A hybrid separation technique combining both chromatographic and electrophoretic separation principles. While the method was invented to separate neutral species, it can also be applied to charged molecules such as small peptides.
A plant genus of the family APIACEAE. Members contain osthol.
A group of naturally occurring amines derived by enzymatic decarboxylation of the natural amino acids. Many have powerful physiological effects (e.g., histamine, serotonin, epinephrine, tyramine). Those derived from aromatic amino acids, and also their synthetic analogs (e.g., amphetamine), are of use in pharmacology.
Inorganic or organic salts and esters of boric acid.
A metabolite of primidone.
A highly-sensitive (in the picomolar range, which is 10,000-fold more sensitive than conventional electrophoresis) and efficient technique that allows separation of PROTEINS; NUCLEIC ACIDS; and CARBOHYDRATES. (Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)
The minute vessels that connect the arterioles and venules.
A nonlinear electrophoretic technique used to separate a variety of ionic compounds, ranging from small metal ions to large molecules like proteins. Unlike "linear" zone electrophoresis in which separating solute bands continually spread by diffusion or dispersion, isotachophoresis forms self-sharpening, adjacent zones of substantially pure solute whose concentrations often exceed several mgs/ml. In isotachophoresis a multianalyte sample is introduced between the leading electrolyte and the terminating electrolyte where the sample ions have lower electrophoretic mobilities than the leading ion but larger than the terminating ion. (From "Isotachophoresis" on the AES Web Site [Internet]. Madison, WI: The American Electrophoresis Society; c2000-2008 [cited 2009 Aug 20]. Available from http://www.aesociety.org/areas/isotachophoresis.php)
Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)
A sulfuric acid dimer, formed by disulfide linkage. This compound has been used to prolong coagulation time and as an antidote in cyanide poisoning.
A phenomenon in which the surface of a liquid where it contacts a solid is elevated or depressed, because of the relative attraction of the molecules of the liquid for each other and for those of the solid. (from McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
Facilities which provide information concerning poisons and treatment of poisoning in emergencies.
A condition or physical state produced by the ingestion, injection, inhalation of or exposure to a deleterious agent.
A colorless, odorless, viscous dihydroxy alcohol. It has a sweet taste, but is poisonous if ingested. Ethylene glycol is the most important glycol commercially available and is manufactured on a large scale in the United States. It is used as an antifreeze and coolant, in hydraulic fluids, and in the manufacture of low-freezing dynamites and resins.
An ethylene compound with two hydroxy groups (-OH) located on adjacent carbons. They are viscous and colorless liquids. Some are used as anesthetics or hypnotics. However, the class is best known for their use as a coolant or antifreeze.
Derivatives of ethylene, a simple organic gas of biological origin with many industrial and biological use.
Agents counteracting or neutralizing the action of POISONS.
Drugs used to treat or prevent skin disorders or for the routine care of skin.

Separation of urea, uric acid, creatine, and creatinine by micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography with sodium cholate. (1/66)

The capillary electrophoretic separation of the four nonprotein nitrogenous compounds (NPNs; urea, uric acid, creatine, and creatinine) typically employed in clinical and medical settings for the monitoring of renal function is described. Successful resolution of these compounds is achieved with the use of a bile salt micelle system composed of sodium cholate at phosphate buffer pH 7.4. The elution patterns of four NPNs are obtained within 30 min with a voltage of 30 kV. The effect of varying the applied voltage, temperature, and the mole ratio of phosphate buffer with bile salt surfactant on the migration behavior is also examined.  (+info)

Quantification of riboflavin, flavin mononucleotide, and flavin adenine dinucleotide in human plasma by capillary electrophoresis and laser-induced fluorescence detection. (2/66)

BACKGROUND: Riboflavin is the precursor of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and FAD, which serve as cofactors for several redox enzymes. We have developed a capillary electrophoresis method for the determination of riboflavin and its two coenzyme forms in human plasma. METHODS: Trichloroacetic acid-treated plasma was subjected to solid-phase extraction on reversed-phase columns. The analytes were separated by micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography in uncoated fused- silica capillaries filled with borate buffer containing 50 mmol/L sodium dodecyl sulfate, methanol, and N-methylformamide. Native fluorescence was monitored at 530 nm, using an argon laser operating at 488 nm as excitation source. RESULTS: The assay was linear over a concentration range of two orders of magnitude, and the limit of detection was far below physiological concentrations for all vitamers. The within-day and between-day coefficients of variation were 4-9% and 6-12%, respectively. The reference values (median, 5-95 percentiles) obtained by analyzing plasma from 63 healthy subjects were 8.6 nmol/L (2.7-42.5 nmol/L) for riboflavin, 7.0 nmol/L (3.5-13.3 nmol/L) for FMN, and 57.9 nmol/L (44.5-78.1 nmol/L) for FAD. CONCLUSIONS: Capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection allows determination of all riboflavin vitamers far below physiological concentrations. The method may become a useful tool for the assessment of riboflavin status in humans.  (+info)

Simultaneous determination of sweeteners and preservatives in preserved fruits by micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography. (3/66)

A micellar electrokinetic capillary method for the simultaneous determination of the sweeteners dulcin, aspartame, saccharin, and acesulfame-K and the preservatives sorbic acid; benzoic acid; sodium dehydroacetate; and methyl-, ethyl-, propyl-, isopropyl-, butyl-, and isobutyl-p-hydroxybenzoate in preserved fruits is developed. These additives are ion-paired and extracted using sonication followed by solid-phase extraction from the sample. Separation is achieved using a 57-cm fused-silica capillary with a buffer comprised of 0.05 M sodium deoxycholate, 0.02 M borate-phosphate buffer (pH 8.6), and 5% acetonitrile, and the wavelength for detection is 214 nm. The average recovery rate for all sweeteners and preservatives is approximately 90% with good reproducibility, and the detection limits range from 10 to 25 microg/g. Fifty preserved fruit samples are analyzed for the content of sweeteners and preservatives. The sweeteners found in 28 samples was aspartame (0.17-11.59 g/kg) or saccharin (0.09-5.64 g/kg). Benzoic acid (0.02-1.72 g/kg) and sorbic acid (0.27-1.15 g/kg) were found as preservatives in 29 samples.  (+info)

Analysis of human ouabainlike compound by micellar electrokinetic chromatography. (4/66)

In this preliminary study we have optimised micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC, a form of capillary electrophoresis) to enable the chromatographic and spectral characteristics of human ouabainlike compound (OLC) to be investigated. Sera from fifty patients were combined to form a pool (100 ml) whilst urine (92.5 ml) was obtained from a normal healthy volunteer. Both samples were initially concentrated and partially purified by solid phase extraction before further purification by sequential HPLC separations. Final volumes for both extracts were 100 microl. MEKC was performed on a HP(3D) CE instrument with voltage set at 20 KV, capillary temperature at 20 degrees C, injection time 4 s, sample volume 10 nl, with detection by photodiode array. A compound was found in both serum and urine that had similar elution and spectral characteristics to authentic ouabain. We conclude that MEKC is potentially a useful tool for the analysis of human OLC.  (+info)

Correlation of the capacity factor in vesicular electrokinetic chromatography with the octanol:water partition coefficient for charged and neutral analytes. (5/66)

PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to develop a method based upon electrokinetic chromatography (EKC) using oppositely charged surfactant vesicles as a buffer modifier to estimate hydrophobicity (log P) for a range of neutral and charged compounds. METHODS: Vesicles were formed from cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and sodium n-octyl sulfate (SOS). The size and polydispersity of the vesicles were characterized by electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and pulsed-field gradient NMR (PFG-NMR). PFG-NMR was also used to determine if ion-pairing between cationic analytes and free SOS monomer occurred. The CTAB/SOS vesicles were used as a buffer modifier in capillary electrophoresis (CE). The capacity factor (log k') was calculated by determining the mobility of the analytes both in the presence and absence of vesicles. Log k' was determined for 29 neutral and charged analytes. RESULTS; There was a linear relationship between the log of capacity factor (log k') and octanol/water partition coefficient (log P) for both neutral and basic species at pH 6.0, 7.3, and 10.2. This indicated that interaction between the cation and vesicle was dominated by hydrophobic forces. At pH 4.3, the log k' values for the least hydrophobic basic analytes were higher than expected, indicating that electrostatic attraction as well as hydrophobic forces contributed to the overall interaction between the cation and vesicle. Anionic compounds could not be evaluated using this system. CONCLUSION: Vesicular electrokinetic chromatography (VEKC) using surfactant vesicles as buffer modifiers is a promising method for the estimation of hydrophobicity.  (+info)

Separation of sympathomimetic amines of abuse and related compounds by micellar electrokinetic chromatography. (6/66)

Separation of twelve sympathomimetic amines and related compounds by micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) with UV absorbance detection is described. These amines were well separated within 25 min using 50 mM sodium tetraborate solution containing 15 mM sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) of pH 9.3 as a running solution and detected at 210 nm. MEKC was performed with an applied voltage of 13 kV at 25 degrees C using a fused-silica capillary (50 cm x 75 mm i.d.) with effective length of 37.5 cm. The detection limits of these compounds were in the range from 4 to 97 fmol/injection at a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of 3. The reproducibility of the method expressed as relative standard deviation (RSD) for within-day (n=6) and between-day (n=5) assays was less than 4.8 and 8.8%, respectively. The proposed method could be applied to the determination of an anorectic drug, phentermine, in Chinese tea with a detection limit of 99 microg/g (105 fmol/injection, S/N=3).  (+info)

Evaluation of variation of acteoside and three major flavonoids in wild and cultivated Scutellaria baicalensis roots by micellar electrokinetic chromatography. (7/66)

Micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) conditions were developed to analyze the constituents of Scutellariae Radix (SR) and Scutellaria baicalensis roots. Using the MEKC method, the major flavonoid constituents of baicalin, baicalein and wogonin of wild and cultivated S. baicalensis roots were compared. In a preliminary comparison of electropherogram, one special peak was found in a wild sample but not in a 2-year-cultivated one. The compound corresponding to the peak was isolated and identified as a phenylethanoid glycoside, acteoside, by comparing the 1H- and 13C-NMR spectral data with that of the authentic compound. This is the first time acteoside has been isolated from the Scutellaria genus. It could only be found in SR derived from wild S. baicalensis roots and 4-year-cultivated plants, but not in plant materials cultivated for 3 years. Applying the MEKC method established in this study, rapid and simultaneous determinations of acteoside together with 3 flavonoids in samples were achieved. The method can thus be used for the quality control of SR in a shorter analysis period than HPLC.  (+info)

Analysis method of the angiotensin-I converting enzyme inhibitory activity based on micellar electrokinetic chromatography. (8/66)

A micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) method was developed for estimating the angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity by separating the hippuric acid liberated in the ACE reaction mixture in the presence of an inhibitor, captopril. The hippuric acid was successfully separated and detected by MEKC with a 25 mM sodium dodecyl sulfate solution in a 25 mM phosphate-50 mM borate buffer at pH 7.0; the total analysis took about 5 min. A good linear relationship was observed between the inhibitor and the peak area of hippuric acid release. No significant difference in the ACE inhibitory activity (IC50) of captopril (an antihypertensive medicine) or autolyzed-mushrooms (functional foods) was observed between the conventional method and the MEKC method. The MEKC method was found to be a useful technique for a rapid assay of the ACE inhibitory activity.  (+info)

Micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography (MECC or MEEKC) is a type of chromatographic technique used for the separation and analysis of mixtures. It is a form of capillary electrophoresis, which utilizes an electric field to separate charged analytes based on their electrophoretic mobility. In MECC, micelles, which are aggregates of surfactant molecules, are added to the buffer solution in the capillary. These micelles have both hydrophobic and hydrophilic regions, allowing for the separation of both charged and neutral analytes based on their partitioning between the micellar phase and the bulk buffer solution. This technique is particularly useful for the separation of small molecules, such as drugs, metabolites, and environmental pollutants.

Cnidium is a genus of plants in the family Apiaceae, also known as Umbelliferae. The name Cnidium may refer to several different plant species, but the one that is most commonly associated with medical use is Cnidium monnieri (also known as Monnier's snowparsley or She Chuang Zi).

Cnidium monnieri has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for centuries to treat a variety of conditions, including skin diseases, fungal infections, and sexual dysfunction. The active components of the plant are thought to include coumarins, osthole, and imperatorin, which have been shown to have anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and antioxidant properties.

However, it is important to note that while some studies suggest that Cnidium monnieri may have potential health benefits, more research is needed to confirm its effectiveness and safety. Additionally, Cnidium monnieri supplements and extracts can interact with certain medications and may cause side effects, so it is important to consult with a healthcare provider before using them.

Biogenic amines are organic compounds that are derived from the metabolic pathways of various biological organisms, including humans. They are formed by the decarboxylation of amino acids, which are the building blocks of proteins. Some examples of biogenic amines include histamine, serotonin, dopamine, and tyramine.

Histamine is a biogenic amine that plays an important role in the immune system's response to foreign invaders, such as allergens. It is also involved in regulating stomach acid production and sleep-wake cycles. Serotonin is another biogenic amine that acts as a neurotransmitter, transmitting signals between nerve cells in the brain. It is involved in regulating mood, appetite, and sleep.

Dopamine is a biogenic amine that functions as a neurotransmitter and is involved in reward and pleasure pathways in the brain. Tyramine is a biogenic amine that is found in certain foods, such as aged cheeses and fermented soy products. It can cause an increase in blood pressure when consumed in large quantities.

Biogenic amines can have various effects on the body, depending on their type and concentration. In general, they play important roles in many physiological processes, but high levels of certain biogenic amines can be harmful and may cause symptoms such as headache, nausea, and hypertension.

Borates are a group of minerals that contain boron, oxygen, and hydrogen in various combinations. They can also contain other elements such as sodium, calcium, or potassium. Borates have a wide range of uses, including as flame retardants, insecticides, and preservatives. In medicine, boric acid powder is sometimes used as a mild antiseptic to treat minor cuts, burns, and scrapes. However, it can be toxic if ingested or absorbed through the skin in large amounts, so it should be used with caution.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Phenylethylmalonamide" doesn't seem to have a specific medical definition as it is not a recognized medication, chemical compound, or diagnostic term in common medical use. It's possible that you may have made a typo or there's some other error in the term. If you have more context or information, I'd be happy to help further!

Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is a laboratory technique used to separate and analyze charged particles such as proteins, nucleic acids, and other molecules based on their size and charge. In CE, the sample is introduced into a narrow capillary tube filled with a buffer solution, and an electric field is applied. The charged particles in the sample migrate through the capillary towards the electrode with the opposite charge, and the different particles become separated as they migrate based on their size and charge.

The separation process in CE is monitored by detecting the changes in the optical properties of the particles as they pass through a detector, typically located at the end of the capillary. The resulting data can be used to identify and quantify the individual components in the sample. Capillary electrophoresis has many applications in research and clinical settings, including the analysis of DNA fragments, protein identification and characterization, and the detection of genetic variations.

Capillaries are the smallest blood vessels in the body, with diameters that range from 5 to 10 micrometers. They form a network of tiny tubes that connect the arterioles (small branches of arteries) and venules (small branches of veins), allowing for the exchange of oxygen, carbon dioxide, nutrients, and waste products between the blood and the surrounding tissues.

Capillaries are composed of a single layer of endothelial cells that surround a hollow lumen through which blood flows. The walls of capillaries are extremely thin, allowing for easy diffusion of molecules between the blood and the surrounding tissue. This is essential for maintaining the health and function of all body tissues.

Capillaries can be classified into three types based on their structure and function: continuous, fenestrated, and sinusoidal. Continuous capillaries have a continuous layer of endothelial cells with tight junctions that restrict the passage of large molecules. Fenestrated capillaries have small pores or "fenestrae" in the endothelial cell walls that allow for the passage of larger molecules, such as proteins and lipids. Sinusoidal capillaries are found in organs with high metabolic activity, such as the liver and spleen, and have large, irregular spaces between the endothelial cells that allow for the exchange of even larger molecules.

Overall, capillaries play a critical role in maintaining the health and function of all body tissues by allowing for the exchange of nutrients, oxygen, and waste products between the blood and surrounding tissues.

Isotachophoresis is a technique used in electrophoresis, which is a method for separating charged particles based on their different migration rates in an electric field. In isotachophoresis, a discontinuous system of buffer solutions with different pH values and ionic mobilities is established in a capillary or other separation medium. The sample to be analyzed is introduced into the system, and an electric field is applied.

The ions in the sample migrate towards the electrodes based on their charges and the electric field. As they migrate, they form zones of constant velocity, called isotachopheres, where the velocity of each ion is equal to that of the leading and terminating ions in the zone. The leading ion has a higher mobility than the following ions, while the terminating ion has a lower mobility.

The isotachopheres are formed in order of decreasing mobility, with the leading ion of each zone having a higher mobility than the terminating ion of the preceding zone. This results in a sharp and well-defined separation of the ions based on their electrophoretic mobilities, which is related to their charges and sizes.

Isotachophoresis has several advantages over other electrophoretic techniques, including high resolution, rapid analysis times, and the ability to analyze samples with a wide range of pH values and ionic strengths. It is commonly used in biochemistry and clinical chemistry for the separation and quantitation of ions, peptides, proteins, and other charged molecules.

An encyclopedia is a comprehensive reference work containing articles on various topics, usually arranged in alphabetical order. In the context of medicine, a medical encyclopedia is a collection of articles that provide information about a wide range of medical topics, including diseases and conditions, treatments, tests, procedures, and anatomy and physiology. Medical encyclopedias may be published in print or electronic formats and are often used as a starting point for researching medical topics. They can provide reliable and accurate information on medical subjects, making them useful resources for healthcare professionals, students, and patients alike. Some well-known examples of medical encyclopedias include the Merck Manual and the Stedman's Medical Dictionary.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but Tetrathionic Acid is not a medical term. It is a chemical compound with the formula S4O62-. It's an acidic oxyanion of sulfur with the sulfur in the +5 oxidation state. It is not related to human health or medicine directly. If you have any questions about a medical topic, I'd be happy to help with that instead!

Capillary action, also known as capillarity, is the ability of a liquid to rise or get drawn into narrow spaces, such as small tubes or gaps between particles, against gravity. This phenomenon occurs due to the attractive forces between the molecules of the liquid and the solid surface of the narrow space.

The height to which a liquid will rise in a capillary tube is determined by several factors, including the surface tension of the liquid, the radius of the capillary tube, and the adhesive forces between the liquid and the tube's material. In general, liquids with higher surface tension and stronger adhesion to the tube's material will rise higher than those with lower surface tension and weaker adhesion.

Capillary action plays an essential role in many natural and industrial processes, such as water absorption by plants, fluid transport in biological systems, and ink movement in fountain pens.

Poison Control Centers are specialized organizations that provide immediate, free, and expert advice and treatment recommendations for exposure to potentially harmful substances, also known as poisons. They are staffed by trained healthcare professionals, including medical toxicologists, nurses, pharmacists, and poison information providers. These centers manage a wide range of poisoning cases, from accidental ingestions in children to intentional overdoses and chemical exposures in adults. They offer 24/7 emergency hotline services to the public, healthcare providers, and first responders for poison-related emergencies and provide valuable resources for poison prevention and education. The primary goal of Poison Control Centers is to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with poison exposures and promote overall public health and safety.

Poisoning is defined medically as the harmful, sometimes fatal, effect produced by a substance when it is introduced into or absorbed by living tissue. This can occur through various routes such as ingestion, inhalation, injection, or absorption through the skin. The severity of poisoning depends on the type and amount of toxin involved, the route of exposure, and the individual's age, health status, and susceptibility. Symptoms can range from mild irritation to serious conditions affecting multiple organs, and may include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, difficulty breathing, seizures, or unconsciousness. Immediate medical attention is required in cases of poisoning to prevent severe health consequences or death.

Ethylene glycol is a colorless, odorless, syrupy liquid with a sweet taste, which makes it appealing to animals and children. It is commonly used in the manufacture of antifreeze, coolants, deicers, hydraulic brake fluids, solvents, and other industrial products. Ethylene glycol is also found in some household items such as certain types of wood stains, paints, and cosmetics.

Ingesting even small amounts of ethylene glycol can be harmful or fatal to humans and animals. It is metabolized by the body into toxic substances that can cause damage to the central nervous system, heart, kidneys, and other organs. Symptoms of ethylene glycol poisoning may include nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, decreased level of consciousness, seizures, coma, acidosis, increased heart rate, low blood pressure, and kidney failure.

If you suspect that someone has ingested ethylene glycol, it is important to seek medical attention immediately. Treatment typically involves administering a medication called fomepizole or ethanol to inhibit the metabolism of ethylene glycol, as well as providing supportive care such as fluid replacement and dialysis to remove the toxic substances from the body.

Ethylene glycols are a class of synthetic chemical compounds that are commonly used as automotive antifreeze, de-icing agents, and as raw materials in the manufacture of polyester fibers and resins. The two most common types of ethylene glycol are ethylene glycol monoethyl ether (also known as ethylene glycol monomethyl ether or EGME) and diethylene glycol (DEG).

Ethylene glycols are colorless, odorless liquids with a sweet taste. They are highly toxic to humans and animals if ingested, inhaled, or absorbed through the skin. Exposure can cause a range of symptoms, including nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, dizziness, confusion, seizures, coma, and even death.

In medical terms, ethylene glycols are often referred to as "toxic alcohols" or "antifreeze poisoning" when they cause toxicity in humans. Treatment typically involves supportive care, such as fluid replacement and kidney dialysis, as well as the use of specific antidotes, such as fomepizole or ethanol, to prevent further absorption and metabolism of the toxic alcohol.

I believe there might be a misunderstanding in your question. "Ethylenes" is not a medical term or a medical condition. Ethylene is actually a colorless gas with a sweet and musky odor, which belongs to the class of hydrocarbons called alkenes. It is used widely in industry, including the production of polyethylene, antifreeze, and other chemicals.

However, if you meant something else or need information on a specific medical topic related to ethylene or its derivatives, please provide more context or clarify your question, and I would be happy to help.

An antidote is a substance that can counteract the effects of a poison or toxin. It works by neutralizing, reducing, or eliminating the harmful effects of the toxic substance. Antidotes can be administered in various forms such as medications, vaccines, or treatments. They are often used in emergency situations to save lives and prevent serious complications from poisoning.

The effectiveness of an antidote depends on several factors, including the type and amount of toxin involved, the timing of administration, and the individual's response to treatment. In some cases, multiple antidotes may be required to treat a single poisoning incident. It is important to note that not all poisons have specific antidotes, and in such cases, supportive care and symptomatic treatment may be necessary.

Examples of common antidotes include:

* Naloxone for opioid overdose
* Activated charcoal for certain types of poisoning
* Digoxin-specific antibodies for digoxin toxicity
* Fomepizole for methanol or ethylene glycol poisoning
* Dimercaprol for heavy metal poisoning.

Dermatologic agents are medications, chemicals, or other substances that are applied to the skin (dermis) for therapeutic or cosmetic purposes. They can be used to treat various skin conditions such as acne, eczema, psoriasis, fungal infections, and wounds. Dermatologic agents include topical corticosteroids, antibiotics, antifungals, retinoids, benzoyl peroxide, salicylic acid, and many others. They can come in various forms such as creams, ointments, gels, lotions, solutions, and patches. It is important to follow the instructions for use carefully to ensure safety and effectiveness.

... capillary isoelectric focusing (CIEF), capillary isotachophoresis and micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) belong also ... "Application of micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography to the analysis of uncharged pesticides of environmental impact ... Micellar electrophoretic capillary chromatography (MECC) has been developed and applied to the analysis of inks extracted from ... of essential and branched-chain amino acids in nutraceutical products by micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography". ...
Injac, R.; Kočevar, N.; Kreft, S. (2007). "Precision of micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography in the determination ... Micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) is a chromatography technique used in analytical chemistry. It is a modification ... "Application of Micellar Electrokinetic Capillary Chromatography to the Analysis of Uncharged Pesticides of Environmental Impact ... "Principles of Micellar Electrokinetic Capillary Chromatography Applied in Pharmaceutical Analysis". Advanced Pharmaceutical ...
Pharmacologically Active Compounds from the Tibetan Medicine Elsholtzia with Micellar Electrokinetic Capillary Chromatography. ... Chenxu Ding; Lingyun Wang; Xianen Zhao; Yulin Li; Honglun Wang; Jinmao You; Yourui Suo , Journal of Liquid Chromatography & ... Yulin Li; Xian'en Zhao; Chenxu Ding; Honglun Wang; Yourui Suo; Guichen Chen; Jinmao You , Journal of Liquid Chromatography & ...
... chromatography, micellar electrokinetic capillary MeSH E05.196.181.750 - chromatography, supercritical fluid MeSH E05.196. ... chromatography, liquid MeSH E05.196.181.400.170 - chromatography, affinity MeSH E05.196.181.400.250 - chromatography, gel MeSH ... chromatography, high pressure liquid MeSH E05.196.181.400.383 - chromatography, ion exchange MeSH E05.196.181.400.383.349 - ... chromatography, deae-cellulose MeSH E05.196.181.400.454 - chromatography, paper MeSH E05.196.181.400.454.655 - nucleotide ...
The sensitivity of conventional CEUV can be improved by using micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC). CEMS has the added ... Capillary electrophoresis (CE)is emerging as the preferred analytical method for YTX analysis, as it has significant advantages ... M. Fernández Amandi; A. Furey; M. Lehane; H. Ramstad; K. J. James (2002). "Liquid chromatography with electrospray ion-trap ... Chromatographic methods with fluorescence detection Liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (LC-FLD) provides a ...
"Characterisation of retention in micellar high-performance liquid chromatography and in micellar electrokinetic chromatography ... "Micelles as separation media in high-performance liquid chromatography and high-performance capillary electrophoresis: overview ... Micellar liquid chromatography (MLC) is a form of reversed phase liquid chromatography that uses an aqueous micellar solutions ... "Micellar chromatography of inorganic compounds". Journal of Chromatography A. 780 (1-2): 343-360. doi:10.1016/S0021-9673(97) ...
"Rapid determination of piracetam in human plasma and cerebrospinal fluid by micellar electrokinetic chromatography with sample ... Piracetam has been found to diminish erythrocyte adhesion to vascular wall endothelium, making any vasospasm in the capillary ... Piracetam may facilitate the deformability of erythrocytes in capillary which is useful for cardiovascular disease. Peripheral ... direct injection". Journal of Chromatography A. 1120 (1-2): 27-34. doi:10.1016/j.chroma.2005.11.071. PMID 16343512. Bravo- ...
... capillary isoelectric focusing (CIEF), capillary isotachophoresis and micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) belong also ... "Application of micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography to the analysis of uncharged pesticides of environmental impact ... Micellar electrophoretic capillary chromatography (MECC) has been developed and applied to the analysis of inks extracted from ... of essential and branched-chain amino acids in nutraceutical products by micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography". ...
Principles of micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography applied in pharmaceutical analysis. Adv. Pharm. Bull. 2013, 3, 1 ... The micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography technique has also been reported for quantification of l-THE. It has shown ... or anion exchange chromatography and electrokinetic capillary chromatography (ECC) [38,39,40]. Similarly, a 100% success rate ... Determination of tea fermentation degree by a rapid micellar electrokinetic chromatography. Food Chem. 2010, 120, 632-636. [ ...
... of polyethylene glycols and polypropylene glycols by capillary zone electrophoresis and micellar electrokinetic chromatography ... Bost RO, Sunshine I [ 1980]. Ethylene-glycol analysis by gas-chromatography. J Anal Toxicol 4(2):102-103.Cao XL, Zhu J [2001]. ... OSHA Salt Lake City, UT: U.S. Department of Labor, OSHA Salt Lake Technical Center, Chromatography Team. ... 3-butylene glycol in human serum and urine by wide-bore column gas chromatography. J Chromatogr B: Biomed Appl 619(2):251-257. ...
So, micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography (MECC) was used to estimate P-ow. Two different micellar systems, sodium ... 2,700-fold to a specific activity of over 600 pmol/min/mg of protein by sequential column chromatographies on Sephacryl S-200, ... and glutathione reductase activities by specific antibody immunoprecipitation and by substrate-affinity chromatography. Conyza ...
capillary electrophoresis and micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography (MECC). Starting with as little as 25 µg of a ... has been extensively used to derivatize carbohydrates prior to separation by gel or capillary electrophoresis.. Among the ... by succinimidyl esters has been extensively utilized for tagging oligosaccharides that are to be separated by capillary zone ...
5. Micellar Electrokinetic Chromatography Edward Bald, Paweł Kubalczyk. 6. Isotachophoresis. Przemysław Kosobucki, Bogusław ... Non-Aqueous Capillary Electrophoresis. Michał Szumski, Bogusław Buszewski. 12. Methods of Analyte Concentration in a Capillary ... 7. Capillary Isoelectric Focusing. Michał J. Markuszewski, Renata Bujak, Emilia Daghir. 8. Two-dimensional Gel Electrophoresis ... 9. Electrochromatographic Methods: Capillary Electrochromatograpy. Michał Szumski. 10. Electrochromatography Methods: Planar ...
... by micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography. Anal Chim Acta 2008; 614: 196-200 ...
... using micellar electrokinetic chromatography-capillary electrophoresis, Journal of Food Safety, 30, pp. 652 - 665, http://dx. ... Nakkote S; Wootton M; Humpa A; Cox J; Bekes F; Wrigley CW, 1999, Application and evaluation of capillary electrophoresis for ... Siriamornpun S; Wootton M; Cox JM; Bekes F; Wrigley CW, 2001, Capillary electrophoresis of wheat gliadin proteins and its ...
Development of a micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography method for the determination of four naphthalenediols in ...
Micellar Electrokinetic Capillary Chromatography 79% * Stem Cells 77% * Neoplasms 43% * Biostatistics 31% ...
SIMULTANEOUS DETERMINATION OF FIBRATES BY MICELLAR ELECTROKINETIC CAPILLARY CHROMATOGRAPHY ELEONORA MIRCIA1, GABRIEL HANCU2, ... AMINO ACIDS BASED CHIRAL IONIC LIQUIDS FOR ENANTIOMER SEPARATION BY CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS MIHAI STĂNESCU1*, CRINA MARIA ...
keywords = "capillary electromigration techniques, capillary electrophoresis, micellar electrokinetic chromatography, ... The analysis of testosterone and related steroids by non-specific micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) was ... The analysis of testosterone and related steroids by non-specific micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) was ... The analysis of testosterone and related steroids by non-specific micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) was ...
CapillaryElectric Power SuppliesPerfusionChromatography, Micellar Electrokinetic CapillaryHematocritParenteral Nutrition ... Chromatography, Micellar Electrokinetic Capillary. A hybrid separation technique combining both chromatographic and ... Micellar Electrokinetic CapillaryPotassium ChlorideSecretinElectricityBiological Transport, ActiveKidney Concentrating Ability ... Electrophoresis, Capillary. A highly-sensitive (in the picomolar range, which is 10,000-fold more sensitive than conventional ...
CHROMATOGRAPHY, MICELLAR ELECTROKINETIC CAPILLARY. CROMATOGRAFIA CAPILAR ELECTROCINETICA MICELAR. CROMATOGRAFIA CAPILAR ...
CHROMATOGRAPHY, MICELLAR ELECTROKINETIC CAPILLARY. CROMATOGRAFIA CAPILAR ELECTROCINETICA MICELAR. CUNNINGHAMELLA. ...
CHROMATOGRAPHY, MICELLAR ELECTROKINETIC CAPILLARY. CROMATOGRAFIA CAPILAR ELETROCINÉTICA MICELAR. CUERPOS DE WEIBEL-PALADE. ...
CHROMATOGRAPHY, MICELLAR ELECTROKINETIC CAPILLARY. CROMATOGRAFIA CAPILAR ELECTROCINETICA MICELAR. CROMATOGRAFIA CAPILAR ...
CHROMATOGRAPHY, MICELLAR ELECTROKINETIC CAPILLARY. CROMATOGRAFIA CAPILAR ELECTROCINETICA MICELAR. CROMATOGRAFIA CAPILAR ...
CHROMATOGRAPHY, MICELLAR ELECTROKINETIC CAPILLARY. CROMATOGRAFIA CAPILAR ELECTROCINETICA MICELAR. CUNNINGHAMELLA. ...
CHROMATOGRAPHY, MICELLAR ELECTROKINETIC CAPILLARY. CROMATOGRAFIA CAPILAR ELECTROCINETICA MICELAR. CROMATOGRAFIA CAPILAR ...
CHROMATOGRAPHY, MICELLAR ELECTROKINETIC CAPILLARY. CROMATOGRAFIA CAPILAR ELETROCINÉTICA MICELAR. CUERPOS DE WEIBEL-PALADE. ...
CHROMATOGRAPHY, MICELLAR ELECTROKINETIC CAPILLARY. CROMATOGRAFIA CAPILAR ELECTROCINETICA MICELAR. CUNNINGHAMELLA. ...
CHROMATOGRAPHY, MICELLAR ELECTROKINETIC CAPILLARY. CROMATOGRAFIA CAPILAR ELETROCINÉTICA MICELAR. CUERPOS DE WEIBEL-PALADE. ...
CHROMATOGRAPHY, MICELLAR ELECTROKINETIC CAPILLARY. CROMATOGRAFIA CAPILAR ELECTROCINETICA MICELAR. CROMATOGRAFIA CAPILAR ...
CHROMATOGRAPHY, MICELLAR ELECTROKINETIC CAPILLARY. CROMATOGRAFIA CAPILAR ELECTROCINETICA MICELAR. CROMATOGRAFIA CAPILAR ...
CapillaryPectinsPhenylmercury CompoundsMacrocyclic CompoundsChromatography, Micellar Electrokinetic CapillaryDiacetyl ... Chromatography, Micellar Electrokinetic Capillary. A hybrid separation technique combining both chromatographic and ... Electrophoresis, Capillary. A highly-sensitive (in the picomolar range, which is 10,000-fold more sensitive than conventional ...
Micellar Electrokinetic Capillary Chromatography 23% * Estradiol 23% * Metals 22% * Menopause 22% * Huang Qi 22% ...
... including capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE), micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC), and capillary ... Fundamental and Practical Aspects of Liquid Chromatography and Capillary Electromigration Techniques for the Analysis of ... Fundamental and Practical Aspects of Liquid Chromatography and Capillary Electromigration Techniques for the Analysis of ... Fundamental and Practical Aspects of Liquid Chromatography and Capillary Electromigration Techniques for the Analysis of ...
Micellar Electrokinetic Capillary Chromatography Medicine & Life Sciences 31% * Villous Adenoma Medicine & Life Sciences 24% ...

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