A malignant metastatic form of trophoblastic tumors. Unlike the HYDATIDIFORM MOLE, choriocarcinoma contains no CHORIONIC VILLI but rather sheets of undifferentiated cytotrophoblasts and syncytiotrophoblasts (TROPHOBLASTS). It is characterized by the large amounts of CHORIONIC GONADOTROPIN produced. Tissue origins can be determined by DNA analyses: placental (fetal) origin or non-placental origin (CHORIOCARCINOMA, NON-GESTATIONAL).
A highly malignant CHORIOCARCINOMA derived from the non-placental origin such as the totipotent cells in the TESTIS, the OVARY, and the PINEAL GLAND. It produces high levels of CHORIONIC GONADOTROPIN and can metastasize widely through the bloodstream to the lungs, brain, liver, bone, and other viscera by the time of diagnosis.
Tumors or cancer of the UTERUS.
Trophoblastic hyperplasia associated with normal gestation, or molar pregnancy. It is characterized by the swelling of the CHORIONIC VILLI and elevated human CHORIONIC GONADOTROPIN. Hydatidiform moles or molar pregnancy may be categorized as complete or partial based on their gross morphology, histopathology, and karyotype.
Trophoblastic growth, which may be gestational or nongestational in origin. Trophoblastic neoplasia resulting from pregnancy is often described as gestational trophoblastic disease to distinguish it from germ cell tumors which frequently show trophoblastic elements, and from the trophoblastic differentiation which sometimes occurs in a wide variety of epithelial cancers. Gestational trophoblastic growth has several forms, including HYDATIDIFORM MOLE and CHORIOCARCINOMA. (From Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1691)
Cells lining the outside of the BLASTOCYST. After binding to the ENDOMETRIUM, trophoblasts develop into two distinct layers, an inner layer of mononuclear cytotrophoblasts and an outer layer of continuous multinuclear cytoplasm, the syncytiotrophoblasts, which form the early fetal-maternal interface (PLACENTA).
A uterine tumor derived from persistent gestational TROPHOBLASTS, most likely after a molar pregnancy (HYDATIDIFORM MOLE). Invasive hyadatiform mole develops in about 15% of patients after evacuation of a complete mole and less frequently after other types of gestation. It may perforate the MYOMETRIUM and erode uterine vessels causing hemorrhage.
A group of diseases arising from pregnancy that are commonly associated with hyperplasia of trophoblasts (TROPHOBLAST) and markedly elevated human CHORIONIC GONADOTROPIN. They include HYDATIDIFORM MOLE, invasive mole (HYDATIDIFORM MOLE, INVASIVE), placental-site trophoblastic tumor (TROPHOBLASTIC TUMOR, PLACENTAL SITE), and CHORIOCARCINOMA. These neoplasms have varying propensities for invasion and spread.
The beta subunit of human CHORIONIC GONADOTROPIN. Its structure is similar to the beta subunit of LUTEINIZING HORMONE, except for the additional 30 amino acids at the carboxy end with the associated carbohydrate residues. HCG-beta is used as a diagnostic marker for early detection of pregnancy, spontaneous abortion (ABORTION, SPONTANEOUS); ECTOPIC PREGNANCY; HYDATIDIFORM MOLE; CHORIOCARCINOMA; or DOWN SYNDROME.
A gonadotropic glycoprotein hormone produced primarily by the PLACENTA. Similar to the pituitary LUTEINIZING HORMONE in structure and function, chorionic gonadotropin is involved in maintaining the CORPUS LUTEUM during pregnancy. CG consists of two noncovalently linked subunits, alpha and beta. Within a species, the alpha subunit is virtually identical to the alpha subunits of the three pituitary glycoprotein hormones (TSH, LH, and FSH), but the beta subunit is unique and confers its biological specificity (CHORIONIC GONADOTROPIN, BETA SUBUNIT, HUMAN).
A highly vascularized mammalian fetal-maternal organ and major site of transport of oxygen, nutrients, and fetal waste products. It includes a fetal portion (CHORIONIC VILLI) derived from TROPHOBLASTS and a maternal portion (DECIDUA) derived from the uterine ENDOMETRIUM. The placenta produces an array of steroid, protein and peptide hormones (PLACENTAL HORMONES).
The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.
The threadlike, vascular projections of the chorion. Chorionic villi may be free or embedded within the DECIDUA forming the site for exchange of substances between fetal and maternal blood (PLACENTA).
The alpha chain of pituitary glycoprotein hormones (THYROTROPIN; FOLLICLE STIMULATING HORMONE; LUTEINIZING HORMONE) and the placental CHORIONIC GONADOTROPIN. Within a species, the alpha subunits of these four hormones are identical; the distinct functional characteristics of these glycoprotein hormones are determined by the unique beta subunits. Both subunits, the non-covalently bound heterodimers, are required for full biologic activity.
Cells grown in vitro from neoplastic tissue. If they can be established as a TUMOR CELL LINE, they can be propagated in cell culture indefinitely.
Tumors or cancer of the TESTIS. Germ cell tumors (GERMINOMA) of the testis constitute 95% of all testicular neoplasms.
Tests to determine whether or not an individual is pregnant.
Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)

Postmenopausal choriocarcinoma: a case report. (1/10)

Postmenopausal uterine choriocarcinoma is very rare and benefits of curative chemotherapy. We present here the case of 62-year-old women with uterine bleeding. Emergency surgery revealed a uterine tumor and histopathology findings were consistent with choriocarcinoma. Immunohistochemistry tests confirmed betahCG and cytokeratin expression by malignant cells, thus establishing the positive diagnosis.  (+info)

Primary non-gestational uterine cervical choriocarcinoma with metaplastic transformation from squamous cells. (2/10)

BACKGROUND: Primary non-gestational uterine cervical choriocarcinoma is very unusual and although it has been hypothesized that it can arise by metaplastic transformation of cervical epithelium, solid evidence has been lacking. CASE: Primary non-gestational uterine cervical choriocarcinoma was diagnosed in a 47-year-old, woman undergoing tubal resection 17 years previously. A histologically- and immunohistochemically-confirmed, non-gestational cervical choriocarcinoma could be diagnosed in which there was metaplastic transformation from squamous cells . The patient underwent 5 courses of an actinomycin-D chemotherapeutic regimen and radical hysterectomy with bilateral pelvic lymphadenectomy. CONCLUSION: Primary non-gestational uterine cervical choriocarcinoma may indeed arise from metaplastic transformation of epithelial tissue.  (+info)

Male choriocarcinoma with metastasis to the jejunum: a case report and review of the literature. (3/10)

We report on a patient with male choriocarcinoma. The patient was a 31-year-old male patient with jejunal choriocarcinoma that metastasized from the mediastinum. He was admitted complaining of melena and severe anemia. Upper and lower gastrointestinal endosocopy was performed, but no source of bleeding was seen. Chest X-ray and CT revealed a mediastinal tumor 7 cm in size anterior to the arotic arch. Superior mesenteric arteriography showed irregularities and macular opacity in the jejunal artery. An emergency laparatomy was performed because of massive gastrointestinal bleeding. A jejunal tumor approximately 4 cm in size was resected and numerous metastases were observed in the liver and mesentery. Histopathological examination showed metastatic jejunal choriocarcinoma. Gynecomastia was not present and the testes were normal. Serum beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) was at an abnormally high level of 4,396 ng/mL. Because of metastases to the brain and invasion to the trachea, he died on postoperative day 20. We report this rare case of a male patient with metastases of choriocarcinoma to the gastrointestinal tract from the mediastinum, together with a review of the literature.  (+info)

Primary intracranial choriocarcinoma: MR imaging findings. (4/10)

 (+info)

Papillary cystadenofibroma of epididymis: a case report. (5/10)

We present the first reported case of papillary cystadenofibroma of the epididymis. The tumor occurred in a 46-year-old man. The mass was 3.7 cm and included a hemorrhagic fluid-filled cyst. Microscopically, stromal-filled papillae were lined by low cuboidal to columnar epithelium. Epithelial cells were reactive for cytokeratin 7, cytokeratins AE1/3, and focally in the apical cytoplasm for CD10. Focal CD10 reactivity was also noted in the stroma. The lesion was negative for alpha-fetoprotein. These findings ruled out other lesions, including metastatic renal cell carcinoma.  (+info)

Pathological complete response and two-year disease-free survival in a primary gastric choriocarcinoma patient with advanced liver metastases treated with germ cell tumor-based chemotherapy: a case report. (6/10)

 (+info)

Pure nongestational choriocarcinoma of the ovary: a case report. (7/10)

 (+info)

Complete response to multidisciplinary therapy in a patient with primary gastric choriocarcinoma. (8/10)

 (+info)

Choriocarcinoma is a rapidly growing and invasive type of gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD), which are abnormal growths that develop in the tissues that are supposed to become the placenta during pregnancy. It occurs when a malignant tumor develops from trophoblast cells, which are normally found in the developing embryo and help to form the placenta.

Choriocarcinoma can occur after any type of pregnancy, including normal pregnancies, molar pregnancies (a rare mass that forms inside the uterus after conception), or ectopic pregnancies (when a fertilized egg implants outside the uterus). It is characterized by the presence of both trophoblastic and cancerous cells, which can produce human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) hormone.

Choriocarcinoma can spread quickly to other parts of the body, such as the lungs, liver, brain, or vagina, through the bloodstream. It is important to diagnose and treat choriocarcinoma early to prevent serious complications and improve the chances of a successful treatment outcome. Treatment typically involves surgery, chemotherapy, or radiation therapy.

Choriocarcinoma, non-gestational is a rare type of cancer that develops from the abnormal growth of cells that form the placenta. Unlike gestational choriocarcinoma, which arises during pregnancy or after it has ended, non-gestational choriocarcinoma is not related to pregnancy and can occur in both men and women. It typically occurs in the ovaries, testicles, or other organs where trophoblastic cells (cells that normally develop into the placenta) may be found.

Non-gestational choriocarcinoma is an aggressive cancer that can spread quickly to other parts of the body, such as the lungs, liver, and brain. It is usually treated with a combination of chemotherapy, surgery, and radiation therapy. The prognosis for non-gestational choriocarcinoma depends on several factors, including the stage of the cancer at diagnosis, the patient's age and overall health, and the response to treatment.

Uterine neoplasms refer to abnormal growths in the uterus, which can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). These growths can originate from different types of cells within the uterus, leading to various types of uterine neoplasms. The two main categories of uterine neoplasms are endometrial neoplasms and uterine sarcomas.

Endometrial neoplasms develop from the endometrium, which is the inner lining of the uterus. Most endometrial neoplasms are classified as endometrioid adenocarcinomas, arising from glandular cells in the endometrium. Other types include serous carcinoma, clear cell carcinoma, and mucinous carcinoma.

Uterine sarcomas, on the other hand, are less common and originate from the connective tissue (stroma) or muscle (myometrium) of the uterus. Uterine sarcomas can be further divided into several subtypes, such as leiomyosarcoma, endometrial stromal sarcoma, and undifferentiated uterine sarcoma.

Uterine neoplasms can cause various symptoms, including abnormal vaginal bleeding or discharge, pelvic pain, and difficulty urinating or having bowel movements. The diagnosis typically involves a combination of imaging tests (such as ultrasound, CT, or MRI scans) and tissue biopsies to determine the type and extent of the neoplasm. Treatment options depend on the type, stage, and patient's overall health but may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or hormone therapy.

A hydatidiform mole, also known as a molar pregnancy, is a type of gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD), which is a group of rare disorders that involve abnormal growth of the placental tissue.

In a hydatidiform mole, there is an abnormal fertilization event leading to the growth of a mass of grapelike cysts in the uterus instead of a normal pregnancy. The chromosomes from the sperm and egg do not combine properly, resulting in an extra set of chromosomes, which leads to the development of the mole.

Hydatidiform moles can be complete or partial:

* Complete hydatidiform mole (CHM): This type arises when an egg without a nucleus is fertilized by one or two sperm, leading to the growth of abnormal placental tissue with no embryo. The chromosomes come from the father only, and there are typically 46 chromosomes, all of paternal origin.
* Partial hydatidiform mole (PHM): This type occurs when an egg is fertilized by two sperm or a single sperm that duplicates itself, resulting in an abnormal placenta with some fetal tissue. The chromosomes are of both maternal and paternal origin, and the placental tissue has a mix of normal and abnormal cells.

Hydatidiform moles can cause vaginal bleeding, rapid uterine enlargement, and high levels of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) hormone in the blood. They are usually detected during an ultrasound exam and require medical treatment to prevent complications such as gestational trophoblastic neoplasia, a malignant form of GTD that can spread to other organs.

Trophoblastic neoplasms are a group of rare tumors that originate from the trophoblast, which is the outer layer of cells that surrounds a developing embryo and helps to form the placenta during pregnancy. These tumors can be benign or malignant and are characterized by their ability to produce human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), a hormone that is normally produced during pregnancy.

There are several types of trophoblastic neoplasms, including:

1. Hydatidiform mole: A benign growth that forms in the uterus when a fertilized egg implants but does not develop into a normal embryo. There are two types of hydatidiform moles: complete and partial. Complete moles have no fetal tissue, while partial moles have some fetal tissue.
2. Invasive mole: A malignant form of hydatidiform mole that invades the uterine wall and may spread to other parts of the body.
3. Choriocarcinoma: A rapidly growing and highly invasive malignant tumor that can arise from a hydatidiform mole, a normal pregnancy, or an ectopic pregnancy. It can spread quickly to other parts of the body, such as the lungs, liver, and brain.
4. Placental site trophoblastic tumor (PSTT): A rare type of trophoblastic neoplasm that arises from the cells that attach the placenta to the uterine wall. It is usually slow-growing but can be aggressive in some cases.
5. Epithelioid trophoblastic tumor (ETT): Another rare type of trophoblastic neoplasm that arises from the cells that form the placental villi. It is typically low-grade and has a good prognosis, but it can recur in some cases.

The treatment for trophoblastic neoplasms depends on the type and stage of the tumor. Treatment options may include surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or a combination of these approaches. Regular monitoring of hCG levels is also important to ensure that the tumor has been completely removed and to detect any recurrence early.

Trophoblasts are specialized cells that make up the outer layer of a blastocyst, which is a hollow ball of cells that forms in the earliest stages of embryonic development. In humans, this process occurs about 5-6 days after fertilization. The blastocyst consists of an inner cell mass (which will eventually become the embryo) and an outer layer of trophoblasts.

Trophoblasts play a crucial role in implantation, which is the process by which the blastocyst attaches to and invades the lining of the uterus. Once implanted, the trophoblasts differentiate into two main layers: the cytotrophoblasts (which are closer to the inner cell mass) and the syncytiotrophoblasts (which form a multinucleated layer that is in direct contact with the maternal tissues).

The cytotrophoblasts proliferate and fuse to form the syncytiotrophoblasts, which have several important functions. They secrete enzymes that help to degrade and remodel the extracellular matrix of the uterine lining, allowing the blastocyst to implant more deeply. They also form a barrier between the maternal and fetal tissues, helping to protect the developing embryo from the mother's immune system.

Additionally, trophoblasts are responsible for the formation of the placenta, which provides nutrients and oxygen to the developing fetus and removes waste products. The syncytiotrophoblasts in particular play a key role in this process by secreting hormones such as human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), which helps to maintain pregnancy, and by forming blood vessels that allow for the exchange of nutrients and waste between the mother and fetus.

Abnormalities in trophoblast development or function can lead to a variety of pregnancy-related complications, including preeclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction, and gestational trophoblastic diseases such as hydatidiform moles and choriocarcinomas.

An invasive hydatidiform mole (IHM) is a rare and aggressive complication of a gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD), which itself originates from the abnormal proliferation of trophoblastic cells, the tissue that normally develops into the placenta during pregnancy. IHMs are characterized by the invasion of molar villi into the myometrium (the muscular layer of the uterus) and can potentially spread to other organs through the bloodstream, leading to distant metastases.

IHMs usually arise from a complete hydatidiform mole (CHM), which is an abnormal conceptus with no embryonic or fetal development. CHMs are typically diploid and originate from the fertilization of an egg without genetic material (an empty egg or an egg with two sets of paternal chromosomes) by one or two sperm cells. This results in a conceptus with only paternal chromosomes, which leads to uncontrolled proliferation of trophoblastic tissue and the formation of grapelike vesicles filled with fluid (hydatidiform moles).

Invasive hydatidiform moles can cause various symptoms, such as vaginal bleeding, pelvic pain, or the presence of an enlarged uterus. They also pose a risk for developing choriocarcinoma, another type of gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN), which is a malignant tumor that can metastasize and spread to other organs. Proper diagnosis and timely treatment are crucial to prevent severe complications and improve the prognosis for patients with IHMs. Treatment usually involves surgical removal of the mole, followed by chemotherapy to eliminate any residual disease and reduce the risk of GTN development.

Gestational Trophoblastic Disease (GTD) is a group of rare pregnancy-related disorders that involve abnormal growth of cells inside a woman's uterus. These cells are part of the placenta, which provides nutrients to the developing fetus. GTD occurs when some of these cells grow in an uncontrolled way, forming tumors or tumor-like growths.

There are several types of GTD:

1. Hydatidiform Mole (HM): Also known as a molar pregnancy, this is the most common type of GTD. It occurs when an egg that has no genetic information is fertilized by a sperm and then divides into multiple copies. This results in a growth that resembles a cluster of grapes, rather than a developing fetus. There are two types of HMs: complete and partial. A complete HM forms when an empty egg is fertilized by two sperms, resulting in no fetal tissue. A partial HM forms when a normal egg is fertilized by two sperm or an abnormal egg with two sets of genetic material, resulting in some fetal tissue.

2. Invasive Mole: This type of GTD occurs when cells from a molar pregnancy invade the uterine wall and surrounding tissues. It can also spread to other parts of the body, such as the lungs or brain.

3. Choriocarcinoma: This is a rare form of GTD that develops from trophoblastic cells and forms a malignant tumor. It can grow rapidly and spread quickly to other organs.

4. Placental Site Trophoblastic Tumor (PSTT): This is an even rarer type of GTD that forms in the tissue where the placenta attaches to the uterus. PSTTs are usually slow-growing but can sometimes spread to other parts of the body.

5. Epithelioid Trophoblastic Tumor (ETT): This is a very rare type of GTD that forms in the tissue where the placenta attaches to the uterus. ETTs are usually slow-growing and have a good prognosis.

It's important to note that most molar pregnancies do not develop into more serious forms of GTD, but regular follow-up care is necessary to monitor for any signs of progression. Treatment options depend on the type and stage of GTD and may include surgery, chemotherapy, or radiation therapy.

Chorionic Gonadotropin, beta Subunit, Human (β-hCG) is a protein that is produced by the placenta during pregnancy. It is a component of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), which is a hormone that is composed of two subunits: alpha and beta. The β-hCG subunit is specific to hCG and is not found in other hormones, making it a useful marker for pregnancy and certain medical conditions.

During early pregnancy, the levels of β-hCG increase rapidly and can be detected in the blood and urine. This has led to the development of pregnancy tests that detect the presence of β-hCG to confirm pregnancy. In addition to its role in pregnancy, β-hCG is also used as a tumor marker for certain types of cancer, such as germ cell tumors and choriocarcinoma.

Elevated levels of β-hCG may indicate the presence of a molar pregnancy, a condition in which a fertilized egg implants in the uterus but does not develop properly. In some cases, a molar pregnancy can become cancerous and require treatment. Therefore, monitoring β-hCG levels during pregnancy is important for detecting any potential complications.

Chorionic Gonadotropin (hCG) is a hormone that is produced during pregnancy. It is produced by the placenta after implantation of the fertilized egg in the uterus. The main function of hCG is to prevent the disintegration of the corpus luteum, which is a temporary endocrine structure that forms in the ovary after ovulation and produces progesterone during early pregnancy. Progesterone is essential for maintaining the lining of the uterus and supporting the pregnancy.

hCG can be detected in the blood or urine as early as 10 days after conception, and its levels continue to rise throughout the first trimester of pregnancy. In addition to its role in maintaining pregnancy, hCG is also used as a clinical marker for pregnancy and to monitor certain medical conditions such as gestational trophoblastic diseases.

The placenta is an organ that develops in the uterus during pregnancy and provides oxygen and nutrients to the growing baby through the umbilical cord. It also removes waste products from the baby's blood. The placenta attaches to the wall of the uterus, and the baby's side of the placenta contains many tiny blood vessels that connect to the baby's circulatory system. This allows for the exchange of oxygen, nutrients, and waste between the mother's and baby's blood. After the baby is born, the placenta is usually expelled from the uterus in a process called afterbirth.

Pregnancy is a physiological state or condition where a fertilized egg (zygote) successfully implants and grows in the uterus of a woman, leading to the development of an embryo and finally a fetus. This process typically spans approximately 40 weeks, divided into three trimesters, and culminates in childbirth. Throughout this period, numerous hormonal and physical changes occur to support the growing offspring, including uterine enlargement, breast development, and various maternal adaptations to ensure the fetus's optimal growth and well-being.

Chorionic villi are finger-like projections of the chorion, which is the outermost extraembryonic membrane in a developing embryo. These structures are composed of both fetal and maternal tissues and play a crucial role in the early stages of pregnancy by providing a site for exchange of nutrients and waste products between the mother and the developing fetus.

Chorionic villi contain fetal blood vessels that are surrounded by stromal cells, trophoblasts, and connective tissue. They are formed during the process of implantation, when the fertilized egg attaches to the uterine wall. The chorionic villi continue to grow and multiply as the placenta develops, eventually forming a highly vascular and specialized organ that supports fetal growth and development throughout pregnancy.

One important function of chorionic villi is to serve as the site for the production of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), a hormone that can be detected in the mother's blood and urine during early pregnancy. This hormone plays a critical role in maintaining pregnancy by signaling the corpus luteum to continue producing progesterone, which helps to prevent menstruation and support fetal growth.

Abnormalities in chorionic villi can lead to various pregnancy complications, such as miscarriage, stillbirth, or intrauterine growth restriction. For this reason, chorionic villus sampling (CVS) is a diagnostic procedure that may be performed during early pregnancy to obtain fetal cells for genetic testing and diagnosis of chromosomal abnormalities or other genetic disorders.

Glycoprotein hormones are a group of hormones that share a similar structure and are made up of four subunits: two identical alpha subunits and two distinct beta subunits. The alpha subunit is common to all glycoprotein hormones, including thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG).

The alpha subunit of glycoprotein hormones is a 92 amino acid polypeptide chain that contains several disulfide bonds, which help to stabilize its structure. It is heavily glycosylated, meaning that it contains many carbohydrate groups attached to the protein backbone. The alpha subunit plays an important role in the biological activity of the hormone by interacting with a specific receptor on the target cell surface.

The alpha subunit contains several regions that are important for its function, including a signal peptide, a variable region, and a conserved region. The signal peptide is a short sequence of amino acids at the N-terminus of the protein that directs it to the endoplasmic reticulum for processing and secretion. The variable region contains several amino acid residues that differ between different glycoprotein hormones, while the conserved region contains amino acids that are identical or very similar in all glycoprotein hormones.

Together with the beta subunit, the alpha subunit forms the functional hormone molecule. The beta subunit determines the specificity of the hormone for its target cells and regulates its biological activity.

'Tumor cells, cultured' refers to the process of removing cancerous cells from a tumor and growing them in controlled laboratory conditions. This is typically done by isolating the tumor cells from a patient's tissue sample, then placing them in a nutrient-rich environment that promotes their growth and multiplication.

The resulting cultured tumor cells can be used for various research purposes, including the study of cancer biology, drug development, and toxicity testing. They provide a valuable tool for researchers to better understand the behavior and characteristics of cancer cells outside of the human body, which can lead to the development of more effective cancer treatments.

It is important to note that cultured tumor cells may not always behave exactly the same way as they do in the human body, so findings from cell culture studies must be validated through further research, such as animal models or clinical trials.

Testicular neoplasms are abnormal growths or tumors in the testicle that can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). They are a type of genitourinary cancer, which affects the reproductive and urinary systems. Testicular neoplasms can occur in men of any age but are most commonly found in young adults between the ages of 15 and 40.

Testicular neoplasms can be classified into two main categories: germ cell tumors and non-germ cell tumors. Germ cell tumors, which arise from the cells that give rise to sperm, are further divided into seminomas and non-seminomas. Seminomas are typically slow-growing and have a good prognosis, while non-seminomas tend to grow more quickly and can spread to other parts of the body.

Non-germ cell tumors are less common than germ cell tumors and include Leydig cell tumors, Sertoli cell tumors, and lymphomas. These tumors can have a variety of clinical behaviors, ranging from benign to malignant.

Testicular neoplasms often present as a painless mass or swelling in the testicle. Other symptoms may include a feeling of heaviness or discomfort in the scrotum, a dull ache in the lower abdomen or groin, and breast enlargement (gynecomastia).

Diagnosis typically involves a physical examination, imaging studies such as ultrasound or CT scan, and blood tests to detect tumor markers. Treatment options depend on the type and stage of the neoplasm but may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these modalities. Regular self-examinations of the testicles are recommended for early detection and improved outcomes.

A pregnancy test is a medical diagnostic tool used to determine whether or not a woman is pregnant. These tests detect the presence of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), a hormone produced by the placenta after fertilization. Pregnancy tests can be performed using a variety of methods, including urine tests and blood tests.

Urine pregnancy tests are typically performed at home and involve either dipping a test strip into a sample of urine or holding the strip under a stream of urine for several seconds. The test strip contains antibodies that react with hCG, producing a visual signal such as a line or plus sign if hCG is present.

Blood pregnancy tests are performed by a healthcare provider and can detect lower levels of hCG than urine tests. There are two types of blood pregnancy tests: qualitative and quantitative. Qualitative tests simply detect the presence or absence of hCG, while quantitative tests measure the exact amount of hCG present in the blood.

Pregnancy tests are generally very accurate when used correctly, but false positives and false negatives can occur. False positives may occur due to certain medical conditions or medications that contain hCG. False negatives may occur if the test is taken too early or if it is not performed correctly. It is important to follow the instructions carefully and consult with a healthcare provider if there is any uncertainty about the results.

An encyclopedia is a comprehensive reference work containing articles on various topics, usually arranged in alphabetical order. In the context of medicine, a medical encyclopedia is a collection of articles that provide information about a wide range of medical topics, including diseases and conditions, treatments, tests, procedures, and anatomy and physiology. Medical encyclopedias may be published in print or electronic formats and are often used as a starting point for researching medical topics. They can provide reliable and accurate information on medical subjects, making them useful resources for healthcare professionals, students, and patients alike. Some well-known examples of medical encyclopedias include the Merck Manual and the Stedman's Medical Dictionary.

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Izhar R (2003). "Prognosis of gestational choriocarcinoma at Khyber Teaching Hospital Peshawar". Journal of Ayub Medical ... Choriocarcinoma, for example, is an uncommon, yet almost always curable cancer. Although choriocarcinoma is a highly malignant ... Gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD) may also be called gestational trophoblastic tumour (GTT). Hydatidiform mole (one type ... Sometimes it may develop into an invasive mole, or, more rarely into a choriocarcinoma. A choriocarcinoma is likely to spread ...
... even for metastatic gestational choriocarcinoma, is more than 90% when using chemotherapy for invasive mole and choriocarcinoma ... Stage I choriocarcinoma Stage 2 choriocarcinoma Stage 3 choriocarcinoma Stage 4 choriocarcinoma "choriocarcinoma" at Dorland's ... High magnification Very high magnification Since gestational choriocarcinoma (which arises from a hydatidiform mole) contains ... Elements of choriocarcinoma in a mixed testicular tumor have no prognostic importance. Choriocarcinomas can also occur in the ...
A molar pregnancy and choriocarcinoma can provoke it. In some people, it persists long-term. It is associated with premature ... Gestational pemphigoid (GP) is a rare autoimmune variant of the skin disease bullous pemphigoid, and first appears in pregnancy ... GP is characterized by flaring and remission during the gestational and sometimes post partum period. Usually after delivery, ... the first or second trimester and presence of blisters may lead to adverse pregnancy outcomes including decreased gestational ...
The choriocarcinoma has 2 significant subtypes including gestational and non-gestational and they are differentiated by their ... "Gestational Trophoblastic Disease Stages". www.cancer.org. Retrieved 2020-12-17. "Choriocarcinoma: MedlinePlus Medical ... Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN) is group of rare diseases related to pregnancy and included in gestational ... "References: Gestational Trophoblastic Disease". www.cancer.org. 25 June 2012. Retrieved 2020-12-16. "Gestational Trophoblastic ...
"A pure non-gestational ovarian choriocarcinoma with delayed solitary brain metastases: Case report and review of the literature ...
... s are associated with gestational trophoblastic disease (molar pregnancy), choriocarcinomas, and multiple ... MRI is especially beneficial in gestational age and obese people. MRI is also beneficial at preventing the exposure of ionizing ... Theca lutein xysts are also often notably seen in patients with choriocarcinoma or hydatidiform mole. Rarely these type of ... Aghajanian P, Rimel BJ (2019). "Gestational Trophoblastic Diseases". In DeCherney AH, Nathan L, Laufer N, Roman AS (eds.). ...
Choriocarcinomas can be divided into gestational choriocarcinomas and non-gestational choriocarcinomas which have ... "Choriocarcinoma", Wikipedia, 2019-02-23, retrieved 2019-04-10 Smith HO, Berwick M, Verschraegen CF, Wiggins C, Lansing L, ... OGCTs can be classified into dysgerminoma, teratomas, yolk sac tumors, and choriocarcinomas, listed in the order of prevalence ... There are four main types of OGCTs, namely dysgerminomas, yolk sac tumor, teratoma, and choriocarcinoma. Dygerminomas are ...
Choriocarcinoma are trophoblastic tumors that form in the uterus from villous cells. Trophoblast stem cells (TSCs) are cells ... Gestational trophoblastic disease is a pregnancy-associated concept, forming from the villous and extravillous trophoblast ... Ning, Fen; Hou, Houmei; Morse, Abraham N.; Lash, Gendie E. (10 April 2019). "Understanding and management of gestational ...
Certain malignancies can mimic the effects of clomifene on the ovaries, also due to increased HCG, in particular gestational ... Ovarian hyperstimulation occurs more often with invasive moles and choriocarcinoma than complete molar pregnancies. A widely ...
Choriocarcinoma can occur as a primary ovarian tumor developing from a germ cell, though it is usually a gestational disease ... Primary ovarian choriocarcinoma has a poor prognosis and can occur without a pregnancy. They produce high levels of hCG and can ... In addition, the cancer markers used vary with tumor type: choriocarcinomas are monitored with beta-HCG and endodermal sinus ... They can develop further into a variety of other neoplasms, including choriocarcinoma, yolk sac tumor, and teratoma. They occur ...
... of women who developed choriocarcinoma died within a year. Today, with chemotherapy, choriocarcinoma can be cured in almost ... Li, Min C. (15 September 1979). "The historical background of successful chemotherapy for advanced gestational trophoblastic ... Yarris, Jonathan P; Hunter, Alan J (1 May 2003). "Roy Hertz, M.D. (1909-2002): The cure of choriocarcinoma and its impact on ... Within four months she was "normal without evidence of disease." Li treated two additional patients with choriocarcinoma that ...
... of all gestational trophoblastic proliferations. Preceding conditions include molar pregnancy (5%). Compared to choriocarcinoma ... Placental site trophoblastic tumor is a form of gestational trophoblastic disease, which is thought to arise from intermediate ...
... on Chromosome 14 that are highly expressed in gestational choriocarcinoma. The EFS mRNA was also identified as differentially ...
... gestational trophoblastic diseases (GTD), and gestational trophoblastic neoplasms). bacterial contamination and blood in urine ... including choriocarcinoma and other germ cell tumors, IgA deficiencies, heterophile antibodies, enterocystoplasties, ... With obstetric ultrasonography the gestational sac (intrauterine fluid collection) can be visualized at 4.5 to 5 weeks ... to 10-weeks gestational age. hCG is produced by what will become the placenta. hCG testing can be performed with a blood (serum ...
... choriocarcinoma MeSH C04.557.465.955.207.750 - choriocarcinoma, non-gestational MeSH C04.557.465.955.207.875 - trophoblastic ... choriocarcinoma MeSH C04.557.470.200.025.455.750 - choriocarcinoma, non-gestational MeSH C04.557.470.200.025.455.875 - ... gestational trophoblastic neoplasms MeSH C04.850.908.416.186 - choriocarcinoma MeSH C04.850.908.416.186.875 - trophoblastic ... choriocarcinoma MeSH C04.557.465.955.416.202.875 - trophoblastic tumor, placental site MeSH C04.557.465.955.416.812 - ...
... gestational trophoblastic neoplasms MeSH C13.703.720.949.416.218 - choriocarcinoma MeSH C13.703.720.949.416.218.875 - ...
Gestational trophoblastic disease like hydatidiform moles ("molar pregnancy") or choriocarcinoma may produce high levels of ... choriocarcinoma, teratoma with elements of choriocarcinoma, other germ cell tumors, hydatidiform mole, and islet cell tumor. ... A study of 32 normal pregnancies came to the result that a gestational sac of 1-3 mm was detected at a mean hCG level of 1150 ... It is also possible to test for hCG to have an approximation of the gestational age. Most tests employ a monoclonal antibody, ...
... including choriocarcinoma, a highly invasive cancer. This article incorporates text in the public domain from page 60 of the ... usually due to bacterial infection Chorionic hematoma Gestational trophoblastic disease, any abnormal proliferation of the ...
"About molar pregnancy , Gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD) , Cancer Research UK". www.cancerresearchuk.org. Retrieved 18 ... Duffy L, Zhang L, Sheath K, Love DR, George AM (December 2015). "The Diagnosis of Choriocarcinoma in Molar Pregnancies: A ... It falls under the category of gestational trophoblastic diseases and was previously known as a hydatidiform mole. During a ... In 2 to 3% of cases, hydatidiform moles may develop into choriocarcinoma, which is a malignant, rapidly growing, and metastatic ...
Types of cancers it is used for include breast cancer, leukemia, lung cancer, lymphoma, gestational trophoblastic disease, and ... Min Chiu Li and his collaborators then demonstrated complete remission in women with choriocarcinoma and chorioadenoma in 1956 ... Hertz R, Li MC, Spencer DB (November 1956). "Effect of methotrexate therapy upon choriocarcinoma and chorioadenoma". ... and choriocarcinoma and other trophoblastic neoplasms. Although originally designed as a chemotherapy drug, in lower doses ...
"Placental Weights: Means, Standard Deviations, and Percentiles by Gestational Age". Placental and Gestational Pathology. 2017. ... They are decreased with toxemia, choriocarcinoma, and Placental insufficiency. The placenta and fetus may be regarded as a ... generally taking advantage of conditions at certain gestational periods as the placenta develops. CMV and Zika travel from the ... of same placenta Close-up of umbilical attachment to fetal side of freshly delivered placenta Placenta weight by gestational ...
... gestational trophoblastic disease - gestational trophoblastic neoplasia - gestational trophoblastic tumor - GI14721 - giant ... choriocarcinoma - choroid plexus tumor - CHPP - chronic granulocytic leukemia - chronic idiopathic myelofibrosis - chronic ...
Gestational choriocarcinoma is a form of gestational trophoblastic neoplasia, which is a type of gestational trophoblastic ... Vaginal bleeding is a common symptom of gestational choriocarcinoma. In the event the gestational choriocarcinoma has already ... and potential of recurring gestational choriocarcinoma. Gestational choriocarcinoma (GC) is the most aggressive form of ... Similar to other non-gestational tumors, gestational choriocarcinoma can be reflected via an elevated level in serum hCG ...
Gestational choriocarcinoma. Giorgio Bogani, Isabelle Ray-Coquard, David Mutch, Ignace Vergote, Pedro T. Ramirez, Jaime Prat, ... Dive into the research topics of Gestational choriocarcinoma. Together they form a unique fingerprint. ...
Gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD) is a group of pregnancy-related conditions that develop inside a womans uterus (womb ... Gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD) is a group of pregnancy-related conditions that develop inside a womans uterus (womb ... Choriocarcinoma (a type of cancer). *Hydatiform mole (also called a molar pregnancy) ... Gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD) is a group of pregnancy-related conditions that develop inside a womans uterus (womb ...
Histologically, it is classified into hydatidiform mole, invasive mole (chorioadenoma destruens), choriocarcinoma, and ... Gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD) can be benign or malignant. ... Trends in gestational choriocarcinoma: a 27-year perspective. Obstet Gynecol. 2003 Nov. 102(5 Pt 1):978-87. [QxMD MEDLINE Link] ... Choriocarcinoma and gestational trophoblastic disease. Obstet Gynecol Clin North Am. 2005 Dec. 32(4):661-84. [QxMD MEDLINE Link ...
The value of surgery in the treatment of gestational choriocarcinoma: A case report. Bencherifi Y, Abbassi IE, Karoini DE, ...
Gestational choriocarcinoma + Placental site trophoblastic tumor + Placenta and major chromosomal abnormalities + Hydropic ...
Hydatidiform Mole and Choriocarcinoma UK Information and Support Service Charing Cross Hospital Trophoblast Disease Service. A ... Home > Cancer Types > Gynecological > Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor. Gestational ... PubMed Central search for free-access publications about Gestational Trophoblastic Tumours. MeSH term: Gestational ... Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor Cancer.Net. Content is peer reviewed and Cancer.Net has an Editorial Board of experts and ...
This is called gestational choriocarcinoma. It most often occurs in young pregnant women. A young child can grow ... Choriocarcinoma. This kind of tumor is very rare. It is often malignant. It starts from a layer of the placenta. During ... This is called nongestational choriocarcinoma.. *Embryonal carcinoma. This type of tumor is usually malignant. It can spread ... choriocarcinoma from chorion cells that are still in the body. ...
A case of intraplacental gestational choriocarcinoma; characterised by the methylation pattern of the early placenta and an ... Genetics of gestational trophoblastic disease. Fisher, Rosemary A; Maher, Geoffrey J. Best Pract Res Clin Obstet Gynaecol ; 74 ... Sensitive screening of single nucleotide polymorphisms in cell free DNA for diagnosis of gestational tumours. Maher, Geoffrey J ... Management and survival of patients with FIGO high-risk gestational trophoblastic neoplasia: the U.K. experience, 1995-2010. ...
Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN) is staged by The American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) and the Féderation ... and choriocarcinomas. [2] Therefore, the FIGO staging system incorporates a modified WHO prognostic scoring system. ... encoded search term (Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor Staging) and Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor Staging What to Read Next on ... Staging and Scoring for Gestational Trophoblastic Neoplasia. Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN) is staged by the ...
... and ovaries as well as choriocarcinoma and gestational trophoblastic disease), male genital tract (including prostate, seminal ... choriocarcinoma, Wilms tumor, cervical cancer, testicular tumor, seminoma, bladder carcinoma, melanoma, and CNS tumors (such ... choriocarcinoma, fibroma, fibrosarcoma, glioblastoma, glioma, hepatoma, histiocytoma, leiomyoblastoma, leiomyosarcoma, lymphoma ...
Histologically, it is classified into hydatidiform mole, invasive mole (chorioadenoma destruens), choriocarcinoma, and ... Gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD) can be benign or malignant. ... Trends in gestational choriocarcinoma: a 27-year perspective. Obstet Gynecol. 2003 Nov. 102(5 Pt 1):978-87. [QxMD MEDLINE Link] ... Choriocarcinoma and gestational trophoblastic disease. Obstet Gynecol Clin North Am. 2005 Dec. 32(4):661-84. [QxMD MEDLINE Link ...
They mention specific types of tumors including post-molar gestational trophoblastic neoplasia, gestational choriocarcinoma, ... Gestational choriocarcinoma originates from the villous trophoblast. And there are neoplastic cytotrophoblast and ... Whereas choriocarcinomas histologically or clinically account for about 50% and post-molar GTN, the other 50%, give or take a ... Malignant gestational trophoblastic neoplasia or GTN consists of post-molar GTN. And usually those are patients treated without ...
... and the other from gestational choriocarcinoma. Conclusion: The high frequency of malignant ovarian tumours in the young age ...
Gestational trophoblastic disease I: epidemiology, pathology, clinical presentation and diagnosis of gestational trophoblastic ... A comparative study of the results of therapy in patients with invasive mole and with choriocarcinoma. Am J Obstet Gynecol 1971 ... Importance of pathological review of gestational trophoblastic diseases: results of the Belgian Gestational Trophoblastic ... Importance of pathological review of gestational trophoblastic diseases: results of the Belgian Gestational Trophoblastic ...
Trends in gestational choriocarcinoma: a 27-year perspective. Obstetrics and gynecology. 2003;102(5 Pt 1):978-87.. ... A case of non-gestational choriocarcinoma arising in the ovary of a postmenopausal woman. Journal of gynecologic oncology. 2009 ... Demographics, natural history and treatment outcomes of non-molar gestational choriocarcinoma: a UK population study. BJOG : an ... Relative Effects of Age, Race, and Stage on Mortality in Gestational Choriocarcinoma. International journal of gynecological ...
In gestational trophoblastic neoplasias, such as invasive mole and choriocarcinoma, a high level of hCG can help to distinguish ... Hyperglycosylated hCG in gestational implantation and in choriocarcinoma and testicular germ cell malignancy tumorigenesis. J ... gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD, hydatidiform mole, and choriocarcinoma); and benign or malignant nontesticular ... as in the invasive gestational trophoblastic diseases, choriocarcinoma and invasive mole. ...
Pregnancy With Gestational Age (How Far Along). The Pregnancy with Gestational Age (How Far Along) Test is a blood test that ... hCG can also be produced in other conditions, such as hydatidiform mole, choriocarcinoma, testicular neoplasm, and more. ...
Genomic profile in gestational and non-gestational choriocarcinomas. Placenta 2017 02 50 8-15. Mello Julia Bette Homem de, ... Distinct genomic profiles of gestational choriocarcinoma, a unique cancer of pregnant tissues. Experimental & molecular ... VEGF 936C/T Polymorphism and Gestational Trophoblastic Neoplasia. The Journal of reproductive medicine 2016 Sep 61 (9-10): 489- ...
Gestational Trophoblastic Disease - Etiology, pathophysiology, symptoms, signs, diagnosis & prognosis from the MSD Manuals - ... Choriocarcinoma develops after 2 to 3% of hydatidiform moles, more commonly after a complete than a partial mole. After a ... Gestational trophoblastic neoplasias are malignant placental tumors. These tumors include postmolar gestational trophoblastic ... National Cancer Institute: Gestational Trophoblastic Disease Treatment: This web site provides information about gestational ...
Choriocarcinoma is a rare and aggressive form of cancer that originates in the trophoblastic cells of the placenta, which are ... Choriocarcinoma is a rare and aggressive form of cancer that originates in the trophoblastic cells of the placenta, which are ...
Choriocarcinoma. Choriocarcinoma is reserved for the malignant end of the spectrum within gestational trophoblastic neoplasia ( ... GTN). Most choriocarcinomas occur in the uterus, but occasionally arise in the ovary. Choriocarcinoma invades the decidua, ... non-metastasising Choriocarcinoma and low risk metastasising Chorioncarcinoma). High risk metastasising Choriocarcinoma is ... Methotrexate is the treatment of choice for low risk choriocarcinoma (destructive hydatidiform mole, ...
... etoposide and actinomycin D in patients with choriocarcinoma and high-risk gestational trophoblastic neoplasia / o7295_summary ...
Pulmonary metastases in gestational trophoblastic disease: a review of 97 cases. Br J Obstet Gynaecol 1988;95:70-4. ... Choriocarcinoma in the pulmonary artery treated with emergency pulmonary embolectomy. Chest 2002;121:654-6. ... Primary and metastatic choriocarcinoma have been reported to mimic pulmonary embolism in women after pregnancy and after ... resection was performed via video-assisted thorascopic surgery which showed poorly differentiated metastatic choriocarcinoma. ...
Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN) in itself is an uncommon condition, much so is a primary extrauterine GTN. The ... Only two cases of primary vaginal choriocarcinoma are reported in literature. This is a case of a 26 year old G1P0 (0010) who ... Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN) in itself is an uncommon condition, much so is primary extrauterine GTN. The ... Only two cases of primary vaginal choriocarcinoma are reported in the literature. This is a case of a 26‑year‑old gravida 1 ...
A choriocarcinoma is a rare but aggressive type of cancer, which commonly spreads to other parts of the body, such as the lungs ... The eight gynaecological cancer is called gestational trophoblastic disease, and it arises from the placenta during pregnancy. ... The most malignant form of the disease is called choriocarcinoma. It forms from cells that were part of the placenta during ... and gestational trophoblastic disease, which arises from the placenta. In total, these make up the 8 gynae cancers that the ...
hCG can also be produced in other conditions, such as hydatidiform mole, choriocarcinoma, testicular neoplasm, and more. .... ... https://www.anylabtestnow.com/charlotte-28269/tests/pregnancy-with-gestational-age-how-far-along/ ... Genome ... adrenocortical neoplasms, choriocarcinomas, hepatocellular carcinomas, bladder cancers, ovarian serous epithelial ...
Choriocarcinoma is extremely chemo sensitive; cure is possible even in metastatic disease. All patients with choriocarcinoma ... 22.1.4. Gestational trophoblastic disease. 22.1.4.1. Hydatidiform mole. Two types; complete and partial hydatidiform mole. ...
Choriocarcinoma. Difficult pregnancy. Dysmenorrhea. Dyspareunia. Eclampsia. Endometriosis. Female hypogonadism. Fetal ... Gestational diabetes. Hydatidiform mole. Hydramnios. Infertility. Internal endometriosis. Maternal hyperphenylalaninemia. ...
  • Gestational choriocarcinoma is a form of gestational trophoblastic neoplasia, which is a type of gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD), that can occur during pregnancy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN) is a collective term for gestational trophoblastic diseases that invade locally or metastasize. (medscape.com)
  • Efficacy of Combination Therapy with Actinomycin D and Methotrexate in the Treatment of Low-Risk Gestational Trophoblastic Neoplasia. (cancerindex.org)
  • We aimed to identify an optimal regimen for low-risk gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (LR-GTN) providing reduction in dosage and toxicity/side effects, enhancement of therapeutic efficacy, and a shorter treatment duration. (cancerindex.org)
  • Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN) is staged by the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) and the Féderation Internationale de Gynécologie et d'Obstétrique (FIGO) systems, based on the criteria below (see Table 1). (medscape.com)
  • Current FIGO staging for cancer of the vagina, fallopian tube, ovary, and gestational trophoblastic neoplasia. (medscape.com)
  • Malignant gestational trophoblastic neoplasia or GTN consists of post-molar GTN. (igcs.org)
  • The diagnosis of gestational trophoblastic neoplasia was altered in 42% of cases. (uliege.be)
  • VEGF 936C/T Polymorphism and Gestational Trophoblastic Neoplasia. (cdc.gov)
  • These tumors include postmolar gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (gestational trophoblastic neoplasia that develops after a molar pregnancy), placental-site trophoblastic tumor, epithelioid trophoblastic tumor, choriocarcinoma, and invasive mole. (msdmanuals.com)
  • After a complete hydatidiform mole, approximately 15 to 20% of patients are treated for gestational trophoblastic neoplasia. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Those with gestational choriocarcinoma may experience abnormal vaginal bleeding, abdominal pain, and have high levels of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), in addition to history of molar pregnancy or other metastatic cancer. (wikipedia.org)
  • Approximately 50% of those with gestational choriocarcinoma have experienced molar pregnancy, approximately 25% developed the disease after a regular, term pregnancy, and other situations have included history of ectopic pregnancy, where the pregnancy does not occur in the uterus. (wikipedia.org)
  • In most cases, only placental tissue forms with gestational trophoblastic disease. (medlineplus.gov)
  • others are invasive mole (chorioadenoma destruens), choriocarcinoma, placental site trophoblastic tumor (PSTT), and epithelioid trophoblastic tumor (ETT). (medscape.com)
  • A service of Charing Cross Hospital, which provides a national service for the treatment and follow-up of all forms of gestational trophoblast diseases such as hydatidiform mole, choriocarcinoma and placental site tumour in the UK. (cancerindex.org)
  • others are invasive mole (chorioadenoma destruens), choriocarcinoma, and placental site trophoblastic tumor (PSTT). (medscape.com)
  • Mixed lesions of placental site trophoblastic tumor or ETT combined with choriocarcinoma have been described. (igcs.org)
  • Gestational trophoblastic neoplasias are malignant placental tumors. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Gestational trophoblastic disease includes a spectrum of proliferative disorders ranging from nonneoplastic hydatiform moles to malignant neoplastic disorders. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Choriocarcinoma is a malignant, trophoblastic cancer, usually of the placenta. (gamuts.net)
  • Choriocarcinoma is a rare and aggressive form of cancer that originates in the trophoblastic cells of the placenta, which are responsible for providing nutrients to the developing fetus. (yalemedicine.org)
  • We then add two more cancers that may potentially happen related to this area: peritoneal cancer that may occur in the peritoneum (lining of the abdomen), which has the same cells as the covering of the ovaries, and gestational trophoblastic disease, which arises from the placenta. (agcf.org.au)
  • Nica A, Bouchard-Fortier G, Covens A. Gestational trophoblastic disease: hydatidiform mole, nonmetastatic and metastatic gestational trophoblastic tumor: diagnosis and management. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Bronchoscopy revealed nothing unusual so a left lung wedge resection was performed via video-assisted thorascopic surgery which showed poorly differentiated metastatic choriocarcinoma. (bmj.com)
  • Primary and metastatic choriocarcinoma have been reported to mimic pulmonary embolism in women after pregnancy and after abortion. (bmj.com)
  • Depending on the risk of gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD) development, such as in certain people with mole pregnancies, chemotherapy has been used in a preventative manner in the past. (wikipedia.org)
  • Gestational trophoblastic disease treatment depends on the specific type and risk category, and may include surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation. (hhs.gov)
  • So clinical features of these tumors compared to choriocarcinoma. (igcs.org)
  • These tumors have a very slow growth rate compared to choriocarcinoma and often present years after the last pregnancy event as compared with the rapid doubling of gestational choriocarcinoma where doubling times can be a matter of weeks. (igcs.org)
  • The World Health Organization (WHO) prognostic scoring system is important in the medical management of patients with complete hydatidiform moles, partial hydatidiform moles, and choriocarcinomas. (medscape.com)
  • Choriocarcinoma develops after 2 to 3% of hydatidiform moles, more commonly after a complete than a partial mole. (msdmanuals.com)
  • CT and MRI are recommended if the patient has hydatidiform mole with metastasis to the lungs, choriocarcinoma, or persistent hydatidiform mole. (medscape.com)
  • The centre was established in 1973, as part of a national programme, to screen for gestational trophoblastic tumours (a spectrum of disorders including hydatidiform mole and choriocarcinoma) in the Uk, and covers the North of England and North Wales. (cancerindex.org)
  • So just in brief, the classification of gestational trophoblastic disease or GTD in general, benign GTD entities are complete and partial hidatidiform mole. (igcs.org)
  • Elevated or rising human chorionic gonadotropin can be a sign of gestational choriocarcinoma, though it is also used as a biomarker in other types of gestational trophoblastic diseases (GTD). (wikipedia.org)
  • Gestational trophoblastic tumours (GTT) are a rare group of diseases in which the tissues formed in the uterus following conception grow abnormally to form a tumour. (cancerindex.org)
  • Importance of pathological review of gestational trophoblastic diseases: results of the Belgian Gestational Trophoblastic Diseases Registry. (uliege.be)
  • en] [en] OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the added value of a centralized pathology review of the diagnoses of gestational trophoblastic diseases by expert pathologists and its potential impact on clinical management in a prospective multicenter study based on the Belgian Gestational Trophoblastic Diseases Registry. (uliege.be)
  • Concordance between diagnoses of gestational trophoblastic diseases made by general 'non-expert' and expert pathologists was analyzed together with the potential impact of the alterations on clinical management. (uliege.be)
  • CONCLUSION: Systematic centralized pathological review of gestational trophoblastic diseases modified the diagnosis in a third of cases. (uliege.be)
  • This is called nongestational choriocarcinoma. (chkd.org)
  • Gestational and nongestational trophoblasts are by far the most common sources of hCG, but a small amount of the hormone may also be produced by the pituitary gland and nontrophoblastic malignancies. (medscape.com)
  • And sometimes patients will respond to treatment of the choriocarcinoma and have residual PSTT or ETT that doesn't respond as well to conventional chemotherapies. (igcs.org)
  • Il s'agitd'une étude rétrospective et descriptive portant sur tous les cancers gynécologiques reçus en oncologie entre le 1erJanvier 2016 et le 31 Décembre 2021. (bvsalud.org)
  • Diagnosis and management of gestational trophoblastic disease: 2021 update. (uliege.be)
  • It is useful not only for diagnosis but also for monitoring disease progression, treatment response, and potential of recurring gestational choriocarcinoma. (wikipedia.org)
  • Gestational choriocarcinoma can happen during and after any type of pregnancy event, though risk of the disease is higher in and after complete or partial molar pregnancies. (wikipedia.org)
  • Distinct genomic profiles of gestational choriocarcinoma, a unique cancer of pregnant tissues. (cdc.gov)
  • Gestational trophoblastic disease is proliferation of trophoblastic tissue in pregnant or recently pregnant women. (msdmanuals.com)
  • General references Gestational trophoblastic disease is proliferation of trophoblastic tissue in pregnant or recently pregnant women. (msdmanuals.com)
  • All patients with choriocarcinoma should undergo a careful pre-treatment evaluation for proper staging and risk stratification. (africadigitalclinic.com)
  • If the choriocarcinoma has metastasized to the lungs, one of the most common organs of metastasis, then symptoms may include abnormally quick breathing, coughing, and chest pain. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chest x-rays may also be used to see if gestational choriocarcinoma has potentially spread to the lungs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Gestational Trophoblastic Disease: Current Evaluation and Management. (medscape.com)
  • Pulmonary metastases in gestational trophoblastic disease: a review of 97 cases. (bmj.com)
  • En 11 annees (1er janvier 1998-31 decembre 2008) 9946 patientes ont ete operes dans notre servie dont 29 pour le cancer de l'ovaire soit 0;29. (bvsalud.org)
  • Vaginal bleeding is a common symptom of gestational choriocarcinoma. (wikipedia.org)
  • 35 years old and those who have previously had gestational trophoblastic disease. (msdmanuals.com)
  • A choriocarcinoma can also form in a young child. (chkd.org)
  • A young child can grow choriocarcinoma from chorion cells that are still in the body. (stanfordchildrens.org)
  • The Pregnancy Test (Yes or No) includes hCG with Gestational Table. (anylabtestnow.com)
  • The amount and degree of choriocarcinoma spread to other parts of the body can vary greatly from person to person. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the event the gestational choriocarcinoma has already spread to other parts of the body, bleeding events in other organs may be the first symptom. (wikipedia.org)
  • They can have HCG values that are elevated but generally much lower levels compared to the tumor volume than gestational choriocarcinomas. (igcs.org)
  • Gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD) is a group of pregnancy-related conditions that develop inside a woman's uterus (womb). (medlineplus.gov)