Benign or malignant tumors which arise from the choroid plexus of the ventricles of the brain. Papillomas (see PAPILLOMA, CHOROID PLEXUS) and carcinomas are the most common histologic subtypes, and tend to seed throughout the ventricular and subarachnoid spaces. Clinical features include headaches, ataxia and alterations of consciousness, primarily resulting from associated HYDROCEPHALUS. (From Devita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, p2072; J Neurosurg 1998 Mar;88(3):521-8)
A villous structure of tangled masses of BLOOD VESSELS contained within the third, lateral, and fourth ventricles of the BRAIN. It regulates part of the production and composition of CEREBROSPINAL FLUID.
A usually benign neoplasm that arises from the cuboidal epithelium of the choroid plexus and takes the form of an enlarged CHOROID PLEXUS, which may be associated with oversecretion of CSF. The tumor usually presents in the first decade of life with signs of increased intracranial pressure including HEADACHES; ATAXIA; DIPLOPIA; and alterations of mental status. In children it is most common in the lateral ventricles and in adults it tends to arise in the fourth ventricle. Malignant transformation to choroid plexus carcinomas may rarely occur. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p667; DeVita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, p2072)
The thin, highly vascular membrane covering most of the posterior of the eye between the RETINA and SCLERA.
The large network of nerve fibers which distributes the innervation of the upper extremity. The brachial plexus extends from the neck into the axilla. In humans, the nerves of the plexus usually originate from the lower cervical and the first thoracic spinal cord segments (C5-C8 and T1), but variations are not uncommon.
Neoplasms located in the brain ventricles, including the two lateral, the third, and the fourth ventricle. Ventricular tumors may be primary (e.g., CHOROID PLEXUS NEOPLASMS and GLIOMA, SUBEPENDYMAL), metastasize from distant organs, or occur as extensions of locally invasive tumors from adjacent brain structures.
A watery fluid that is continuously produced in the CHOROID PLEXUS and circulates around the surface of the BRAIN; SPINAL CORD; and in the CEREBRAL VENTRICLES.
One of two ganglionated neural networks which together form the ENTERIC NERVOUS SYSTEM. The myenteric (Auerbach's) plexus is located between the longitudinal and circular muscle layers of the gut. Its neurons project to the circular muscle, to other myenteric ganglia, to submucosal ganglia, or directly to the epithelium, and play an important role in regulating and patterning gut motility. (From FASEB J 1989;3:127-38)
A thin membrane that lines the CEREBRAL VENTRICLES and the central canal of the SPINAL CORD.
One of two ganglionated neural networks which together form the enteric nervous system. The submucous (Meissner's) plexus is in the connective tissue of the submucosa. Its neurons innervate the epithelium, blood vessels, endocrine cells, other submucosal ganglia, and myenteric ganglia, and play an important role in regulating ion and water transport. (From FASEB J 1989;3:127-38)
The three membranes that cover the BRAIN and the SPINAL CORD. They are the dura mater, the arachnoid, and the pia mater.
Tumors of the choroid; most common intraocular tumors are malignant melanomas of the choroid. These usually occur after puberty and increase in incidence with advancing age. Most malignant melanomas of the uveal tract develop from benign melanomas (nevi).
Specialized non-fenestrated tightly-joined ENDOTHELIAL CELLS with TIGHT JUNCTIONS that form a transport barrier for certain substances between the cerebral capillaries and the BRAIN tissue.
A complex network of nerve fibers including sympathetic and parasympathetic efferents and visceral afferents. The celiac plexus is the largest of the autonomic plexuses and is located in the abdomen surrounding the celiac and superior mesenteric arteries.
The lumbar and sacral plexuses taken together. The fibers of the lumbosacral plexus originate in the lumbar and upper sacral spinal cord (L1 to S3) and innervate the lower extremities.
A network of nerve fibers originating in the upper four CERVICAL SPINAL CORD segments. The cervical plexus distributes cutaneous nerves to parts of the neck, shoulders, and back of the head. It also distributes motor fibers to muscles of the cervical SPINAL COLUMN, infrahyoid muscles, and the DIAPHRAGM.
Any fluid-filled closed cavity or sac that is lined by an EPITHELIUM. Cysts can be of normal, abnormal, non-neoplastic, or neoplastic tissues.

Imaging features of intraventricular melanoma. (1/71)

We present the MR imaging findings in a patient with symptoms of increased intracranial pressure and a mass in the left lateral ventricle. The mass showed increased signal intensity on T1-weighted images and low signal intensity on T2-weighted images. The histologic diagnosis was that of melanoma, and detailed physical and funduscopic examinations disclosed no evidence of a primary lesion. We believe that the mass was a primary intraventricular melanoma, possibly arising from the choroid plexus, and we discuss the mechanisms that may be responsible for its occurrence in this location.  (+info)

Choroid plexus papilloma of cerebellopontine angle with extension to foramen magnum. (2/71)

A case of choroid plexus papilloma resembling meningioma of cerebellopontine (CP) angle with its extension to foramen magnum is presented. Occurrence of this tumour in CP angle is very rare. Its extension towards foramen magnum is further rare. It was a real diagnostic enigma preoperatively as the tumour was resembling meningioma upto some extent on radiological study. Retromastoid craniectomy with microsurgical excision of tumour and its extension was achieved in toto. Tumour was attached to few rootlets of lower cranial nerves which were preserved. Attachment of the tumour with lower cranial nerves again caused diagnostic confusion with neurofibroma intraoperatively.  (+info)

Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte epitope immunodominance in the control of choroid plexus tumors in simian virus 40 large T antigen transgenic mice. (3/71)

The simian virus 40 (SV40) large tumor antigen (Tag) is a virus-encoded oncoprotein which is the target of a strong cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) response. Three immunodominant H-2(b)-restricted epitopes, designated epitopes I, II/III, and IV, have been defined. We investigated whether induction of CTLs directed against these Tag epitopes might control Tag-induced tumors in SV11(+) (H-2(b)) mice. SV11(+) mice develop spontaneous tumors of the choroid plexus due to expression of SV40 Tag as a transgene. We demonstrate that SV11(+) mice are functionally tolerant to the immunodominant Tag CTL epitopes. CTLs specific for the H-2Kb-restricted Tag epitope IV were induced in SV11(+) mice following adoptive transfer with unprimed C57BL/6 spleen cells and immunization with recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing either full-length Tag or the H-2Kb-restricted epitope IV as a minigene. In addition, irradiation of SV11(+) mice prior to adoptive transfer with unprimed C57BL/6 spleen cells led to the priming of epitope IV-specific CTLs by the endogenous Tag. Induction of epitope IV-specific CTLs in SV11(+) mice by either approach correlated with increased life span and control of the choroid plexus tumor progression, indicating that CTLs specific for the immunodominant Tag epitope IV control the progressive growth of spontaneous tumors induced by this DNA virus oncogene in transgenic mice.  (+info)

Cytokeratin 7 and 20 expression in choroid plexus tumors: utility in differentiating these neoplasms from metastatic carcinomas. (4/71)

Tumors derived from choroid plexus epithelium are uncommon and may exhibit a wide variety of histologic patterns. They often are difficult to distinguish from metastatic carcinomas. Previous studies that addressed this issue yielded conflicting results. Recent reports have demonstrated that evaluation of coordinate expression of cytokeratin (CK) 7 and CK20 aids in distinguishing primary from metastatic lesions in a number of anatomic sites and that tumors that commonly are metastatic to the brain retain their CK7/CK20 immunophenotype in this location. We examined 35 choroid plexus tumors with a panel of antibodies to determine their CK7/CK20 immunophenotype. Tumors from 35 patients (7 male, 28 female; mean age, 25 years), including 31 choroid plexus papillomas and 4 atypical papillomas, were evaluated. All tumors were intraventricular or within the cerebellopontine angle and composed predominantly of orderly columnar epithelial cells resting on distinct fibrovascular cores. Atypical papillomas contained combinations of focal loss of architectural pattern, increased mitotic activity, necrosis, and brain parenchymal invasion. No lesion was unequivocally malignant. Twenty-six tumors (74%), including all atypical papillomas, were CK7 positive and CK20 negative. Two tumors stained with both markers, one stained with CK20 only, and six stained with neither marker. Other findings included expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein in 24 tumors, S-100 protein in 19 tumors, transthyretin in 31 tumors, Ber EP4 in 1 tumor, CAM5.2 in 33 tumors, epithelial membrane antigen in 4 tumors, and pancytokeratin in 27 tumors. Our results indicate that the majority of choroid plexus tumors have a CK7-positive/CK20-negative immunophenotype. This finding may be useful in differentiating these lesions from metastatic carcinomas that have differing CK7/CK20 profiles.  (+info)

IL-12 treatment of endogenously arising murine brain tumors. (5/71)

A number of recent studies have indicated that T cells can be stimulated to attack transplanted brain tumors in rodent models. As IL-12 has been shown to activate cytotoxic T cell responses, we tested the idea that it might stimulate a T cell response against endogenous brain tumors that arise in SV40 large T Ag transgenic mice (SV11). SV11 mice develop tumors of the choroid plexus, a specialization of the ependymal lining of the brain ventricles. They are a particularly relevant model of human disease, because they are immunocompetent but immunologically tolerant of the tumors. SV11 mice were treated with recombinant murine IL-12 for 10 days. Tumors grew more slowly than in control treated mice, and in some cases were reduced in size, as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging before and after treatment. At the end of treatment, tumors, but not brain parenchyma, exhibited extensive infiltration of activated CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells. Tumors also showed a reduction in vascular density. Mice treated with IL-12 lived significantly longer than control mice. Tumors that progressed were nearly devoid of T cells, indicating that the T cell response was not sustained. In addition, some mice that had a substantial tumor burden at the beginning of treatment displayed evidence of immunosuppression, which might be related to TGF-ss2 detected in tumors. We conclude that IL-12 treatment can initiate an anti-tumor response even against endogenously arising brain tumors, but factors that will allow a sustained and more effective anti-tumor response need to be determined.  (+info)

Prostaglandin D synthase (beta-trace) in meningeal hemangiopericytoma. (6/71)

The level of prostaglandin D synthase (PGDS), a major protein constituent of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), is altered in various brain diseases, including meningitis. However, its role in the brain remains unclear. PGDS is mainly synthesized in the arachnoid cells, the choroid plexus and oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system. Among brain tumors, meningiomas showed intense immunoreactivity to PGDS in the perinuclear region. Thus, PGDS has been considered a specific cell marker of meningioma. In this study, we examined 25 meningeal hemangiopericytomas (HPCs) and found that 16 of the tumors (64%) showed immunoreactivity for PGDS in the perinuclear region. For comparison, 15 meningiomas, 14 soft-tissue HPCs, 1 mesenchymal chondrosarcoma, 3 choroid plexus papillomas, and 7 oligodendrogliomas were also examined. Meningiomas showed positive immunoreactivity for PGDS in 13 cases (80%). Except for one case located at the sacrum, none of the other soft-tissue HPCs showed immunostaining for PGDS. Mesenchymal chondrosarcoma arises in the bones of the skull, and its histological pattern resembles that of HPC; however, it showed no immunoreactivity for PGDS. Neither choroid plexus papillomas nor oligodendrogliomas were immunopositive for PGDS. These findings suggest that meningeal HPCs may have a unique molecular phenotype that is distinct from that of the soft-tissue HPCs. The origin of meningeal HPCs may be more closely related to the arachnoid cells.  (+info)

Tissue-specific expression of SV40 in tumors associated with the Li-Fraumeni syndrome. (7/71)

Inactivation of wild-type p53 tumor suppressor function is the primary mechanism of tumor initiation in Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) individuals with germline p53 mutations. Tumors derived from LFS patients frequently retain the normal p53 allele, suggesting that alternative mechanisms in addition to gene deletion must be involved in inactivating wild-type p53 protein. DNA tumor viruses, such as SV40, target p53 for inactivation through the action of viral oncoproteins. We studied the probands from two unrelated LFS families, each of whom presented with multiple malignant neoplasms. Patient 1 developed an embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) and a choroid plexus carcinoma (CPC), while patient 2 developed a CPC and subsequently presented with both an osteosarcoma (OS) and renal cell carcinoma (RCC). We utilized DNA sequence analysis and immunohistochemistry to determine p53 gene status in the germline and tumors, as well as evidence for SV40 T-antigen oncoprotein expression. Each patient harbored a heterozygous germline p53 mutation at codons 175 and 273, respectively. In patient 1, the normal p53 gene was lost while the mutant p53 allele was reduced to homozygosity in the RMS. Both normal and mutant genes were maintained in the CPC. In patient 2, normal and mutant p53 alleles were retained in both the CPC and RCC. Both specific PCR and immunostaining detected SV40 T-antigen in both CPCs and the RCC. In addition to chromosomal alterations, epigenetic mechanisms may disrupt p53 function during tumorigenesis. In two LFS patients, we found SV40 DNA sequences and viral T-antigen expression that could account for inactivation of the normal p53 protein. Inactivation of p53 or other tumor suppressors by viral proteins may contribute to tumor formation in specific tissues of genetically susceptible individuals.  (+info)

Cytogenetics and molecular genetics of childhood brain tumors. (8/71)

Considerable progress has been made toward improving survival for children with brain tumors, and yet there is still relatively little known regarding the molecular genetic events that contribute to tumor initiation or progression. Nonrandom patterns of chromosomal deletions in several types of childhood brain tumors suggest that the loss or inactivation of tumor suppressor genes are critical events in tumorigenesis. Deletions of chromosomal regions 10q, 11 and 17p, and example, are frequent events in medulloblastoma, whereas loss of a region within 22q11.2, which contains the INI1 gene, is involved in the development of atypical teratoid and rhabdoid tumors. A review of the cytogenetic and molecular genetic changes identified to date in childhood brain tumors will be presented.  (+info)

Choroid plexus neoplasms are rare types of brain tumors that arise from the choroid plexus, which are clusters of blood vessels in the ventricles (fluid-filled spaces) of the brain. These tumors can be benign (choroid plexus papilloma) or malignant (choroid plexus carcinoma). Choroid plexus neoplasms most commonly occur in children under the age of 2, but they can also affect adults. Symptoms may include increased head circumference, hydrocephalus (fluid buildup in the brain), vomiting, and developmental delays. Treatment typically involves surgical removal of the tumor, followed by radiation therapy or chemotherapy for malignant tumors.

The choroid plexus is a network of blood vessels and tissue located within each ventricle (fluid-filled space) of the brain. It plays a crucial role in the production of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), which provides protection and nourishment to the brain and spinal cord.

The choroid plexus consists of modified ependymal cells, called plexus epithelial cells, that line the ventricular walls. These cells have finger-like projections called villi, which increase their surface area for efficient CSF production. The blood vessels within the choroid plexus transport nutrients, ions, and water to these epithelial cells, where they are actively secreted into the ventricles to form CSF.

In addition to its role in CSF production, the choroid plexus also acts as a barrier between the blood and the central nervous system (CNS), regulating the exchange of substances between them. This barrier function is primarily attributed to tight junctions present between the epithelial cells, which limit the paracellular movement of molecules.

Abnormalities in the choroid plexus can lead to various neurological conditions, such as hydrocephalus (excessive accumulation of CSF) or certain types of brain tumors.

A choroid plexus papilloma is a rare, benign (non-cancerous) tumor that develops in the choroid plexus, which are clusters of blood vessels and specialized cells in the ventricles of the brain. These tumors can occur at any age but are more common in children under the age of 10.

Choroid plexus papillomas arise from the ependymal cells that line the ventricular system and produce cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The tumor grows slowly and tends to block the flow of CSF, leading to increased intracranial pressure and symptoms such as headaches, vomiting, irritability, and developmental delays in children.

The medical definition of choroid plexus papilloma is: "A benign, slow-growing tumor that arises from the ependymal cells of the choroid plexus in the ventricles of the brain. The tumor can obstruct the flow of cerebrospinal fluid and cause increased intracranial pressure."

It is important to note that while choroid plexus papillomas are generally benign, they can still cause significant symptoms due to their location in the brain and the obstruction of CSF flow. Treatment typically involves surgical removal of the tumor, followed by radiation therapy or chemotherapy if necessary.

The choroid is a layer of the eye that contains blood vessels that supply oxygen and nutrients to the outer layers of the retina. It lies between the sclera (the white, protective coat of the eye) and the retina (the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye). The choroid is essential for maintaining the health and function of the retina, particularly the photoreceptor cells that detect light and transmit visual signals to the brain. Damage to the choroid can lead to vision loss or impairment.

The brachial plexus is a network of nerves that originates from the spinal cord in the neck region and supplies motor and sensory innervation to the upper limb. It is formed by the ventral rami (branches) of the lower four cervical nerves (C5-C8) and the first thoracic nerve (T1). In some cases, contributions from C4 and T2 may also be included.

The brachial plexus nerves exit the intervertebral foramen, pass through the neck, and travel down the upper chest before branching out to form major peripheral nerves of the upper limb. These include the axillary, radial, musculocutaneous, median, and ulnar nerves, which further innervate specific muscles and sensory areas in the arm, forearm, and hand.

Damage to the brachial plexus can result in various neurological deficits, such as weakness or paralysis of the upper limb, numbness, or loss of sensation in the affected area, depending on the severity and location of the injury.

Cerebral ventricle neoplasms refer to tumors that develop within the cerebral ventricles, which are fluid-filled spaces in the brain. These tumors can arise from various types of cells within the ventricular system, including the ependymal cells that line the ventricles, choroid plexus cells that produce cerebrospinal fluid, or other surrounding tissues.

Cerebral ventricle neoplasms can cause a variety of symptoms depending on their size and location, such as headaches, nausea, vomiting, vision changes, imbalance, weakness, or difficulty with mental tasks. The treatment options for these tumors may include surgical resection, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy, depending on the type and extent of the tumor. Regular follow-up care is essential to monitor for recurrence and manage any long-term effects of treatment.

Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a clear, colorless fluid that surrounds and protects the brain and spinal cord. It acts as a shock absorber for the central nervous system and provides nutrients to the brain while removing waste products. CSF is produced by specialized cells called ependymal cells in the choroid plexus of the ventricles (fluid-filled spaces) inside the brain. From there, it circulates through the ventricular system and around the outside of the brain and spinal cord before being absorbed back into the bloodstream. CSF analysis is an important diagnostic tool for various neurological conditions, including infections, inflammation, and cancer.

The myenteric plexus, also known as Auerbach's plexus, is a component of the enteric nervous system located in the wall of the gastrointestinal tract. It is a network of nerve cells (neurons) and supporting cells (neuroglia) that lies between the inner circular layer and outer longitudinal muscle layers of the digestive system's muscularis externa.

The myenteric plexus plays a crucial role in controlling gastrointestinal motility, secretion, and blood flow, primarily through its intrinsic nerve circuits called reflex arcs. These reflex arcs regulate peristalsis (the coordinated muscle contractions that move food through the digestive tract) and segmentation (localized contractions that mix and churn the contents within a specific region of the gut).

Additionally, the myenteric plexus receives input from both the sympathetic and parasympathetic divisions of the autonomic nervous system, allowing for central nervous system regulation of gastrointestinal functions. Dysfunction in the myenteric plexus has been implicated in various gastrointestinal disorders, such as irritable bowel syndrome, achalasia, and intestinal pseudo-obstruction.

The ependyma is a type of epithelial tissue that lines the ventricular system of the brain and the central canal of the spinal cord. These cells are specialized glial cells that help to form the blood-brain barrier, regulate the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) composition, and provide support and protection for the nervous tissue.

Ependymal cells have a cuboidal or columnar shape and possess numerous cilia on their apical surface, which helps to circulate CSF within the ventricles. They also have tight junctions that help to form the blood-brain barrier and prevent the passage of harmful substances from the blood into the CSF.

In addition to their role in maintaining the integrity of the CNS, ependymal cells can also differentiate into other types of cells, such as neurons and glial cells, under certain conditions. This property has made them a topic of interest in regenerative medicine and the study of neurodevelopmental disorders.

The submucosal plexus, also known as Meissner's plexus, is a component of the autonomic nervous system located in the submucosa layer of the gastrointestinal tract. It is a network of nerve fibers and ganglia that primarily regulates local reflexes and secretions, contributing to the control of gut motility, blood flow, and mucosal transport.

Meissner's plexus is part of the enteric nervous system (ENS), which can operate independently from the central nervous system (CNS). The ENS consists of two interconnected plexuses: Meissner's submucosal plexus and Auerbach's myenteric plexus.

Meissner's plexus is responsible for regulating functions such as absorption, secretion, vasodilation, and local immune responses in the gastrointestinal tract. Dysfunction of this plexus can lead to various gastrointestinal disorders, including irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and other motility-related conditions.

The meninges are the protective membranes that cover the brain and spinal cord. They consist of three layers: the dura mater (the outermost, toughest layer), the arachnoid mater (middle layer), and the pia mater (the innermost, delicate layer). These membranes provide protection and support to the central nervous system, and contain blood vessels that supply nutrients and remove waste products. Inflammation or infection of the meninges is called meningitis, which can be a serious medical condition requiring prompt treatment.

Choroid neoplasms are abnormal growths that develop in the choroid, a layer of blood vessels that lies between the retina and the sclera (the white of the eye). These growths can be benign or malignant (cancerous). Benign choroid neoplasms include choroidal hemangiomas and choroidal osteomas. Malignant choroid neoplasms are typically choroidal melanomas, which are the most common primary eye tumors in adults. Other types of malignant choroid neoplasms include metastatic tumors that have spread to the eye from other parts of the body. Symptoms of choroid neoplasms can vary depending on the size and location of the growth, but may include blurred vision, floaters, or a dark spot in the visual field. Treatment options depend on the type, size, and location of the tumor, as well as the patient's overall health and personal preferences.

The Blood-Brain Barrier (BBB) is a highly specialized, selective interface between the central nervous system (CNS) and the circulating blood. It is formed by unique endothelial cells that line the brain's capillaries, along with tight junctions, astrocytic foot processes, and pericytes, which together restrict the passage of substances from the bloodstream into the CNS. This barrier serves to protect the brain from harmful agents and maintain a stable environment for proper neural function. However, it also poses a challenge in delivering therapeutics to the CNS, as most large and hydrophilic molecules cannot cross the BBB.

The celiac plexus, also known as the solar plexus or autonomic plexus, is a complex network of nerves located in the abdomen, near the stomach and other digestive organs. It plays a crucial role in regulating various automatic functions of the body, such as digestion, absorption, and secretion.

The celiac plexus is formed by the union of several splanchnic nerves that arise from the spinal cord and pass through the diaphragm to reach the abdomen. These nerves carry sensory information from the organs in the abdomen to the brain, as well as motor impulses that control the function of these organs.

In some medical procedures, such as celiac plexus block or neurolysis, the celiac plexus may be targeted to relieve chronic pain associated with conditions like pancreatitis, cancer, or abdominal surgery. These procedures involve injecting anesthetic or neurolytic agents into the area around the celiac plexus to interrupt nerve signals and reduce pain.

The lumbosacral plexus is a complex network of nerves that arises from the lower part of the spinal cord, specifically the lumbar (L1-L5) and sacral (S1-S4) roots. This plexus is responsible for providing innervation to the lower extremities, including the legs, feet, and some parts of the abdomen and pelvis.

The lumbosacral plexus can be divided into several major branches:

1. The femoral nerve: It arises from the L2-L4 roots and supplies motor innervation to the muscles in the anterior compartment of the thigh, as well as sensation to the anterior and medial aspects of the leg and thigh.
2. The obturator nerve: It originates from the L2-L4 roots and provides motor innervation to the adductor muscles of the thigh and sensation to the inner aspect of the thigh.
3. The sciatic nerve: This is the largest nerve in the body, formed by the union of the tibial and common fibular (peroneal) nerves. It arises from the L4-S3 roots and supplies motor innervation to the muscles of the lower leg and foot, as well as sensation to the posterior aspect of the leg and foot.
4. The pudendal nerve: It originates from the S2-S4 roots and is responsible for providing motor innervation to the pelvic floor muscles and sensory innervation to the genital region.
5. Other smaller nerves, such as the ilioinguinal, iliohypogastric, and genitofemoral nerves, also arise from the lumbosacral plexus and supply sensation to various regions in the lower abdomen and pelvis.

Damage or injury to the lumbosacral plexus can result in significant neurological deficits, including muscle weakness, numbness, and pain in the lower extremities.

The cervical plexus is a network of nerves that arises from the ventral rami (anterior divisions) of the first four cervical spinal nerves (C1-C4) and a portion of C5. These nerves form a series of loops and anastomoses (connections) that give rise to several major and minor branches.

The main functions of the cervical plexus include providing sensory innervation to the skin on the neck, shoulder, and back of the head, as well as supplying motor innervation to some of the muscles in the neck and shoulders, such as the sternocleidomastoid and trapezius.

Some of the major branches of the cervical plexus include:

* The lesser occipital nerve (C2), which provides sensory innervation to the skin over the back of the head and neck.
* The great auricular nerve (C2-C3), which provides sensory innervation to the skin over the ear and lower part of the face.
* The transverse cervical nerve (C2-C3), which provides sensory innervation to the skin over the anterior and lateral neck.
* The supraclavicular nerves (C3-C4), which provide sensory innervation to the skin over the shoulder and upper chest.
* The phrenic nerve (C3-C5), which supplies motor innervation to the diaphragm, the major muscle of respiration.

Overall, the cervical plexus plays a crucial role in providing sensory and motor innervation to the neck, head, and shoulders, allowing for normal movement and sensation in these areas.

A cyst is a closed sac, having a distinct membrane and division between the sac and its surrounding tissue, that contains fluid, air, or semisolid material. Cysts can occur in various parts of the body, including the skin, internal organs, and bones. They can be caused by various factors, such as infection, genetic predisposition, or blockage of a duct or gland. Some cysts may cause symptoms, such as pain or discomfort, while others may not cause any symptoms at all. Treatment for cysts depends on the type and location of the cyst, as well as whether it is causing any problems. Some cysts may go away on their own, while others may need to be drained or removed through a surgical procedure.

Paulus W, Jänisch W. Clinicopathologic correlations in epithelial choroid plexus neoplasms: a study of 52 cases. Acta ... Choroid plexus papilloma, also known as papilloma of the choroid plexus, is a rare benign neuroepithelial intraventricular WHO ... Media related to Choroid plexus papilloma at Wikimedia Commons Choroid Plexus Papilloma MRI, CT, and pathology images from ... Recent researches have shown that choroid plexus papilloma and choroid plexus cancer may be distinguished from one another ...
... of intracranial neoplasms in people of all ages. Choroid plexus papilloma, atypical choroid plexus papilloma, and choroid ... Choroid plexus carcinoma (WHO grade III) Choroid atypical plexus papilloma (WHO grade II) Choroid plexus papilloma (WHO grade I ... Together, atypical choroid plexus papilloma, and choroid plexus carcinoma make up around 25% of all choroid plexus tumors. ... Choroid plexus tumors are a rare type of cancer that occur from the brain tissue called choroid plexus of the brain. Choroid ...
Choriocarcinoma Chorioretinitis Chorioretinopathy dominant form microcephaly Choroid plexus cyst Choroid plexus neoplasms ... syndrome Collins-Sakati syndrome Coloboma chorioretinal cerebellar vermis aplasia Coloboma hair abnormality Coloboma of choroid ... Carrington syndrome Cartilage hair hypoplasia like syndrome Cartilage-hair hypoplasia Cartilaginous neoplasms Cartwright-Nelson ... hypoxia Cerebral malformations hypertrichosis claw hands Cerebral palsy Cerebral thrombosis Cerebral ventricle neoplasms ...
... brain neoplasms MeSH C10.228.140.211.280 - cerebral ventricle neoplasms MeSH C10.228.140.211.280.300 - choroid plexus neoplasms ... brain neoplasms MeSH C10.551.240.250.200 - cerebral ventricle neoplasms MeSH C10.551.240.250.200.200 - choroid plexus neoplasms ... choroid plexus MeSH C10.228.140.211.500 - infratentorial neoplasms MeSH C10.228.140.211.500.100 - brain stem neoplasms MeSH ... choroid plexus MeSH C10.551.240.250.400 - infratentorial neoplasms MeSH C10.551.240.250.400.200 - brain stem neoplasms MeSH ...
Neoplasms (tumours) in nervous tissue include: Gliomas (glial cell tumors) Gliomatosis cerebri, Oligoastrocytoma, Choroid ... plexus papilloma, Ependymoma, Astrocytoma (Pilocytic astrocytoma, Glioblastoma multiforme), Dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial ...
... the tumors appeared to be less differentiated than a choroid plexus papilloma and more differentiated than a choroid plexus ... The critical diagnosis of this neoplasm is often difficult because of its similarity with other primary or secondary papillary ... These tumors were tested immunohistochemically with a profile similar to that of a choroid plexus tumor; however, ... choroid plexus papilloma, and metastatic papillary carcinoma. Papillary tumors characteristically show a discrete, compressive ...
Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome Papillitis of the lingual papillae Papillitis of the optic nerve Papilloma of choroid plexus Papular ... familial Pancreatic diseases Pancreatic islet cell neoplasm Pancreatic islet cell tumors Pancreatic lipomatosis duodenal ... et varioliformis acuta Pityriasis rubra pilaris Piussan-Lenaerts-Mathieu syndrome Placenta disorder Placenta neoplasm Placental ... retardation-hyperkeratosis Parapsoriasis Parasitophobia Parastremmatic dwarfism Parathyroid cancer Parathyroid neoplasm ...
Choroid Plexus Papilloma - Palmer, Cheryl Ann and Daniel Keith Harrison; EMedicine; Jun 5, 2008 (CS1 errors: periodical ignored ... Benign neoplasms, Glandular and epithelial neoplasia, Histopathology). ...
Similar mutations are also present in other childhood cancers, such as choroid plexus carcinoma, medulloblastoma and in some ... several more subunits of the human SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex have been found mutated in a wide range of neoplasms. ...
... choroid plexus neoplasms MeSH C04.588.614.250.195.205.200.500 - papilloma, choroid plexus MeSH C04.588.614.250.195.411 - ... uveal neoplasms MeSH C04.588.364.978.223 - choroid neoplasms MeSH C04.588.364.978.400 - iris neoplasms MeSH C04.588.443.353 - ... skull base neoplasms MeSH C04.588.149.828 - spinal neoplasms MeSH C04.588.180.260 - breast neoplasms, male MeSH C04.588.180.390 ... bile duct neoplasms MeSH C04.588.274.120.250.250 - common bile duct neoplasms MeSH C04.588.274.120.401 - gallbladder neoplasms ...
... ependymoma 1.6.5 Subependymoma 2.1 Choroid plexus papilloma 2.2 Atypical choroid plexus papilloma 2.3 Choroid plexus carcinoma ... neoplasms 8.1.1 Meningeal melanocytosis and meningeal melanomatosis 8.2 Circumscribed meningeal melanocytic neoplasms 8.2.1 ...
Choroid plexus carcinoma, Choroid plexus papilloma, Choroid plexus tumor, Colloid cyst, Dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumour ... Neoplasms will often show as differently colored masses (also referred to as processes) in CT or MRI results.[citation needed] ... More generally a neoplasm may cause release of metabolic end products (e.g., free radicals, altered electrolytes, ... The skull bone structure can also be subject to a neoplasm that by its very nature reduces the volume of the intracranial ...
... choroid plexus tumor, or rhabdomyosarcoma of embryonal anaplastic subtype, at any age of onset, irrespective of family history ... Li F.P.; Fraumeni J.F. (October 1969). "Soft-tissue sarcomas, breast cancer, and other neoplasms. A familial syndrome?". Ann. ... choroid plexus, colorectal, and prostate cancers. Around 80% of children with adrenocortical carcinoma and 2-10% of childhood ... Erratum for "Germ Line p53 Mutations in a Familial Syndrome of Breast Cancer, Sarcomas, and Other Neoplasms"". Science. 259 ( ...
... choroid plexus papilloma, middle ear adenocarcinoma, and ceruminous adenoma. Wide excision is the treatment of choice, although ... Aug 1993). "Papillary neoplasms (Heffner's tumors) of the endolymphatic sac". Ann. Otol. Rhinol. Laryngol. 102 (8 pt 1): 648-51 ... An endolymphatic sac tumor (ELST) is a very uncommon papillary epithelial neoplasm arising within the endolymphatic sac or ...
These circulating complexes have been found trapped in the highly vascular choroid plexus of SLE patients upon autopsy. True ... and cannot reliably be distinguished from neoplasms. Cerebritis usually occurs as a result of an underlying condition, which ...
... or choroid plexus tumor.[citation needed] Idiopathic or unknown cause (idiopathic intracranial hypertension, a common cause in ... In cases of confirmed brain neoplasm, dexamethasone is given to decrease ICP. Although the exact mechanism is unknown, current ...
... negatively regulates initial leukocyte recruitment to the brain across the choroid plexus in murine experimental autoimmune ... a plasma cell marker immunohistochemical profile in hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic neoplasms". American Journal of Clinical ...
... choroid plexus tumor - CHPP - chronic granulocytic leukemia - chronic idiopathic myelofibrosis - chronic leukemia - chronic ... neoplasm - nephrotomogram - nephrotoxic - nephroureterectomy - nerve block - nerve grafting - nerve-sparing radical ... brachial plexus - brachytherapy - brain metastasis - brainstem glioma - brain stem tumor - brain tumor - BRCA1 - BRCA2 - ... Hürthle cell neoplasm - hydrazine sulfate - hydromorphone - hydronephrosis - hydroureter - hydroxychloroquine - hydroxyurea - ...
... the brains choroid plexus (3 cases), inside brain [[Ventricular system[ventricle]] (1 case), the cerebellopontine angle (2 ... "The 2016 revision of the World Health Organization classification of lymphoid neoplasms". Blood. 127 (20): 2375-90. doi:10.1182 ...
NOS M9390/1 Atypical choroid plexus papilloma M9390/3 Choroid plexus carcinoma Choroid plexus papilloma, anaplastic or ... NOS M8000/6 Neoplasm, metastatic Neoplasm, metastatic Tumor, metastatic Tumor, secondary Tumor embolus M8000/9 Neoplasm, ... NOS Mixed subendymoma-ependymoma M9384/1 Subependymal giant cell astrocytoma M9390/0 Choroid plexus papilloma, ... benign M8000/1 Neoplasm, uncertain whether benign or malignant Neoplasm, NOS Tumor, NOS Unclassified tumor, uncertain whether ...
Choroid plexus tumors are graded based on the World Health Organization (WHO) classification scheme and include choroid plexus ... tumors derived from choroid plexus epithelium that are seen predominantly in children. ... Choroid plexus neoplasms are rare, intraventricular, primary central nervous system (CNS) ... encoded search term (Pathology of Choroid Plexus Neoplasms) and Pathology of Choroid Plexus Neoplasms What to Read Next on ...
Paulus W, Jänisch W. Clinicopathologic correlations in epithelial choroid plexus neoplasms: a study of 52 cases. Acta ... Choroid plexus papilloma, also known as papilloma of the choroid plexus, is a rare benign neuroepithelial intraventricular WHO ... Media related to Choroid plexus papilloma at Wikimedia Commons Choroid Plexus Papilloma MRI, CT, and pathology images from ... Recent researches have shown that choroid plexus papilloma and choroid plexus cancer may be distinguished from one another ...
Brain Neoplasms (MeSH) * Child (MeSH) * Child, Preschool (MeSH) * Choroid Plexus Neoplasms (MeSH) ...
Brain Neoplasms Medicine & Life Sciences 15% * Choroid Plexus Neoplasms Medicine & Life Sciences 14% ... N2 - Choroid plexus carcinoma (CPC) is a rare brain tumor that occurs most commonly in very young children and has a dismal ... AB - Choroid plexus carcinoma (CPC) is a rare brain tumor that occurs most commonly in very young children and has a dismal ... Choroid plexus carcinoma (CPC) is a rare brain tumor that occurs most commonly in very young children and has a dismal ...
Choroid plexus tumors (CPTs) are rare intracranial neoplasms, representing Assuntos. Neoplasias do Plexo Corióideo , Síndrome ... Genomic profile of two Brazilian choroid plexus tumors by whole-exome sequencing. ...
We show here that c-MYC overexpression in the choroid plexus epithelium induces T-cell inflammation-dependent choroid plexus ... We demonstrate that c-MYC is expressed in a substantial proportion of human choroid plexus tumours and that this subgroup of ... Our data raise the possibility that benign choroid plexus tumours expressing c-MYC could be amenable to medical therapy with ... Choroid plexus tumours (CPTs) account for 2-5% of brain tumours in children. They can spread along the neuraxis and can recur ...
Choroid PlexusChoroid Plexus NeoplasmsPapilloma, Choroid PlexusChoroidBrachial PlexusCerebral Ventricle NeoplasmsCerebrospinal ... Choroid plexus - Wikipedia. Choroid Plexus Histology 40x Choroid plexus Choroid plexus Choroid plexus Choroid plexus papilloma ... Choroid plexus. ... Histology 40x Choroid plexus Choroid plexus Choroid plexus Choroid plexus papilloma Tela choroidea This ... Choroid plexus tumor. Choroid plexus carcinoma (WHO grade III) Choroid atypical plexus papilloma (WHO grade II) Choroid plexus ...
... the tumors appeared to be less differentiated than a choroid plexus papilloma and more differentiated than a choroid plexus ... The critical diagnosis of this neoplasm is often difficult because of its similarity with other primary or secondary papillary ... These tumors were tested immunohistochemically with a profile similar to that of a choroid plexus tumor; however, ... choroid plexus papilloma, and metastatic papillary carcinoma. Papillary tumors characteristically show a discrete, compressive ...
2024 ICD-10-CM Codes C00-D49 - Neoplasms (C00-D49). , 2024 ICD-10-CM Codes D10-D36 - Benign neoplasms, except benign ... 2024 ICD-10-CM Codes D33 - Benign neoplasm of brain and other parts of central nervous system (D33). , 2024 ICD-10-CM Diagnosis ... 2024 ICD-10-CM Diagnosis Code D33.0 - Benign neoplasm of brain, supratentorial (D33.0). 201620172018201920202021202220232024 ... choroid plexus (lateral ventricle) (third ventricle) , Papilloma Primary Sidebar. Footer. About us. At Freemedicalcoding.com, ...
Brain Stem Neoplasms (1) * Central Nervous System (1) * Chemotherapy (1) * Choroid Plexus Neoplasms (1) ... Final results of the Choroid Plexus Tumor study CPT-SIOP-2000  Wolff, Johannes E.; Van Gool, Stefaan W.; Kutluk, Tezer; Diez, ... An Attypical Choroid Plexus Papilloma of IV Ventricle with Dissemination to a Sacral Tarlov Cyst: A Case Report  ...
This study assesses the BRAF V600E mutation status in 969 intracranial neoplasms using a tissue microarray method and ... we did not find any V600E positive ependymal or choroid plexus tumor in 133 samples analyzed, indicating that V600E mutations ... Therefore a relatively large number of gliosarcomas, meningiomas, choroid plexus tumors and non-melanoma brain metastases were ... 36 choroid plexus tumors as well as 50 vestibular schwannomas were analyzed. None of them showed evidence of a BRAF V600E ...
Case 99 Choroid plexus papilloma Case 100 Choroid plexus papilloma Case 101 Tuberous sclerosis - multisystem manifestations ...
III CNS and misc intracranial and intraspinal neoplasms 31 III(a) Ependymomas and choroid plexus tumors 32 III(b) Astrocytomas ... III(e) Other specified intracranial/intraspinal neoplasms 36 III(f) Unspecified intracranial and intraspinal neoplasms 40 IV ... II Lymphoma and reticuloendothelial neoplasms 21 II(a) Hodgkin lymphoma 22 II(b) Non-Hodgkin lymphoma 23 II(c) Burkitt lymphoma ... XI Carcinomas and other malignant epithelial neoplasms 111 XI(a) Adrenocortical carcinomas 112 XI(b) Thyroid carcinomas 113 XI( ...
8. Ependymomas and Choroid Plexus Tumors. 9. Other Glial Neoplasms. 10. Neuronal and Glioneuronal Neoplasms ...
It may enhance depending on the vascularity or presence of choroid plexus (2, 15, 18). An important role of MR imaging is to ... Rare instances of neoplasm, including oligodendroglioma and neuroectodermal tumor, within excised lesions have been reported ( ... F, Choroid plexus-like tissue is noted in the inner wall of cyst (H&E, original magnification x200). ... It can be explained by dense fibrosis of the wall, which also contained functioning choroid plexus and vascularity, as ...
Benign and unspecified intracranial and intraspinal tumours, including choroid plexus papilloma, ganglioglioma, non-malignant ... and other gonadal neoplasms; XI carcinomas and other malignant epithelial neoplasms; XII other and unspecified malignant ... 2001). Second malignant neoplasms in five-year survivors of childhood cancer: childhood cancer survivor study. J Natl Cancer ... The main groups are as follows: I leukaemia; II lymphomas and reticuloendothelial neoplasms; III central nervous system and ...
... choroid plexus tumors, subependymomas and idiopathic foramen of monro stenosis. In this chapter, we will discuss the various ... The structures comprising this foramen are the anterior part of the thalamus, the fornix and the choroid plexus. Vital ... They are slow growing neoplasms frequently seen in middle aged men more commonly in the fourth [50-60%] and the lateral [30-40 ... The spectrum of choroid plexus tumors include a] WHO grade I choroid plexus papilloma b] WHO grade II atypical choroid plexus ...
It is the most common primary intracranial neoplasm and the most diversified in histologic patterns among all primary tumors of ... Part I: The ventricular system, meninges and choroid plexuses. Arch Anat Cytol Pathol. 1998. 46(3):153-69. [QxMD MEDLINE Link] ... Immunohistochemical analysis of hSNF5/INI1 in pediatric CNS neoplasms. Am J Surg Pathol. 2004 May. 28(5):644-50. [QxMD MEDLINE ... where there is an arachnoidal invagination into the stromal base of the choroid plexus. During early embryonic development, the ...
Malignant neoplasms of male genital organs Malignant neoplasms of urinary tract Malignant neoplasms of eye, brain and other ... Disorders of choroid and retina Glaucoma Disorders of vitreous body and globe Disorders of optic nerve and visual pathways ... Nerve, nerve root and plexus disorders Polyneuropathies and other disorders of the peripheral nervous system Diseases of ... Malignant neoplasms of mesothelial and soft tissue Malignant neoplasms of breast Malignant neoplasms of female genital organs ...
... tumour cells which are infiltrating choroid plexus (H/E X 200). Figure 4C: PNET -like area of atypical teratoid /rhabdoid ... We think in our case lymphedema was associated with intracranial neoplasm due to the lesions projection. Intracranial lesion ... small blue tumour cells which are infiltrating choroid plexus, PNET -like area of atypical teratoid/ rhabdoid tumour, ...
A preliminary choroid plexus volumetric study in individuals with psychosis. Senay, O., Seethaler, M., Makris, N., Yeterian, E ...
Hyperornithinemia with gyrate atrophy of choroid and retina, see Gyrate atrophy of the choroid and retina ... Hereditary brachial plexus neuropathy, see Hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy. *Hereditary bundle branch defect, see Progressive ... Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal neoplasms, see Lynch syndrome. *Hereditary nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia due to ... Heredofamilial neuritis with brachial plexus predilection, see Hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy. *Heredopathia atactica ...
Choroid Plexus Cysts and Trisomy 18. 謝豐舟; 柯滄銘; Chen, Hsi-Yao; Lee, Chien-Nan; Tsai, Yieh-Loong; 陳皙堯. Journal of Obstetrics and ... Incremental angiogenesis assessed by color Doppler ultrasound in the tumorigenesis of ovarian neoplasms. CHIH-CHENG WU ; CHIEN- ... Fetal Choroid Plexus Cysts and Trisomy 18. LEE, CHIEN-NAN; HSIEH, FON-JOU; TASI, YIEH-LOONG; KO, TSANG-MING; CHEN, HSI-YAO. ...
It is the most common primary intracranial neoplasm and the most diversified in histologic patterns among all primary tumors of ... Part I: The ventricular system, meninges and choroid plexuses. Arch Anat Cytol Pathol. 1998. 46(3):153-69. [QxMD MEDLINE Link] ... Immunohistochemical analysis of hSNF5/INI1 in pediatric CNS neoplasms. Am J Surg Pathol. 2004 May. 28(5):644-50. [QxMD MEDLINE ... where there is an arachnoidal invagination into the stromal base of the choroid plexus. During early embryonic development, the ...
M]Choroid plexus papilloma NOS Active Synonym false false 2692408014 Choroid plexus papilloma, no ICD-O subtype Active Synonym ... Choroid plexus papilloma, no International Classification of Diseases for Oncology subtype Active Synonym false false ... Choroid plexus papilloma, no International Classification of Diseases for Oncology subtype (morphologic abnormality). ... Choroid plexus papilloma, no International Classification of Diseases for Oncology subtype (morphologic abnormality). ...
  • Choroid plexus tumors are graded based on the World Health Organization (WHO) classification scheme and include choroid plexus papilloma (CPP) (WHO grade I) (see the following image), atypical choroid plexus papilloma (WHO grade II), and choroid plexus carcinoma (CPC) (WHO grade III). (medscape.com)
  • This coronal T1-weighted magnetic resonance image (MRI) following contrast administration shows a homogeneously enhancing choroid plexus papilloma within the right lateral ventricle of a 1-year-old boy. (medscape.com)
  • There is no evidence of hSNF5/INI1 point mutations in patients with choroid plexus papilloma. (medscape.com)
  • The constitutional 9p duplication is another rare abnormality whose association with choroid plexus hyperplasia and choroid plexus papilloma has been reported. (medscape.com)
  • [ 12 ] Extra copies of chromosome arm 9p have also been found in patients harboring either a sporadic choroid plexus papilloma or carcinoma-a finding that implicates this locus in the formation of both of these tumors. (medscape.com)
  • The proportion of CPC to choroid plexus papilloma (CPP) was much higher than that reported elsewhere. (nih.gov)
  • 8. Ultrasound in the diagnosis of choroid plexus papilloma. (nih.gov)
  • 9. Choroid plexus papilloma in a 4-month-old child: a case report. (nih.gov)
  • 12. Choroid plexus papilloma: magnetic resonance, computed tomography, and angiographic observations. (nih.gov)
  • 13. Congenital choroid plexus papilloma of the third ventricle: diagnosis with real-time sonography and MR imaging. (nih.gov)
  • 15. Malignant choroid plexus papilloma with extraneural metastasis. (nih.gov)
  • 17. Choroid plexus papilloma of the III ventricle in an infant. (nih.gov)
  • 20. [A choroid plexus papilloma of the third ventricle in the neonatal period--a case report]. (nih.gov)
  • Papillomas (see PAPILLOMA, CHOROID PLEXUS ) and carcinomas are the most common histologic subtypes, and tend to seed throughout the ventricular and subarachnoid spaces. (nih.gov)
  • Choroid plexus neoplasms are rare, intraventricular, primary central nervous system (CNS) tumors derived from choroid plexus epithelium that are seen predominantly in children. (medscape.com)
  • [ 2 , 3 ] In adults, they account for less than 1% of primary intracranial neoplasms, whereas choroid plexus tumors represent up to 5% of pediatric brain tumors, and up to 20% of those arising in children aged 1 year and younger. (medscape.com)
  • Up to 90% of choroid plexus tumors in children are papillomas, and up to 70% of all choroid plexus papillomas occur in children younger than 2 years. (medscape.com)
  • Although the vast majority of choroid plexus tumors are sporadic, hereditary factors appear to play a role in the development of some choroid plexus papillomas and carcinomas. (medscape.com)
  • Choroid plexus tumors consist of papillomas and carcinomas. (medscape.com)
  • Choroid plexus tumors are rare tumors of neuroectodermal origin. (medscape.com)
  • Choroid plexus carcinomas are one of the tumors found in Li-Fraumeni families with TP53 germline mutations. (medscape.com)
  • In families with this mutation, researchers have identified the development of both renal and extrarenal malignant rhabdoid tumors, choroid plexus carcinomas, atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors, and medulloblastomas. (medscape.com)
  • [ 6 , 7 ] It therefore has been suggested that tumors believed to be choroid plexus carcinomas with hSNF5/INI1 mutations may actually be atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors. (medscape.com)
  • Multiple chromosomal imbalances have been described in reports of comparative genomic hybridization of choroid plexus tumors. (medscape.com)
  • Sixty-five of 70 patients (93%) with adrenocortical tumors (ACTs), 9 of 13 patients (69%) with choroid plexus carcinoma (CPC), and 3 of 41 patients (7.3%) with osteosarcoma carried the mutation. (nih.gov)
  • Benign or malignant tumors which arise from the choroid plexus of the ventricles of the brain. (nih.gov)
  • It is the most common primary intracranial neoplasm and the most diversified in histologic patterns among all primary tumors of the CNS. (medscape.com)
  • [ 17 , 23 ] Somatic mutations of the hSNF5/INI1 gene have also been reported in cases of choroid plexus carcinoma. (medscape.com)
  • The vast majority of choroid plexus neoplasms arise within the ventricles. (medscape.com)
  • [ 28 , 32 ] Positive nuclear staining for p53 protein is evident in the majority of choroid plexus carcinomas (10 of 11), whereas it is only seen rarely in choroid plexus papillomas (one of 12). (medscape.com)
  • Seeding of the CSF may be seen even in benign choroid plexus papillomas, but leptomeningeal dissemination is much more common in choroid plexus carcinomas. (medscape.com)
  • Meningiomas , as defined by the 2016 World Health Organization (WHO), are "a group of mostly benign, slow-growing neoplasms that most likely derive from the meningothelial cells of the arachnoid layer. (medscape.com)
  • Irrespective of patient age, choroid plexus papillomas outnumber choroid plexus carcinomas by a 5:1 ratio. (medscape.com)
  • Choroid plexus carcinomas are also far more common in the pediatric population, with approximately 80% of choroid plexus carcinomas occurring in children. (medscape.com)
  • Choroid plexus carcinomas occasionally arise in association with hereditary cancer predisposition syndromes, including the Li-Fraumeni and rhabdoid predisposition syndromes, with germline mutations of TP53 and hSNF5/INI1/SMARCB1, respectively. (medscape.com)
  • Choroid plexus neoplasms can produce hydrocephalus and increased intracranial pressure by a number of mechanisms, including obstruction of normal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow, overproduction of CSF by the tumor itself, local expansion of the ventricles, or spontaneous hemorrhage. (medscape.com)
  • The most frequent route of choroid plexus tumor spread is via seeding of the CSF. (medscape.com)
  • 10. Pediatric choroid plexus neoplasms: MR, CT, and pathologic correlation. (nih.gov)
  • ELZONRIS is a CD123-directed cytotoxin indicated for the treatment of blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN) in adults and in pediatric patients 2 years and older. (nih.gov)
  • Several authors have reported choroid plexus papillomas in girls with Aicardi syndrome. (medscape.com)
  • In the setting of an X;17(q12;p13) translocation, hypomelanosis of Ito has been associated with the development of choroid plexus papillomas. (medscape.com)
  • The third ventricle is the least common intraventricular location for choroid plexus neoplasms, irrespective of patient age. (medscape.com)
  • Metastatic neoplasms may involve the third ventricle via its roof, floor, lateral wall, or choroid plexus. (medscape.com)
  • 4. Lateral ventricular neoplasms of the brain: differential diagnosis based on clinical, CT, and MR findings. (nih.gov)
  • Intraventricular meningiomas probably arise from the meningothelial cells of the tela choroidea, where there is an arachnoidal invagination into the stromal base of the choroid plexus. (medscape.com)
  • Cerebrospinal fluid is made by the choroid plexus, which is in spaces in the brain called ventricles . (cancer.org)
  • 16. Childhood choroid plexus neoplasms. (nih.gov)
  • The overall annual incidence of choroid plexus neoplasms for all ages is 0.3 cases per million. (medscape.com)
  • During early embryonic development, the tela choroidea represents a portion of the pia and, together with the adjacent ependyma, forms the roof of the diencephalon. (medscape.com)

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