Rare, benign, chronic, progressive metaplasia in which cartilage is formed in the synovial membranes of joints, tendon sheaths, or bursae. Some of the metaplastic foci can become detached producing loose bodies. When the loose bodies undergo secondary calcification, the condition is called synovial osteochondromatosis.
Multiple formation of chondromas. (Dorland, 27th ed)
Fibrous, bony, cartilaginous and osteocartilaginous fragments in a synovial joint. Major causes are osteochondritis dissecans, synovial chondromatosis, osteophytes, fractured articular surfaces and damaged menisci.
A benign neoplasm derived from mesodermal cells that form cartilage. It may remain within the substance of a cartilage or bone (true chondroma or enchondroma) or may develop on the surface of a cartilage (ecchondroma or ecchondrosis). (Dorland, 27th ed; Stedman, 25th ed)
The compartment containing the anterior extremities and half the inferior surface of the temporal lobes (TEMPORAL LOBE) of the cerebral hemispheres. Lying posterior and inferior to the anterior cranial fossa (CRANIAL FOSSA, ANTERIOR), it is formed by part of the TEMPORAL BONE and SPHENOID BONE. It is separated from the posterior cranial fossa (CRANIAL FOSSA, POSTERIOR) by crests formed by the superior borders of the petrous parts of the temporal bones.
A variety of conditions affecting the anatomic and functional characteristics of the temporomandibular joint. Factors contributing to the complexity of temporomandibular diseases are its relation to dentition and mastication and the symptomatic effects in other areas which account for referred pain to the joint and the difficulties in applying traditional diagnostic procedures to temporomandibular joint pathology where tissue is rarely obtained and x-rays are often inadequate or nonspecific. Common diseases are developmental abnormalities, trauma, subluxation, luxation, arthritis, and neoplasia. (From Thoma's Oral Pathology, 6th ed, pp577-600)
Endoscopes for visualizing the interior of a joint.
The articulation between a metacarpal bone and a phalanx.
A slowly growing malignant neoplasm derived from cartilage cells, occurring most frequently in pelvic bones or near the ends of long bones, in middle-aged and old people. Most chondrosarcomas arise de novo, but some may develop in a preexisting benign cartilaginous lesion or in patients with ENCHONDROMATOSIS. (Stedman, 25th ed)
Extraoral body-section radiography depicting an entire maxilla, or both maxilla and mandible, on a single film.
The inner membrane of a joint capsule surrounding a freely movable joint. It is loosely attached to the external fibrous capsule and secretes SYNOVIAL FLUID.

Synovial chondromatosis in the temporomandibular joint complicated by displacement and calcification of the articular disk: report of two cases. (1/4)

Two cases of synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are presented, including correlation of CT and MR imaging characteristics with surgical and pathologic findings. The usefulness of CT and MR imaging in the diagnosis of TMJ disorders is discussed.  (+info)

Symptomatic laryngeal nodular chondrometaplasia: a clinicopathological study. (2/4)

A 41 year old man with a history of politrauma presented with a nodular mass of the left false vocal cord, associated with progressive dysphonia, dyspnoea, and dysphagia. A computed tomography scan of the neck region showed a rounded and circumscribed mass without infiltration of the surrounding tissues. Histological investigation of the nodule revealed the presence of fibroelastic cartilaginous tissue, surrounded by a thin rim of fibrous tissue, with rare hypercellular areas, occasional binucleated cells, slight hyperchromasia, and an irregular nuclear profile. Mitotic activity was absent. The patient's history of laryngeal trauma, with the subsequent progressive onset of clinical symptoms, helps to distinguish the chondrometaplastic nature of this nodule from true laryngeal cartilaginous tumours, such as chondroma and low grade chondrosarcoma.  (+info)

A case of chondromatosis indicates a synovial stem cell aetiology. (3/4)

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate cell cultures derived from intrasynovial nodules from a patient with primary synovial chondromatosis (PSC) for aberrant numbers/differentiation of osteochondroprogenitor cells. METHODS: Cell cultures were established from PSC synovial nodules, or normal bovine or human osteoarthritis (OA) synovia (for comparison). Multi-lineage potential was determined using well-characterized in vitro culture systems to assess osteogenic, chondrogenic and adipogenic capability. RESULTS: Primary PSC cell cultures were typically fibroblastic but contained islands of dense cell clusters/nodules, some of which were isolated and cultured separately [putative osteochondroprogenitris (pOCP) cultures]. OA synovial cultures had barely detectable levels of alkaline phosphatase (AP) that increased (0.006+/-0.008 to 0.141+/-0.000 nmol p-nitrophenol/min/cm(2)) with dexamethasone treatment. AP activity was higher in primary PSC cell cultures and further enhanced by dexamethasone (from 0.076+/-0.022 to 5.735+/-0.000 nmol p-nitrophenol/min/cm(2)). Histochemically, AP was localized as discreet areas within PSC cultures. No AP activity was detected histochemically in OA or normal bovine synovial cultures. The pOCP cultures had high basal AP (5.036+/-0.439 nmol p-nitrophenol/min/cm(2)) and spontaneously formed mineralized nodules, which increased in number under standard osteogenic conditions. Under chondrogenic conditions, micromass or pellet-cultured pOCP cells spontaneously synthesized a matrix containing glycosaminoglycans and collagen II. In adipogenic medium, the number of lipid-containing cells was increased. CONCLUSIONS: Compared with cultures established from OA or normal synovia, cell cultures established from PSC synovial nodules were enriched in osteochondroprogenitors, which, unlike normal mesenchymal cells, differentiated along chondrogenic and osteogenic lineages in the absence of dexamethasone.  (+info)

Chondromyxoid fibroma of the seventh cervical vertebra. (4/4)

Chondromyxoid fibroma is a rare benign bone tumor representing less than 0.5% of all bone tumors. It commonly involves the long tubular bones. Involvement of the spine is rare. A 35-year-old man presented with history of neck pain, restriction of neck movements, pain and numbness along the medial aspect of the left forearm and weakness with wasting of the left hand. A presumptive diagnosis of a bony tumor such as an aneurysmal bone cyst or a giant cell tumor involving the seventh vertebral body was made on plain X-rays, MRI and bone scan. He underwent C7 central corpectomy, incomplete intralesional curettage with iliac bone grafting and C6 to T1 interspinous wiring. The histological diagnosis was chondromyxoid fibroma. On eight years' follow-up, CT scan showed no progression of the tumor with good alignment and fusion of the graft at the site of the corpectomy. The authors conclude that corpectomy and iliac bone grafting for chondromyxoid fibroma has a good outcome on long-term follow-up.  (+info)

Synovial chondromatosis is a rare condition that affects the synovial membrane, which is the lining of joints, bursae (fluid-filled sacs that cushion bones), and tendon sheaths. In this condition, nodules made up of cartilage form in the synovial membrane. These nodules can detach from the synovial membrane and float freely in the synovial fluid, which lubricates the joint. If they become numerous, they can cause joint pain, stiffness, and decreased range of motion. In some cases, the loose bodies may also cause locking or catching sensations in the joint. Surgery is typically required to remove the cartilaginous nodules and relieve symptoms. If left untreated, synovial chondromatosis can lead to osteoarthritis and other joint problems.

Chondromatosis is a medical condition characterized by the abnormal formation of multiple cartilaginous nodules or masses within a joint or soft tissue. It is often seen in synovial joints, where the synovial membrane that lines the joint cavity produces these cartilage nodules.

There are two types of chondromatosis: primary and secondary. Primary chondromatosis, also known as synovial chondromatosis, is a rare condition where the cartilaginous nodules develop spontaneously within the synovium. Over time, these nodules may calcify or ossify, turning into bone-like structures. Secondary chondromatosis occurs as a result of degenerative joint disease, trauma, or other underlying conditions that cause cartilage to break off and float freely in the synovial fluid, eventually forming nodules.

Symptoms of chondromatosis may include joint pain, swelling, stiffness, and limited range of motion. In some cases, the condition may lead to osteoarthritis or other joint complications if left untreated. Treatment typically involves surgical removal of the cartilaginous nodules, followed by management of any underlying conditions that may have contributed to the development of chondromatosis.

'Joint loose bodies' refer to free-floating fragments or particles within the joint space. These can be composed of cartilage, bone, or other synovial tissue debris. They can vary in size and number and may cause symptoms such as pain, locking, catching, or decreased range of motion due to mechanical interference with joint movement. Joint loose bodies are often associated with degenerative joint diseases like osteoarthritis but can also result from trauma or previous surgeries.

A chondroma is a benign, slow-growing tumor that develops in the cartilage. Cartilage is a type of connective tissue found in various parts of the body, including the joints, ribcage, and nose. Chondromas are most commonly found in the hands and feet.

Chondromas are typically small, measuring less than 2 centimeters in diameter, and they usually do not cause any symptoms. However, if a chondroma grows large enough to press on nearby nerves or blood vessels, it may cause pain, numbness, or weakness in the affected area.

Chondromas are usually diagnosed through imaging tests such as X-rays, CT scans, or MRI scans. If a chondroma is suspected based on these tests, a biopsy may be performed to confirm the diagnosis and rule out other types of tumors.

Treatment for chondromas typically involves surgical removal of the tumor. In most cases, this can be done using minimally invasive techniques that allow for quicker recovery times. After surgery, patients will need to follow up with their healthcare provider to ensure that the tumor has been completely removed and to monitor for any signs of recurrence.

The middle cranial fossa is a depression or hollow in the skull that forms the upper and central portion of the cranial cavity. It is located between the anterior cranial fossa (which lies anteriorly) and the posterior cranial fossa (which lies posteriorly). The middle cranial fossa contains several important structures, including the temporal lobes of the brain, the pituitary gland, the optic chiasm, and the cavernous sinuses. It is also where many of the cranial nerves pass through on their way to the brain.

The middle cranial fossa can be further divided into two parts: the anterior and posterior fossae. The anterior fossa contains the optic chiasm and the pituitary gland, while the posterior fossa contains the temporal lobes of the brain and the cavernous sinuses.

The middle cranial fossa is formed by several bones of the skull, including the sphenoid bone, the temporal bone, and the parietal bone. The shape and size of the middle cranial fossa can vary from person to person, and abnormalities in its structure can be associated with various medical conditions, such as pituitary tumors or aneurysms.

Temporomandibular Joint Disorders (TMD) refer to a group of conditions that cause pain and dysfunction in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and the muscles that control jaw movement. The TMJ is the hinge joint that connects the lower jaw (mandible) to the skull (temporal bone) in front of the ear. It allows for movements required for activities such as eating, speaking, and yawning.

TMD can result from various causes, including:

1. Muscle tension or spasm due to clenching or grinding teeth (bruxism), stress, or jaw misalignment
2. Dislocation or injury of the TMJ disc, which is a small piece of cartilage that acts as a cushion between the bones in the joint
3. Arthritis or other degenerative conditions affecting the TMJ
4. Bite problems (malocclusion) leading to abnormal stress on the TMJ and its surrounding muscles
5. Stress, which can exacerbate existing TMD symptoms by causing muscle tension

Symptoms of Temporomandibular Joint Disorders may include:
- Pain or tenderness in the jaw, face, neck, or shoulders
- Limited jaw movement or locking of the jaw
- Clicking, popping, or grating sounds when moving the jaw
- Headaches, earaches, or dizziness
- Difficulty chewing or biting
- Swelling on the side of the face

Treatment for TMD varies depending on the severity and cause of the condition. It may include self-care measures (like eating soft foods, avoiding extreme jaw movements, and applying heat or cold packs), physical therapy, medications (such as muscle relaxants, pain relievers, or anti-inflammatory drugs), dental work (including bite adjustments or orthodontic treatment), or even surgery in severe cases.

An arthroscope is a medical device that is used during minimally invasive surgical procedures. It is a thin, flexible tube with a light and camera on the end, which allows surgeons to visualize the inside of a joint without making a large incision. This enables them to diagnose and treat various joint conditions, such as torn cartilage or ligaments, inflamed synovial tissue, and bone spurs. The images captured by the arthroscope are displayed on a monitor in the operating room, helping the surgeon guide their instruments and perform the procedure with great precision. Arthroscopy is commonly used for joints such as the knee, shoulder, hip, ankle, and wrist.

The metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint is the joint that connects the bones of the hand (metacarpals) to the bones of the fingers and thumb (phalanges). It's also commonly referred to as the "knuckle" joint. The MCP joint allows for flexion, extension, abduction, and adduction movements of the fingers and thumb. It is a synovial joint, which means it contains a lubricating fluid called synovial fluid that helps reduce friction during movement.

Chondrosarcoma is a type of cancer that develops in the cartilaginous tissue, which is the flexible and smooth connective tissue found in various parts of the body such as the bones, ribs, and nose. It is characterized by the production of malignant cartilage cells that can invade surrounding tissues and spread to other parts of the body (metastasis).

Chondrosarcomas are typically slow-growing tumors but can be aggressive in some cases. They usually occur in adults over the age of 40, and men are more commonly affected than women. The most common sites for chondrosarcoma development include the bones of the pelvis, legs, and arms.

Treatment for chondrosarcoma typically involves surgical removal of the tumor, along with radiation therapy or chemotherapy in some cases. The prognosis for chondrosarcoma depends on several factors, including the size and location of the tumor, the grade of malignancy, and whether it has spread to other parts of the body.

Panoramic radiography is a specialized type of dental X-ray imaging that captures a panoramic view of the entire mouth, including the teeth, upper and lower jaws, and surrounding structures. It uses a special machine that rotates around the head, capturing images as it moves. This technique provides a two-dimensional image that is helpful in diagnosing and planning treatment for various dental conditions such as impacted teeth, bone abnormalities, and jaw disorders.

The panoramic radiograph can also be used to assess the development and positioning of wisdom teeth, detect cysts or tumors in the jaws, and evaluate the effects of trauma or injury to the mouth. It is a valuable tool for dental professionals as it allows them to see a comprehensive view of the oral structures, which may not be visible with traditional X-ray techniques.

It's important to note that while panoramic radiography provides valuable information, it should be used in conjunction with other diagnostic tools and clinical examinations to ensure accurate diagnosis and treatment planning.

The synovial membrane, also known as the synovium, is the soft tissue that lines the inner surface of the capsule of a synovial joint, which is a type of joint that allows for smooth movement between bones. This membrane secretes synovial fluid, a viscous substance that lubricates and nourishes the cartilage and helps to reduce friction within the joint during movement.

The synovial membrane has a highly specialized structure, consisting of two layers: the intima and the subintima. The intima is a thin layer of cells that are in direct contact with the synovial fluid, while the subintima is a more fibrous layer that contains blood vessels and nerves.

The main function of the synovial membrane is to produce and regulate the production of synovial fluid, as well as to provide nutrients to the articular cartilage. It also plays a role in the immune response within the joint, helping to protect against infection and inflammation. However, abnormalities in the synovial membrane can lead to conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, where the membrane becomes inflamed and produces excess synovial fluid, leading to pain, swelling, and joint damage.

... can reportedly occur as either a primary or secondary form. Primary synovial chondromatosis, which is ... Synovial chondromatosis occurs twice as commonly in males as females and usually in their forties. However, online communities ... Synovial chondromatosis is a locally aggressive bone tumor of the cartilaginous type. It consists of several hyaline ... Secondary synovial chondromatosis is the more common form and often occurs when there is pre-existent osteoarthritis, ...
... is a rare genetic disorder characterized by a combination of both synovial ... "Entry - 186575 - SYNOVIAL CHONDROMATOSIS, FAMILIAL, WITH DWARFISM - OMIM". omim.org. Retrieved 22 August 2022. Steinberg, G. G ... "Synovial chondromatosis, familial with dwarfism". Global Genes. Retrieved 22 August 2022. "Clinical Synopsis - 186575 - ... Felbel, J.; Gresser, U.; Lohmöller, G.; Zöllner, N. (January 1992). "Familial synovial chondromatosis combined with dwarfism". ...
... (SOC) (synonyms include synovial chondromatosis, primary synovial chondromatosis, synovial ... Coles MJ, Tara HH (January 1997). "Synovial chondromatosis: a case study and brief review". Am. J. Orthop. 26 (1): 37-40. PMID ... "Synovial Chondromatosis". Genetic And Rare Disease Information Centre. Retrieved 8 July 2021. FletcherCDM, UnniKK, MertensF, ... Maurice H, Crone M, Watt I (1 November 1988). "Synovial chondromatosis". J Bone Joint Surg Br. 70 (5): 807-11. doi:10.1302/0301 ...
"Synovial chondromatosis". Soft Tissue and Bone Tumours: WHO Classification of Tumours. International Agency for Research on ... disease Larsen-Johansson disease Knee rheumatoid arthritis Osteochondritis dissecans disease Synovial chondromatosis disease ...
X-ray of synovial chondromatosis. CT of synovial chondromatosis. Radiological signs of transient osteoporosis of the hip ... Synovial chondromatosis can be confidently diagnosed by X-ray when calcified cartilaginous chondromas are seen. However, other ...
Mutations in this gene have been shown to cause metaphyseal chondromatosis with aciduria. Mutations in IDH1 are also implicated ... November 2011). "Whole-exome sequencing detects somatic mutations of IDH1 in metaphyseal chondromatosis with D-2- ...
Synovial chondromatosis occurs in a much older age group and can be ruled out on this basis. Most reported cases of DEH in the ... Trevor disease can often mimic posttraumatic osseous fragments, synovial chondromatosis, ostechondroma, or anterior spur of ...
Koyama, J; Ito, J; Hayashi, T; Kobayashi, F (2001). "Synovial chondromatosis in the temporomandibular joint complicated by ...
He is recognised for his research on synovial chondromatosis, a disease affecting the thin flexible membrane around a joint ...
Chondromalacia Chondromatosis (benign) Chondrosarcoma (malignant) Chondrysplasia punctata, humero-metacarpal type Chordoma ...
... chondromatosis MeSH C04.557.450.565.280 - chondrosarcoma MeSH C04.557.450.565.280.280 - chondrosarcoma, mesenchymal MeSH ...
... is indicated in following conditions: Inflammatory arthritis: rheumatoid arthritis, hemophilia, chondromatosis ...
... or synovial chondromatosis (cartilage formations in the synovial membrane of the joint).[citation needed] Ultrasound during hip ...
Synovial chondromatosis can reportedly occur as either a primary or secondary form. Primary synovial chondromatosis, which is ... Synovial chondromatosis occurs twice as commonly in males as females and usually in their forties. However, online communities ... Synovial chondromatosis is a locally aggressive bone tumor of the cartilaginous type. It consists of several hyaline ... Secondary synovial chondromatosis is the more common form and often occurs when there is pre-existent osteoarthritis, ...
... and mechanical symptoms of synovial chondromatosis and its generation of loose bodies have historically been treated with ... Secondary synovial chondromatosis. Secondary synovial chondromatosis is more common than primary disease. It occurs in the ... encoded search term (Synovial Chondromatosis) and Synovial Chondromatosis What to Read Next on Medscape ... Primary synovial chondromatosis appears to occur in the following three phases, as described by Milgram in 1977 [8] :. * Phase ...
... and mechanical symptoms of synovial chondromatosis and its generation of loose bodies have historically been treated with ... encoded search term (Synovial Chondromatosis) and Synovial Chondromatosis What to Read Next on Medscape ... Synovial Chondromatosis Clinical Presentation. Updated: May 13, 2022 * Author: Nicolai B Baecher, MD; Chief Editor: Omohodion ( ... Synovial chondromatosis of the foot and ankle. Foot Ankle Int. 2008 Mar. 29 (3):312-7. [QxMD MEDLINE Link]. ...
Synovial chondromatosis of the TMJ: MR and CT findings. Message Subject (Your Name) has sent you a message from American ... Synovial chondromatosis of the TMJ: MR and CT findings.. S Herzog and M Mafee ... Interventional radiology of synovial chondromatosis in the temporomandibular joint using a thin arthroscope ...
Osteochondrosis, Synovial Chondromatosis and Dysplasia of the Shoulder Joint World Small Animal Veterinary Association World ...
Patel M, Synovial chondromatosis of knee. Case study, Radiopaedia.org (Accessed on 26 Sep 2023) https://doi.org/10.53347/rID- ... ":"synovial-chondromatosis-of-knee-1","modality":"X-ray","series":[{"id":2148236,"content_type":"image/jpeg","frames":[{"id": ...
Histopathology reports confirmed synovial chondromatosis. The report introduced a case about synovial chondromatosis in ... The initial diagnosis of bilateral elbow synovial chondromatosis was performed by physical examination and imaging report. ... Primary synovial chondromatosis is a rare benign disease that occurs in the joint mucosa. In this case report, a 14-year-old ... Tenosynovial (Extra-articular) Chondromatosis of the Extensor Digitorum Longus Tendon and Synovial Chondromatosis of the Ankle ...
... are benign tumors that, if left unchecked, will grow and destroy your normal bone. As the tumor slowly ... Synovial Chondromatosis. An uncommon and noncancerous, process that occurs in large joints like the knee joint. This condition ... Treatment of Synovial Chondromatosis. Treatment includes excision of the synovium and removal of the cartilage nodules. ... The cause of synovial chondromatosis is unknown. The condition occurs spontaneously. It is not inherited. ...
Synovial chondromatosis is rare, benign condition that causes joint pain, swelling. Learn about diagnosis, treatment options, ...
Synovial chondromatosis is characterized by the formation of osteocartilaginous nodules (free bodies) under the surface of the ... Bone morphogenetic proteins are involved in the pathobiology of synovial chondromatosis.在哪里下载?这篇文献在哪里可以阅读?: ... Synovial chondromatosis is characterized by the formation of osteocartilaginous nodules (free bodies) under the surface of the ... Bone morphogenetic proteins are involved in the pathobiology of synovial chondromatosis.. Abstract
Synovial chondromatosis of the flexor hallucis longus tendon sheath. Synovial chondromatosis of the flexor hallucis longus ... This case report discusses a rare case of secondary tenosynovial chondromatosis of the flexor hallucis longus (FHL). Synovial ... When it is extra-articular, it is considered tenosynovial chondromatosis. The diagnosis is often delayed given the rarity of ...
Synovial Chondromatosis (American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons) * Thyroid Nodules (Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and ...
4. Synovial Osteo Chondromatosis. Synovial osteochondromatosis is a disorder of the synovial lining characterized by cartilage ...
Synovial chondromatosis * Tumoral calcinosis Board review style answer #1. A. Calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposition disease ...
Synovial Chondromatosis-Reichel Syndrome. DEUTSCHES ARZTEBLATT INTERNATIONAL. 2022; 119 (6): 87-87 Editorial Material ...
Synovial chondromatosis Synovial chondromatosis (previously called synovial osteochondromatosis) is a condition in which cells ... However, two conditions-synovial chondromatosis and tenosynovial giant cell tumors-occur in the lining (synovium) of joints. ...
Chondromatosis of temporomandibular joint - a case report with a literature review (str. 145-146) ...
Plain radiographs of the affected joints may be normal for both rice bodies and early phases of synovial chondromatosis. Late ... The important differential diagnoses that need to be excluded in patients with rice bodies are synovial chondromatosis and ... In calcified synovial chondromatosis, posterior acoustic shadowing may be noted.1,5 ... 5 Uncalcified bodies of synovial chondromatosis have a high signal on T2weighted images (making them difficult to visualise) ...
565.575.650.655 Tree - heading Chondromatosis Chondrosarcoma Chondrosarcoma, Mesenchymal Endometrial Stromal Tumors ...
Articular Chondromatosis and Chrondroid Metaplasia in Transgenic TAg Mice.. Authors. Verschoyle RD; Edwards R; Nolan B; Greaves ... However, a disturbance of hyaline cartilage in joints was observed similar to that found in synovial chondromatosis in humans. ...
To provide the highest quality clinical and technology services to customers and patients, in the spirit of continuous improvement and innovation.. Sign up for our monthly web clinics ...
Arthroscopic management of primary synovial chondromatosis of the hip. Arthroscopy 29(3):420-426. https://doi.org/10.1016/j. ...
Examples include giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath and synovial chondromatosis. ...
Metaphyseal chondromatosis with D-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria (MC-HGA) (OMIM 614875) is a severe chondrodysplasia combined with ...
4. Bonatti B de S, Patrocinio LG, Costa SA, Costa JM, Patrocinio JA. Temporomandibular joint synovial chondromatosis. Rev Brás Otorrinolaringol. 2008; 74: 480. ...
Secondary synovial chondromatosis is a disorder that results in intra-articular loose bodies as a result of trauma, ... In primary synovial chondromatosis, there is benign cartilaginous metaplasia arising from the synovial membrane. Histologically ... MRI, especially with osteochondritis dissecans and early stages of synovial chondromatosis, has proven reliable when correlated ... Other causes include osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, primary synovial chondromatosis or neuropathic joint. ...
Ganglion cysts may have following differential diagnoses of ganglion cysts may include synovial chondromatosis, pigmented ...
Extraarticular synovial chondromatosis: review of epidemiology, imaging studies, microscopy and pathogenesis, with a report of ...
FACR 154 Synovial Chondromatosis B. J. Manaster, MD, PhD, FACR 160 Charcot (Neuropathic) B. J. Manaster, MD, PhD, FACR 166 ...
  • Synovial chondromatosis is considered a benign process associated with an extremely low risk of malignancy. (medscape.com)
  • Primary synovial chondromatosis is a rare benign disease that occurs in the joint mucosa. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Synovial chondromatosis is a benign tumor-like lesion of soft tissue cartilage such as joint synovium, which can lead to the formation of multiple cartilage nodules or loose bodies [ 1 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Synovial Chondromatosis are benign tumors that, if left unchecked, will grow and destroy your normal bone. (orthopediconcologist.com)
  • ABSTRACT: Synovial chondromatosis (CS) is a benign lesion that is rare and clinically quite nonspecific. (bvsalud.org)
  • The mistaken perception that the methods can be due to lumbar muscle strain fractures neoplasms benign osteoid osteomas, synovial chondromatosis and lipomatosis arborescens can occur in % and acth release. (familytreecounseling.com)
  • However, online communities for synovial chondromatosis patients have yielded a stark contrast, with equal representation from both genders and members diagnosed as young as late teenage/early 20s. (wikipedia.org)
  • Free bodies and synovium isolated from synovial chondromatosis patients expressed high levels of BMP-2 and BMP-4 mRNAs. (shengsci.com)
  • Case reports have described the coexistence of chondrosarcoma and synovial chondromatosis, sparking debate as to whether the chondromatosis is a cause or the result of chondrosarcoma. (medscape.com)
  • Synovial chondromatosis with malignant degeneration to chondrosarcoma. (medscape.com)
  • Malignant transformation of synovial chondromatosis of the shoulder to chondrosarcoma. (medscape.com)
  • The important differential diagnoses that need to be excluded in patients with rice bodies are synovial chondromatosis and pigmented villonodular synovitis. (scielo.org.za)
  • Kirchhoff C, Buhmann S, Braunstein V, Weiler V, Mutschler W, Biberthaler P. Synovial chondromatosis of the long biceps tendon sheath in a child: a case report and review of the literature. (medscape.com)
  • Synovial chondromatosis of the flexor hallucis longus tendon sheath. (bvsalud.org)
  • Examples include giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath and synovial chondromatosis. (kaiserpermanente.org)
  • The pain, swelling, and mechanical symptoms of synovial chondromatosis and its generation of loose bodies have historically been treated with surgery. (medscape.com)
  • Moreover, relative studies had reported that fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) or transforming growth factor beta 3 (TGF-β3) were responsible for the formation of cartilaginous loose bodies and involved in the pathogenesis of synovial chondromatosis [ 9 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Synovial chondromatosis is characterized by the formation of osteocartilaginous nodules (free bodies) under the surface of the synovial membrane in joints. (shengsci.com)
  • Plain radiographs of the affected joints may be normal for both rice bodies and early phases of synovial chondromatosis. (scielo.org.za)
  • Late phases of synovial chondromatosis will demonstrate calcified bodies within the joint space. (scielo.org.za)
  • Extraarticular synovial chondromatosis: review of epidemiology, imaging studies, microscopy and pathogenesis, with a report of an additional case in a child. (umassmed.edu)
  • This case report discusses a rare case of secondary tenosynovial chondromatosis of the flexor hallucis longus (FHL). (bvsalud.org)
  • When it is extra-articular, it is considered tenosynovial chondromatosis . (bvsalud.org)
  • However, two conditions-synovial chondromatosis and tenosynovial giant cell tumors-occur in the lining (synovium) of joints. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Synovial chondromatosis can reportedly occur as either a primary or secondary form. (wikipedia.org)
  • Primary synovial chondromatosis, which is more rare, occurs spontaneously and does not appear to relate to any pre-existing conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • A review of 155 cases of primary synovial chondromatosis by McCarthy et al identified only four cases of aggressive behavior and chondrosarcomalike histology (one in the elbow and three in the hip). (medscape.com)
  • The typical history of a patient with primary synovial chondromatosis of the knee is that of a middle-aged man with monoarticular pain, swelling, and stiffness with or without mechanical symptoms in the knee. (medscape.com)
  • Primary synovial chondromatosis: a reassessment of malignant potential in 155 cases. (medscape.com)
  • Herein is reported a case of primary synovial chondromatosis of metatarsophalangeal joint in 54yearold male. (aleijten.com)
  • Only a few case reports have documented malignant degeneration of synovial chondromatosis. (medscape.com)
  • Moreover, synovial chondromatosis can be found intra-articular as well as extra-articular (like the extensor digitorum longus tendon), which were still relatively rare in the literature [ 5 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Synovial chondromatosis is a rare condition in which foci of cartilage develop in the synovial membrane of joints, bursae, or tendon sheaths as a result of metaplasia of the subsynovial connective tissue. (medscape.com)
  • These results suggest that BMPs are involved in the pathobiology of cartilaginous and osteogenic metaplasia observed in synovial chondromatosis. (shengsci.com)
  • Articular Chondromatosis and Chrondroid Metaplasia in Transgenic TAg Mice. (jax.org)
  • La osteocondromatosis sinovial es una metaplasia benigna de la membrana sinovial que afecta a 1 de cada 100 000 personas, en su mayoría adultos, y es extremadamente infrecuente en edad pediátrica. (bvsalud.org)
  • Secondary synovial chondromatosis is the more common form and often occurs when there is pre-existent osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, osteonecrosis, osteochondritis dissecans, neuropathic osteoarthropathy (which often occurs in diabetic individuals), tuberculosis, or osteochondral fractures (torn cartilage covering the end of a bone in a joint) in the affected individual. (wikipedia.org)
  • Synovial chondromatosis (previously called synovial osteochondromatosis) is a condition in which cells in the lining of the joint turn into cartilage-producing cells. (msdmanuals.com)
  • However, a disturbance of hyaline cartilage in joints was observed similar to that found in synovial chondromatosis in humans. (jax.org)
  • The initial diagnosis of bilateral elbow synovial chondromatosis was performed by physical examination and imaging report. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The report introduced a case about synovial chondromatosis in bilateral elbow found in a 14-year-old girl, which is rarely involved in bilateral elbow and rarely found in adolescents. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Although Henderson [ 6 ] reported the first elbow synovial chondromatosis in 1918, the etiology of synovial chondromatosis was currently uncertain. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Nakanishi S, Sakamoto K, Yoshitake H, Kino K, Amagasa T, Yamaguchi A. Bone morphogenetic proteins are involved in the pathobiology of synovial chondromatosis. (medscape.com)
  • Bone morphogenetic proteins are involved in the pathobiology of synovial chondromatosis. (shengsci.com)
  • Controversies surrounding the diagnosis and treatment of synovial chondromatosis are few. (medscape.com)
  • OBJECTIVES@#To evaluate the value of arthroscopy in the diagnosis and treatment of synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJSC). (bvsalud.org)
  • Before operation and at follow-up, @*CONCLUSIONS@#Arthroscopy is essential in the diagnosis and treatment of TMJ synovial chondromatosis. (bvsalud.org)
  • Case of the month #166: synovial chondromatosis of the temporal mandibular joint. (wikipedia.org)
  • A pesar de ser considerada una lesión de tipo benigna, esta puede llegar a ser localmente agresiva, extendiéndose como en nuestro reporte hacia la fosa craneal media, adelgazando parte del hueso temporal. (bvsalud.org)
  • Synovial chondromatosis is a locally aggressive bone tumor of the cartilaginous type. (wikipedia.org)
  • Free chapter on ultrasound findings of synovial chondromatosis affecting the subacromial-subdeltoid bursa available at ShoulderUS.com Fuller E, Bharatha A, Yeung R, Kassel EE, Aviv RI, Howard P, Symons SP. (wikipedia.org)
  • Synovial chondromatosis of the TMJ: MR and CT findings. (ajnr.org)
  • Abdelwahab IF, Contractor D, Bianchi S, Hermann G, Hoch B. Synovial chondromatosis of the lumbar spine with compressive myelopathy: a case report with review of the literature. (medscape.com)
  • Synovial chondromatosis of the foot and ankle. (medscape.com)
  • Fukuhara et al identified elevated levels of chondrocalcin in the synovial fluid of patients with synovial chondromatosis. (medscape.com)
  • Synovial chondromatosis occurs twice as commonly in males as females and usually in their forties. (wikipedia.org)
  • Kerimoglu S, Aynaci O, Saraçoglu M, Cobanoglu U. Synovial chondromatosis of the subtalar joint: a case report and review of the literature. (medscape.com)
  • Melorheostosis with Synovial Chondromatosis of the Foot. (dkmc.or.kr)