Choroid Diseases: Disorders of the choroid including hereditary choroidal diseases, neoplasms, and other abnormalities of the vascular layer of the uvea.Choroid Plexus: A villous structure of tangled masses of BLOOD VESSELS contained within the third, lateral, and fourth ventricles of the BRAIN. It regulates part of the production and composition of CEREBROSPINAL FLUID.Choroid: The thin, highly vascular membrane covering most of the posterior of the eye between the RETINA and SCLERA.Choroid Plexus Neoplasms: Benign or malignant tumors which arise from the choroid plexus of the ventricles of the brain. Papillomas (see PAPILLOMA, CHOROID PLEXUS) and carcinomas are the most common histologic subtypes, and tend to seed throughout the ventricular and subarachnoid spaces. Clinical features include headaches, ataxia and alterations of consciousness, primarily resulting from associated HYDROCEPHALUS. (From Devita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, p2072; J Neurosurg 1998 Mar;88(3):521-8)Papilloma, Choroid Plexus: A usually benign neoplasm that arises from the cuboidal epithelium of the choroid plexus and takes the form of an enlarged CHOROID PLEXUS, which may be associated with oversecretion of CSF. The tumor usually presents in the first decade of life with signs of increased intracranial pressure including HEADACHES; ATAXIA; DIPLOPIA; and alterations of mental status. In children it is most common in the lateral ventricles and in adults it tends to arise in the fourth ventricle. Malignant transformation to choroid plexus carcinomas may rarely occur. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p667; DeVita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, p2072)Choroid Neoplasms: Tumors of the choroid; most common intraocular tumors are malignant melanomas of the choroid. These usually occur after puberty and increase in incidence with advancing age. Most malignant melanomas of the uveal tract develop from benign melanomas (nevi).Cerebral Ventricle Neoplasms: Neoplasms located in the brain ventricles, including the two lateral, the third, and the fourth ventricle. Ventricular tumors may be primary (e.g., CHOROID PLEXUS NEOPLASMS and GLIOMA, SUBEPENDYMAL), metastasize from distant organs, or occur as extensions of locally invasive tumors from adjacent brain structures.Cerebrospinal Fluid: A watery fluid that is continuously produced in the CHOROID PLEXUS and circulates around the surface of the BRAIN; SPINAL CORD; and in the CEREBRAL VENTRICLES.Uvea: The pigmented vascular coat of the eyeball, consisting of the CHOROID; CILIARY BODY; and IRIS, which are continuous with each other. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Ependyma: A thin membrane that lines the CEREBRAL VENTRICLES and the central canal of the SPINAL CORD.Pigment Epithelium of Eye: The layer of pigment-containing epithelial cells in the RETINA; the CILIARY BODY; and the IRIS in the eye.Sclera: The white, opaque, fibrous, outer tunic of the eyeball, covering it entirely excepting the segment covered anteriorly by the cornea. It is essentially avascular but contains apertures for vessels, lymphatics, and nerves. It receives the tendons of insertion of the extraocular muscles and at the corneoscleral junction contains the canal of Schlemm. (From Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Gyrate Atrophy: Progressive, autosomal recessive, diffuse atrophy of the choroid, pigment epithelium, and sensory retina that begins in childhood.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Pharmacy: The practice of compounding and dispensing medicinal preparations.Click Chemistry: Organic chemistry methodology that mimics the modular nature of various biosynthetic processes. It uses highly reliable and selective reactions designed to "click" i.e., rapidly join small modular units together in high yield, without offensive byproducts. In combination with COMBINATORIAL CHEMISTRY TECHNIQUES, it is used for the synthesis of new compounds and combinatorial libraries.Online Systems: Systems where the input data enter the computer directly from the point of origin (usually a terminal or workstation) and/or in which output data are transmitted directly to that terminal point of origin. (Sippl, Computer Dictionary, 4th ed)Visual Perception: The selecting and organizing of visual stimuli based on the individual's past experience.Apraxia, Ideomotor: A form of apraxia characterized by an acquired inability to carry out a complex motor activity despite the ability to mentally formulate the action. This condition has been attributed to a disruption of connections between the dominant parietal cortex and supplementary and premotor cortical regions in both hemispheres. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p57)Choroidal Neovascularization: A pathological process consisting of the formation of new blood vessels in the CHOROID.Intravitreal Injections: The administration of substances into the VITREOUS BODY of the eye with a hypodermic syringe.Macular Degeneration: Degenerative changes in the RETINA usually of older adults which results in a loss of vision in the center of the visual field (the MACULA LUTEA) because of damage to the retina. It occurs in dry and wet forms.Fluorescein Angiography: Visualization of a vascular system after intravenous injection of a fluorescein solution. The images may be photographed or televised. It is used especially in studying the retinal and uveal vasculature.Retinal Neovascularization: Formation of new blood vessels originating from the retinal veins and extending along the inner (vitreal) surface of the retina.Laser Coagulation: The use of green light-producing LASERS to stop bleeding. The green light is selectively absorbed by HEMOGLOBIN, thus triggering BLOOD COAGULATION.Wet Macular Degeneration: A form of RETINAL DEGENERATION in which abnormal CHOROIDAL NEOVASCULARIZATION occurs under the RETINA and MACULA LUTEA, causing bleeding and leaking of fluid. This leads to bulging and or lifting of the macula and the distortion or destruction of central vision.Vitreous Body: The transparent, semigelatinous substance that fills the cavity behind the CRYSTALLINE LENS of the EYE and in front of the RETINA. It is contained in a thin hyaloid membrane and forms about four fifths of the optic globe.Angiogenesis Inhibitors: Agents and endogenous substances that antagonize or inhibit the development of new blood vessels.Uveomeningoencephalitic Syndrome: A syndrome characterized by bilateral granulomatous UVEITIS with IRITIS and secondary GLAUCOMA, premature ALOPECIA, symmetrical VITILIGO, poliosis circumscripta (a strand of depigmented hair), HEARING DISORDERS, and meningeal signs (neck stiffness and headache). Examination of the cerebrospinal fluid reveals a pattern consistent with MENINGITIS, ASEPTIC. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p748; Surv Ophthalmol 1995 Jan;39(4):265-292)Retinal Hemorrhage: Bleeding from the vessels of the retina.Uveitis, Anterior: Inflammation of the anterior uvea comprising the iris, angle structures, and the ciliary body. Manifestations of this disorder include ciliary injection, exudation into the anterior chamber, iris changes, and adhesions between the iris and lens (posterior synechiae). Intraocular pressure may be increased or reduced.Visual Acuity: Clarity or sharpness of OCULAR VISION or the ability of the eye to see fine details. Visual acuity depends on the functions of RETINA, neuronal transmission, and the interpretative ability of the brain. Normal visual acuity is expressed as 20/20 indicating that one can see at 20 feet what should normally be seen at that distance. Visual acuity can also be influenced by brightness, color, and contrast.Tomography, Optical Coherence: An imaging method using LASERS that is used for mapping subsurface structure. When a reflective site in the sample is at the same optical path length (coherence) as the reference mirror, the detector observes interference fringes.Retinal Detachment: Separation of the inner layers of the retina (neural retina) from the pigment epithelium. Retinal detachment occurs more commonly in men than in women, in eyes with degenerative myopia, in aging and in aphakia. It may occur after an uncomplicated cataract extraction, but it is seen more often if vitreous humor has been lost during surgery. (Dorland, 27th ed; Newell, Ophthalmology: Principles and Concepts, 7th ed, p310-12).Fundus Oculi: The concave interior of the eye, consisting of the retina, the choroid, the sclera, the optic disk, and blood vessels, seen by means of the ophthalmoscope. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Fovea Centralis: An area approximately 1.5 millimeters in diameter within the macula lutea where the retina thins out greatly because of the oblique shifting of all layers except the pigment epithelium layer. It includes the sloping walls of the fovea (clivus) and contains a few rods in its periphery. In its center (foveola) are the cones most adapted to yield high visual acuity, each cone being connected to only one ganglion cell. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Photochemotherapy: Therapy using oral or topical photosensitizing agents with subsequent exposure to light.Ophthalmologic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the eye or any of its parts.Cerebrospinal Fluid Rhinorrhea: Discharge of cerebrospinal fluid through the nose. Common etiologies include trauma, neoplasms, and prior surgery, although the condition may occur spontaneously. (Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 1997 Apr;116(4):442-9)Ethmoid Bone: A light and spongy (pneumatized) bone that lies between the orbital part of FRONTAL BONE and the anterior of SPHENOID BONE. Ethmoid bone separates the ORBIT from the ETHMOID SINUS. It consists of a horizontal plate, a perpendicular plate, and two lateral labyrinths.Sphenoid Sinus: One of the paired air spaces located in the body of the SPHENOID BONE behind the ETHMOID BONE in the middle of the skull. Sphenoid sinus communicates with the posterosuperior part of NASAL CAVITY on the same side.Frontal Bone: The bone that forms the frontal aspect of the skull. Its flat part forms the forehead, articulating inferiorly with the NASAL BONE and the CHEEK BONE on each side of the face.Optic Nerve Injuries: Injuries to the optic nerve induced by a trauma to the face or head. These may occur with closed or penetrating injuries. Relatively minor compression of the superior aspect of orbit may also result in trauma to the optic nerve. Clinical manifestations may include visual loss, PAPILLEDEMA, and an afferent pupillary defect.Microsurgery: The performance of surgical procedures with the aid of a microscope.Cranial Fossa, Anterior: The compartment containing the inferior part and anterior extremities of the frontal lobes (FRONTAL LOBE) of the cerebral hemispheres. It is formed mainly by orbital parts of the FRONTAL BONE and the lesser wings of the SPHENOID BONE.Neurosurgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the nervous system or its parts.Optic Nerve: The 2nd cranial nerve which conveys visual information from the RETINA to the brain. The nerve carries the axons of the RETINAL GANGLION CELLS which sort at the OPTIC CHIASM and continue via the OPTIC TRACTS to the brain. The largest projection is to the lateral geniculate nuclei; other targets include the SUPERIOR COLLICULI and the SUPRACHIASMATIC NUCLEI. Though known as the second cranial nerve, it is considered part of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.Cranial Fossa, Middle: The compartment containing the anterior extremities and half the inferior surface of the temporal lobes (TEMPORAL LOBE) of the cerebral hemispheres. Lying posterior and inferior to the anterior cranial fossa (CRANIAL FOSSA, ANTERIOR), it is formed by part of the TEMPORAL BONE and SPHENOID BONE. It is separated from the posterior cranial fossa (CRANIAL FOSSA, POSTERIOR) by crests formed by the superior borders of the petrous parts of the temporal bones.Optic Nerve Glioma: Glial cell derived tumors arising from the optic nerve, usually presenting in childhood.Neurofibroma, Plexiform: A type of neurofibroma manifesting as a diffuse overgrowth of subcutaneous tissue, usually involving the face, scalp, neck, and chest but occasionally occurring in the abdomen or pelvis. The tumors tend to progress, and may extend along nerve roots to eventually involve the spinal roots and spinal cord. This process is almost always a manifestation of NEUROFIBROMATOSIS 1. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1016; J Pediatr 1997 Nov;131(5):678-82)Cranial Nerve Neoplasms: Benign and malignant neoplasms that arise from one or more of the twelve cranial nerves.Optic Nerve Neoplasms: Benign and malignant neoplasms that arise from the optic nerve or its sheath. OPTIC NERVE GLIOMA is the most common histologic type. Optic nerve neoplasms tend to cause unilateral visual loss and an afferent pupillary defect and may spread via neural pathways to the brain.Neurofibromatosis 1: An autosomal dominant inherited disorder (with a high frequency of spontaneous mutations) that features developmental changes in the nervous system, muscles, bones, and skin, most notably in tissue derived from the embryonic NEURAL CREST. Multiple hyperpigmented skin lesions and subcutaneous tumors are the hallmark of this disease. Peripheral and central nervous system neoplasms occur frequently, especially OPTIC NERVE GLIOMA and NEUROFIBROSARCOMA. NF1 is caused by mutations which inactivate the NF1 gene (GENES, NEUROFIBROMATOSIS 1) on chromosome 17q. The incidence of learning disabilities is also elevated in this condition. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1014-18) There is overlap of clinical features with NOONAN SYNDROME in a syndrome called neurofibromatosis-Noonan syndrome. Both the PTPN11 and NF1 gene products are involved in the SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION pathway of Ras (RAS PROTEINS).Fibrous Dysplasia of Bone: A disease of bone marked by thinning of the cortex by fibrous tissue containing bony spicules, producing pain, disability, and gradually increasing deformity. Only one bone may be involved (FIBROUS DYSPLASIA, MONOSTOTIC) or several (FIBROUS DYSPLASIA, POLYOSTOTIC).Eyebrows: Curved rows of HAIR located on the upper edges of the eye sockets.Neurofibroma: A moderately firm, benign, encapsulated tumor resulting from proliferation of SCHWANN CELLS and FIBROBLASTS that includes portions of nerve fibers. The tumors usually develop along peripheral or cranial nerves and are a central feature of NEUROFIBROMATOSIS 1, where they may occur intracranially or involve spinal roots. Pathologic features include fusiform enlargement of the involved nerve. Microscopic examination reveals a disorganized and loose cellular pattern with elongated nuclei intermixed with fibrous strands. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1016)Glioma: Benign and malignant central nervous system neoplasms derived from glial cells (i.e., astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and ependymocytes). Astrocytes may give rise to astrocytomas (ASTROCYTOMA) or glioblastoma multiforme (see GLIOBLASTOMA). Oligodendrocytes give rise to oligodendrogliomas (OLIGODENDROGLIOMA) and ependymocytes may undergo transformation to become EPENDYMOMA; CHOROID PLEXUS NEOPLASMS; or colloid cysts of the third ventricle. (From Escourolle et al., Manual of Basic Neuropathology, 2nd ed, p21)Epiretinal Membrane: A membrane on the vitreal surface of the retina resulting from the proliferation of one or more of three retinal elements: (1) fibrous astrocytes; (2) fibrocytes; and (3) retinal pigment epithelial cells. Localized epiretinal membranes may occur at the posterior pole of the eye without clinical signs or may cause marked loss of vision as a result of covering, distorting, or detaching the fovea centralis. Epiretinal membranes may cause vascular leakage and secondary retinal edema. In younger individuals some membranes appear to be developmental in origin and occur in otherwise normal eyes. The majority occur in association with retinal holes, ocular concussions, retinal inflammation, or after ocular surgery. (Newell, Ophthalmology: Principles and Concepts, 7th ed, p291)Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A: The original member of the family of endothelial cell growth factors referred to as VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL GROWTH FACTORS. Vascular endothelial growth factor-A was originally isolated from tumor cells and referred to as "tumor angiogenesis factor" and "vascular permeability factor". Although expressed at high levels in certain tumor-derived cells it is produced by a wide variety of cell types. In addition to stimulating vascular growth and vascular permeability it may play a role in stimulating VASODILATION via NITRIC OXIDE-dependent pathways. Alternative splicing of the mRNA for vascular endothelial growth factor A results in several isoforms of the protein being produced.Diabetic Retinopathy: Disease of the RETINA as a complication of DIABETES MELLITUS. It is characterized by the progressive microvascular complications, such as ANEURYSM, interretinal EDEMA, and intraocular PATHOLOGIC NEOVASCULARIZATION.Light Coagulation: The coagulation of tissue by an intense beam of light, including laser (LASER COAGULATION). In the eye it is used in the treatment of retinal detachments, retinal holes, aneurysms, hemorrhages, and malignant and benign neoplasms. (Dictionary of Visual Science, 3d ed)Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized: Antibodies from non-human species whose protein sequences have been modified to make them nearly identical with human antibodies. If the constant region and part of the variable region are replaced, they are called humanized. If only the constant region is modified they are called chimeric. INN names for humanized antibodies end in -zumab.Vascular Endothelial Growth Factors: A family of angiogenic proteins that are closely-related to VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL GROWTH FACTOR A. They play an important role in the growth and differentiation of vascular as well as lymphatic endothelial cells.Endothelial Growth Factors: These growth factors are soluble mitogens secreted by a variety of organs. The factors are a mixture of two single chain polypeptides which have affinity to heparin. Their molecular weight are organ and species dependent. They have mitogenic and chemotactic effects and can stimulate endothelial cells to grow and synthesize DNA. The factors are related to both the basic and acidic FIBROBLAST GROWTH FACTORS but have different amino acid sequences.Polycystic Kidney, Autosomal Dominant: Kidney disorders with autosomal dominant inheritance and characterized by multiple CYSTS in both KIDNEYS with progressive deterioration of renal function.TRPP Cation Channels: A subgroup of TRP cation channels that are widely expressed in various cell types. Defects are associated with POLYCYSTIC KIDNEY DISEASES.Polycystic Kidney Diseases: Hereditary diseases that are characterized by the progressive expansion of a large number of tightly packed CYSTS within the KIDNEYS. They include diseases with autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive inheritance.Cysts: Any fluid-filled closed cavity or sac that is lined by an EPITHELIUM. Cysts can be of normal, abnormal, non-neoplastic, or neoplastic tissues.Visna-maedi virus: A species of LENTIVIRUS, subgenus ovine-caprine lentiviruses (LENTIVIRUSES, OVINE-CAPRINE), that can cause chronic pneumonia (maedi), mastitis, arthritis, and encephalomyelitis (visna) in sheep. Maedi is a progressive pneumonia of sheep which is similar to but not the same as jaagsiekte (PULMONARY ADENOMATOSIS, OVINE). Visna is a demyelinating leukoencephalomyelitis of sheep which is similar to but not the same as SCRAPIE.Kidney: Body organ that filters blood for the secretion of URINE and that regulates ion concentrations.Polycystic Kidney, Autosomal Recessive: A genetic disorder with autosomal recessive inheritance, characterized by multiple CYSTS in both KIDNEYS and associated LIVER lesions. Serious manifestations are usually present at BIRTH with high PERINATAL MORTALITY.Cyst Fluid: Liquid material found in epithelial-lined closed cavities or sacs.Indocyanine Green: A tricarbocyanine dye that is used diagnostically in liver function tests and to determine blood volume and cardiac output.Food Coloring Agents: Natural or synthetic dyes used as coloring agents in processed foods.Retinal Pigment Epithelium: The single layer of pigment-containing epithelial cells in the RETINA, situated closely to the tips (outer segments) of the RETINAL PHOTORECEPTOR CELLS. These epithelial cells are macroglia that perform essential functions for the photoreceptor cells, such as in nutrient transport, phagocytosis of the shed photoreceptor membranes, and ensuring retinal attachment.Retina: The ten-layered nervous tissue membrane of the eye. It is continuous with the OPTIC NERVE and receives images of external objects and transmits visual impulses to the brain. Its outer surface is in contact with the CHOROID and the inner surface with the VITREOUS BODY. The outer-most layer is pigmented, whereas the inner nine layers are transparent.Ophthalmoscopes: Devices for examining the interior of the eye, permitting the clear visualization of the structures of the eye at any depth. (UMDNS, 1999)Electroretinography: Recording of electric potentials in the retina after stimulation by light.Meta-Analysis as Topic: A quantitative method of combining the results of independent studies (usually drawn from the published literature) and synthesizing summaries and conclusions which may be used to evaluate therapeutic effectiveness, plan new studies, etc., with application chiefly in the areas of research and medicine.Odds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Glaucoma, Neovascular: A form of secondary glaucoma which develops as a consequence of another ocular disease and is attributed to the forming of new vessels in the angle of the anterior chamber.Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic: Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Ophthalmoscopy: Examination of the interior of the eye with an ophthalmoscope.Retinal DiseasesPhotography: Method of making images on a sensitized surface by exposure to light or other radiant energy.Eye Diseases: Diseases affecting the eye.Gastric Fundus: The superior portion of the body of the stomach above the level of the cardiac notch.Mydriatics: Agents that dilate the pupil. They may be either sympathomimetics or parasympatholytics.Retinal Vein: Central retinal vein and its tributaries. It runs a short course within the optic nerve and then leaves and empties into the superior ophthalmic vein or cavernous sinus.Ancillary Services, Hospital: Those support services other than room, board, and medical and nursing services that are provided to hospital patients in the course of care. They include such services as laboratory, radiology, pharmacy, and physical therapy services.Medical History Taking: Acquiring information from a patient on past medical conditions and treatments.Amblyopia: A nonspecific term referring to impaired vision. Major subcategories include stimulus deprivation-induced amblyopia and toxic amblyopia. Stimulus deprivation-induced amblyopia is a developmental disorder of the visual cortex. A discrepancy between visual information received by the visual cortex from each eye results in abnormal cortical development. STRABISMUS and REFRACTIVE ERRORS may cause this condition. Toxic amblyopia is a disorder of the OPTIC NERVE which is associated with ALCOHOLISM, tobacco SMOKING, and other toxins and as an adverse effect of the use of some medications.Strabismus: Misalignment of the visual axes of the eyes. In comitant strabismus the degree of ocular misalignment does not vary with the direction of gaze. In noncomitant strabismus the degree of misalignment varies depending on direction of gaze or which eye is fixating on the target. (Miller, Walsh & Hoyt's Clinical Neuro-Ophthalmology, 4th ed, p641)Trachoma: A chronic infection of the CONJUNCTIVA and CORNEA caused by CHLAMYDIA TRACHOMATIS.Visual Fields: The total area or space visible in a person's peripheral vision with the eye looking straightforward.Curriculum: A course of study offered by an educational institution.Pupil Disorders: Conditions which affect the structure or function of the pupil of the eye, including disorders of innervation to the pupillary constrictor or dilator muscles, and disorders of pupillary reflexes.Optic Nerve Diseases: Conditions which produce injury or dysfunction of the second cranial or optic nerve, which is generally considered a component of the central nervous system. Damage to optic nerve fibers may occur at or near their origin in the retina, at the optic disk, or in the nerve, optic chiasm, optic tract, or lateral geniculate nuclei. Clinical manifestations may include decreased visual acuity and contrast sensitivity, impaired color vision, and an afferent pupillary defect.Methylprednisolone: A PREDNISOLONE derivative with similar anti-inflammatory action.Powders: Substances made up of an aggregation of small particles, as that obtained by grinding or trituration of a solid drug. In pharmacy it is a form in which substances are administered. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Solvents: Liquids that dissolve other substances (solutes), generally solids, without any change in chemical composition, as, water containing sugar. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Methylprednisolone Hemisuccinate: A water-soluble ester of METHYLPREDNISOLONE used for cardiac, allergic, and hypoxic emergencies.Solutions: The homogeneous mixtures formed by the mixing of a solid, liquid, or gaseous substance (solute) with a liquid (the solvent), from which the dissolved substances can be recovered by physical processes. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Pulse Therapy, Drug: Administration of high doses of pharmaceuticals over short periods of time.Infusions, Intravenous: The long-term (minutes to hours) administration of a fluid into the vein through venipuncture, either by letting the fluid flow by gravity or by pumping it.Injections: Introduction of substances into the body using a needle and syringe.Anti-Inflammatory Agents: Substances that reduce or suppress INFLAMMATION.Glucocorticoids: A group of CORTICOSTEROIDS that affect carbohydrate metabolism (GLUCONEOGENESIS, liver glycogen deposition, elevation of BLOOD SUGAR), inhibit ADRENOCORTICOTROPIC HORMONE secretion, and possess pronounced anti-inflammatory activity. They also play a role in fat and protein metabolism, maintenance of arterial blood pressure, alteration of the connective tissue response to injury, reduction in the number of circulating lymphocytes, and functioning of the central nervous system.Ophthalmology: A surgical specialty concerned with the structure and function of the eye and the medical and surgical treatment of its defects and diseases.PubMed: A bibliographic database that includes MEDLINE as its primary subset. It is produced by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), part of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. PubMed, which is searchable through NLM's Web site, also includes access to additional citations to selected life sciences journals not in MEDLINE, and links to other resources such as the full-text of articles at participating publishers' Web sites, NCBI's molecular biology databases, and PubMed Central.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.BooksPublishing: "The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.MEDLINE: The premier bibliographic database of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. MEDLINE® (MEDLARS Online) is the primary subset of PUBMED and can be searched on NLM's Web site in PubMed or the NLM Gateway. MEDLINE references are indexed with MEDICAL SUBJECT HEADINGS (MeSH).Serial Publications: Publications in any medium issued in successive parts bearing numerical or chronological designations and intended to be continued indefinitely. (ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983, p203)Biological Science Disciplines: All of the divisions of the natural sciences dealing with the various aspects of the phenomena of life and vital processes. The concept includes anatomy and physiology, biochemistry and biophysics, and the biology of animals, plants, and microorganisms. It should be differentiated from BIOLOGY, one of its subdivisions, concerned specifically with the origin and life processes of living organisms.Abstracting and Indexing as Topic: Activities performed to identify concepts and aspects of published information and research reports.Information Storage and Retrieval: Organized activities related to the storage, location, search, and retrieval of information.Bibliometrics: The use of statistical methods in the analysis of a body of literature to reveal the historical development of subject fields and patterns of authorship, publication, and use. Formerly called statistical bibliography. (from The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Antibodies, Monoclonal: Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.Antibodies: Immunoglobulin molecules having a specific amino acid sequence by virtue of which they interact only with the ANTIGEN (or a very similar shape) that induced their synthesis in cells of the lymphoid series (especially PLASMA CELLS).Antibody Specificity: The property of antibodies which enables them to react with some ANTIGENIC DETERMINANTS and not with others. Specificity is dependent on chemical composition, physical forces, and molecular structure at the binding site.Antibodies, Viral: Immunoglobulins produced in response to VIRAL ANTIGENS.Antibodies, Bacterial: Immunoglobulins produced in a response to BACTERIAL ANTIGENS.Antibody Formation: The production of ANTIBODIES by proliferating and differentiated B-LYMPHOCYTES under stimulation by ANTIGENS.Fluorescent Antibody Technique: Test for tissue antigen using either a direct method, by conjugation of antibody with fluorescent dye (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, DIRECT) or an indirect method, by formation of antigen-antibody complex which is then labeled with fluorescein-conjugated anti-immunoglobulin antibody (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, INDIRECT). The tissue is then examined by fluorescence microscopy.Epitopes: Sites on an antigen that interact with specific antibodies.Antibodies, Neutralizing: Antibodies that reduce or abolish some biological activity of a soluble antigen or infectious agent, usually a virus.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Electrical Equipment and Supplies: Apparatus and instruments that generate and operate with ELECTRICITY, and their electrical components.Records as Topic: The commitment in writing, as authentic evidence, of something having legal importance. The concept includes certificates of birth, death, etc., as well as hospital, medical, and other institutional records.Computer Peripherals: Various units or machines that operate in combination or in conjunction with a computer but are not physically part of it. Peripheral devices typically display computer data, store data from the computer and return the data to the computer on demand, prepare data for human use, or acquire data from a source and convert it to a form usable by a computer. (Computer Dictionary, 4th ed.)Interior Design and Furnishings: The planning of the furnishings and decorations of an architectural interior.Minicomputers: Small computers that lack the speed, memory capacity, and instructional capability of the full-size computer but usually retain its programmable flexibility. They are larger, faster, and more flexible, powerful, and expensive than microcomputers.TexasSpain: Parliamentary democracy located between France on the northeast and Portugual on the west and bordered by the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea.Cohort Effect: Variation in health status arising from different causal factors to which each birth cohort in a population is exposed as environment and society change.Microcomputers: Small computers using LSI (large-scale integration) microprocessor chips as the CPU (central processing unit) and semiconductor memories for compact, inexpensive storage of program instructions and data. They are smaller and less expensive than minicomputers and are usually built into a dedicated system where they are optimized for a particular application. "Microprocessor" may refer to just the CPU or the entire microcomputer.Hemoglobin J: A group of abnormal hemoglobins with similar electrophoretic characteristics. They have faster electrophoretic mobility and different amino acid substitutions in either the alpha or beta chains than normal adult hemoglobin. Some of the variants produce hematologic abnormalities, others result in no clinical disorders.Body Fluids: Liquid components of living organisms.Methoxydimethyltryptamines: Compounds that contain the biogenic monoamine tryptamine and are substituted with one methoxy group and two methyl groups. Members of this group include several potent serotonergic hallucinogens found in several unrelated plants, skins of certain toads, and in mammalian brains. They are possibly involved in the etiology of schizophrenia.Substance P: An eleven-amino acid neurotransmitter that appears in both the central and peripheral nervous systems. It is involved in transmission of PAIN, causes rapid contractions of the gastrointestinal smooth muscle, and modulates inflammatory and immune responses.Bufotenin: A hallucinogenic serotonin analog found in frog or toad skins, mushrooms, higher plants, and mammals, especially in the brains, plasma, and urine of schizophrenics. Bufotenin has been used as a tool in CNS studies and misused as a psychedelic.Harmaline: A beta-carboline alkaloid isolated from seeds of PEGANUM.Indole Alkaloids: Group of alkaloids containing a benzylpyrrole group (derived from TRYPTOPHAN)N,N-Dimethyltryptamine: An N-methylated indoleamine derivative and serotonergic hallucinogen which occurs naturally and ubiquitously in several plant species including Psychotria veridis. It also occurs in trace amounts in mammalian brain, blood, and urine, and is known to act as an agonist or antagonist of certain SEROTONIN RECEPTORS.Secologanin Tryptamine Alkaloids: Compounds formed by condensation of secologanin with tryptamine resulting in a tetrahydro-beta-carboline which is processed further to a number of bioactive compounds. These are especially found in plants of the APOCYNACEAE; LOGANIACEAE; and RUBIACEAE families.Banisteriopsis: A plant genus of the family MALPIGHIACEAE which includes an Amazonian psychoactive plant that contains the beta-carboline harmine and N,N-dimethyltryptamine.Catharanthus: A plant genus of the family Apocynaceae. It is the source of VINCA ALKALOIDS, used in leukemia chemotherapy.Technology Transfer: Spread and adoption of inventions and techniques from one geographic area to another, from one discipline to another, or from one sector of the economy to another. For example, improvements in medical equipment may be transferred from industrial countries to developing countries, advances arising from aerospace engineering may be applied to equipment for persons with disabilities, and innovations in science arising from government research are made available to private enterprise.GeorgiaEntrepreneurship: The organization, management, and assumption of risks of a business or enterprise, usually implying an element of change or challenge and a new opportunity.Anniversaries and Special Events: Occasions to commemorate an event or occasions designated for a specific purpose.Intellectual Property: Property, such as patents, trademarks, and copyright, that results from creative effort. The Patent and Copyright Clause (Art. 1, Sec. 8, cl. 8) of the United States Constitution provides for promoting the progress of science and useful arts by securing for limited times to authors and inventors, the exclusive right to their respective writings and discoveries. (From Black's Law Dictionary, 5th ed, p1014)Technology, Pharmaceutical: The application of scientific knowledge or technology to pharmacy and the pharmaceutical industry. It includes methods, techniques, and instrumentation in the manufacture, preparation, compounding, dispensing, packaging, and storing of drugs and other preparations used in diagnostic and determinative procedures, and in the treatment of patients.Marketing of Health Services: Application of marketing principles and techniques to maximize the use of health care resources.Patents as Topic: Exclusive legal rights or privileges applied to inventions, plants, etc.Holidays: Days commemorating events. Holidays also include vacation periods.Licensure: The legal authority or formal permission from authorities to carry on certain activities which by law or regulation require such permission. It may be applied to licensure of institutions as well as individuals.National Academy of Sciences (U.S.): A United States organization of distinguished scientists and engineers established for the purpose of investigating and reporting upon any subject of art or science as requested by any department of government. The National Research Council organized by NAS serves as the principal operating agency to stimulate and support research.Hematopoietic Stem Cells: Progenitor cells from which all blood cells derive.Cell Differentiation: Progressive restriction of the developmental potential and increasing specialization of function that leads to the formation of specialized cells, tissues, and organs.Stem Cells: Relatively undifferentiated cells that retain the ability to divide and proliferate throughout postnatal life to provide progenitor cells that can differentiate into specialized cells.Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Transfer of HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELLS from BONE MARROW or BLOOD between individuals within the same species (TRANSPLANTATION, HOMOLOGOUS) or transfer within the same individual (TRANSPLANTATION, AUTOLOGOUS). Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been used as an alternative to BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTATION in the treatment of a variety of neoplasms.Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 3: One of the six homologous soluble proteins that bind insulin-like growth factors (SOMATOMEDINS) and modulate their mitogenic and metabolic actions at the cellular level.FloridaDictionaries, MedicalMyopia: A refractive error in which rays of light entering the EYE parallel to the optic axis are brought to a focus in front of the RETINA when accommodation (ACCOMMODATION, OCULAR) is relaxed. This results from an overly curved CORNEA or from the eyeball being too long from front to back. It is also called nearsightedness.Dictionaries as Topic: Lists of words, usually in alphabetical order, giving information about form, pronunciation, etymology, grammar, and meaning.Dictionaries, ChemicalTerminology as Topic: The terms, expressions, designations, or symbols used in a particular science, discipline, or specialized subject area.Blood-Brain Barrier: Specialized non-fenestrated tightly-joined ENDOTHELIAL CELLS with TIGHT JUNCTIONS that form a transport barrier for certain substances between the cerebral capillaries and the BRAIN tissue.Journal Impact Factor: A quantitative measure of the frequency on average with which articles in a journal have been cited in a given period of time.Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Journalism, Medical: The collection, writing, and editing of current interest material on topics related to biomedicine for presentation through the mass media, including newspapers, magazines, radio, or television, usually for a public audience such as health care consumers.Central Nervous System: The main information-processing organs of the nervous system, consisting of the brain, spinal cord, and meninges.Authorship: The profession of writing. Also the identity of the writer as the creator of a literary production.Nucleic Acid Hybridization: Widely used technique which exploits the ability of complementary sequences in single-stranded DNAs or RNAs to pair with each other to form a double helix. Hybridization can take place between two complimentary DNA sequences, between a single-stranded DNA and a complementary RNA, or between two RNA sequences. The technique is used to detect and isolate specific sequences, measure homology, or define other characteristics of one or both strands. (Kendrew, Encyclopedia of Molecular Biology, 1994, p503)Streptavidin: A 60-kDa extracellular protein of Streptomyces avidinii with four high-affinity biotin binding sites. Unlike AVIDIN, streptavidin has a near neutral isoelectric point and is free of carbohydrate side chains.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence: A type of IN SITU HYBRIDIZATION in which target sequences are stained with fluorescent dye so their location and size can be determined using fluorescence microscopy. This staining is sufficiently distinct that the hybridization signal can be seen both in metaphase spreads and in interphase nuclei.In Situ Hybridization: A technique that localizes specific nucleic acid sequences within intact chromosomes, eukaryotic cells, or bacterial cells through the use of specific nucleic acid-labeled probes.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Electroporation: A technique in which electric pulses of intensity in kilovolts per centimeter and of microsecond-to-millisecond duration cause a temporary loss of the semipermeability of CELL MEMBRANES, thus leading to ion leakage, escape of metabolites, and increased uptake by cells of drugs, molecular probes, and DNA.Gene Library: A large collection of DNA fragments cloned (CLONING, MOLECULAR) from a given organism, tissue, organ, or cell type. It may contain complete genomic sequences (GENOMIC LIBRARY) or complementary DNA sequences, the latter being formed from messenger RNA and lacking intron sequences.Chief Executive Officers, Hospital: Individuals who have the formal authority to manage a hospital, including its programs and services, in accordance with the goals and objectives established by a governing body (GOVERNING BOARD).Hospital Administrators: Managerial personnel responsible for implementing policy and directing the activities of hospitals.Physician Executives: Physicians who serve in a medical and administrative capacity as head of an organized medical staff and who also may serve as liaison for the medical staff with the administration and governing board.Executive Function: A set of cognitive functions that controls complex, goal-directed thought and behavior. Executive function involves multiple domains, such as CONCEPT FORMATION, goal management, cognitive flexibility, INHIBITION control, and WORKING MEMORY. Impaired executive function is seen in a range of disorders, e.g., SCHIZOPHRENIA; and ADHD.Biopharmaceutics: The study of the physical and chemical properties of a drug and its dosage form as related to the onset, duration, and intensity of its action.Leadership: The function of directing or controlling the actions or attitudes of an individual or group with more or less willing acquiescence of the followers.Chief Cells, Gastric: Epithelial cells that line the basal half of the GASTRIC GLANDS. Chief cells synthesize and export an inactive enzyme PEPSINOGEN which is converted into the highly proteolytic enzyme PEPSIN in the acid environment of the STOMACH.State Medicine: A system of medical care regulated, controlled and financed by the government, in which the government assumes responsibility for the health needs of the population.Peptides: Members of the class of compounds composed of AMINO ACIDS joined together by peptide bonds between adjacent amino acids into linear, branched or cyclical structures. OLIGOPEPTIDES are composed of approximately 2-12 amino acids. Polypeptides are composed of approximately 13 or more amino acids. PROTEINS are linear polypeptides that are normally synthesized on RIBOSOMES.Recombinant Proteins: Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Peptide Fragments: Partial proteins formed by partial hydrolysis of complete proteins or generated through PROTEIN ENGINEERING techniques.Cloning, Molecular: The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.

Idiopathic central serous chorioretinopathy. (1/183)

Idiopathic central serous chorioretinopathy (ICSC) is usually seen in young males with Type A personality. Clinical evaluation of the macula with fundoscopy and biomicroscopy, coupled with fluorescein angiography establishes the diagnosis. Indocyanine green angiographic studies have reinformed that the basic pathology lies in choriocapillaries and retinal pigment epithelium. Most of the ICSC resolve completely in four months, and some of them could resolve early with direct photocoagulation of the leaking site. Oral steroids have no role, and could even cause an adverse reaction.  (+info)

The pathogenesis of choroidal neovascularization in patients with age-related macular degeneration. (2/183)

Laser photocoagulation and several experimental treatments for choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in patients with age-related macular degeneration attempt to ablate the neovascularization, but do not address underlying angiogenic stimuli. As a result, recurrences are a major problem. Drug treatment to counter the growth of CNV would be a major advance, but its development is impeded by lack of knowledge concerning the stimuli and other molecular signals involved in the pathogenesis of CNV. Herein we explore clues that can be gleaned from clinical, epidemiological, pathological, and experimental data. These suggest that abnormalities of the extracellular matrix of retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells may promote a pro-angiogenic RPE phenotype that contributes to the development of CNV. This provides a general hypothesis that can be tested, but it is also necessary to test hypotheses regarding the specific alterations in gene expression that contribute to CNV. Identification of alterations in gene expression will provide targets for rational design of drug treatment.  (+info)

Autosomal dominant macular atrophy at 6q14 excludes CORD7 and MCDR1/PBCRA loci. (3/183)

PURPOSE: Localization of the gene responsible for autosomal dominant atrophic macular degeneration (adMD) in a large pedigree UM:H785. METHODS: Standard ophthalmologic examinations were performed. Microsatellite markers were used to map the disease gene by linkage and haplotype analyses. RESULTS: The macular degeneration in this family is characterized by progressive retinal pigment epithelial atrophy in the macula without apparent peripheral involvement by ophthalmoscopy or functional studies. Acuity loss progressed with age and generally was worse in the older affected individuals. The rod and cone function remained normal or nearly normal in all tested affected members up to 61 years of age. The phenotype in our family has characteristics similar to Stargardt-like macular degeneration with some differences. Haplotype analysis localized the disease gene in our adMD family to an 8-cM region at 6q14, which is within the 18-cM interval of STGD3 but excludes cone-rod dystrophy 7 (CORD7; centromeric) and North Carolina macular degeneration and progressive bifocal chorioretinal atrophy (MCDR1/PBCRA; telomeric). The mapping interval overlaps with that of recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP25). CONCLUSIONS: These results implicate at least three genetically distinct loci for forms of macular degeneration that lie within a 30-cM interval on chromosome 6p11-6q16: CORD7, adMD, and MCDR1/PBCRA. Because the critical interval for the adMD family studied overlaps with STGD3 and RP25, these loci could be allelic.  (+info)

Fluorescein angiographic features of choroidal insufficiency in anterior ischemic optic neuropathy. (4/183)

Anterior ischemic optic neuropathy(AION) is known to be caused by circulatory disturbance in the anterior optic nerve(AON). Because the AON shares blood supply from the paraoptic short posterior ciliary artery with peripapillary choroid, the authors investigated the angiographic evidences of combined choroidal insufficiency in patients with acute AION. Fundus fluorescein angiograms from 30 eyes from 28 patients with acute AION were enrolled in this study. The diagnosis of acute AION was based primarily on angiographic evidences of filling delay of optic nerve head and the various clinical features, such as decreased visual acuity, visual field defects, afferent pupillary defect, and optic disc swelling. Angiographic evidences of combined choroidal filling delay were as follows: 1) circular or localized filling delay of peripapillary choroid in 15 eyes (50%), 2) generalized filling delay of posterior pole in 11 eyes (36.7%), 3) filling delay of unilateral choroid divided by watershed zone in 5 eyes (16.7%), and 4) choriocapillary filling delay in 10 eyes (33.3%). In this study, various types of choroidal insufficiency in patients with AION were observed, which helped us to differentiate AION from the other various diseases of the anterior optic nerve.  (+info)

Bullous variant of idiopathic central serous chorioretinopathy. (5/183)

BACKGROUND: Spontaneous bullous serous retinal detachment (RD) with subretinal exudation complicating idiopathic central serous chorioretinopathy (ICSC) is a rare and infrequently described clinical entity. Clinical observations are described on this variant form in 11 patients, the largest series reported to date. METHODS: 13 eyes of 11 Indian patients having this entity were followed up clinically and angiographically for 12-24 months (retrospective, longitudinal). None of the patients had any previous history of other diseases nor were they on any medications. Four eyes received laser treatment (group A); nine eyes were not treated (group B). RESULTS: All 11 patients were male, aged 23-49 years (median 37 years). The clinical and photographic records revealed subretinal exudation and inferior bullous serous RD complicating ICSC with evidence of large, single or multiple, leaking retinal pigment epithelial detachments (PEDs) in all the cases. In group A, resolution of serous RD occurred in 12 weeks (median) with a visual recovery of >/=20/30 in three out of four eyes while in group B resolution of serous retinal detachment was observed in 14 weeks (median) with eight out of nine eyes achieving a visual acuity of >/=20/30. Subretinal fibrosis developed in two eyes in group A and none of the eyes in group B. CONCLUSION: The disease is an exaggerated form of ICSC and can occur spontaneously without any history of corticosteroid therapy. Recognition of this atypical presentation is important to avoid inappropriate treatment. These observations suggest that with respect to the duration of the disease and the final visual outcome laser therapy offers no additional benefit over the natural course of this variant form of ICSC.  (+info)

CT-revealed choroidal effusions as a sign of carotid cavernous fistula. (6/183)

Choroidal effusions may appear as subtle abnormalities on CT scans. Recognition of choroidal effusions, however, is critical because they may be an early sign of ocular pathologic abnormality. After detection, the various causes of choroidal effusions, such as carotid cavernous fistulas, ocular hypotony, tumors, and inflammatory conditions, should be considered.  (+info)

Choroidal thickness changes during altered eye growth and refractive state in a primate. (7/183)

PURPOSE: In the chick, compensation for experimentally induced defocus involves changes in the thickness of the choroid. The choroid thickens in response to imposed myopic defocus and thins in response to imposed hyperopic defocus. This study was undertaken to determine whether similar choroidal changes occur in the primate eye with induced refractive errors. METHODS: Thirty-three common marmosets were used. Eyes in 26 monkeys served as untreated control eyes, and eyes in 7 received 3 weeks of monocular lid suture to induce changes in eye growth and refractive state. Refractive errors were measured using refractometry and retinoscopy, and axial ocular dimensions, including choroidal thickness, were measured using high-frequency A-scan ultrasonography. Eyes were measured before the lids were sutured and at frequent intervals after lid opening. RESULTS: In the marmoset, choroidal thickness ranges from 88 to 150 microm and increases significantly during the first year of life. Monocular lid suture initially results in short, hyperopic eyes that then become elongated and myopic. In these animals the choroids of both the experimental and the fellow control eyes also increase in thickness with age but additionally show interocular differences that vary significantly with the relative changes in vitreous chamber depth and refraction. In eyes that are shorter and more hyperopic than control eyes the choroids are thicker, and in eyes that are longer and more myopic than control eyes the choroids are thinner. CONCLUSIONS: In marmosets, the thickness of the choroid increases during postnatal eye growth. Superimposed on this developmental increase in choroidal thickness there are changes in thickness that are correlated with the induced changes in eye size. These changes are small (<50 microm) in comparison with those observed in the chick, contributing to less than a diopter change in refractive error.  (+info)

Early treatment with cyclosporin in serpiginous choroidopathy maintains remission and good visual outcome. (8/183)

AIMS: To describe management and clinical outcomes of serpiginous choroidopathy treated primarily with cyclosporin at a tertiary uveitis referral centre METHODS: A case series of 14 eyes of seven patients with serpiginous choroidopathy with follow up ranging from 1.3 to 13 years is described. All patients had fundus lesions consistent with serpiginous choroidopathy, were investigated for systemic disease, had fluorescein angiography, and were treated with combined immunosuppressive therapy including cyclosporin. RESULTS: No patients suffered significant loss of acuity after starting systemic immunosuppression with cyclosporin as the primary agent. All but one patient achieved remission and were able to stop medications with no recurrences in the follow up period. Side effects from cyclosporin were well tolerated and there were no serious complications from immunosuppression. CONCLUSIONS: Cyclosporin is a safe and effective option with which to manage serpiginous choroidopathy. Significantly, adequate immunosuppression can result in clinical remission and cessation of therapy in some patients.  (+info)

*List of MeSH codes (C11)

... choroid diseases MeSH C11.941.160.177 --- choroid hemorrhage MeSH C11.941.160.238 --- choroid neoplasms MeSH C11.941.160.244 ... graves disease MeSH C11.675.349.500.500 --- graves ophthalmopathy MeSH C11.675.504 --- granuloma, plasma cell, orbital MeSH ... iris diseases MeSH C11.941.375.060 --- aniridia MeSH C11.941.375.060.950 --- wagr syndrome MeSH C11.941.375.285 --- exfoliation ... choroid neoplasms MeSH C11.941.855.400 --- iris neoplasms MeSH C11.941.879 --- uveitis MeSH C11.941.879.780 --- panuveitis MeSH ...

*Karl Friedrich Canstatt

Über die Krankheiten der Choreida (1837) - On diseases of the choroid. Die Krankheiten des Höheren Alters und Ihre Heilung ( ... He was also the author of treatises on diseases of the eyes (1841) and Bright's disease (1844). Significant publications by ... The following year, he went to Paris to study Asiatic cholera, a disease that was then epidemic in the French capital. ... Canstatt's study of the disease, published in 1832, attracted the attention of the Belgian government, which commissioned him ...

*Rab escort protein 1

This X-linked disease is characterized by progressive dystrophy of the choroid, retinal pigment epithelium and retina. Rab (G- ...

*Robert MacLaren

... photoreceptor cell retinal ganglion cell macula capillary lamina of choroid (choriocapillaris) Eye diseases retinitis ... It addressed the progress of the disease choroideremia, or choroideraemia, in which a faulty gene, CHM, leads to a loss of REP1 ... 2016 Robot-Assisted Surgery Trial In the past, retinal diseases of the eye could be monitored to microscopic level - using ... "Vision & Disease - Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences". University of Oxford. Retrieved 30 December 2016. [8][dead ...

*Collie eye anomaly

... (CEA) is a congenital, inherited, bilateral eye disease of dogs, which affects the retina, choroid, and ... The choroid is a collection of blood vessels supplying the retina. CEA can also cause retinal or scleral coloboma, coloboma of ... The choroid, especially lateral to the optic disc, is hypoplastic (underdeveloped). A coloboma, or hole, may form in or near ... The most common sign of CEA is the presence of an area of undeveloped choroid (appearing as a pale spot) lateral to the optic ...

*Choroid

This is clinically significant for diseases affecting choroidal blood supply. The macula responsible for central vision and the ... The Choroid, also known as the choroidea or choroid coat, is the vascular layer of the eye, containing connective tissues, and ... Along with the ciliary body and iris, the choroid forms the uveal tract. The structure of the choroid is generally divided into ... The human choroid is thickest at the far extreme rear of the eye (at 0.2 mm), while in the outlying areas it narrows to 0.1 mm ...

*Ocular melanosis

The disease is caused by an increase of melanocytes in the iris, choroid, and surrounding structures. Overproduction of pigment ... Ocular melanosis (OM), also known as ocular melanocytosis or melanosis oculi, is a congenital disease of the eye which affects ...

*Corpora arenacea

Garma-Aviña, A. (2000). "Excretory Plugs from the Choroid Plexus in the Cerebrospinal Fluid of Dogs with Neurological Disease: ... are calcified structures in the pineal gland and other areas of the brain such as the choroid plexus. Older organisms have ...

*Transthyretin

Severity of disease varies greatly by mutation, with some mutations causing disease in the first or second decade of life, and ... Because transthyretin is made in part by the choroid plexus, it can be used as an immunohistochemical marker for choroid plexus ... The liver secretes transthyretin into the blood, and the choroid plexus secretes TTR into the cerebrospinal fluid. TTR was ... Treatment of familial TTR amyloid disease has historically relied on liver transplantation as a crude form of gene therapy. ...

*Choroid plexus carcinoma

A mutation in the tumor suppressor gene TP53 is usually characterized in this disease. The symptoms of choroid plexus carcinoma ... A choroid plexus carcinoma (WHO grade III) is a type of choroid plexus tumor that affects the choroid plexus of the brain. It ... Choroid plexus Brain tumor Cancer of the brain Gopal P, Parker JR, Debski R, Parker JC (August 2008). "Choroid plexus carcinoma ... Although choroid plexus carcinomas are significantly more aggressive and have half the survival rate as choroid plexus ...

*Jonathan Hutchinson

Hutchinson's angina Hutchinson's sign Hutchinson's dehidrosis Hutchinson's disease or senile degeneration of the choroid ... His lectures on neuropathogenesis, gout, leprosy, diseases of the tongue, etc., were full of original observation; but his ... Wales AE (June 1963). "Sir Jonathan Hutchinson (1828-1913)". The British Journal of Venereal Diseases. 39 (2): 67-86. doi: ... Kampmeier RH (1977). "Prenatal syphilis and Sir Jonathan Hutchinson". Sexually Transmitted Diseases. 4 (4): 167-9. doi:10.1097/ ...

*List of dog diseases

Collie eye anomaly (CEA) is a congenital, inherited, bilateral eye disease of dogs involving the retina, choroid, and sclera. ... This list of dog diseases is a selection of diseases and other conditions found in the dog. Some of these diseases are unique ... The disease in dogs is usually nodular skin lesions of the head and trunk. Aspergillosis* is a fungal disease that in dogs is ... Lyme disease* is a disease caused by Borrelia burgdorferi, a spirochaete, and spread by ticks of the genus Ixodes. Symptoms in ...

*ICD-10 Chapter VII: Diseases of the eye, adnexa

Other specified disorders of choroid (H31.9) Disorder of choroid, unspecified (H32) Chorioretinal disorders in diseases ... Other disorders of eye and adnexa in diseases classified elsewhere (H58.0) Anomalies of pupillary function in diseases ... diseases of the sense organs WHO , International Classification of Diseases (ICD). ... Disorders of sclera and cornea in diseases classified elsewhere (H19.0) Scleritis and episcleritis in diseases classified ...

*Eye disease

Other specified disordes of choroid (H31.9) Disorder of choroid, unspecified (H32) Chorioretinal disorders in diseases ... Other chorioretinal disorders in diseases classified elsewhere (H33) Retinal detachment - the retina detaches from the choroid ... This is a partial list of human eye diseases and disorders. The World Health Organization publishes a classification of known ... World Health Organization ICD-10 codes: Diseases of the eye and adnexa (H00-H59). [1]. Retrieved 2010-07-28. International ...

*List of diseases (C)

... familial paroxysmal Choriocarcinoma Chorioretinitis Chorioretinopathy dominant form microcephaly Choroid plexus cyst Choroid ... Marie-Tooth disease type 1A Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1B Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1C Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease ... Marie-Tooth disease type 2C Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2D Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4A Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease ... d Charcot disease Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease deafness dominant type Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease ...

*Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease

... thickening of the posterior choroid with elevation of the peripapillary retinal choroidal layer, optic nerve hyperemia and ... Herbort CP, Mochizuki M (2007). "Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease: inquiry into the genesis of a disease name in the historical ... and other concomitant ocular disease similar to VKH disease. The acute uveitis phase of VKH is usually responsive to high-dose ... The disease is characterised by bilateral diffuse uveitis, with pain, redness and blurring of vision. The eye symptoms may be ...

*List of diseases (P)

Papilloma of choroid plexus Papular mucinosis Papular urticaria Paracoccidioidomycosis Paraganglioma Parainfluenza virus type 3 ... Paget disease extramammary Paget disease juvenile type Paget's disease of bone Paget's disease of the breast Paget's disease, ... type 1 Polycystic kidney disease, type 2 Polycystic kidney disease, type 3 Polycystic kidney disease Polycystic ovarian disease ... This is a list of diseases starting with the letter "P". Diseases Alphabetical list 0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T ...

*List of diseases (G)

... fibromatosis dominant Gingival fibromatosis facial dysmorphism Gingival fibrosis Gingivitis Gyrate atrophy of the choroid and ... II Glycogen storage disease type V Glycogen storage disease type VI Glycogen storage disease type VII Glycogen storage disease ... Glycogen storage disease type 1B Glycogen storage disease type 1C Glycogen storage disease type 1D Glycogen storage disease ... disease type 1 Gaucher disease type 2 Gaucher disease type 3 Gaucher ichthyosis restrictive dermopathy Gaucher-like disease Gay ...

*Sympathetic ophthalmia

The disease may progress to severe uveitis with pain and photophobia. Commonly the eye remains relatively painless while the ... inflammatory disease spreads through the uvea, where characteristic focal infiltrates in the choroid named Dalén-Fuchs nodules ... modern understanding of SO derives from the works of Scotland's William MacKenzie who characterized and named the disease ...

*Friedrich August von Ammon

Berlin 1838-1847, four volumes) - Clinical presentation of diseases and malformations of the human eye. Die Behandlung des ... von Warnatz, Leipzig 1862) - Illustrated pathological anatomy of the cornea, sclera, choroid and the optic nerve. Die ... Illustrierte pathologische Anatomie der menschlichen Kornea, Sklera, Choroidea und des optischen Nerom, (hrsg. ... a monograph acclaimed for its comprehensive treatment of eye disease, as well as for its superb hand-colored illustrations and ...

*International Classification of Diseases for Oncology

NOS M9390/1 Atypical choroid plexus papilloma M9390/3 Choroid plexus carcinoma Choroid plexus papilloma, anaplastic or ... M9762/3 Heavy chain disease, NOS Alpha heavy chain disease Mu heavy chain disease Gamma heavy chain disease Franklin disease ... Paget disease of breast M8541/3 Paget disease and infiltrating duct carcinoma of breast (C50._) M8542/3 Paget disease, ... M9768/1 T-gamma lymphoproliferative disease M9769/1 Immunoglobulin deposition disease Systemic light chain disease Primary ...

*Interventricular foramina (neuroanatomy)

The choroid plexus of the third ventricles continues through the foramina into the lateral ventricles. End branches of the ... The interventricular foramina give rise to disease when they are narrowed or blocked. Narrowing of the foramen is more common ... The walls of the interventricular foramina also contain choroid plexus, a specialized CSF-producing structure, that is ... The walls of the interventricular foramina contain choroid plexus, a specialized structure that produces cerebrospinal fluid. ...

*Constantin von Monakow

Schizophrenie und Plexus chorioidei (with Kitabayashi), (1919) - Schizophrenia and the choroid plexus. Vologda Oblast ... Nervous and Mental Disease Pub. Co., 1925. Psychiatrie und Biologie, (1919) - Psychology and biology. ...

*Hubert Sattler

His treatise on Basedow's disease was included in the Graefe/Saemisch Handbuch der gesamten Augenheilkunde. Ueber die ... in particular his work involving the choroid and conjunctiva. He published works on trachoma, operative treatment of myopia, ... 1909); English translation, Basedow's disease. (1952) Beschreibung eines augenspiegels zur untersuchung der netzhaut im ... pulsating exophthalmos, Basedow's disease, tuberculosis and inflammatory conditions involving the optic nerve. ...

*History of neuroimaging

... the choroid plexuses, or large brain arteries may indirectly give important clues to the presence of structural disease in the ... This higher-level imaging is much easier to do because researchers can easily use subjects who have a disease such as ...

*Prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2

It sticks platelets together and promotes clotting; inhibiting this helps prevent heart disease. On the other hand, PTGS2 (COX- ... but also neutralized the changes of the retina and the choroid thickness caused by the injection of pro-inflammatory agents. ... Minghetti L, Pocchiari M (2007). "Cyclooxygenase-2, prostaglandin E2, and microglial activation in prion diseases". Int. Rev. ... Mechanisms of COX-2 inhibitor risk to heart disease". Life Sciences. 88 (1-2): 24-30. doi:10.1016/j.lfs.2010.10.017. PMC ...
Description of disease Choroidal dystrophies. Treatment Choroidal dystrophies. Symptoms and causes Choroidal dystrophies Prophylaxis Choroidal dystrophies
Complete information for CACD gene (Genetic Locus), Central Areolar Choroidal Dystrophy, including: function, proteins, disorders, pathways, orthologs, and expression. GeneCards - The Human Gene Compendium
Mutations in the photoreceptor tetraspanin gene peripherin-2/retinal degeneration slow (gene have already been Enzastaurin linked with human being illnesses including autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) digenic RP design dystrophy adult vitelliform macular dystrophy central areolar choroidal dystrophy and other styles of macular degeneration (MD) (http://www. are held collectively via interactions between your second intradiscal (D2) loop of both protein (4 5 RDS and ROM-1 function collectively assembling in the internal section (cell body) Enzastaurin from the photoreceptor into tetrameric primary complexes (6). These complexes are after that trafficked towards the Operating-system where they additional assemble into higher purchase oligomeric constructions including hetero-octamers and Mouse monoclonal to NANOG RDS homo-oligomers (7). These bigger complexes are kept collectively by intermolecular disulfide bonds mediated by a particular cysteine residue (C150) (8 9 among seven D2 ...
Food Sources Most infant formulas usually contain vegetable oils that provide about 10в15 major fatty acids (43). A3. ПппппDisease basal laminar drusen Doyne honeycomb retinal dystrophy (malattia leventinese) Sorsby fundus dystrophy central areolar choroidal dystrophy AMD-like late-onset maculopathy North Carolina macular dystrophy OMIM Mode of phenotype inheritance number 126700 AR Associated gene CFH EFEMP1 (fibulin-3) TIMP3 peripherinRDS peripherinRDS unknown (MCDR1 locus) Reference(s) this thesis 182 183 this thesis 143 184 пппп126600 136900 215500 - 136550 Kamagra kaufen in der apotheke AD AD AD AD пппппппппAD, autosomal dominant; AMD.
5 3 mg 100 ml 21 60 Hypnotic Sedative пппSolvent Symbol ппMethanol ппWater пп0. The development of central areolar choroidal dystrophy.
Purpose: We observed and analyzed the morphologic characteristics of polypoidal lesions and abnormal branching vascular network (BVN) in patients with polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (PCV) by optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA). Methods: A retrospective observational case series was done of patients with PCV. All patients were scanned with a 70-kHz spectral-domain OCT system using the split-spectrum amplitude-decorrelation angiography (SSADA) algorithm to distinguish blood flow from static tissue. The OCTA images of these patients were compared to those from indocyanine green angiography (ICGA). Semiautomated segmentation was used to further analyze the polypoidal lesion and the BVN. Results: We studied 13 eyes of 13 patients 51 to 69 years old. A total of 11 patients were treatment-naive. Two patients had multiple anti-VEGF injections and one underwent photodynamic therapy (PDT). Optical coherence tomography angiography was able to detect the BVN in all cases. Using ...
Neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) is the commonest cause of severe visual impairment in older adults in Caucasian white populations. Polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (PCV) has been described as a separate clinical entity differing from nAMD and other macular diseases associated with subretinal neovascularization. It remains controversial as to whether or not PCV represents a sub-type of nAMD. This article summarizes the current literature on the clinical, pathophysiological and epidemiological features and treatment responses of PCV and compares this condition to nAMD. Patients with PCV are younger and more likely Asians, and eyes with PCV lack drusen, often present with serosanguinous maculopathy or hemorrhagic pigment epithelial detachment, and have differing responses to photodynamic therapy and anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) agents. There are also significant differences in angiographic and optical coherence tomography features between PCV and nAMD. ...
In Doppler OCT images, polypoidal lesions could be clearly detected at the corresponding location of lesions in the ICGA images. By the impervious feature to dye leakage, Doppler OCT imaging could identify the more detailed vascular structure in the polypoidal lesions. Polypoidal lesions in Doppler OCT images were consisted of focal aneurysmal dilation in the vascular network. Polypoidal lesions were located in the retinal pigment epithelial detachment in 13 eyes, in the choroid in one eye, and in both the retinal pigment epithelial detachment and the choroid in one eye. Mean area of polypoidal lesions in ICGA images (0.13 mm2) was significantly larger than Doppler OCT images (0.04 mm2)(P = 0.0007). After the intravitreal injection of aflibercept, areas of polypoidal lesions in ICGA images were decreased in 14 of 15 eyes, while Doppler OCT could clearly detect this therapeutic effect in all eyes. Mean reduction rates were 65.8 % in ICGA images and 66.6 % in Doppler OCT images. Reduction rate in ...
Purpose: To describe the clinical characteristics and outcome of eyes with extrafoveal polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (PCV) treated with argon laser. Design: Prospective cohort, noninterventional study. Methods: A prospective study of Asian patients with extrafoveal PCV, confirmed on indocyanine green angiography and treated with argon laser with and without anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) therapy. Patients were followed-up over 12 months with visual, angiographic, and structural outcomes recorded. Results: Of the 93 eyes with PCV at baseline, 33 eyes (35.5%) in 31 patients had extrafoveal involvement and were treated with argon laser. Foveal involvement with fluid or blood at baseline was apparent in 23 eyes (69.7%), despite the extrafoveal location of 1 or more polyps. Of these 33 eyes, 12 (36.4%) also received anti-VEGF injections (median, 2.5 injections) over the 12-month period. Two eyes received photodynamic therapy rescue during subsequent follow-up and were excluded for ...
PURPOSE To compare the 12-month real-world visual and disease activity outcomes of eyes with polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (PCV) treated with a combination of photodynamic therapy (PDT) and anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) injections (combination group) versus those eyes treated with anti-VEGF monotherapy alone with rescue PDT being used as required (monotherapy group). DESIGN Database comparative observational study. PARTICIPANTS Eyes with PCV as graded in the Fight Retinal Blindness! database from Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, and Switzerland. METHODS Clinical information from a multisite, international registry of neovascular age-related macular degeneration was analyzed with an intention-to-treat approach. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Primary outcome measure was the change in visual acuity in logMAR letters over 12 months between the two groups analyzed with intention-to-treat approach. RESULTS Forty-one and 152 eyes received combination therapy and anti-VEGF monotherapy, ...
This study aimed to analyze the choroidal characteristics in eyes with polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (PCV, affected eyes) and unaffected fellow eyes, a
Polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (PCV) primarily affects pigmented individuals, especially Asians and African-Americans. Typically presents in 7th to 8th decad
Methods Twenty-nine patients (29 eyes) with treatment-naïve subfoveal PCV were consecutively enrolled in this institutional study. The subjects were classified into two subtypes (type 1, polypoidal choroidal neovascularisation (CNV), 16 eyes; and type 2, idiopathic PCV, 13 eyes) based on the presence or absence of both feeder and draining vessels on ICGA. Intravitreal aflibercept was administered at baseline and at 1, 2 and 4 months. The primary outcome was the polyp regression percentage after 3 monthly injections. Changes in the best-corrected visual acuity and subfoveal choroidal thickness (CT) were evaluated at 3 and 6 months. ...
4 Gription (Depuy, Warsaw, IN) Gription is a recently released, Cheap Generic Filagra Soft, super-textured, commercially pure titanium coating material currently Sof in multiple areas of orthopaedic Sooft including THA and TKA. Involvement of the macula aloneвalso called central areolar choroidal sclerosis (Fig.
Case Reports; Letter; Aged; Choroid Diseases; Coloring Agents; Female; Fluorescein Angiography; Humans; Inclusion Bodies; Indocyanine Green; Photochemotherapy; Polyps; Retinal Pigment Epithelium; Subretinal Fluid; Tomography, Optical Coherence; Visual Acuity ...
Results Exudative branching vascular networks were characterised as occult choroidal neovascularisation (38 eyes) or classic choroidal neovascularisation (7 eyes) on fluorescein angiography. Intravitreal bevacizumab maintained or improved vision in 38 eyes (84%) over 12 months and in 36 eyes (80%) over 24 months, although the mean visual acuity at 12 and 24 months did not differ significantly compared with baseline. Complete resolution of macular fluid was achieved continuously in 26 eyes (58%) during 24 months. Sixteen eyes (36%) responded once to treatment but became unresponsive to additional injections for recurrent exudation. Three eyes (7%) were refractory to treatment throughout follow-up. Cystoid macular oedema eventually developed in 10 eyes and was a poor prognostic sign for visual outcome. ...
PubMed Central Canada (PMC Canada) provides free access to a stable and permanent online digital archive of full-text, peer-reviewed health and life sciences research publications. It builds on PubMed Central (PMC), the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) free digital archive of biomedical and life sciences journal literature and is a member of the broader PMC International (PMCI) network of e-repositories.
Twenty-two tumours from 19 eyes of 17 patients were included in the study. Mean age at presentation was 43.5 years (range-15-68 years). Mean presenting BCVA was +1.10 Log MAR. Secondary tumours were found in 68% eyes. At presentation, mean basal tumour dimension of primary tumours was 7.17 mm and secondary tumours was 9.92 mm. Most common association of secondary VPT was Coats disease (n=5) followed by retinal vasculitis (n=2), Polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (n=2), Familial exudative vitreorretinopathy (n=2) and traumatic chorioretinopathy (n=2). Ten tumours (45%) involved the inferior quadrant. tumour associated features were intra/sub-retinal exudates (n=14), vitritis (n=7), sub-retinal fluid (n=5), vitreous haemorrhage (n=3), pre-retinal fibrosis (n=3), epiretinal membrane (n=3) and sub-retinal blood (n=2). Treatment included transconjunctival cryotherapy (n=9), intravitreal or oral steroids (n=4), laser (n=3), transconjunctival cryotherapy with encirclage (n=1), transconjunctival ...
Characterized by hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Usually this disorder is diagnosed at the onset of puberty (primary amenorrhea, poor development of sexual organs, sparse growth of secondary hair, short stature, delayed puberty, delayed bone age, infertility), spinocerebellar ataxia (with a variable age of onset; impaired balance, ataxic gait, mild dysmetria on finger-to-nose testing, but marked dysmetria on heel-to-shin testing, nystagmus, bilateral extensor plantar responses), and choroidal dystrophy (variable age of onset, diffuse and slowly progressive, with involvement of the choriocapillaris, retinal pigment epithelium, and outer retina, resulting in loss of visual acuity with a dense ring scotoma and a spared central field). Muscle strength, sensibility, and proprioception are normal. ...
PMID 19556007] Role of RDBP and SKIV2L variants in the major histocompatibility complex class III region in polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy etiology [PMID 19899988] Association of c3 gene polymorphisms with neovascular age-related macular degeneration in a chinese population ...
This is a 2-step process combining a light-activated drug called Visudyne (verteporfin) with light from a cold laser directed onto the abnormal area of retina. Once activated, the drug causes the abnormal vessels to close off. PDT does not cause direct damage to the surrounding retina. Therefore, it can be used to treat new vessels that are under the centre of the macula (fovea).. Several treatments are needed to keep the leaking blood vessels closed and stop the progression of wet MD. Close follow up and monitoring is needed to determine if further treatment is required.. Unlike anti-VEGF drugs with which the vision is usually maintained, patients undergoing PDT continue to lose vision in the first 6 months. Their vision then stabilises so that the eye does not progress to severe vision loss.. PDT is now rarely used to treat ordinary wet MD. It is sometimes used in conjunction an anti-VEGF drug to treat a type of MD called polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (PCV) as some of these cases do not ...
The separation of the choroid from the sclera of the eye as a result of leakage of fluid from the vessels of the choroid. It occurs when pressure inside the eyeball is very low, usually after trauma or intraocular surgery. ...
The suprachoroidal space is normally virtual because the choroid is in close apposition to the sclera. As fluid accumulates, this space becomes real, and the choroid is displaced from its normal position.
Personal protection: filter respirator for organic gases and vapours adapted to the airborne concentration of the substance. Collect leaking and spilled liquid in sealable containers as far as possible. Carefully collect remainder. Then store and dispose of according to local regulations. Do NOT let this chemical enter the environment ...
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Clinical Ophthalmology Dovepress open access to scientific and medical research review Open Access Full Text Article Central serous chorioretinopathy: a pathogenetic model This article was published in the following Dove Press journal: Clinical Ophthalmology 18 Febuary 2011 Number of times this article has been viewed Antonio Caccavale 1 Filippo Romanazzi 1 Manuela Imparato 1 Angelo Negri 2 Anna Morano 3 Fabio Ferentini 2 1 Department of Ophthalmology, Neuropthalmology and Ocular Immunology Service, 2Department of Ophthalmology, Hospital "C. Cantù", Abbiategrasso, Milan, Italy; 3University Eye Clinic, Foundation IRCCS San Matteo Hospital, Pavia, Italy Abstract: Despite numerous studies describing predominantly its demography and clinical course, many aspects of central serous chorioretinopathy (CSCR) remain unclear. Perhaps the major impediment to finding an effective therapy is the difficulty of performing studies with large enough cohorts, which has meant that clinicians have focused more on ...
Purpose:. to evaluate the effectiveness as well as the detrimental influence of half-dose and half-fluence modification of verteporfin PDT for the treatment of prolonged unresolved Central Serous Chorioretinopathy (CSCR).. Study Design and Patient Recruitment:. This study was a prospective, randomized, consecutive, open-labeled, comparative interventional case series. Patients with symptomatic acute or chronic CSC of 3 weeks or more duration were recruited. Patients were offered treatment if they had worsening of symptoms or no subjective improvement since the onset of the CSC. Inclusion criteria included 1) patients with best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) of 20/400 or better; 2) presence of subretinal fluid (SRF) and/or serous pigment epithelial detachment (PED) involving the fovea on optical coherence tomography (OCT); 3) presence of active angiographic leakage in fluorescein angiography (FA) caused by CSC but not CNV or other diseases; and 4) abnormal dilated choroidal vasculature and other ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Low-dose rifampin as maintenance therapy in chronic central serous chorioretinopathy. AU - Mattingly, Jeffrey J.. AU - Amram, Alec Lee. AU - El-Annan, Jaafar. PY - 2018/1/1. Y1 - 2018/1/1. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85040763872&partnerID=8YFLogxK. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85040763872&partnerID=8YFLogxK. U2 - 10.1016/j.jcjo.2017.11.019. DO - 10.1016/j.jcjo.2017.11.019. M3 - Article. C2 - 30340736. AN - SCOPUS:85040763872. JO - Canadian Journal of Ophthalmology. JF - Canadian Journal of Ophthalmology. SN - 0008-4182. ER - ...
The macula in the left eye shows a small puddle of fluid involving the fovea. This represents a detachment of the neurosensory retina from the RPE. OCT confirmed this finding. These findings are classic for idiopathic central serous chorioretinopathy (ICSC), also called central serous retinopathy. ICSC typically occurs in 20- to 45-year-old males who exhibit type A personalities.1 Although our patient is age 50, it does not change our diagnosis; ICSC has been reported in patients as old as age 60.2 It occurs more commonly in males than females (a 10-to-1 ratio), and there is often a strong relationship between ICSC and emotional stress, although we do not know whether stress triggers the condition.1 Migraine headaches also have been associated with the onset of these neurosensory detachments. On examination, the macula usually exhibits a round or oval area of elevation of the neurosensory retina. This can be very subtle and easily missed if the detachment is small or if there is a very shallow ...
Idiopathic central serous chorioretinopathy (ICSC) is characterized by a serous detachment of the neurosensory retina in the macular region secondary to a focal or retinal pigment epithelial defect. Patients with ICSC, oftentimes young male adults, experience visual disturbances including micropsia, metamorphopsia, central scotoma, reduced visual acuity and loss of contrast sensitivity. Most cases of ICSC are presumed to be self-limiting and usually resolve spontaneously within 3 to 4 months.Nevertheless the duration of the disease is strongly related to the vision prognosis and reattachment within 4 months of onset is considered as a relevant therapeutic target because prolonged detachment is associated with photoreceptor atrophy.. The therapeutic effect of focal cw laser photocoagulation has not been fully established. One obvious theory postulates that the beneficial effect of photocoagulation is associated with the establishment of a new barrier of RPE cells which subsequently reintegrate ...
COPHy AA in Seoul again will be devoted to evidence-based debates and discussions amongst session moderators, speakers and the audience, all of whom will examine and analyze the most relevant and controversial issues raised during the course of 2016 and 2017 within the field of ophthalmology. This educational Congress will continue to discuss controversies in Anterior Segment, Glaucoma, and Retina, as well as other areas of ophthalmology, such as neuro-ophthalmology, ocular imaging, and uveitis. Topics will include the treatment of retinal diseases such as diabetic macular edema, the role of anti-VEGF agents versus panretinal photocoagulation in the management of proliferative diabetic retinopathy, polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy, pathologic myopia, the current management of corneal disease with the use of advanced technologies for corneal transplants, as well as novel medical and surgical glaucoma issues ...
Our understanding of "pachychoroid disease" has expanded greatly thanks to multimodal clinical imaging technologies. Cross-sectional and en face depth-resolved imaging, such as enhanced depth imaging (EDI) OCT, Swept-Source OCT (SS-OCT), and OCT angiography (OCTa), have enabled a deeper appreciation for the role of the choroid in a wide-range of macular disorders.. Pachychoroid disease is a phenotype encompassing a spectrum of macular conditions which manifest common choroidal findings, and includes pachychoroid pigment epitheliopathy, central serous chorioretinopathy, peripapillary pachychoroid syndrome and focal choroidal excavation. This phenotype of great clinical relevance in that it may predispose patients to macular neovascularization (pachychoroid neovasculopathy). Many patients with pachychoroid disease develop this type 1 neovascularization as a late-stage manifestation. In some eyes, these vessels may form a branching network that can give rise to aneurysmal type 1 neovascularization ...
Central serous chorioretinopathy (CSCR) is a retinal disorder that has been linked to the systemic use of corticosteroids. Recently, it has also been reported after local corticosteroid administration.
PDF Similar Articles Mail to Author Mail to Editor Outcomes of Photodynamic Therapy with a Half Dose of Verteporfin in Patients with Chronic Central Serous Chorioretinopathy Fatih Mehmet TÜRKCÜ1, Harun YÜKSEL1, Alparslan ŞAHİN1, Yasin ÇINAR1, Kürşat CİNGÜ1, Muhammed ŞAHİN1, Adnan YILDIRIM2, İhsan ÇAÇA3 Turkish Abstract Abstract ...
PDF Similar Articles Mail to Author Mail to Editor Short-term Effi ciency of (577-nm) Subthreshold Yellow Laser on Treatment of Chronic Central Serous Chorioretinopathy Ökkeş BAZ1, İhsan YILMAZ1, Cengiz ALAGÖZ1, Ahmet TaylanYAZICI,2, Abdullah ÖZKAYA2, Muhittin TAŞKAPILI2 Turkish Abstract Abstract ...
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All rights reserved. The published material is being distributed without warranty of any kind, either expressed or implied. Neither ILO nor WHO nor the European Commission shall be responsible for the interpretation and use of the information contained in this material ...
Choose font and icon sizes appropriate to iOS devices. iPhones and iPads have smaller screens than the typical browser window in which you would use Mapbox Studio, especially when multitasking is enabled. Your users viewing distance may be shorter than on a desktop computer. Some of your users may use the Larger Dynamic Type and Accessibility Text features to increase the size of all text on the device. You can use the runtime styling API to adjust your styles font and icon sizes accordingly.. Design sprite images and choose font weights that look crisp on both standard-resolution displays and Retina displays. This SDK supports the same resolutions as iOS. Standard-resolution displays are limited to older devices that your application may or may not support, depending on its minimum deployment target.. Icon and text labels should be legible regardless of the maps orientation. By default, this SDK makes it easy for your users to rotate or tilt the map using multitouch gestures. If you do not ...
All authors have completed and submitted the ICMJE form for disclosure of potential conflicts of interest. No financial disclosures. Both authors (D.C and M.C) were involved in the design and conduct of the study; collection, management, analysis and interpretation of the data; and preparation, review or approval of the manuscript.. The authors have full control over the primary data, and they agree to allow Graefes Archive for Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology to review their data if requested. ...
The effect of eradicating Helicobacter pylori on idiopathic central serous chorioretinopathy patients Yalong Dang,1,2,* Yalin Mu,2,* Manli Zhao,2 Lin Li,3 Yaning Guo,4 Yu Zhu1,2 1Department of Ophthalmology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan, Peoples Republic of China; 2Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Yellow River Hospital of Henan University of Science and Technology, Sanmenxia City, Henan, Peoples Republic of China; 3Department of Ophthalmology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Henan University of Science and Technology, Luoyang City, Henan, Peoples Republic of China; 4Gu-Cheng Eye Hospital, Xian City, Shanxi, Peoples Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: To evaluate the effect of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication on the remission of acute idiopathic central serous chorioretinopathy (ICSCR). Study design: A prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled study of 53 participants. Main outcome measure
Choroidal vascular remodelling in central serous chorioretinopathy after indocyannie green guided photodynamic therapy with verteporfin: a novel treatment at the primary desease level. Chan, W-M.; Lam, D. S. C.; Lai, T. Y. Y.; Tam, B. S. M.; Liu, D. T. L.; Chan, C. K. M. // British Journal of Ophthalmology;Dec2003, Vol. 87 Issue 12, p1453 Aims: To evaluate the changes in the choroidal vasculature in central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC) after photodynamic therapy (PDT) with verteporfin and to assess its potential role as a treatment option. Methods: A prospective, non-comparative interventional study was performed in eyes with... ...
A 37-year-old woman (gravida 2, para 1, abortus 0), following an uncomplicated pregnancy except for a history of insulin-dependent gestational diabetes with good glycaemic control and a local Varicella-Zoster infection which treated successfully, underwent elective caesarean section under spinal anaesthesia with bupivacaine hydrochloride (10mg). Surgery was uneventful and two healthy twin-girls were delivered. Corticosteroids were at no point given. Antibiotics were given intraoperatively. Four days after the caesarean section the patient experienced a sudden decrease of visual acuity combined with a central scotoma and metamorphopsia in her right eye. At presentation, best-corrected visual acuity of the right eye was 8/20 with metamorphopsia, a central scotoma in Amslers grid and blurred vision. Funduscopy of the right eye revealed a serous elevation of the macula (Figure 1). Fluorescein angiography (FA) disclosed three expanding points of fluorescein leakage at the foveolar avascular zone. ...
There are two main types of laser treatment for CSC that we use at NYC Retina: micropulse laser and focal laser. Both types of laser are safe and effective. There are a few key differences that we will discuss below. Micropulse laser is a shorter pulse of laser compared to conventional, continuous wave laser (focal).. The purpose of the laser is to stimulate the pigmented cells under the retina to reduce fluid leakage from the small blood vessels in the macula and facilitate the bodys removal of the excess fluid. If the fluid under the macula clears, the vision should improve.. Focal laser is a continuous pulse of laser as opposed to a "micro" pulse. This type of laser can be very effective in CSC when there is a clear, single leaking point or "hot spot" seen on the fluorescein angiogram. When focal laser treatment is successful, the fluid under the macula may clear leading to vision improvement. Of note, although the vision may improve, it may not improve all the way back to normal if ...
The patient was a 15-year-old girl with an established diagnosis of Alagille syndrome (AS) since early life. Her medical history was significant for systemic manifestations of AS including liver transplantation and pulmonary artery balloon dilation. She had an unusual triangular facies characterized by a broad overhanging forehead, deep set, hyperteloric eyes and small pointed chin. Her bestcorrected visual acuity was 1.0 in both eyes. Slit-lamp examination was positive for posterior embryotoxon in both eyes. Funduscopy revealed diffuse choroidal hypopigmentation with increased visibility of the choroidal vessels and symmetric, well-circumscribed macular discoloration (Figure 1). A circumferential chorioretinal atrophy was also detected in the peripheral retina (Figure 1). Fundus autofluorescence (FAF) imaging clearly defined hypofluorescent areas in the peripapillary regions that extended along the macula and had a sleep mask appearance (Figure 2). Peripheral circumferential chorioretinal ...
Looking for online definition of chorioretinal in the Medical Dictionary? chorioretinal explanation free. What is chorioretinal? Meaning of chorioretinal medical term. What does chorioretinal mean?
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The water solubility of the test substance is 0.02 g/L, which is classified as slightly soluble. No information on the primary source of the data or the methods used is available. However, this information is taken from a reliable peer reviewed database and so can be considered reliable and suitable for use as the key study for this endpoint (WHO ICSC 2005). This value is also cited in a MITI study (1997) which was unavailable for review but was identified in the OECD SIDS. The QSAR (US EPA 2009) model predicts a water solubility of 51.88 mg/L at 25°C. This model and value are considered adequate to use for assessment as a supporting study. The data presented here are for the high purity form of DCPD. No information is available specifically on the water solubility of the commercial form of DCPD but it is not expected to be significantly different from the high purity form. ...
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This gene encodes a ubiquitous transcriptional enhancer factor that is a member of the TEA/ATTS domain family. This protein directs the transactivation of a wide variety of genes and, in placental cells, also acts as a transcriptional repressor. Mutations in this gene cause Sveinssons chorioretinal atrophy. Additional transcript variants have been described but their full-length natures have not been experimentally verified ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Treatment of massive subretinal hemorrhage from complications of scleral buckling procedures. AU - Rubsamen, P. E.. AU - Flynn, Harry W. AU - Civantos, J. M.. AU - Smiddy, William E. AU - Murray, T. G.. AU - Nicholson, D. H.. AU - Blumenkranz, M. S.. PY - 1994/1/1. Y1 - 1994/1/1. N2 - Vitrectomy techniques permit removal of subretinal hemorrhage, but the prognosis varies and depends principally on the cause of the hemorrhage. Nine consecutive patients undergoing pars plana vitrectomy with internal drainage of massive subretinal hemorrhage from complications of scleral buckling procedures were studied, to evaluate the long-term results. In all eyes, the final visual acuity was improved, compared with preoperative visual acuity, and was 20/80 or better in seven of nine cases. Recurrent retinal detachment secondary to proliferative vitreoretinopathy developed in two patients, but complete retinal reattachment was achieved after further procedures were performed. Patients with ...
Looking for online definition of helicoid peripapillary chorioretinal degeneration in the Medical Dictionary? helicoid peripapillary chorioretinal degeneration explanation free. What is helicoid peripapillary chorioretinal degeneration? Meaning of helicoid peripapillary chorioretinal degeneration medical term. What does helicoid peripapillary chorioretinal degeneration mean?
To report the anatomic and functional outcome of intravitreal dobesilate to treat recurrent central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC). This is an interventional case report in which dobesilate was intravitreally injected in a case of recurrent CSC
391 Although other studies have suggested significant loss of rods,386 many remaining rods proprranolol an increase in propranolрl outer segment length (albeit with convolutions and propranolol 30 mg daily, such as nausea, bloating, indigestion, and flatulence, 330 sometimes benefited by cholecys- tectomy; however, the more the symptoms differ daliy the classic pattern of biliary pain, the less likely the patient is to experience relief after cholecystectomy. A common example of a superficial propranolol daphnia is central serous chorioretinopathy (Box 11-2; Figs. 2).
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Anti-VEGF medications have a number of effects that are theoretically beneficial in CSCR, such as the upregulation of tight junctions between endothelial cells and reduction of vascular fenestrations.21-23 A study by Ji Won Lim, MD, and colleagues suggested that VEGF levels in the aqueous humor of patients with chronic CSCR may be elevated compared to normal eyes.24 Case studies and anecdotal reports of intravitreal anti-VEGF medications in patients with persistent or chronic CSCR have shown improvements in visual acuity, resolution of neurosensory detachments and decreased RPE leakage on FA.25-28 Prospective studies using anti-VEGF medications have shown inconsistent results.29,30 So far, however, the cumulative weight of evidence has failed to show sustained, clinically significant benefits.31 Controlled clinical trials are necessary to determine the tolerability and efficacy of anti-VEGF therapies in CSCR ...
In the article in the August 1994 issue of the Archives, Guyer et al1 reported on hyperpermeability of the choroid around the site of the dye leakage and elsewh
Synonyms for birdshot in Free Thesaurus. Antonyms for birdshot. 4 words related to shotgun shell: bird shot, buckshot, duck shot, shell. What are synonyms for birdshot?
If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Centers RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.. ...
6. LABELLING The label states в thenumberofmicrogramsofPRPperhumandose; в thetypeandnominalamountofcarrierproteinpersingle human dose.
In the current study, quantitative mapping of choroidal thickness and volume and qualitative analysis of choroidal vascular integrity showed loss of choroidal tissue including the choriocapillaris layer in the convalescent stage of VKH. Additionally, loss of the choriocapillaris and the thinning of the choroid in the sub-macula area correlated with increased duration of the disease, lower VA, and the presence of structural changes in the retina.. Normal sub-foveal choroidal thickness measured by SD-OCT ranges from 260 to 287 μm and varies by age, refractive error, and ethnicity [24-26]. Choroidal thickness varies based on the nature of posterior segment pathology as well. For instance, choroidal thickness increases in hyperopia [24], acute VKH [14, 15, 18], central serous chorioretinopathy [27, 28], and polypoid choroidal vasculopathy [29, 30]. On the other hand, loss of choroidal mass has been seen in high myopia [24], age-related macular degeneration [29], macular hole [30], degenerative ...
Expertise, Disease and Conditions: Central Serous Chorioretinopathy, Diabetic Macular Edema, Diabetic Retinopathy, Macular Degeneration (Age-Related), Macular Disorders, Macular Holes, Macular Puckers, Medical Diseases of the Retina, Ocular Trauma, Ophthalmology, Retinal Detachment, Retinal Specialist, Retinal Surgery, Retinal Vein Occlusion, Retinal Vessel Occlusion, Surgical and Medical Diseases of the Retina, Surgical Diseases of the Retina, Vitreoretinal Diseases and Surgery ...
Expertise, Disease and Conditions: Diabetic Macular Edema, Diabetic Retinopathy, Macular Degeneration, Macular Degeneration (Age-Related), Macular Disorders, Macular Holes, Macular Puckers, Medical Diseases of the Retina, Ophthalmology, Proliferative Vitreoretinopathy, Retinal Detachment, Retinal Specialist, Retinal Surgery, Retinal Vascular Disease, Retinal Vessel Occlusion, Surgical and Medical Diseases of the Retina, Surgical Diseases of the Retina, Vitreoretinal Diseases and Surgery ...
Chief Executive Officer. Dr. Slakter joined Ohr as Chief Medical Officer in May 2014 and was appointed board member in January 2015. He was previously Chief Executive Officer and co-founder of SKS Ocular LLC. He is also the Founder and Director of the Digital Angiography Reading Center (DARC) in New York, which is the largest center for ocular image evaluation for clinical trials of posterior segment disease with over 900 certified clinical sites in over 44 countries worldwide. Dr. Slakter has been involved extensively in the design and application of new diagnostic and treatment modalities for ophthalmic diseases. He has played a major role in the discovery, development and commercialization of treatments for age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, retinal vascular disease, central serous chorioretinopathy and other retinal diseases. He has provided critical assistance in the design of clinical trials at all stages of development, and has participated in numerous meetings with ...
International Journal of Hypertension is a peer-reviewed, Open Access journal that provides a forum for clinicians and basic scientists interested in blood pressure regulation and pathophysiology, as well as treatment and prevention of hypertension. The journal publishes original research articles, review articles, and clinical studies on the etiology and risk factors of hypertension, with a special focus on vascular biology, epidemiology, pediatric hypertension, and hypertensive nephropathy.
We are pleased to announce details of the 3rd BUS Birdshot Uveitis Day on Saturday 14th November 2015. We will be holding it at the Grange City Hotel, 8 - 14 Coopers Row, London EC3N 2BQ, close to Tower Hill tube station and Fenchurch BR station. The educational day is intended for people with Birdshot Uveitis, their family members and health professionals who treat people with Birdshot or research Birdshot, or want to learn more about the condition. We welcome both old and new friends. A two course buffet lunch, tea and coffee will be provided and the day will be divided into five main sessions which are briefly described below.. SESSION 1 - Chaired by Professor Andrew Dick. Birdshot Uveitis and where we are now: Medication and keeping yourself well - an interactive panel presentation including a doctor, pharmacist, specialist nurse and chairman with lots of opportunity to ask questions from the floor for example, information about trough levels and blood tests; information about skin problems, ...
88-year-old man has noticed for the last few months the vision in the right eye is foggy, like there is a film in the eye or a haze, His vision is 20/16 in each eye ...
Pigmented paravenous chorioretinal atrophy (PPCRA) [MIM:172870]: Unusual retinal degeneration characterized by accumulation of pigmentation along retinal veins. PPCRA is dominantly inherited, but exhibited variable expressivity. Males are more likely to exhibit a severe phenotype, whereas females may remain virtually asymptomatic even in later years. The PPCRA phenotype is associated with a mutation in CRB1 gene which is likely to affect the structure of the CRB1 protein. {ECO:0000269,PubMed:15623792}. Note=The disease is caused by mutations affecting the gene represented in this entry ...
This contrast study shows a polypoidal tumor in the fundus of the stomach. A small blob of barium can be seen in an ulcer at the apex of the tumor. This is the classical appearance of a leiomyoma of the stomach. The operative view shows the portion of the stomach containing the tumor has been grasped between the surgeons fingers and lifted anteriorly ...
This site is dedicated exclusively to helping you look up ICD-10 codes, quickly access the codes you use most, and become more comfortable with the new code set in general. No ads, no spam, and its free for everybody.. Our hope is that we can ease your search for ICD-10 codes just a little, and maybe even make it fun.. Also, for good measure you should read this (legal disclaimer).. And heres our privacy policy.. ...
without a doubt the scariest part of my gluten reaction is the perceptional disturbances that occur. It is a feeling that is hard to explain without the use of this original Alice in Wonderland picture "Micropsia is a condition affecting human visual perception in which objects are perceived to be smaller than they actually are. Micropsia can be caused by either optical distortion of images in the eye (as by glasses or certain ocular conditions) or by a neurological dysfunction. The condition of micropsia can be caused by more factors than any other visual distortion.[1] Factors known to cause micropsia include traumatic brain injury, swelling of the cornea, epilepsy, migraines, prescription and illicit drug use, retinal edema, macular degeneration, central serous chorioretinopathy, brain lesions, and psychological factors. Dissociative phenomena are linked with micropsia, which may be the result of brain lateralization disturbance.[2] Related visual distortion conditions include macropsia, a ...
Our results show that operated clear corneal and limbal perforations do not cause chronic macular edema, peripapillary RNFL atrophy, choroidal thickness changes, or RVC alterations in the late post-operative period. Of course, this statement is valid only for uncomplicated corneal perforations that do not include posterior segment damage initially. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature related to the impact of corneal perforation on posterior pole structures.. Although corneal perforation primarily affects the anterior segment of the eye, it is possible that retinal damage occurs by several mechanisms. In perforating corneal injuries, concomitant choroidal detachment was frequently seen, and this would have an impact on retinal morphology and function.4 Also, hypotony is common in corneal perforations both before and after surgical repair, so it is possible that hypotony maculopathy and its sequelae might occur to some extent. Since OCT is accepted as the best ...
Do You Have Coloboma Chorioretinal Cerebellar Vermis Aplasia? Join friendly people sharing true stories in the I Have Coloboma Chorioretinal Cerebellar Vermis Aplasia group. Find support forums, advice and chat with groups who share this life experie...
Three aims are proposed to study the chorioretinal complex (choroid, choriocapillaris, Bruchs membrane, retinal pigment epithelium, photoreceptors) in age-rela...
PURPOSE: Choroidal neovascularization (CNV) associated with punctate inner choroidopathy (PIC) is a rare clinical entity, yet still a challenge for medical treatment. A case of a young myopic woman developing CNV secondary to unilateral PIC is presented. Clinical morphology, diagnostic procedure and follow-up are reported. CASE REPORT: A 29-year-old woman presented with multiple yellowish dots at the posterior pole. No other signs of inflammation could be seen. Angiography with fluorescein yielded hyperfluorescent signals in the affected areas with a diffuse leak, and SD-OCT showed a slightly elevated retinal pigment epithelial layer, consistent with the diagnosis of PIC ...
It was established on 1st January 1968 initially as Research Laboratories of Catalysis and Surface Chemistry having the Scientific Council jointly with the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Warsaw. From 1968 to 2002 it was directed by Professor Jerzy Haber. Since 28th November 1978, when the appropriate decree of the Council of Ministers of Poland was issued, it exists as an independent Institute with its own Scientific Council. Since 1990 the Institute has rights to grant PhD degree in Physical Chemistry and since 2000 it has habilitation (DSc) rights. The Institute is a member of Marian Smoluchowski Krakow Scientific Consortium Matter-Energy-Future, which since 2012 has a status of National Leading Scientific Center (KNOW). From 1999 the International PhD Studies are carried out by ICSC together with Department of Technology and Chemical Engineering, Technical University in Cracow. The employment in the Institute evolved from 28 persons when it was ...
Shrestha, Merina, 2012. Genetic basis for inherited eye diseases in dogs : a case study of pigmentary chorioretinopathy in Chinese Crested Dogs. Second cycle, A2E. Uppsala: SLU, Dept. of Animal Breeding and Genetics ...
Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research aims to publish findings of doctors at grass root level and post graduate students, so that all unique medical experiences are recorded in literature.
Introduction Numerous exogenous molecules may cause toxic chorioretinitic effects. Some agents cause disruption of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), while others produce vascular damage within the retina. Certain agents may also produce edema of the retina, particularly in the macular region, while other agents produce crystalline deposits in the retina from derivatives of their metabolites…
Diagnosis Code H30.039 information, including descriptions, synonyms, code edits, diagnostic related groups, ICD-9 conversion and references to the diseases index.
Diagnosis Code H30.109 information, including descriptions, synonyms, code edits, diagnostic related groups, ICD-9 conversion and references to the diseases index.
The white dot syndromes are a group of inflammatory chorioretinopathies of unknown etiology which have in common a unique and characteristic appearance of multiple yellow-white lesions affecting multiple layers of the retina, retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), choriocapillaris, and the choroid. They also have overlapping clinical features. We discuss acute retinal pigment epitheliopathy, multiple evanescent white dot syndrome, acute posterior multifocal placoid pigment epitheliopathy, multifocal choroiditis and panuveitis, acute zonal occult outer retinopathy, birdshot chorioretinopathy, and serpiginous choroidopathy. Some of these diseases are associated with a viral prodrome suggesting a possible viral/infectious etiology, while others are associated with a number of systemic processes suggesting an autoimmune etiology. We also review the presentation, evaluation/diagnosis, and treatment of these entities as well as the prognosis. Where applicable we discuss recent advancements in diagnosing and
Symptoms of the following disorders can be similar to those of acute posterior multifocal placoid pigment epitheliopathy. Comparison may be useful for a differential diagnosis:. Diffuse unilateral subacute neuroretinitis (DUSN) is a progressive parasitic disease affecting the outer retina and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). This syndrome is primarily unilateral, although bilateral cases have occurred. Examination of the eye shows visual loss, vitreous cells, optic disc inflammation and leakage, and transient, but recurrent, crops of gray-white outer retinal lesions.. Stationary or migrating parasitic worms (nematodes) have been identified deep in the retina or in the subretinal space. Later in the course of the disease, slowly progressive RPE changes and optic atrophy may be observed, as well as narrowing of the retinal vessels.. Multifocal choroidopathy syndromes are a group of rare disorders involving a major pathological change at or near the level of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) ...
PURPOSE: To report a case of bilateral serous macular detachment following laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK). DESIGN: Observational case report. METHODS: A 33-year-old man presented with sudden decrease of vision in both eyes 4 days following uncomplicated LASIK in both eyes for spherical equivalent of +5.00 diopters sph in the right eye and +7.00 diopters sph in the left eye. Detailed history with ocular and systemic examination, fluorescein angiography, and optical coherence tomography were done. Retinal examination had a documentation of retinal pigment epithelium atrophy in the macular region in both eyes pre-LASIK. RESULTS: A diagnosis of central serous chorioretinopathy (CSCR) was made in both eyes, with multifocal alterations in the retinal pigment epithelium and a pocket of serous retinal fluid in the macular region confirmed on OCT. Late venous phase of fluorescein angiogram demonstrated multiple hyperfluorescent foci of leakage, more in the right eye with areas of retinal pigment ...
On a rainy Tuesday afternoon in Rome, in the first three hours of the International Conference of Spatial Cognition (ICSC), attendees were treated to a microcosm of the conference to come. First, Dr. Marta Olivetti Belardinelli set the stage for the variety of the research that would be presented by tracing the development of ICSC over the past 12 years. What started, she said, from a small, local meeting of mostly European cognitive researchers has exploded into a cross-disciplinary, international convention. Next, in an hour long, data-infused keynote address, Dr. Alain Berthoz guided the audience through his long career of work on the neuroscience of spatial orientation. Finally, attendees schmoozed and noshed around a crowded foyer, sipping Italian wine and eating porchetta. These themes - interdisciplinarity, detailed discussions of data, and social engagement - discernible in the first three hours, played out over the rest of the conference.. ...
Usually presents with pain and redness that often awakens the patient FROM sleep. The conjunctival, episcleral, and scleral vessels are inflamed, leading to a bluish discoloration of the sclera. Scleritis is more common in women and is often unilateral. Work-up is routinely negative in the unilateral cases. B-scan ultrasonography shows diffuse thickening of the choroid, sclera, and episcleral tissues. Classically, the T-sign is present in cases of posterior scleritis. The T-sign is created by the fluid beneath Tenons capsule that creates a squaring off of the interface between the optic nerve and the sclera. Fluoroscein angiography may SHOW punctate areas of leakage. The choroidal detachment is felt to be a result of the congested sclera. This congestion increases resistance to flow in the vortex veins and through the intact sclera, leading to choroidal effusions ...
PubMed comprises more than 30 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.
Case xtrememac soma portable dock have demonstrated that IVTA can reduce macular edema and improve VA in patients with BRVO (Fig. Caregivers with more fatigue, sorrow, stress, depression, difficulty with sched- uling and finances, and difficulty with family support had more physical health problems. Xtrememac soma portable dock. 39В 1-14-6 Autosomal Dominant Vitreoretinochoroidopathy Another disorder that might be classified among the hereditary vitreoretinal disorders has been termed autosomal dominant vitreo- retinochoroidopathy (ADVIRC).
An association between cataract surgery and uveal effusion was first described by OBrien in 1935. In OBriens study, the incidence of uveal effusion was more than 93%, occurring predominantly during intracapsular cataract extractions [4]. With modern cataract surgical techniques, including small incisions, IOP can be satisfactorily controlled during surgery and the incidence of uveal effusion has been greatly reduced [3]. Theoretically, the maintenance of IOP may contribute to the reduced incidence of uveal effusion.. Notwithstanding the dramatically reduced incidence of uveal effusion, it is necessary to master the diagnosis and management of this vision-threatening complication. When encountering a sudden shallowing of the anterior chamber during phacoemulsification, it is important to first secure wound closure, and then examine the posterior segment by ophthalmoscopy and transillumination for the differential diagnosis, which includes infusion misdirection syndrome, uveal effusion, and ...
Members of the chiropractic profession forged a new spirit of cooperation and understanding during the Interprofessional Collaborative Spine Conference (ICSC), which took place Nov. 8-9 in Pittsburgh, Pa. Organizers of this first-of-its-kind event hope to enhance patient outcomes as well as increase integration of manual therapies for back pain in the wake of the ongoing opioid crisis. ICSC was organized and hosted by the American Chiropractic Association (ACA) with the support of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Manual Physical Therapists (AAOMPT) and the Academy of Orthopaedic Physical Therapy (AOPT), which represent three of the major provider groups of non-drug manual therapies for pain. Manual therapies such as spinal manipulation have received increased attention and support in recent years by major health care organizations such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American College of Family Physicians for their ability to effectively manage many cases of back pain ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Malignant uveal melanoma and similar lesions studied by computed tomography. AU - Mafee, M. F.. AU - Peyman, G. A.. AU - McKusick, M. A.. PY - 1985/1/1. Y1 - 1985/1/1. N2 - Forty-four patients with intraocular disease were studied by computed tomography (CT); in 19 cases malignant uveal melanoma was considered the likely diagnosis. CT proved to be accurate in determining the location and size of uveal melanomas, demonstrating scleral invasion, and differentiating melanoma from choroidal detachment or angioma, toxocariasis, and senile macular degeneration. Astrocytic retinal hamartoma and medulloepithelioma could not be distinguished from melanoma with CT. On CT, uveal melanomas appeared as hyperdense lesions with slight to moderate contrast enhancement. Tumors thinner than 2 mm could not be seen. Using dynamic CT, we noted moderate peak amplitude, normal or delayed tissue transit time, and persistently elevated washout phase (down-slope), indicating increased permeability as the ...
To the Editor: We read with great interest the recent article by Nussbaum et al on the application of indocyanine green angiography to delineate venous system before dural opening in the parasagittal region. Although we agree with the authors that indocyanine green angiography is useful to localize veins or sinuses through the dura mater, we already…
A 29-year-old male patient with sarcoidosis and uveitis, which had been quiescent for about 18 months, complained of a black spot in his central right vision. Acuity was 20/30-2/+2 on the right. He had mild inflammation in both anterior chambers. The right macula revealed an area of subretinal fluid and a pigmented epithelial defect superonasal to the fovea with overlying superficial subretinal hemorrhage. Both eyes had peripheral chorioretinal scars. OCT confirmed presence of subretinal fluid and FA revealed leakage in the right eye. He was started on oral prednisone, but 2 weeks later the serous detachment in the macula had enlarged as measured by serial OCT. Oral prednisone was discontinued. Five months after the initial presentation his vision was 20/20 with resolution of CSR as confirmed by OCT.. CSR is a common disorder of the retina characterized by neurosensory detachment of the macula. It is associated with a number of risk factors including type A personality, psychosocial stress, ...
Orlando, Florida (PRWEB) August 28, 2015 -- The Cuhaci & Peterson team will be at the ICSC Florida Conference, occurring Sunday, August 30th- Tuesday,
RiTradiology.com ดูแลรักษาโดยและเป็นของ น.พ.รัฐชัย แก้วลาย. โลโก้ RiTradiology.com เป็นลิขสิทธิ์ของ น.พ.รัฐชัย แก้วลาย. ข้อมูลส่วนตัวของคุณถือเป็นความลับและจะไม่ถูกเผยแพร่ไปยังบุคคลที่สาม. ข้อมูลใน RiTradiology.com ใช้เป็นแนวทาง, ไม่ใช่เพื่อทดแทน, การให้การวินิจฉัย, รักษาและคำแนะนำสำหรับผู้ป่วย. แพทย์ของคุณอาจให้คำแนะนำในการวินิจฉัยหรือรักษาเป็นอย่างอื่นขึ้นกับข้อมูลและสถานการณ์นั้นๆ. ...
Video articles in JoVE about indocyanine green include Detecting Abnormalities in Choroidal Vasculature in a Mouse Model of Age-related Macular Degeneration by Time-course Indocyanine Green Angiography, Near-infrared Navigation System for Real-time Visualization of Blood Flow in Vascular Grafts, Fluorescence-quenching of a Liposomal-encapsulated Near-infrared Fluorophore as a Tool for In Vivo Optical Imaging, Fluorescent Dye Labeling of Erythrocytes and Leukocytes for Studying the Flow Dynamics in Mouse Retinal Circulation, An
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Purpose: To report the effect of intravitreal injections of ranibizumab on various features of pigment epithelial detachment (PED).. Methods: 15 patients with PED associated with AMD received injections of 0.5 mg ranibizumab monthly. All subjects underwent a standardized ophthalmic evaluation monthly, consisting of visual acuity (VA) measurement using ETDRS charts, and imaging with optical coherence tomography evaluating changes in thickness of PED. Fluorescein angiography (FA) was performed at baseline and every 3 months afterwards. Results: Mean central PED thickness decreased from 624.7 ( 350.8 microns) at baseline to 332.5 ( 158 microns) at the 6-month follow up (P=0.005). Mean ETDRS VA remained stable from 56.1 ( 14.6) letters score at baseline to 58.6 ( 15.7) letters score at the 6-month follow up (P=0.64). Subretinal fluid (SRF) disappeared in 8 patients (53.3%), 6 eyes (40%) showed a decreased in SRF and 1 eye developed an increase of SRF. In 11 eyes, OCT showed hyperreflective mass and ...
Patient: 29 years of age, female, BCVA 0.9 at OD, O.7 at OS. General Medical History: in 2005 severe preeclampsia with prompt cesarean delivery. In 01/2015 second severe preeclampsia and a prompt cesarean delivery at 32 weeks of gestation with history of headache, light flashes, blood pressure of 220/140 mm Hg and pedal edema. Ocular Medical History: in 01/2015 bilateral blurred vision and metamorphopsia accompanied by a decrease of visual acuity, on 04/2015 improvement of visual acuity . Purpose: to present presence of acute and old retinal alterations in repeated preeclampsia/ HELLP-Syndrome. Methods: Colour Photography Posterior Segment, Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT, Heidelberg Engineering, Heidelberg) Findings: SD-OCT: in 01/2015 acute serous retinal detachment in OD and OS. SD-OCT: in 04/2015 in OS macular pigmentepithel proliferation, no serous retinal detachment in OD and OS. The initial finding with serous retinal detachment has spontaneously resolved. Colour ...
0088]The latanoprost containing implants and microspheres disclosed herein may also be configured to release the latanoprost with or without additional agents, as described above, which to prevent or treat diseases or conditions, such as the following: maculopathies/retinal degeneration: macular degeneration, including age related macular degeneration (ARMD), such as non-exudative age related macular degeneration and exudative age related macular degeneration, choroidal neovascularization, retinopathy, including diabetic retinopathy, acute and chronic macular neuroretinopathy, central serous chorioretinopathy, and macular edema, including cystoid macular edema, and diabetic macular edema. Uveitis/retinitis/choroiditis: acute multifocal placoid pigment epitheliopathy, Behcets disease, birdshot retinochoroidopathy, infectious (syphilis, lyme, tuberculosis, toxoplasmosis), uveitis, including intermediate uveitis (pars planitis) and anterior uveitis, multifocal choroiditis, multiple evanescent ...

anterior fossa meningioma 2005:2010[pubdate] *count=100 - BioMedLib™ search engineanterior fossa meningioma 2005:2010[pubdate] *count=100 - BioMedLib™ search engine

MeSH-major] Choroid Diseases / etiology. Meningeal Neoplasms / complications. Meningioma / complications. Retinal Diseases / ... Cranial Nerve Diseases / etiology. Cranial Nerve Diseases / pathology. Cranial Nerve Diseases / surgery. Craniotomy / methods. ... Optic Nerve Diseases / diagnosis. Optic Nerve Diseases / surgery. Retrospective Studies. Sella Turcica / surgery. Tomography, X ... Optic Nerve Diseases / complications. Optic Nerve Diseases / etiology. Sinus Thrombosis, Intracranial / complications. Superior ...
more infohttp://www.bmlsearch.com/?kwr=anterior+fossa+meningioma+2005:2010%5Bpubdate%5D&cxts=100&stmp=b0

Pars Planitis
     Summary Report | CureHunterPars Planitis Summary Report | CureHunter

Choroid Diseases: 54*Choroiditis: 231*Pars Planitis: 75*Familial pars planitis: 2 ... Disease Context: Research Results. *Eye Diseases: 2132*Uveal Diseases: 16*Uveitis: 4860*Panuveitis: 277*Posterior Uveitis: 353* ... 02/13/1996 - "A pilot study in which two patients, one with pars planitis and the other with Behcets disease, were fed with ... Behçets disease, sympathetic ophthalmitis, Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada syndrome, birdshot retinopathy, retinitis pigmentosa and ...
more infohttp://www.curehunter.com/public/keywordSummaryD015868-Pars-Planitis.do

Pars Planitis - NORD (National Organization for Rare Disorders)Pars Planitis - NORD (National Organization for Rare Disorders)

... the retina and/or choroid. It has therefore been designated as one of the diseases of a family of intermediate uveitis. ... NORDs Rare Disease Database provides brief introductions for patients and their families to more than 1,200 rare diseases. ... Lyme disease, Behcet disease, sarcoidosis, and tuberculosis, among others. ... This is not a comprehensive database since there are nearly 7,000 diseases considered rare in the U.S. We add new topics as we ...
more infohttps://rarediseases.org/rare-diseases/pars-planitis/

Choroid plexus carcinomaChoroid plexus carcinoma

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others. The ... Choroid plexus carcinoma or choroid plexus tumor is a type of cancerous tumor that occurs in the brains choroid plexus tissue ... Choroid plexus carcinoma. Common Name(s). Choroid plexus carcinoma, Choroid plexus tumor ... Tumors of the choroid plexus (CPT) are rare. While choroid plexus papillomas (CPP) are regarded as benign, choroid plexus ...
more infohttp://diseaseinfosearch.org/Choroid+plexus+tumor/1391

JoVE Search Results: Choroid DiseaseJoVE Search Results: Choroid Disease

Choroid plexus implants rescue Alzheimers disease-like pathologies by modulating amyloid-β degradation. Abstract ... Neurogenic effects of β-amyloid in the choroid plexus epithelial cells in Alzheimers disease. Abstract ... Choroid plexus: biology and pathology. Abstract Engelhardt, Britta. University of Bern. 05/25/2011. 8.46. Antioxidants & redox ... Epithelial pathways in choroid plexus electrolyte transport. Abstract Ostman, Arne. Karolinska Institutet. 12/14/2012. 7.86. ...
more infohttp://labindex.jove.com/group/Choroid-Disease

The choroid in aging and disease | HSTalksThe choroid in aging and disease | HSTalks

Robert F. Mullins on The choroid in aging and disease, part of a collection of online lectures. ... The choroid in aging and disease. *Prof. Robert F. Mullins - The University of Iowa, USA ... Mullins, R.F. (2016, October 31). The choroid in aging and disease [Video file]. In The Biomedical & Life Sciences Collection, ... about the changes that occur in the choroid in aging and in macular disease. ...
more infohttps://hstalks.com/t/3379/the-choroid-in-aging-and-disease/?biosci

Papilloma of Choroid Plexus disease: Malacards - Research Articles, Drugs, Genes, Clinical TrialsPapilloma of Choroid Plexus disease: Malacards - Research Articles, Drugs, Genes, Clinical Trials

Papilloma of Choroid Plexus (CPP) Categories: Cancer diseases, Eye diseases, Genetic diseases, Neuronal diseases, Rare diseases ... Global: Genetic diseases Rare diseases Cancer diseases Anatomical: Neuronal diseases Eye diseases See all MalaCards categories ... NIH Rare Diseases : 53 Choroid plexus papilloma (CPP) ia a non-cancerous (benign) tumor of the choroid plexus, a network of ... MalaCards based summary : Papilloma of Choroid Plexus, also known as choroid plexus papilloma, is related to choroid plexus ...
more infohttps://www.malacards.org/card/papilloma_of_choroid_plexus

Yale Eye Center Clinical Conference Series: Imaging the choroid in health and disease + 360 laser: should we do it? | Yale...Yale Eye Center Clinical Conference Series: 'Imaging the choroid in health and disease + 360 laser: should we do it?' | Yale...

Yale Eye Center Clinical Conference Series: Imaging the choroid in health and disease + 360 laser: should we do it?. Temple ...
more infohttps://medicine.yale.edu/event/62357/

Choroid Necrotic Melanoma disease: Malacards - Research Articles, Drugs, Genes, Clinical TrialsChoroid Necrotic Melanoma disease: Malacards - Research Articles, Drugs, Genes, Clinical Trials

Choroid Necrotic Melanoma Categories: Cancer diseases, Eye diseases, Neuronal diseases, Skin diseases ... Global: Cancer diseases Anatomical: Eye diseases Neuronal diseases Skin diseases See all MalaCards categories (disease lists) ... Diseases related to Choroid Necrotic Melanoma via text searches within MalaCards or GeneCards Suite gene sharing:. #. Related ... The MalaCards human disease database index: 1-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z ...
more infohttps://www.malacards.org/card/choroid_necrotic_melanoma?search=Skin%20diseases

visionlist] UAB Department of Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences seeking a Clinician Scientist in Diseases of Vitreous, Retina,...visionlist] UAB Department of Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences seeking a Clinician Scientist in Diseases of Vitreous, Retina,...

Clinician Scientist in Diseases of Vitreous, Retina, and Choroid The Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, School of ... Visual Sciences seeking a Clinician Scientist in Diseases of Vitreous, Retina, and Choroid ... Visual Sciences seeking a Clinician Scientist in Diseases of Vitreous, Retina, and Choroid ... and Choroid. MiYoung Kwon miyoungkwon02 at gmail.com Thu Apr 25 17:34:28 -04 2019 *Previous message (by thread): [visionlist] ...
more infohttp://visionscience.com/pipermail/visionlist_visionscience.com/2019/002893.html

Study Evaluating Intravitreal hI-con1™ in Patients With Choroidal Neovascularization Secondary to Age-related Macular...Study Evaluating Intravitreal hI-con1™ in Patients With Choroidal Neovascularization Secondary to Age-related Macular...

Retinal Diseases. Eye Diseases. Metaplasia. Pathologic Processes. Choroid Diseases. Uveal Diseases. Ranibizumab. ... Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Choroidal Neovascularization Age-related Macular Degeneration Biological: hI- ...
more infohttps://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02358889?term=iconic+therapeutics&rank=1

Intravitreal Bevacizumab for the Treatment of CNV in VKH Disease - A Prospective Study - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.govIntravitreal Bevacizumab for the Treatment of CNV in VKH Disease - A Prospective Study - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov

Choroid Diseases. Uveal Diseases. Eye Diseases. Autoimmune Diseases of the Nervous System. Nervous System Diseases. Uveitis. ... Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center resources: Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada Disease Uveal Diseases ... Autoimmune Diseases. Immune System Diseases. Bevacizumab. Cyclosporins. Cyclosporine. Angiogenesis Inhibitors. Angiogenesis ... Intravitreal Bevacizumab for the Treatment of CNV in VKH Disease - A Prospective Study. The recruitment status of this study is ...
more infohttps://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02015351?cond=%22Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada+syndrome%22&rank=2

Safety Study of Suprachoroidal Triamcinolone Acetonide Via Microneedle to Treat Uveitis - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.govSafety Study of Suprachoroidal Triamcinolone Acetonide Via Microneedle to Treat Uveitis - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov

Uveal Diseases. Eye Diseases. Choroiditis. Choroid Diseases. Anti-Inflammatory Agents. Glucocorticoids. Hormones. Hormones, ... Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Uveitis Intermediate Uveitis Posterior Uveitis Panuveitis Noninfectious ... Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center resources: Posterior Uveitis Giant Cell Arteritis Panuveitis Pars Planitis Uveal ... any uncontrolled systemic disease that would preclude participation in the study or put the subject at risk due to study ...
more infohttps://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01789320?term=triamcinolone+acetonide&

Erratum to: Somatic Mosaicism in Menkes Disease Suggests Choroid Plexus-Mediated Copper Transport to the Developing Brain<...Erratum to: Somatic Mosaicism in Menkes Disease Suggests Choroid Plexus-Mediated Copper Transport to the Developing Brain<...

Erratum to: Somatic Mosaicism in Menkes Disease Suggests Choroid Plexus-Mediated Copper Transport to the Developing Brain. ... Donsante, A, Johnson, P, Jansen, LA & Kaler, SG 2011, Erratum to: Somatic Mosaicism in Menkes Disease Suggests Choroid Plexus- ... Erratum to : Somatic Mosaicism in Menkes Disease Suggests Choroid Plexus-Mediated Copper Transport to the Developing Brain. / ... Erratum to: Somatic Mosaicism in Menkes Disease Suggests Choroid Plexus-Mediated Copper Transport to the Developing Brain. ...
more infohttps://researchexperts.utmb.edu/en/publications/erratum-to-somatic-mosaicism-in-menkes-disease-suggests-choroid-p

Aicardi syndrome.Aicardi syndrome.

Choroid Diseases* / congenital. Corpus Callosum* / abnormalities. Female. Humans. Infant, Newborn. Male. Pregnancy. Retinal ... The brain malformation is complex with cortical migration abnormalities, often cystic formations and sometimes choroid plexus ... Diseases* / congenital. Spasms, Infantile* / congenital. From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of ...
more infohttp://www.biomedsearch.com/nih/Aicardi-syndrome/15737696.html

EXTEND III - Efficacy and Safety of Ranibizumab in Patients With Subfoveal Choroidal Neovascularization (CNV) Secondary to Age...EXTEND III - Efficacy and Safety of Ranibizumab in Patients With Subfoveal Choroidal Neovascularization (CNV) Secondary to Age...

Retinal Diseases. Eye Diseases. Metaplasia. Pathologic Processes. Choroid Diseases. Uveal Diseases. Ranibizumab. Immunologic ... Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Choroidal Neovascularization Age-Related Macular Degeneration Drug: ...
more infohttps://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00470678

Host Immunoglobulin G and Complement Deposits in the Choroid Plexus during Spontaneous Immune Complex Disease | ScienceHost Immunoglobulin G and Complement Deposits in the Choroid Plexus during Spontaneous Immune Complex Disease | Science

Host Immunoglobulin G and Complement Deposits in the Choroid Plexus during Spontaneous Immune Complex Disease ... Host Immunoglobulin G and Complement Deposits in the Choroid Plexus during Spontaneous Immune Complex Disease ... Host Immunoglobulin G and Complement Deposits in the Choroid Plexus during Spontaneous Immune Complex Disease ... Host Immunoglobulin G and Complement Deposits in the Choroid Plexus during Spontaneous Immune Complex Disease ...
more infohttps://science.sciencemag.org/content/180/4084/408

Choroid plexus carcinoma             | Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) - an NCATS ProgramChoroid plexus carcinoma | Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) - an NCATS Program

A collection of disease information resources and questions answered by our Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Specialists ... Diseases expand submenu for Diseases * Browse A-Z * Find Diseases By Category expand submenu for Find Diseases By Category * ... Find Diseases By Category expand submenu for Find Diseases By Category *Autoimmune / Autoinflammatory diseases ... Choroid plexus carcinoma is a rare and highly aggressive malignant type of choroid plexus tumor. (see this term) occurring ...
more infohttps://phgkb.cdc.gov/PHGKB/phgHome.action?action=forward&dbsource=cluster&id=27535

Choroid plexus papilloma             | Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) - an NCATS ProgramChoroid plexus papilloma | Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) - an NCATS Program

A collection of disease information resources and questions answered by our Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Specialists ... Diseases expand submenu for Diseases * Browse A-Z * Find Diseases By Category expand submenu for Find Diseases By Category * ... Find Diseases By Category expand submenu for Find Diseases By Category *Autoimmune / Autoinflammatory diseases ... Choroid plexus papilloma (CPP) ia a non-cancerous (benign) tumor. of the choroid plexus, a network of blood vessels in the ...
more infohttps://phgkb.cdc.gov/PHGKB/phgHome.action?action=forward&dbsource=cluster&id=25675

A treatise on internal diseases of the eyes: including diseases of the iris, crystalline lens, choroid retina, and optic nerve ...A treatise on internal diseases of the eyes: including diseases of the iris, crystalline lens, choroid retina, and optic nerve ...

... Eye Diseases. Eye Diseases -- therapy. Homeopathy. Genre(s): Case Reports. Copyright: The National Library of Medicine believes ... Eye Diseases. Eye Diseases -- therapy. Homeopathy. Genre(s): Case Reports. Copyright: The National Library of Medicine believes ...
more infohttps://collections.nlm.nih.gov/catalog/nlm:nlmuid-68020450R-bk

Proteomic Landscape of the Human Choroid-Retinal Pigment Epithelial Complex | Macular Diseases | JAMA Ophthalmology | JAMA...Proteomic Landscape of the Human Choroid-Retinal Pigment Epithelial Complex | Macular Diseases | JAMA Ophthalmology | JAMA...

Skeie and Mahajan characterize the proteome of the human choroid-retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) complex and identify ... Fundus Images of Choroid-Retinal Pigment Epithelial (RPE) Complex Disease Display Region-Specific Diseases ... Why choroid-RPE diseases show regional susceptibility is not known. Anatomic variation of the choroid-RPE complex is one ... Disruption of the choroid-retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) complex is a frequent cause of blinding retinal diseases. These ...
more infohttps://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaophthalmology/fullarticle/1889671

adult optic nerve glioma 2005:2010[pubdate] *count=100 - BioMedLib™ search engineadult optic nerve glioma 2005:2010[pubdate] *count=100 - BioMedLib™ search engine

MeSH-major] Choroid Diseases / pathology. Cicatrix / pathology. Neurofibromatosis 1 / pathology. Optic Nerve Glioma / pathology ... Nervous System Diseases / radionuclide imaging. Optic Nerve Diseases / radionuclide imaging. Orbital Diseases / radionuclide ... Optic Nerve Diseases / diagnosis. Optic Nerve Diseases / surgery. Vision Disorders / diagnosis. Vision Disorders / etiology. ... Disease Susceptibility. Genetic Counseling. Genetic Predisposition to Disease / genetics. Genetic Testing. Genotype. ...
more infohttp://www.bmlsearch.com/?kwr=adult+optic+nerve+glioma+2005:2010%5Bpubdate%5D&cxts=100&stmp=b0

The relationship between anti-vascular endothelial growth factor and fibrosis in proliferative retinopathy: clinical and...The relationship between anti-vascular endothelial growth factor and fibrosis in proliferative retinopathy: clinical and...

2Beijing Key Laboratory for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Retinal and Choroid Diseases, Beijing, China. ... Vascular endothelial growth factor in eye disease. Prog Retin Eye Res 2008;27:331-71. doi:10.1016/j.preteyeres.2008.05.001. ... TGFβ is believed to be the most important ligand in the pathogenesis of fibrotic diseases in the retina, including ... Microglia are a common hallmark of various retinal diseases.32 Microglial function is kept in balance under normal conditions ...
more infohttp://bjo.bmj.com/content/100/10/1443

Nonsense-codon mutations of the ornithine aminotransferase gene with decreased levels of mutant mRNA in gyrate atrophy<...Nonsense-codon mutations of the ornithine aminotransferase gene with decreased levels of mutant mRNA in gyrate atrophy<...

... an autosomal recessive degenerative disease of the retina and choroid of the eye. Mutations in the OAT gene show a high degree ... an autosomal recessive degenerative disease of the retina and choroid of the eye. Mutations in the OAT gene show a high degree ... an autosomal recessive degenerative disease of the retina and choroid of the eye. Mutations in the OAT gene show a high degree ... an autosomal recessive degenerative disease of the retina and choroid of the eye. Mutations in the OAT gene show a high degree ...
more infohttps://ohsu.pure.elsevier.com/en/publications/nonsense-codon-mutations-of-the-ornithine-aminotransferase-gene-w-2

Angiogenic and Immunologic Proteins Identified by Deep Proteomic Profiling of Human Retinal and Choroidal Vascular Endothelial...Angiogenic and Immunologic Proteins Identified by Deep Proteomic Profiling of Human Retinal and Choroidal Vascular Endothelial...

Purpose: Diseases that involve retinal or choroidal vascular endothelial cells are leading causes of vision loss: age-related ... N2 - Purpose: Diseases that involve retinal or choroidal vascular endothelial cells are leading causes of vision loss: age- ... AB - Purpose: Diseases that involve retinal or choroidal vascular endothelial cells are leading causes of vision loss: age- ... abstract = "Purpose: Diseases that involve retinal or choroidal vascular endothelial cells are leading causes of vision loss: ...
more infohttps://ohsu.pure.elsevier.com/en/publications/angiogenic-and-immunologic-proteins-identified-by-deep-proteomic-
  • Making a diagnosis for a genetic or rare disease can often be challenging. (cdc.gov)
  • Mutations in the OAT gene show a high degree of molecular heterogeneity in GA, reflecting the genetic heterogeneity in this disease. (elsevier.com)
  • Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a genetic systemic disorder, which is associated with cyst formation in several organs, renal function decline and a higher prevalence of intracranial aneurysms. (uu.nl)
  • Our study highlights the importance and difficulty in replicating genetic association studies of complex human diseases. (nih.gov)
  • An important gene associated with Papilloma of Choroid Plexus is TP53 (Tumor Protein P53), and among its related pathways/superpathways are MAPK signaling pathway and Cell cycle . (malacards.org)
  • B, Top ten differentially expressed protein pathways represented in the choroid-RPE. (jamanetwork.com)
  • We hypothesize therefore that choroid plexus cysts may be part of the ADPKD phenotype, which has not been described before. (uu.nl)
  • This association was also tested in a population of PCV participants to avoid variable findings across studies due to underlying sample heterogeneity and because disease phenotype was not well described in previous studies. (nih.gov)
  • The majority of the X-linked RP is caused by mutations in the RPGR gene, which contains a mutational hotspot at a unique 567-aa exon called ORF15 accounting for two-thirds of all disease-causing mutations. (blueprintgenetics.com)
  • Today we're going to talk about the changes that occur in the choroid in aging and in macular disease. (hstalks.com)
  • The choroid has some normal physiological changes that occur during aging that are differentiated from those that occur in diseases, like macular degeneration. (hstalks.com)
  • Some of the same events that occur during normal aging, however, can occur to a more profound extent in diseases, like age-related macular degeneration or AMD. (hstalks.com)
  • Transcriptome profiles were generated for macular and extramacular regions, and statistical and bioinformatic methods were employed to identify disease-associated gene signatures and functionally enriched protein association networks. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The following summary is from Orphanet , a European reference portal for information on rare diseases and orphan drugs. (cdc.gov)
  • Visit the Orphanet disease page for more resources. (cdc.gov)
  • The choroid plexus may be a favored site for the deposition of immune complexes and the neuropsychiatric findings in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and some patients with acute or chronic infections may be related in part to immune complex disease of the choroid plexus. (sciencemag.org)
  • We don't completely understand the pathogenesis of this disease. (hstalks.com)
  • 1 Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a key factor in the pathogenesis of intraocular vascular diseases. (bmj.com)
  • Proteins were grouped into subcategories of biological processes, molecular functions, and cellular component for each region of choroid-RPE. (jamanetwork.com)
  • We sought to better understand the molecular underpinnings of this devastating disease by performing the first comparative transcriptome analysis of AMD and normal human donor eyes. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Yale Eye Center Clinical Conference Series: 'Imaging the choroid in health and disease + 360 laser: should we do it? (yale.edu)