ailurus fulgens styani) transported by airplane from Florida to a North Dakota zoo died 1 week after arrival. Grossly, an interscapular abscess, subcutaneous inflammation, lymphadenitis, and pulmonary abscesses were observed. Microscopic findings included necrotizing inflammation in liver, lung, lymph node, and spleen. Chromobacterium violaceum was cultured from the interscapular abscess, liver, lung, and spleen and was injected into Swiss Webster mice. These mice died 18 hours postinoculation, and C. violaceum was cultured from liver, lung, and spleen. Chromobacterium violaceum is a sporadically reported but highly virulent pathogenic bacterium of both animals and humans typically found as a soil and water inhabitant of tropical and subtropical regions.  (+info)

Intrinsic conformation of lipid A is responsible for agonistic and antagonistic activity. (6/183)

Lipopolysaccharides (LPS, endotoxin) represent a major virulence factor of Gram-negative bacteria, which can cause septic shock in mammals, including man. The lipid anchor of LPS to the bacterial outer membrane, lipid A, exhibits a peculiar chemical structure, harbours the 'endotoxic principle' of LPS and is also responsible for the expression of pathophysiological effects. Chemically modified lipid A can be endotoxically inactive, but may express strong antagonistic activity against endotoxically active LPS. By applying orientation measurements with attenuated total reflectance (ATR) infrared spectroscopy on hydrated lipid A samples, we show here that these different biological activities are directly correlated to the intrinsic conformation of lipid A. Bisphosphoryl-hexaacyl lipid A molecules with an asymmetric (4/2) distribution of the acyl chains linked to the diglucosamine backbone have a large tilt angle (> 45 degrees ) of the diglucosamine backbone with respect to the membrane surface, a conical molecular shape (larger cross-section of the hydrophobic than the hydrophilic moiety), and are endotoxically highly active. Monophosphoryl hexaacyl lipid A has a smaller tilt angle, and the conical shape is less expressed in favour of a more cylindrical shape. This correlates with decreasing endotoxic activity. Penta- and tetraacyl lipid A or hexaacyl lipid A with a symmetric acyl chain distribution (3/3) have a small tilt angle (< 25 degrees ) and a cylindrical shape and are endotoxically inactive, but may be antagonistic.  (+info)

Chromobacterium violaceum infection in Brazil. A case report. (7/183)

We report the second case of infection with Chromobacterium violaceum that occurred in Brazil. A farm worker living in the State of Sao Paulo presented fever and severe abdominal pain for four days. At hospitalization the patient was in a toxemic state and had a distended and painful abdomen. Chest X-ray and abdominal ultrasound revealed bilateral pneumonia and hypoechoic areas in the liver. The patient developed failure of multiple organs and died a few hours later. Blood culture led to isolation of C. violaceum resistant to ampicillin and cephalosporins and sensitive to chloramphenicol, tetracyclin, aminoglicosydes, and ciprofloxacin. Autopsy revealed pulmonary microabscesses and multiple abscesses in the liver. The major features of this case are generally observed in infections by C. violaceum: rapid clinical course, multiple visceral abscesses, and high mortality. Because of the antimicrobial resistance profile of this Gram-negative bacillus, for appropriate empirical antibiotic therapy it is important to consider chromobacteriosis in the differential diagnosis of severe community infections in Brazil.  (+info)

Plants secrete substances that mimic bacterial N-acyl homoserine lactone signal activities and affect population density-dependent behaviors in associated bacteria. (8/183)

In gram-negative bacteria, many important changes in gene expression and behavior are regulated in a population density-dependent fashion by N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) signal molecules. Exudates from pea (Pisum sativum) seedlings were found to contain several separable activities that mimicked AHL signals in well-characterized bacterial reporter strains, stimulating AHL-regulated behaviors in some strains while inhibiting such behaviors in others. The chemical nature of the active mimic compounds is currently unknown, but all extracted differently into organic solvents than common bacterial AHLs. Various species of higher plants in addition to pea were found to secrete AHL mimic activities. The AHL signal-mimic compounds could prove to be important in determining the outcome of interactions between higher plants and a diversity of pathogenic, symbiotic, and saprophytic bacteria.  (+info)

'Chromobacterium' is a genus of gram-negative, aerobic or facultatively anaerobic bacteria that are commonly found in soil and water. The name "Chromobacterium" comes from the Greek words "chroma," meaning color, and "bakterion," meaning rod or staff. This refers to the fact that many species of this genus produce pigments that give them distinctive colors.

One of the most well-known species in this genus is Chromobacterium violaceum, which produces a characteristic violet-colored pigment called violacein. This bacterium can cause serious infections in humans, particularly in people with weakened immune systems. Other species in the genus include Chromobacterium aquaticum, Chromobacterium haemolyticum, and Chromobacterium piscinae, among others.

Chromobacterium species are known to be resistant to a variety of antibiotics, which can make them difficult to treat in clinical settings. They have also been studied for their potential industrial applications, such as the production of enzymes and other biomolecules with commercial value.

Gram-negative bacterial infections refer to illnesses or diseases caused by Gram-negative bacteria, which are a group of bacteria that do not retain crystal violet dye during the Gram staining procedure used in microbiology. This characteristic is due to the structure of their cell walls, which contain a thin layer of peptidoglycan and an outer membrane composed of lipopolysaccharides (LPS), proteins, and phospholipids.

The LPS component of the outer membrane is responsible for the endotoxic properties of Gram-negative bacteria, which can lead to severe inflammatory responses in the host. Common Gram-negative bacterial pathogens include Escherichia coli (E. coli), Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Proteus mirabilis, among others.

Gram-negative bacterial infections can cause a wide range of clinical syndromes, such as pneumonia, urinary tract infections, bloodstream infections, meningitis, and soft tissue infections. The severity of these infections can vary from mild to life-threatening, depending on the patient's immune status, the site of infection, and the virulence of the bacterial strain.

Effective antibiotic therapy is crucial for treating Gram-negative bacterial infections, but the increasing prevalence of multidrug-resistant strains has become a significant global health concern. Therefore, accurate diagnosis and appropriate antimicrobial stewardship are essential to ensure optimal patient outcomes and prevent further spread of resistance.

Electronic waste (e-waste) is not a medical term per se, but it is a term used to describe discarded electronic devices, such as computers, televisions, smartphones, and other electrical equipment that have reached the end of their useful life. These items are often disposed of in landfills or incinerated, which can lead to environmental pollution and health risks due to the hazardous substances they contain, including heavy metals like lead, mercury, and cadmium. Proper management and recycling of e-waste is essential to minimize these negative impacts.

Acyl-butyrolactones are a type of chemical compound that consists of a butyrolactone ring (a five-membered ring containing an oxygen atom and a carbonyl group) that has an acyl group (a functional group consisting of a carbon atom double-bonded to an oxygen atom and single-bonded to another functional group) attached to it.

Butyrolactones are lactones, which are cyclic esters derived from carboxylic acids. The addition of an acyl group to the butyrolactone ring results in the formation of acyl-butyrolactones. These compounds have a variety of uses in organic synthesis and may also be found in some natural sources.

It's worth noting that "acyl-butyrolactones" is a general term that can refer to any compound with this basic structure, and there may be many specific compounds that fall under this category. Therefore, it's important to consult a detailed chemical reference or speak with a chemist for more information on a specific acyl-butyrolactone compound.

Quorum sensing is a type of cell-cell communication that allows bacteria to detect and respond to changes in population density by producing, releasing, and responding to signaling molecules called autoinducers. This process enables the coordinated expression of certain genes related to various group behaviors such as biofilm formation, virulence factor production, and bioluminescence. The term "quorum sensing" was coined in 1994 by Bonnie L. Bassler and Susan Goldberg to describe this population-dependent gene regulation mechanism in bacteria.

4-Butyrolactone, also known as gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) or 1,4-butanolide, is a chemical compound with the formula C4H6O2. It is a colorless oily liquid that is used in various industrial and commercial applications, including as an intermediate in the production of other chemicals, as a solvent, and as a flavoring agent.

In the medical field, 4-butyrolactone has been studied for its potential use as a sleep aid and muscle relaxant. However, it is not currently approved by regulatory agencies such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for these uses. It is also known to have abuse potential and can cause intoxication, sedation, and other central nervous system effects when ingested or inhaled.

It's important to note that 4-butyrolactone is not a medication and should only be used under the supervision of a qualified healthcare professional for approved medical purposes.

... two of those are Chromobacterium violaceum and Chromobacterium subtsugae; the latter was discovered by scientists at the ... Chromobacterium is a genus of Gram-negative rod-shaped bacteria.: 279 Currently, eleven species within the genus are known, ... Parte, A.C. "Chromobacterium". LPSN. Blackburn, Michael B.; Farrar, Robert R.; Sparks, Michael E.; Kuhar, Daniel; Mowry, Joseph ... "Chromobacterium subtsugae sp. nov., a betaproteobacterium toxic to Colorado potato beetle and other insect pests". ...
... at the NCBI Taxonomy Browser Type strain of Chromobacterium violaceum at BacDive, the Bacterial ... 2012). "Chromobacterium violaceum: A rare bacterium isolated from a wound over the scalp". Int J Appl Basic Med Res. 2 (1): 70- ... Chromobacterium violaceum is a Gram-negative, facultative anaerobic, non-sporing coccobacillus. It is motile with the help of a ... Lee, J; Kim, JS; Nahm, CH; Choi, JW; Kim, J; Pai, SH; Moon, KH; Lee, K; Chong, Y (1999). "Two Cases of Chromobacterium ...
Further, Chromobacterium subtsugae and Burkholderia spp. showed a reduction of 29% and 24%, respectively. Differences in ...
Genet R, Benetti PH, Hammadi A, Menez A (1995). "L-tryptophan 2',3'-oxidase from Chromobacterium violaceum. Substrate ... oxidase from Chromobacterium violaceum". J. Biol. Chem. 269 (27): 18177-84. PMID 8027079. ...
2016). "Advances in Chromobacterium violaceum and properties of violacein-Its main secondary metabolite: A review". ... Lichstein HC, Van De Sand VF (1945). "Violacein, an Antibiotic Pigment Produced by Chromobacterium violaceum". Journal of ... Violacein is produced by several species of bacteria, including Chromobacterium violaceum, and gives these organisms their ... These include Chromobacterium, Duganella, Pseudoalteromonas, Janthinobacterium, Iodobacter, Rugamonas, and Massilia. Violacein ...
are known to produce violacein, a pigment also prouduced by Chromobacterium violaceum. This produces blue-purple pigmented ... "Genetic analysis of violacein biosynthesis by Chromobacterium violaceum". Genetics and Molecular Research. 3 (1): 85-91. ISSN ...
... is a macrolide antibiotic derived from Chromobacterium species. It is used as a pharmacological research compound ...
It is found in the bacteria Rhodopirellula baltica and Chromobacterium violaceum. It is also found in the following eukaryotes ...
... a Novel Antitumor Bicyclic Depsipeptide Produced by Chromobacterium Violaceum No. 968. III. Antitumor Activities on ...
... who isolated it in a culture of Chromobacterium violaceum from a soil sample obtained in Yamagata Prefecture. It was found to ... Romidepsin is a natural product obtained from the bacterium Chromobacterium violaceum, and works by blocking enzymes known as ... a novel antitumor bicyclic depsipeptide produced by Chromobacterium violaceum No. 968. I. Taxonomy, fermentation, isolation, ... a novel antitumor bicyclic depsipeptide produced by Chromobacterium violaceum No. 968. II. Structure determination". The ...
... a novel antitumor bicyclic depsipeptide produced by Chromobacterium violaceum No. 968. I. Taxonomy, fermentation, isolation, ...
It is a manufactured version of a chemical from the bacterium Chromobacterium violaceum. Nebulized forms of aztreonam are used ...
There, he isolated product SQ26.180 from Chromobacterium violaceum, a bacteria discovered at Pine Barrens. By modifying the ...
2003). "The complete genome sequence of Chromobacterium violaceum reveals remarkable and exploitable bacterial adaptability". ...
Chromobacterium violaceum and Pseudomonas fluorescens can both mobilize solid copper as a cyanide compound. The ericoid ...
In 1989, Chromobacterium marismortui was reclassified as Chromohalobacter marismortui forming a third genus in the family ... "Chromobacterium marismortui" in a new genus, Chromohalobacter gen. nov., as Chromohalobacter marismortui comb. nov., nom. rev ...
It was first isolated as a fermentation product from Chromobacterium violaceum by the Fujisawa Pharmaceutical Company. Etamycin ...
1980). "Reclassification of Chromobacterium iodinum (Davis) in a redefined genus Brevibacterium (Breed) as Brevibacterium ...
Ventosa, A., Gutierrez, M. C., Garcia, M. T. & Ruiz-Berraquero, F. (1989) Classification of Chromobacterium marismortui in a ... It was established by Ventosa and others in 1989, with the reclassification of Chromobacterium marismortui as Chromohalobacter ...
Bacteria of the genera Chromobacterium, Janthinobacterium, and Pseudoalteromonas produce a toxic secondary metabolite, ...
... and chromobacterium violaceum. Fungal infections may lead to chromoblastomycosis, blastomycosis, mucormycosis, and ...
At first, this organism was named Chromobacterium typhiflavuum because it closely resembled the bacteria that caused enteric ...
They are slowly decomposed by bacteria, including Chromobacterium violaceum, Cladosporium resinae, Bacillus submarinus, ...
They are slowly decomposed by microorganisms such as Chromobacterium violaceum, Cladosporium resinae, Bacillus submarinus, ...
For example, certain bacteria such as Chromobacterium violaceum and Pseudomonas aeruginosa can secrete toxin agents related to ...
Chromobacterium, Flavobacterium, Pseudomonas, and Achromobacter. They belong for the most part to the group of ...
"Biochemical and structural characterization of WlbA from Bordetella pertussis and Chromobacterium violaceum: enzymes required ...
Suitable species of bacteria (with their colours) include Bacillus subtilis (cream to brown), Chromobacterium violaceum (violet ...
... now Chromobacterium violaceum Bacterium amylovorum, now Erwinia amylovora Bacterium zopfii, now Kurthia zopfii Bacterium ...
Bacillus polymyxa Chromobacterium violaceum Clostridium beijerinckii Clostridium cellulolyticum Pseudomonas putida While this ...
... two of those are Chromobacterium violaceum and Chromobacterium subtsugae; the latter was discovered by scientists at the ... Chromobacterium is a genus of Gram-negative rod-shaped bacteria.: 279 Currently, eleven species within the genus are known, ... Parte, A.C. "Chromobacterium". LPSN. Blackburn, Michael B.; Farrar, Robert R.; Sparks, Michael E.; Kuhar, Daniel; Mowry, Joseph ... "Chromobacterium subtsugae sp. nov., a betaproteobacterium toxic to Colorado potato beetle and other insect pests". ...
Shao PL, Hsueh PR, Hang YC, Lu CY, Lee PY, Lee CH, Chromobacterium violaceum infection in children: a case of fatal septicemia ... Chromobacterium violaceum infection in Brazil: a case report. Rev Inst Med Trop Sao Paulo. 2000;42:111-3. DOIPubMedGoogle ... Chromobacterium violaceum as a cause of periorbital cellulitis. Pediatr Infect Dis. 1984;3:561-3. DOIPubMedGoogle Scholar ... Chromobacterium violaceum infection: a rare but frequently fatal disease. J Pediatr Surg. 2002;37:108-10. DOIPubMedGoogle ...
Insecticidal activity of Chromobacterium vaccinii (Peer Reviewed Journal) (22-Nov-17) The complete genome sequence of a third ... Chromobacterium sphagni sp. nov., an insecticidal bacterium isolated from Sphagnum bogs (Peer Reviewed Journal) (2-Jun-17) ...
Ecthyma gangrenosum and septic shock syndrome secondary to Chromobacterium violaceum. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2006 May. 54(5 Suppl ...
Quorum sensing and Chromobacterium violaceum: Exploitation of violacein production and inhibition for the detection of N-acyl ...
Quorum sensing and Chromobacterium violaceum: exploitation of violacein production and inhibition for the detection of N- ...
Misidentifications may include Burkholderia spp. (specifically B. cepacia and B. thailandensis), Chromobacterium violaceum, ...
... functionalized with an inducer molecule suppresses quorum sensing in Chromobacterium violaceum. Chemical Communications 2019, ...
specifically B. cepacia and B. thailandensis), Chromobacterium violaceum, Ochrobactrum anthropic, and, possibly, Pseudomonas ...
N. Doukyu, K. Shibata, H. Ogino and M. Sagermann, "Purification and Characterization of Chromobacterium sp. DS-1 Cholesterol ... and Expression of a Gene Encoding Chromobacterium sp. DS-1 Cholesterol Oxidase," Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology, Vol. ...
Chromobacterium haemolyticum Pneumonia Possibly Due to the Aspiration of Runoff Water. Ryuichi Takenaka, Shin-ichi Nureki, ... Here, we report a case of pneumonia possibly caused by the aspiration of runoff water containing Chromobacterium haemolyticum. ...
Proteins Derived from an Aedes Mosquito Midgut Chromobacterium Isolate Inhibit Dengue Virus and Zika Virus Infection In-Vitro ...
Action and function of Chromobacterium violaceum in health and disease: Violacein as a promising metabolite to counteract ...
specifically B. cepacia and B. thailandensis), Chromobacterium violaceum, Ochrobactrum anthropic, and, possibly, Pseudomonas ...
... esotropia why subterranean allosciurus swings beside their dithionous Chromobacterium. Gush ahead of an excesses pirolazamide, ...
Inhibition of quorum sensing in Chromobacterium violaceum by Syzygium cumini L. and Pimenta dioica L. Asian Pac J Trop Biomed ... Kothari V, Sharma S, Padia D. Recent research advances on Chromobacterium violaceum. Asian Pac J Trop Med 2017; 10(8): 744-52. ... Mu Y, Zeng H, Chen W. Okanin in Coreopsis tinctoria Nutt is a major quorum-sensing inhibitor against Chromobacterium violaceum ... Flavones as quorum sensing inhibitors identified by a newly optimized screening platform using Chromobacterium violaceum as ...
3 million for the improvement of the network established through the sequencing project ofChromobacterium violaceum , ... first study to mobilize the network of scientific cooperation that was formed was the mapping of the genome ofChromobacterium ...
Chromobacterium violaceum: a review of pharmacological and industiral perspectives. Crit Rev Microbiol. 2001;27(3):201-22. ... The natural synthesizer of aztreonam (Azactam), Chromobacterium violaceum, is a Gram-negative rod-shaped bacteria found in ... produced by the bacteria Chromobacterium violaceum).. The monobactams are neat because a) only one of them (aztreonam) has ...
Quorum sensing in chromobacterium violaceum: DNA recognition and gene regulation by the CviR receptor. Stauff, D. L. & Bassler ...
Chromobacterium subtsugae. s. 4. 1. Chromobacterium subtsugae. s. 4. 1. Bacillus thuringiensis. s. 4. 1. ...
A urinary tract infection (UTI) (also known as acute cystitis or bladder infection) is an infection that affects part of the urinary tract. When it affects the lower urinary tract it is known as a simple cystitis (a bladder infection) and when it affects the upper urinary tract it is known as pyelonephritis (a kidney infection). Symptoms from a lower urinary tract include painful urination and either frequent urination or urge to urinate (or both); while the symptoms of pyelonephritis include fever and flank pain in addition to the symptoms of a lower UTI. In some cases, a painful burning sensation in the urethra may be present even when not urinating. In the elderly and the very young, symptoms may be vague or non-specific. The main causal agent of both types is Escherichia coli, though other bacteria, viruses or fungi may rarely be the cause.. Urinary tract infections occur more commonly in women than men, with half of women having at least one infection at some point in their lives. ...
... and biofilm formation in Chromobacterium violaceum. BMC Microbiology, 21( 1), 1-14. doi:10.1186/s12866-021-02369-x ... and biofilm formation in Chromobacterium violaceum. BMC Microbiology, v. 21, n. 1, p. 1-14, 2021Tradução . . Disponível em: ... and biofilm formation in Chromobacterium violaceum [Internet]. BMC Microbiology. 2021 ; 21( 1): 1-14.[citado 2024 abr. 18 ] ... and biofilm formation in Chromobacterium violaceum [Internet]. BMC Microbiology. 2021 ; 21( 1): 1-14.[citado 2024 abr. 18 ] ...
Chromobacterium (7) * Apoptose (7) *Mostrar mais.... Tipo de estudo * Prognostic_studies (19) ...
Chromobacterium violaceum Infection in a Free-ranging Howler Monkey in Costa Rica. M Baldi, JA Morales, G Hern ndez, M Jim nez ...
Chromobacterium violaceum ATCC 12472 Site: position = -160. score = 29.14 sequence = CCGAGGAGCGCTGCG.... Gene: CV0965: ... Chromobacterium violaceum ATCC 12472 Gene: CV4301: S-adenosyl-L-methionine-dependent RNA binding methyltransferase ... Chromobacterium violaceum ATCC 12472 Gene: CV0966: 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (EC 1.5.1.20) ...
Chromobacterium violaceum); ZP_01088761 (Blastopirellula marina); BIOF_ERWHE (Erwinia herbicola); WP_008990014 (Galbibacter ...
Active Ingredients: Chromobacterium subtsugae strain PRAA4-1 30.0% Insecticide Mode of Action: Insecticide Class: EPA Signal ...
  • Chromobacterium violaceum , a saprophyte bacterium found commonly in soil and water in tropical and subtropical climates, is a rare cause of severe, often fatal, human disease. (cdc.gov)
  • Chromobacterium violaceum is an aerobic, gram-negative bacillus usually found as a saprophyte in soil and water in tropical and subtropical regions ( 1 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Colonies of Chromobacterium violaceum on a chocolate agar plate. (cdc.gov)
  • specifically B. cepacia and B. thailandensis ), Chromobacterium violaceum , Ochrobactrum anthropi , and often Pseudomonas spp. (cdc.gov)
  • Chromobacterium is a genus of Gram-negative rod-shaped bacteria. (wikipedia.org)
  • Case report and review of Chromobacterium sepsis--a gram-negative sepsis mimicking melioidosis. (nih.gov)