A rare movement disorder developed during PREGNANCY, characterized by involuntary jerky motion (CHOREA) and inability to maintain stable position of body parts (ATHETOSIS). RHEUMATIC FEVER and collagen vascular disorders are frequently associated with this disease. Chorea may vary from mild to severe and occurs in approximately 1 per 2,000 to 3,000 pregnancies. (From Md Med J 1997 Sep;46(8):436-9)
Intractable VOMITING that develops in early PREGNANCY and persists. This can lead to DEHYDRATION and WEIGHT LOSS.
Involuntary, forcible, rapid, jerky movements that may be subtle or become confluent, markedly altering normal patterns of movement. Hypotonia and pendular reflexes are often associated. Conditions which feature recurrent or persistent episodes of chorea as a primary manifestation of disease are referred to as CHOREATIC DISORDERS. Chorea is also a frequent manifestation of BASAL GANGLIA DISEASES.
Linear dermal scars accompanied by epidermal atrophy that affects skin that is subjected to continuous stretching. They usually do not cause any significant medical problems, only cosmetic problems.
Symptoms of NAUSEA and VOMITING in pregnant women that usually occur in the morning during the first 2 to 3 months of PREGNANCY. Severe persistent vomiting during pregnancy is called HYPEREMESIS GRAVIDARUM.
Women who allow themselves to be impregnated with the understanding that the offspring are to be given over to the parents who have commissioned the surrogate.
Conditions or pathological processes associated with pregnancy. They can occur during or after pregnancy, and range from minor discomforts to serious diseases that require medical interventions. They include diseases in pregnant females, and pregnancies in females with diseases.
The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.
Premature separation of the normally implanted PLACENTA from the UTERUS. Signs of varying degree of severity include UTERINE BLEEDING, uterine MUSCLE HYPERTONIA, and FETAL DISTRESS or FETAL DEATH.
A familial disorder inherited as an autosomal dominant trait and characterized by the onset of progressive CHOREA and DEMENTIA in the fourth or fifth decade of life. Common initial manifestations include paranoia; poor impulse control; DEPRESSION; HALLUCINATIONS; and DELUSIONS. Eventually intellectual impairment; loss of fine motor control; ATHETOSIS; and diffuse chorea involving axial and limb musculature develops, leading to a vegetative state within 10-15 years of disease onset. The juvenile variant has a more fulminant course including SEIZURES; ATAXIA; dementia; and chorea. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1060-4)
A degenerative disease of the central nervous system characterized by balance difficulties; OCULAR MOTILITY DISORDERS (supranuclear ophthalmoplegia); DYSARTHRIA; swallowing difficulties; and axial DYSTONIA. Onset is usually in the fifth decade and disease progression occurs over several years. Pathologic findings include neurofibrillary degeneration and neuronal loss in the dorsal MESENCEPHALON; SUBTHALAMIC NUCLEUS; RED NUCLEUS; pallidum; dentate nucleus; and vestibular nuclei. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1076-7)
A syndrome complex composed of three conditions which represent clinical variants of the same disease process: STRIATONIGRAL DEGENERATION; SHY-DRAGER SYNDROME; and the sporadic form of OLIVOPONTOCEREBELLAR ATROPHIES. Clinical features include autonomic, cerebellar, and basal ganglia dysfunction. Pathologic examination reveals atrophy of the basal ganglia, cerebellum, pons, and medulla, with prominent loss of autonomic neurons in the brain stem and spinal cord. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1076; Baillieres Clin Neurol 1997 Apr;6(1):187-204; Med Clin North Am 1999 Mar;83(2):381-92)
The name of two islands of the West Indies, separated by a narrow channel. Their capital is Basse-Terre. They were discovered by Columbus in 1493, occupied by the French in 1635, held by the British at various times between 1759 and 1813, transferred to Sweden in 1813, and restored to France in 1816. Its status was changed from colony to a French overseas department in 1946. Columbus named it in honor of the monastery of Santa Maria de Guadalupe in Spain. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p470 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p221)
The book composed of writings generally accepted by Christians as inspired by God and of divine authority. (Webster, 3d ed)
A motor neuron disease marked by progressive weakness of the muscles innervated by cranial nerves of the lower brain stem. Clinical manifestations include dysarthria, dysphagia, facial weakness, tongue weakness, and fasciculations of the tongue and facial muscles. The adult form of the disease is marked initially by bulbar weakness which progresses to involve motor neurons throughout the neuroaxis. Eventually this condition may become indistinguishable from AMYOTROPHIC LATERAL SCLEROSIS. Fazio-Londe syndrome is an inherited form of this illness which occurs in children and young adults. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1091; Brain 1992 Dec;115(Pt 6):1889-1900)
A two-person sport in which the fists are skillfully used to attack and defend.
Any dummy medication or treatment. Although placebos originally were medicinal preparations having no specific pharmacological activity against a targeted condition, the concept has been extended to include treatments or procedures, especially those administered to control groups in clinical trials in order to provide baseline measurements for the experimental protocol.

The reduced expression of the HADH2 protein causes X-linked mental retardation, choreoathetosis, and abnormal behavior. (1/1)

Recently, we defined a new syndromic form of X-linked mental retardation in a 4-generation family with a unique clinical phenotype characterized by mild mental retardation, choreoathetosis, and abnormal behavior (MRXS10). Linkage analysis in this family revealed a candidate region of 13.4 Mb between markers DXS1201 and DXS991 on Xp11; therefore, mutation analysis was performed by direct sequencing in most of the 135 annotated genes located in the region. The gene (HADH2) encoding L-3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase II displayed a sequence alteration (c.574 C-->A; p.R192R) in all patients and carrier females that was absent in unaffected male family members and could not be found in 2,500 control X chromosomes, including in those of 500 healthy males. The silent C-->A substitution is located in exon 5 and was shown by western blot to reduce the amount of HADH2 protein by 60%-70% in the patient. Quantitative in vivo and in vitro expression studies revealed a ratio of splicing transcript amounts different from those normally seen in controls. Apparently, the reduced expression of the wild-type fragment, which results in the decreased protein expression, rather than the increased amount of aberrant splicing fragments of the HADH2 gene, is pathogenic. Our data therefore strongly suggest that reduced expression of the HADH2 protein causes MRXS10, a phenotype different from that caused by 2-methyl-3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency, which is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by missense mutations in this multifunctional protein.  (+info)

Chorea gravidarum is a rare condition characterized by involuntary, irregular, and abrupt movements known as chorea, which typically affect the face, arms, and legs. This condition usually occurs during pregnancy or after childbirth. The exact cause of chorea gravidarum is not well understood, but it is believed to be related to hormonal changes and fluctuations during pregnancy.

Chorea gravidarum can range from mild to severe in its presentation. In some cases, the movements may be barely noticeable, while in others, they can interfere with daily activities and quality of life. The condition may also cause emotional lability, which refers to rapid and unpredictable shifts in mood or behavior.

Chorea gravidarum is typically treated with medications that help to reduce the severity of the movements and improve symptoms. These medications may include anticholinergics, dopamine-blocking agents, or benzodiazepines. In some cases, supportive therapies such as physical therapy or occupational therapy may also be recommended to help manage symptoms and improve function.

It is important to note that chorea gravidarum can pose risks to both the mother and the developing fetus. Women who experience this condition should be closely monitored by their healthcare provider throughout pregnancy and postpartum period to ensure the best possible outcomes for both.

Hyperemesis Gravidarum is a severe form of nausea and vomiting in pregnancy that is more extreme than the typical morning sickness. It's characterized by persistent vomiting, dehydration, weight loss, and electrolyte imbalance. If left untreated, it can lead to serious complications for both the mother and the baby. The exact cause is not known, but it may be related to high levels of hormones or other substances in the pregnant woman's body. Treatment often involves hospitalization for rehydration, medication to control vomiting, and nutritional support.

Chorea is a medical term that describes an involuntary movement disorder characterized by brief, irregular, and abrupt jerky movements. These movements often occur randomly and can affect any part of the body. Chorea can also cause difficulty with coordination and balance, and can sometimes be accompanied by muscle weakness or rigidity.

The term "chorea" comes from the Greek word "χορεία" (khoréia), which means "dance," reflecting the graceful, dance-like movements that are characteristic of this condition. Chorea can occur as a symptom of various underlying medical conditions, including neurological disorders such as Huntington's disease, Sydenham's chorea, and cerebral palsy, as well as metabolic disorders, infections, and certain medications.

Treatment for chorea depends on the underlying cause of the condition and may include medications to help control the involuntary movements, physical therapy to improve coordination and balance, and lifestyle modifications to reduce the risk of injury from falls or other accidents. In some cases, surgery may be recommended as a last resort for severe or refractory chorea.

Striae Distensae, also known as stretch marks, are linear or curvilinear depressions in the skin that occur when the dermis is stretched beyond its limit of elasticity. They are often caused by rapid growth or weight gain, and can be seen in conditions such as pregnancy, obesity, adolescent growth spurts, and Cushing's syndrome.

Striae Distensae initially appear as reddish or purple lines that may have a glossy appearance. Over time, they fade to a lighter color and become less noticeable, but they do not typically disappear completely. They are most commonly found on the abdomen, breasts, hips, thighs, and buttocks.

Histologically, Striae Distensae are characterized by thinning of the dermis, fragmentation of collagen fibers, and increased deposition of ground substance. Treatment options for Striae Distensae include topical creams and ointments, laser therapy, and chemical peels, but results may vary depending on the severity and duration of the condition.

Morning sickness is a common condition during pregnancy, typically characterized by nausea and vomiting. It usually occurs in the morning, although it can happen at any time of the day. The exact cause is not known, but it's thought to be due to the hormonal changes that occur during early pregnancy. For most women, morning sickness improves or goes away after the first trimester. However, for some, it may last longer. While it can be unpleasant and uncomfortable, morning sickness is generally not harmful to the mother or baby, unless it's severe and leads to dehydration or weight loss. In such cases, medical attention is required.

A surrogate mother is a woman who carries and gives birth to a child for another person or couple, called the intended parents. This can occur through traditional surrogacy, in which the surrogate mother is artificially inseminated with the intended father's sperm and she is genetically related to the child, or gestational surrogacy, in which the embryo created through in vitro fertilization (IVF) using the eggs and sperm of the intended parents or donors is transferred to the surrogate mother's uterus. Surrogacy arrangements are complex and involve legal, ethical, and emotional considerations. It is important for all parties involved to have a clear understanding of the process and to work with experienced professionals in order to ensure a successful outcome.

Pregnancy complications refer to any health problems that arise during pregnancy which can put both the mother and the baby at risk. These complications may occur at any point during the pregnancy, from conception until childbirth. Some common pregnancy complications include:

1. Gestational diabetes: a type of diabetes that develops during pregnancy in women who did not have diabetes before becoming pregnant.
2. Preeclampsia: a pregnancy complication characterized by high blood pressure and damage to organs such as the liver or kidneys.
3. Placenta previa: a condition where the placenta covers the cervix, which can cause bleeding and may require delivery via cesarean section.
4. Preterm labor: when labor begins before 37 weeks of gestation, which can lead to premature birth and other complications.
5. Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR): a condition where the fetus does not grow at a normal rate inside the womb.
6. Multiple pregnancies: carrying more than one baby, such as twins or triplets, which can increase the risk of premature labor and other complications.
7. Rh incompatibility: a condition where the mother's blood type is different from the baby's, which can cause anemia and jaundice in the newborn.
8. Pregnancy loss: including miscarriage, stillbirth, or ectopic pregnancy, which can be emotionally devastating for the parents.

It is important to monitor pregnancy closely and seek medical attention promptly if any concerning symptoms arise. With proper care and management, many pregnancy complications can be treated effectively, reducing the risk of harm to both the mother and the baby.

Pregnancy is a physiological state or condition where a fertilized egg (zygote) successfully implants and grows in the uterus of a woman, leading to the development of an embryo and finally a fetus. This process typically spans approximately 40 weeks, divided into three trimesters, and culminates in childbirth. Throughout this period, numerous hormonal and physical changes occur to support the growing offspring, including uterine enlargement, breast development, and various maternal adaptations to ensure the fetus's optimal growth and well-being.

Abruptio placentae, also known as placental abruption, is a medical condition that occurs when the placenta separates from the uterus before the baby is born. The placenta is an organ that develops in the uterus during pregnancy to provide oxygen and nutrients to the growing fetus.

In abruptio placentae, the separation of the placenta from the uterus can cause bleeding, which can be serious or life-threatening for both the mother and the baby. The severity of the condition depends on how much of the placenta has separated from the uterus and how much bleeding has occurred.

Abruptio placentae can cause a range of symptoms, including vaginal bleeding, abdominal pain, contractions, and fetal distress. In severe cases, it can lead to preterm labor, low birth weight, and even stillbirth. The exact cause of abruptio placentae is not always known, but risk factors include high blood pressure, smoking, cocaine use, trauma to the abdomen, and advanced maternal age. Treatment may involve hospitalization, bed rest, medication to prevent contractions, or delivery of the baby if the pregnancy is at term.

Huntington Disease (HD) is a genetic neurodegenerative disorder that affects both cognitive and motor functions. It is characterized by the progressive loss of neurons in various areas of the brain, particularly in the striatum and cortex. The disease is caused by an autosomal dominant mutation in the HTT gene, which codes for the huntingtin protein. The most common mutation is a CAG repeat expansion in this gene, leading to the production of an abnormal form of the huntingtin protein that is toxic to nerve cells.

The symptoms of HD typically appear between the ages of 30 and 50, but they can start earlier or later in life. The early signs of HD may include subtle changes in mood, cognition, and coordination. As the disease progresses, individuals with HD experience uncontrolled movements (chorea), emotional disturbances, cognitive decline, and difficulties with communication and swallowing. Eventually, they become dependent on others for their daily needs and lose their ability to walk, talk, and care for themselves.

There is currently no cure for HD, but medications and therapies can help manage the symptoms of the disease and improve quality of life. Genetic testing is available to confirm the diagnosis and provide information about the risk of passing the disease on to future generations.

Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP) is a rare neurological disorder characterized by the progressive degeneration of brain cells that regulate movement, thoughts, behavior, and eye movements. The term "supranuclear" refers to the location of the damage in the brain, specifically above the level of the "nuclei" which are clusters of nerve cells that control voluntary movements.

The most common early symptom of PSP is a loss of balance and difficulty coordinating eye movements, particularly vertical gaze. Other symptoms may include stiffness or rigidity of muscles, slowness of movement, difficulty swallowing, changes in speech and writing, and cognitive decline leading to dementia.

PSP typically affects people over the age of 60, and its progression can vary from person to person. Currently, there is no cure for PSP, and treatment is focused on managing symptoms and maintaining quality of life.

Multiple System Atrophy (MSA) is a rare, progressive neurodegenerative disorder that affects multiple systems in the body. It is characterized by a combination of symptoms including Parkinsonism (such as stiffness, slowness of movement, and tremors), cerebellar ataxia (lack of muscle coordination), autonomic dysfunction (problems with the autonomic nervous system which controls involuntary actions like heart rate, blood pressure, sweating, and digestion), and pyramidal signs (abnormalities in the corticospinal tracts that control voluntary movements).

The disorder is caused by the degeneration of nerve cells in various parts of the brain and spinal cord, leading to a loss of function in these areas. The exact cause of MSA is unknown, but it is thought to involve a combination of genetic and environmental factors. There is currently no cure for MSA, and treatment is focused on managing symptoms and improving quality of life.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Guadeloupe" is not a medical term. It is actually an overseas region and department of France, located in the Caribbean Sea. Guadeloupe is an archipelago consisting of several islands, with a total land area of approximately 1,700 square kilometers (656 square miles) and a population of around 400,000 people.

If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health-related topics, I would be happy to try and help answer them for you.

I am not aware of a medical definition for the term "Bible." The Bible is a religious text that is considered sacred in Christianity. It is composed of two main sections: the Old Testament, which contains writings recognized by Christians as Jewish scripture, and the New Testament, which contains Christian teachings, including the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ.

While the Bible may be referenced in a medical context, such as in discussions about medical ethics or end-of-life care, it is not a medical term or concept and does not have a specific medical definition.

Progressive bulbar palsy (PBP) is a form of motor neuron disease (MND), also known as Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). It is characterized by the progressive degeneration of the motor neurons in the brainstem, which control vital functions such as swallowing, speaking, chewing, and breathing.

In PBP, these symptoms gradually worsen over time, often resulting in severe disability and ultimately death due to respiratory failure. The progression of the disease can vary from person to person, but it typically advances more slowly than other forms of ALS. There is currently no cure for PBP or any other form of MND, and treatment is focused on managing symptoms and maintaining quality of life.

'Boxing' is a combat sport that involves two competitors throwing punches at each other with gloved hands within a ring. According to medical definitions, boxing can pose several potential risks and injuries to the participants, including but not limited to:

1. Cuts and bruises from punches or headbutts
2. Fractures or dislocations of bones in the hands, wrists, or face
3. Concussions or traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) from blows to the head
4. Eye injuries, including retinal detachment and cataracts
5. Internal bleeding or organ damage
6. Long-term neurological problems, such as Parkinson's disease or chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE)

It is important for boxers to undergo regular medical evaluations and take measures to minimize the risks associated with the sport, such as wearing protective gear and using proper technique.

A placebo is a substance or treatment that has no inherent therapeutic effect. It is often used in clinical trials as a control against which the effects of a new drug or therapy can be compared. Placebos are typically made to resemble the active treatment, such as a sugar pill for a medication trial, so that participants cannot tell the difference between what they are receiving and the actual treatment.

The placebo effect refers to the phenomenon where patients experience real improvements in their symptoms or conditions even when given a placebo. This may be due to psychological factors such as belief in the effectiveness of the treatment, suggestion, or conditioning. The placebo effect is often used as a comparison group in clinical trials to help determine if the active treatment has a greater effect than no treatment at all.

... ~treatment at eMedicine Palanivelu, L. M. (2007). "Chorea gravidarum". Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology. 27 ... "Chorea gravidarum". Obstetrics and Gynecology. 32 (1): 24-7. PMID 5742087. Willson, Prentiss (1932). "Chorea Gravidarum". ... Chorea gravidarum is a rare type of chorea which presents with involuntary abnormal movement, characterized by abrupt, brief, ... Chorea Gravidarum at eMedicine Axley, John (1972). "Rheumatic chorea controlled with haloperidol". The Journal of Pediatrics. ...
... gravidarum refers to choreic symptoms that occur during pregnancy. If left untreated, the disease resolves in 30% of ... Chorea Gravidarum~clinical at eMedicine (Articles with short description, Short description is different from Wikidata, ... When chorea is serious, slight movements will become thrashing motions; this form of severe chorea is referred to as ballism, ... Patterson, John F. (1979). "Treatment of Chorea Gravidarum With Haloperidol". Southern Medical Journal. 72 (9): 1220-1. doi: ...
Sydenham's chorea, of which chorea gravidarum is a severe variant, has a number of psychiatric complications, which include ... Only about 50 chorea psychoses have been reported, and only one this century; but it could return if the streptococcus escapes ... This form of chorea was caused by streptococcal infections, which at present respond to antibiotics; it still occurs as a ... It is usually found in severe alcoholics, but can also result from pernicious vomiting of pregnancy (hyperemesis gravidarum), ...
... chorea gravidarum), drug intoxication and side effects of certain anticonvulsants (e.g. phenytoin) or psychotropic agents. ... Sydenham's chorea is primarily seen in children. As with rheumatic fever, Sydenham's chorea is seen more often in less affluent ... Sydenham's chorea, also known as rheumatic chorea, is a disorder characterized by rapid, uncoordinated jerking movements ... but Sydenham's chorea is one of the exclusion criteria. PANDAS can present with chorea but more typically there are tics or ...
Chorea or Choreia may also refer to: Choreia, an ancient Greek dance Chorea minor Chorea gravidarum, a chorea that occurs as a ... Look up chorea or choreá in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. Chorea is an abnormal involuntary movement disorder. ... a combination of chorea and athetosis All pages with titles containing Chorea Cholera, an infection of the small intestine by ... This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Chorea. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to ...
... with observations on cases of chorea gravidarum, extra uterine gestation, rupture of the uterus, and inversion of the uterus ...
... chorea gravidarum MeSH C10.228.662.150.550 - huntington disease MeSH C10.228.662.300 - dystonic disorders MeSH C10.228.662.300. ... chorea gravidarum MeSH C10.228.140.079.357 - dystonia musculorum deformans MeSH C10.228.140.079.493 - hallervorden-spatz ... chorea MeSH C10.597.350.300 - dystonia MeSH C10.597.350.300.800 - torticollis MeSH C10.597.350.350 - hyperkinesis MeSH C10.597. ...
VITUS'S DANCE: Sydenhams Vascular Increased RBC's (polycythemia) Toxins: CO, Mg, Hg Uremia SLE Senile chorea Drugs APLA ... Glaucoma Hyperemesis gravidarum Infection [pyelonephritis, meningitis] "All patients take meds": Reading from top left: Aortic ...
... chorea MeSH C23.888.592.350.300 - dystonia MeSH C23.888.592.350.300.800 - torticollis MeSH C23.888.592.350.350 - hyperkinesis ... hyperemesis gravidarum MeSH C23.888.821.937.059 - postoperative nausea and vomiting MeSH C23.888.821.937.080 - vomiting, ...
Tan JY, Loh KC, Yeo GS, Chee YC (June 2002). "Transient hyperthyroidism of hyperemesis gravidarum". BJOG. 109 (6): 683-688. doi ... chorea, myopathy, and in some susceptible individuals (in particular of Asian descent) periodic paralysis. An association ...
Chorea Gravidarum~treatment at eMedicine Palanivelu, L. M. (2007). "Chorea gravidarum". Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology. 27 ... "Chorea gravidarum". Obstetrics and Gynecology. 32 (1): 24-7. PMID 5742087. Willson, Prentiss (1932). "Chorea Gravidarum". ... Chorea gravidarum is a rare type of chorea which presents with involuntary abnormal movement, characterized by abrupt, brief, ... Chorea Gravidarum at eMedicine Axley, John (1972). "Rheumatic chorea controlled with haloperidol". The Journal of Pediatrics. ...
This is not an etiologically or pathologically distinct morbid entity but a generic term for chorea of any cause starting ... is the term given to chorea occurring during pregnancy. ... encoded search term (Chorea Gravidarum) and Chorea Gravidarum ... Chorea gravidarum (CG) is the term given to chorea occurring during pregnancy. This is not an etiologically or pathologically ... Ghanem Q. Recurrent chorea gravidarum in four pregnancies. Can J Neurol Sci. 1985 May. 12(2):136-8. [QxMD MEDLINE Link]. ...
Pregnancy (chorea gravidarum). *Stroke or lack of oxygen to the brain (hypoxic brain injury) ... A person with chorea may look jittery or restless.. Chorea can be a painful condition, making it hard to do daily living ... Rest helps improve chorea. Try to reduce emotional stress.. Safety measures should also be taken to prevent injury from the ... Sydenham chorea (movement disorder that occurs most often in children after infection with bacteria called group A ...
Chorea gravidarum. Nonobstetric features of APS are as follows:. * Nontraumatic thrombosis or thromboembolism (venous or ...
Chorea is a movement disorder that causes involuntary, random muscle movements. Its a symptom of Huntingtons disease and ... a type of chorea called chorea gravidarum can occur during pregnancy. (If pregnancy is the cause of the chorea, it may appear ... How common is chorea?. No one knows for sure how many people experience chorea. Chorea is usually a symptom of another disorder ... The symptoms of chorea are much the same no matter what caused the movement disorder. The most common signs of chorea are:. * ...
Chorea, Athetosis, and Hemiballismus - Etiology, pathophysiology, symptoms, signs, diagnosis & prognosis from the Merck Manuals ... Chorea gravidarum occurs during pregnancy, often in patients who have had rheumatic fever. Chorea usually begins during the 1st ... Chorea in patients > 60 should not be assumed to be senile chorea but should be thoroughly evaluated to identify the cause (eg ... Sydenham chorea and chorea due to infarcts of the caudate nucleus often lessen over time without treatment. ...
Learn about Sydenham Chorea, including symptoms, causes, and treatments. If you or a loved one is affected by this condition, ... so-called chorea gravidarum, which may represent a recurrence of Sydenham chorea in some cases). ... The severity of chorea and the presence of non-chorea symptoms of Sydenham chorea may vary greatly from one person to another. ... Sydenham chorea is a rare neurological disorder characterized by sudden onset chorea, usually in childhood. Chorea is defined ...
Chorea, Athetosis, and Hemiballismus - Etiology, pathophysiology, symptoms, signs, diagnosis & prognosis from the MSD Manuals ... Chorea gravidarum occurs during pregnancy, often in patients who have had rheumatic fever. Chorea usually begins during the 1st ... Chorea in patients > 60 should not be assumed to be senile chorea but should be thoroughly evaluated to identify the cause (eg ... Sydenham chorea and chorea due to infarcts of the caudate nucleus often lessen over time without treatment. ...
Chorea gravidarum. *Obsessive-compulsive behavior. *Rheumatic fever. *Streptococcal pharyngitis. Related Articles * Infectious ...
COREA GRAVIDARUM. CHOREA GRAVIDARUM. CORÉIA GRAVÍDICA. CUARTO VENTRICULO. FOURTH VENTRICLE. QUARTO VENTRÍCULO. ...
Chorea in Children * Chorea in Adults * Acute Rheumatic Fever * Rheumatic Fever * Chorea Gravidarum ... Sydenham chorea is the most common cause of acquired chorea in the young. During the latter part of the twentieth century the ... These choreas consist of any combination of these paroxysmal attacks: dystonia, chorea, athetosis, and ballismus. Goodenough et ... encoded search term (Chorea in Children) and Chorea in Children What to Read Next on Medscape ...
COREA GRAVIDARUM. CHOREA GRAVIDARUM. CORÉIA GRAVÍDICA. CUARTO VENTRICULO. FOURTH VENTRICLE. QUARTO VENTRÍCULO. ...
COREA GRAVIDARUM. CHOREA GRAVIDARUM. CORÉIA GRAVÍDICA. CUARTO VENTRICULO. FOURTH VENTRICLE. QUARTO VENTRÍCULO. ...
CHOREA GRAVIDARUM COREA GRAVIDARUM CORÉIA GRAVÍDICA CHOREATIC DISORDERS TRASTORNOS COREATICOS TRANSTORNOS CORÉICOS ...
CHOREA GRAVIDARUM COREA GRAVIDARUM CORÉIA GRAVÍDICA CHOREATIC DISORDERS TRASTORNOS COREATICOS TRANSTORNOS CORÉICOS ...
CHOREA GRAVIDARUM COREA GRAVIDARUM CORPOS ESPIRALADOS COILED BODIES CUERPOS ENROLLADOS CULDOSCÓPIOS CULDOSCOPES CULDOSCOPIOS ...
COREA GRAVIDARUM. CHOREA GRAVIDARUM. CORÉIA GRAVÍDICA. CUARTO VENTRICULO. FOURTH VENTRICLE. QUARTO VENTRÍCULO. ...
CHOREA GRAVIDARUM COREA GRAVIDARUM CORÉIA GRAVÍDICA CHOREATIC DISORDERS TRASTORNOS COREATICOS TRANSTORNOS CORÉICOS ...
CHOREA GRAVIDARUM COREA GRAVIDARUM CORPOS ESPIRALADOS COILED BODIES CUERPOS ENROLLADOS CULDOSCÓPIOS CULDOSCOPES CULDOSCOPIOS ...
CHOREA GRAVIDARUM COREA GRAVIDARUM CORÉIA GRAVÍDICA CHOREATIC DISORDERS TRASTORNOS COREATICOS TRANSTORNOS CORÉICOS ...
CHOREA GRAVIDARUM COREA GRAVIDARUM CORÉIA GRAVÍDICA CHOREATIC DISORDERS TRASTORNOS COREATICOS TRANSTORNOS CORÉICOS ...
CHOREA GRAVIDARUM COREA GRAVIDARUM CORPOS ESPIRALADOS COILED BODIES CUERPOS ENROLLADOS CULDOSCÓPIOS CULDOSCOPES CULDOSCOPIOS ...
Occasionally, choreic abasia can develop during pregnancy, which experts classify as chorea gravidarum. The acquired condition ... Choreic abasia is an inability to walk due to chorea, an involuntary muscle movement disorder that causes quick movements of ... Cerebrovascular disease, HIV, and rheumatic fever can all lead to chorea in the legs. ...
Chorea is slightly more common in females than males. Chorea is also known as rheumatic chorea, Sydenham chorea, chorea minor, ... Chorea: In the absence of a family history of Huntington chorea or findings consistent with systemic lupus erythematosus, the ... Chorea: It may occur late and be the only manifestation of rheumatic fever, thus it may be impossible to document previous ... The fever may be low grade (38-38.5°C) in children with mild carditis or absent in patients with pure chorea. The fever ...
Chorea Gravidarum [C12.050.703.141] * Diabetes, Gestational [C12.050.703.170] * Fetal Death [C12.050.703.223] ...
Chorea Gravidarum. *Dystonia Musculorum Deformans. *Hepatolenticular Degeneration. *Huntington Disease. *Meige Syndrome. * ...
... similar to what is seen in children with Sydenhams chorea," he explained. ...
Chorea Gravidarum * Diffusion Tensor Imaging * Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis * Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia * Charcot-Marie- ...
Chorea Gravidarum. *Dystonia Musculorum Deformans. *Hepatolenticular Degeneration. *Huntington Disease. *Meige Syndrome. * ...
Chorea Gravidarum. *Dystonia Musculorum Deformans. *Hepatolenticular Degeneration. *Huntington Disease. *Meige Syndrome. * ...
  • In the United States, about 4,000 kids a year develop Sydenham chorea after having rheumatic fever . (clevelandclinic.org)
  • Kids and adolescents can develop Sydenham chorea after rheumatic fever, which is a complication of untreated strep throat. (clevelandclinic.org)
  • Around one to eight months after having rheumatic fever, children can develop Sydenham chorea (also called St. Vitus dance). (clevelandclinic.org)
  • Most of the time, kids with Sydenham chorea get better without treatment in less than two years. (clevelandclinic.org)
  • Sydenham chorea and chorea due to infarcts of the caudate nucleus often lessen over time without treatment. (merckmanuals.com)
  • Sydenham chorea is a rare neurological disorder characterized by sudden onset chorea, usually in childhood. (rarediseases.org)
  • Additional symptoms of Sydenham chorea may include slurring of speech and difficulty maintaining steady hand grip. (rarediseases.org)
  • Sydenham chorea most often affects children over the age of 5 years and adolescents. (rarediseases.org)
  • Sydenham chorea usually develops within weeks to months following group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal infection and may occur as an isolated finding or as a major complication of acute rheumatic fever. (rarediseases.org)
  • The severity of chorea and the presence of non-chorea symptoms of Sydenham chorea may vary greatly from one person to another. (rarediseases.org)
  • Symptoms of Sydenham chorea may appear anywhere from 1 week to 6 months following streptococcal infection. (rarediseases.org)
  • The abnormal movements (chorea) that characterize Sydenham chorea usually emerge over hours, peaking within a few hours or days. (rarediseases.org)
  • Initially, doctors may misattribute the restless movements and involuntary facial expressions of Sydenham chorea to a child being extremely fidgety, hyperactive, clumsy and/or purposely uncooperative. (rarediseases.org)
  • The abnormal movements in Sydenham chorea range from subtle symptoms, affecting coordination and tasks such as writing, to severe symptoms, disrupting walking, talking, and performing basic tasks such as dressing, eating, or simply holding objects. (rarediseases.org)
  • Because Sydenham chorea is a complication of rheumatic fever, some individuals will have additional symptoms of joint arthritis or arthralgia, inflammation of the heart valves causing permanent damage to the valves, and ongoing fever. (rarediseases.org)
  • Sydenham chorea symptoms usually resolve within three weeks to six months. (rarediseases.org)
  • Occasionally, the symptoms of Sydenham chorea have recurred later during adult life, particularly in young women during the first trimester of pregnancy (so-called chorea gravidarum, which may represent a recurrence of Sydenham chorea in some cases). (rarediseases.org)
  • Two hundred years later, Huntington described hereditary chorea and suggested that this movement disorder was similar to that described by Sydenham. (medscape.com)
  • Recently there has been a decline in incidence which is probably the result of a decline in rheumatic fever (RF), which was a major cause of chorea gravidarum before the use of antibiotics for streptococcal pharyngitis. (wikipedia.org)
  • History of either rheumatic fever or chorea is suspected: the suggestion is that estrogens and progesterone may sensitize dopamine receptors (presumably at a striatal level) and induce chorea in individuals who are vulnerable to this complication by virtue of preexisting pathology in the basal ganglia. (wikipedia.org)
  • The relation to rheumatic fever was strengthened by many studies that showed that women with normal pregnancies before rheumatic fever developed chorea in subsequent pregnancies. (wikipedia.org)
  • 4% of those with chorea gravidarum had acute rheumatic fever. (wikipedia.org)
  • Rheumatic fever is no longer a major cause of chorea gravidarum (CG) and the pathophysiology of CG in current times is unclear. (medscape.com)
  • Chorea gravidarum occurs during pregnancy, often in patients who have had rheumatic fever. (merckmanuals.com)
  • Cerebrovascular disease, HIV, and rheumatic fever can all lead to chorea in the legs. (facty.com)
  • Chorea: It may occur late and be the only manifestation of rheumatic fever, thus it may be impossible to document previous group A streptococci pharyngitis. (medscape.com)
  • Athetosis (slow chorea) is nonrhythmic, slow, writhing, sinuous movements predominantly in distal muscles, often alternating with postures of the proximal limbs. (merckmanuals.com)
  • many experts believe that when they occur together (as choreoathetosis), athetosis is a dystonia superimposed on chorea. (merckmanuals.com)
  • Chorea and athetosis result from impaired inhibition of thalamocortical neurons by the basal ganglia. (merckmanuals.com)
  • Movement disorders (particularly chorea, athetosis, and dystonia) are thought to result from basal ganglia pathology. (medscape.com)
  • It is not a causal or pathologically distinct entity but a generic term for chorea of any cause starting during pregnancy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chorea gravidarum (CG) is the term given to chorea occurring during pregnancy. (medscape.com)
  • In 1950, Beresford and Graham postulated that, "It may be that pregnancy lowers the resistance of a patient who is inherently susceptible to chorea. (medscape.com)
  • Dozens of genetic conditions, autoimmune and infectious diseases, endocrine disorders, medications and even pregnancy can have chorea as a symptom. (clevelandclinic.org)
  • Though rare, a type of chorea called chorea gravidarum can occur during pregnancy. (clevelandclinic.org)
  • If pregnancy is the cause of the chorea, it may appear during the first three months of pregnancy and stop shortly after the birth of the baby. (clevelandclinic.org)
  • Occasionally, choreic abasia can develop during pregnancy, which experts classify as chorea gravidarum. (facty.com)
  • Chorea gravidarum is a rare type of chorea which presents with involuntary abnormal movement, characterized by abrupt, brief, nonrhythmic, nonrepetitive movement of any limb, often associated with nonpatterned facial grimaces. (wikipedia.org)
  • Autoimmune diseases (such as lupus) and hormonal disorders like hyperthyroidism and metabolic disorders such as hypoglycemia can cause chorea. (clevelandclinic.org)
  • Chorea due to hyperthyroidism or another metabolic cause (eg, hyperglycemia) usually lessens over time when thyroid function or blood glucose returns to normal. (merckmanuals.com)
  • A patient developed this chorea with no definite evidence of previous Sydenham's chorea or recent streptococcal infections, but had anti-basal ganglia antibodies, suggesting immunological basis for the pathophysiology of this chorea. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chorea usually begins during the 1st trimester and resolves spontaneously at or after delivery. (merckmanuals.com)
  • An exception to the requirement for evidence of previous group A streptococci pharyngitis can be made in patients with chorea and clinical or subclinical (echo diagnosis) evidence of carditis. (medscape.com)
  • Movement disorders rarely occur during reproductive years, therefore, clinicians are not very familiar with chorea gravidarum (CG). (medscape.com)
  • There is a long list of other disorders that can cause chorea. (clevelandclinic.org)
  • Dozens of genetic conditions, autoimmune diseases, metabolic disorders, infections and medications can affect basal ganglia and lead to the onset of chorea. (clevelandclinic.org)
  • It is associated with history of Sydenham's chorea. (wikipedia.org)
  • In PANDAS, "the decreased correlation between inflammation and longer duration of disease suggests an acute or more isolated immunogenic exposure, similar to what is seen in children with Sydenham's chorea ," he explained. (medscape.com)
  • Chorea itself isn't life-threatening, but it could be a sign of a neurological disease such as Huntington's disease . (clevelandclinic.org)
  • About 30,000 people in the United States have Huntington's disease (a genetic condition that causes chorea). (clevelandclinic.org)
  • Chorea is the most common symptom of Huntington's disease. (clevelandclinic.org)
  • When abnormal movements are excessive, they are called 'hyperkinetic' movements and include myoclonus (jerking and twitching) and ballismus (violent flinging of extremities), chorea (slow, twisting, or continued movements), among others. (medlineplus.gov)
  • If treatment before delivery is necessary because chorea is severe, barbiturates are indicated because they have fewer fetal risks than other drugs used to manage chorea. (merckmanuals.com)
  • Chorea is a movement disorder that causes involuntary, irregular, unpredictable muscle movements. (clevelandclinic.org)
  • At least two other movements related to chorea are seen in neurological diseases. (clevelandclinic.org)
  • Chorea is defined as random-appearing, continuous (while awake), involuntary movements which can affect the entire body. (rarediseases.org)
  • Choreic abasia is an inability to walk due to chorea, an involuntary muscle movement disorder that causes quick movements of the body which the person cannot control. (facty.com)
  • A person with chorea may look jittery or restless. (medlineplus.gov)
  • The disorder can make you look like you're dancing (the word chorea comes from the Greek word for "dance") or look restless or fidgety. (clevelandclinic.org)
  • Some people develop chorea if they have a stroke or a tumor that occurs in or near basal ganglia. (clevelandclinic.org)
  • If chorea does not subside after several weeks of metabolic control, clinicians should check for another cause such as stroke. (merckmanuals.com)
  • A tumor or an infarct in the striatum (caudate or putamen) can cause acute unilateral chorea (hemichorea) on the opposite side of the body. (merckmanuals.com)
  • 60 should not be assumed to be senile chorea but should be thoroughly evaluated to identify the cause (eg, toxic, metabolic, autoimmune, paraneoplastic, drug-induced). (merckmanuals.com)
  • citation needed] Drug treatment is indicated for patients with severe disabling chorea. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hemiballismus may be considered a severe form of chorea. (merckmanuals.com)
  • In some extremely rare cases (less than 2 percent), severe muscle weakness, irritability, or confusion may be profound and affected children may become bedridden, a condition sometimes referred to as paralytic chorea. (rarediseases.org)
  • Chorea is a neurological symptom that originates in an area of the brain called basal ganglia, which are collections of nerve cells deep inside the brain that control movement. (clevelandclinic.org)
  • Chorea is a movement disorder that occurs in many different diseases and conditions. (clevelandclinic.org)
  • People who have systemic lupus erythematosus (also called SLE or just lupus ) can develop chorea. (clevelandclinic.org)
  • In 2004, Miranda et al reported of a case of chorea associated with the use of the oral contraceptives, in which anti-basal ganglia antibodies were detected, suggesting a possible immunological basis to the pathogenesis of this disorder. (medscape.com)
  • Clinicians should seek and treat the cause of chorea whenever possible. (merckmanuals.com)
  • It has been suggested that use of oral contraceptives is an infrequent cause of chorea. (wikipedia.org)
  • Another pathologic hypothesis is related to hormonal mediation, particularly estrogen, given there is an increase in chorea cases among young women on oral contraceptives. (medscape.com)
  • [ 11 , 12 ] Oral contraceptives may activate the same high estrogen state mechanism of CG leading to chorea and further supporting the role of estrogen in CG. (medscape.com)
  • The term chorea is derived from the Greek word for dancing and was applied initially to epidemics of dancing mania in the Middle Ages, in which large numbers of people danced together for days. (medscape.com)
  • Depending on the underlying cause, chorea may be temporary or be ongoing and get worse over time. (clevelandclinic.org)