Sulfatases are a group of enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of sulfate ester bonds in various substrates, playing crucial roles in the metabolism and homeostasis of carbohydrates, proteoglycans, neurotransmitters, and steroid hormones within the body.
An arylsulfatase with high specificity towards sulfated steroids. Defects in this enzyme are the cause of ICHTHYOSIS, X-LINKED.
An enzyme that specifically cleaves the ester sulfate of iduronic acid. Its deficiency has been demonstrated in Hunter's syndrome, which is characterized by an excess of dermatan sulfate and heparan sulfate. EC 3.1.6.13.
An enzyme from the sulfuric ester hydrolase class that breaks down one of the products of the chondroitin lyase II reaction. EC 3.1.6.9.
Enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of a phenol sulfate to yield a phenol and sulfate. Arylsulfatase A, B, and C have been separated. A deficiency of arylsulfatases is one of the causes of metachromatic leukodystrophy (LEUKODYSTROPHY, METACHROMATIC). EC 3.1.6.1.
An arylsulfatase that catalyzes the hydrolysis of the 4-sulfate groups of the N-acetyl-D-galactosamine 4-sulfate units of chondroitin sulfate and dermatan sulfate. A deficiency of this enzyme is responsible for the inherited lysosomal disease, Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome (MUCOPOLYSACCHARIDOSIS VI). EC 3.1.6.12.
A group of enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of various sulfate bonds of chondroitin sulfate. EC 3.1.6.-.
Systemic lysosomal storage disease marked by progressive physical deterioration and caused by a deficiency of L-sulfoiduronate sulfatase. This disease differs from MUCOPOLYSACCHARIDOSIS I by slower progression, lack of corneal clouding, and X-linked rather than autosomal recessive inheritance. The mild form produces near-normal intelligence and life span. The severe form usually causes death by age 15.
An inherited metabolic disorder characterized by the intralysosomal accumulation of sulfur-containing lipids (sulfatides) and MUCOPOLYSACCHARIDES. Excess levels of both substrates are present in urine. This is a disorder of multiple sulfatase (arylsulfatases A, B, and C) deficiency which is caused by the mutation of sulfatase-modifying factor-1. Neurological deterioration is rapid.
Chronic form of ichthyosis that is inherited as a sex-linked recessive trait carried on the X-chromosome and transmitted to the male offspring. It is characterized by severe scaling, especially on the extremities, and is associated with steroid sulfatase deficiency.
An enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of cerebroside 3-sulfate (sulfatide) to yield a cerebroside and inorganic sulfate. A marked deficiency of arylsulfatase A, which is considered the heat-labile component of cerebroside sulfatase, has been demonstrated in all forms of metachromatic leukodystrophy (LEUKODYSTROPHY, METACHROMATIC). EC 3.1.6.8.
Genetic disorder of mucopolysaccharide metabolism characterized by skeletal abnormalities, joint instability, development of cervical myelopathy, and excessive urinary keratan sulfate. There are two biochemically distinct forms, each due to a deficiency of a different enzyme.
Any of several generalized skin disorders characterized by dryness, roughness, and scaliness, due to hypertrophy of the stratum corneum epidermis. Most are genetic, but some are acquired, developing in association with other systemic disease or genetic syndrome.
Enzymes which transfer sulfate groups to various acceptor molecules. They are involved in posttranslational sulfation of proteins and sulfate conjugation of exogenous chemicals and bile acids. EC 2.8.2.
Mucopolysaccharidosis with excessive CHONDROITIN SULFATE B in urine, characterized by dwarfism and deafness. It is caused by a deficiency of N-ACETYLGALACTOSAMINE-4-SULFATASE (arylsulfatase B).
An autosomal recessive metabolic disease caused by a deficiency of CEREBROSIDE-SULFATASE leading to intralysosomal accumulation of cerebroside sulfate (SULFOGLYCOSPHINGOLIPIDS) in the nervous system and other organs. Pathological features include diffuse demyelination, and metachromatically-staining granules in many cell types such as the GLIAL CELLS. There are several allelic and nonallelic forms with a variety of neurological symptoms.
A group of inherited metabolic disorders characterized by the intralysosomal accumulation of SPHINGOLIPIDS primarily in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM and to a variable degree in the visceral organs. They are classified by the enzyme defect in the degradation pathway and the substrate accumulation (or storage). Clinical features vary in subtypes but neurodegeneration is a common sign.
An aromatized C18 steroid with a 3-hydroxyl group and a 17-ketone, a major mammalian estrogen. It is converted from ANDROSTENEDIONE directly, or from TESTOSTERONE via ESTRADIOL. In humans, it is produced primarily by the cyclic ovaries, PLACENTA, and the ADIPOSE TISSUE of men and postmenopausal women.
Inorganic or organic oxy acids of sulfur which contain the RSO2(OH) radical.
Group of lysosomal storage diseases each caused by an inherited deficiency of an enzyme involved in the degradation of glycosaminoglycans (mucopolysaccharides). The diseases are progressive and often display a wide spectrum of clinical severity within one enzyme deficiency.
Most common form of ICHTHYOSIS characterized by prominent scaling especially on the exterior surfaces of the extremities. It is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait.
A class of enzymes that catalyzes the oxidation of 17-hydroxysteroids to 17-ketosteroids. EC 1.1.-.
Inborn errors of metabolism characterized by defects in specific lysosomal hydrolases and resulting in intracellular accumulation of unmetabolized substrates.
Mucopolysaccharidosis characterized by heparitin sulfate in the urine, progressive mental retardation, mild dwarfism, and other skeletal disorders. There are four clinically indistinguishable but biochemically distinct forms, each due to a deficiency of a different enzyme.
Inorganic salts of sulfuric acid.
Synthetic or naturally occurring substances related to coumarin, the delta-lactone of coumarinic acid.
The female sex chromosome, being the differential sex chromosome carried by half the male gametes and all female gametes in human and other male-heterogametic species.
The circulating form of a major C19 steroid produced primarily by the ADRENAL CORTEX. DHEA sulfate serves as a precursor for TESTOSTERONE; ANDROSTENEDIONE; ESTRADIOL; and ESTRONE.
A synthetic progestational hormone with no androgenic or estrogenic properties. Unlike many other progestational compounds, dydrogesterone produces no increase in temperature and does not inhibit OVULATION.
A class of morphologically heterogeneous cytoplasmic particles in animal and plant tissues characterized by their content of hydrolytic enzymes and the structure-linked latency of these enzymes. The intracellular functions of lysosomes depend on their lytic potential. The single unit membrane of the lysosome acts as a barrier between the enzymes enclosed in the lysosome and the external substrate. The activity of the enzymes contained in lysosomes is limited or nil unless the vesicle in which they are enclosed is ruptured. Such rupture is supposed to be under metabolic (hormonal) control. (From Rieger et al., Glossary of Genetics: Classical and Molecular, 5th ed)
A genus of gram-positive, anaerobic, coccoid bacteria that is part of the normal flora of the mouth, upper respiratory tract, and large intestine in humans. Its organisms cause infections of soft tissues and bacteremias.
Enzymes which catalyze the elimination of glucuronate residues from chondroitin A,B, and C or which catalyze the hydrolysis of sulfate groups of the 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-D-galactose 6-sulfate units of chondroitin sulfate. EC 4.2.2.-.
Heteropolysaccharides which contain an N-acetylated hexosamine in a characteristic repeating disaccharide unit. The repeating structure of each disaccharide involves alternate 1,4- and 1,3-linkages consisting of either N-acetylglucosamine or N-acetylgalactosamine.
Therapeutic replacement or supplementation of defective or missing enzymes to alleviate the effects of enzyme deficiency (e.g., GLUCOSYLCERAMIDASE replacement for GAUCHER DISEASE).
A heterogeneous group of bone dysplasias, the common character of which is stippling of the epiphyses in infancy. The group includes a severe autosomal recessive form (CHONDRODYSPLASIA PUNCTATA, RHIZOMELIC), an autosomal dominant form (Conradi-Hunermann syndrome), and a milder X-linked form. Metabolic defects associated with impaired peroxisomes are present only in the rhizomelic form.
Steroidal compounds in which one or more carbon atoms in the steroid ring system have been substituted with nitrogen atoms.
An enzyme that catalyzes the desaturation (aromatization) of the ring A of C19 androgens and converts them to C18 estrogens. In this process, the 19-methyl is removed. This enzyme is membrane-bound, located in the endoplasmic reticulum of estrogen-producing cells of ovaries, placenta, testes, adipose, and brain tissues. Aromatase is encoded by the CYP19 gene, and functions in complex with NADPH-FERRIHEMOPROTEIN REDUCTASE in the cytochrome P-450 system.
A genus of gram-negative, anaerobic, nonsporeforming, nonmotile rods. Organisms of this genus had originally been classified as members of the BACTEROIDES genus but overwhelming biochemical and chemical findings in 1990 indicated the need to separate them from other Bacteroides species, and hence, this new genus was established.
Diazomethane is an extremely hazardous and unstable organic compound, (CH2)N=N=O, with a methane substituted diazo group, that is highly explosive when heated, shocked or contaminated, and used as a powerful methylating agent in chemical syntheses, but its production and handling require special expertise and equipment due to the high risks involved.
Connective tissue cells which secrete an extracellular matrix rich in collagen and other macromolecules.
Abnormal number or structure of the SEX CHROMOSOMES. Some sex chromosome aberrations are associated with SEX CHROMOSOME DISORDERS and SEX CHROMOSOME DISORDERS OF SEX DEVELOPMENT.
Pregnadienes which have undergone ring contractions or are lacking carbon-18 or carbon-19.
A naturally occurring glycosaminoglycan found mostly in the skin and in connective tissue. It differs from CHONDROITIN SULFATE A (see CHONDROITIN SULFATES) by containing IDURONIC ACID in place of glucuronic acid, its epimer, at carbon atom 5. (from Merck, 12th ed)
Any member of the class of enzymes that catalyze the cleavage of the substrate and the addition of water to the resulting molecules, e.g., ESTERASES, glycosidases (GLYCOSIDE HYDROLASES), lipases, NUCLEOTIDASES, peptidases (PEPTIDE HYDROLASES), and phosphatases (PHOSPHORIC MONOESTER HYDROLASES). EC 3.
A major C19 steroid produced by the ADRENAL CORTEX. It is also produced in small quantities in the TESTIS and the OVARY. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) can be converted to TESTOSTERONE; ANDROSTENEDIONE; ESTRADIOL; and ESTRONE. Most of DHEA is sulfated (DEHYDROEPIANDROSTERONE SULFATE) before secretion.
Enzymes which catalyze the elimination of delta-4,5-D-glucuronate residues from polysaccharides containing 1,4-beta-hexosaminyl and 1,3-beta-D-glucuronosyl or 1,3-alpha-L-iduronosyl linkages thereby bringing about depolymerization. EC 4.2.2.4 acts on chondroitin sulfate A and C as well as on dermatan sulfate and slowly on hyaluronate. EC 4.2.2.5 acts on chondroitin sulfate A and C.
Certain tumors that 1, arise in organs that are normally dependent on specific hormones and 2, are stimulated or caused to regress by manipulation of the endocrine environment.
Derivatives of chondroitin which have a sulfate moiety esterified to the galactosamine moiety of chondroitin. Chondroitin sulfate A, or chondroitin 4-sulfate, and chondroitin sulfate C, or chondroitin 6-sulfate, have the sulfate esterified in the 4- and 6-positions, respectively. Chondroitin sulfate B (beta heparin; DERMATAN SULFATE) is a misnomer and this compound is not a true chondroitin sulfate.
Organic esters of sulfuric acid.
Any cell, other than a ZYGOTE, that contains elements (such as NUCLEI and CYTOPLASM) from two or more different cells, usually produced by artificial CELL FUSION.
An indirect sympathomimetic. Tyramine does not directly activate adrenergic receptors, but it can serve as a substrate for adrenergic uptake systems and monoamine oxidase so it prolongs the actions of adrenergic transmitters. It also provokes transmitter release from adrenergic terminals. Tyramine may be a neurotransmitter in some invertebrate nervous systems.
17-Hydroxy-6-methylpregna-3,6-diene-3,20-dione. A progestational hormone used most commonly as the acetate ester. As the acetate, it is more potent than progesterone both as a progestagen and as an ovulation inhibitor. It has also been used in the palliative treatment of breast cancer.
The homologous chromosomes that are dissimilar in the heterogametic sex. There are the X CHROMOSOME, the Y CHROMOSOME, and the W, Z chromosomes (in animals in which the female is the heterogametic sex (the silkworm moth Bombyx mori, for example)). In such cases the W chromosome is the female-determining and the male is ZZ. (From King & Stansfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)
Glucuronidase is an enzyme (specifically, a glycosidase) that catalyzes the hydrolysis of glucuronic acid from various substrates, playing crucial roles in metabolic processes like detoxification and biotransformation within organisms.
Inorganic and organic derivatives of sulfuric acid (H2SO4). The salts and esters of sulfuric acid are known as SULFATES and SULFURIC ACID ESTERS respectively.
A heteropolysaccharide that is similar in structure to HEPARIN. It accumulates in individuals with MUCOPOLYSACCHARIDOSIS.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
A highly vascularized mammalian fetal-maternal organ and major site of transport of oxygen, nutrients, and fetal waste products. It includes a fetal portion (CHORIONIC VILLI) derived from TROPHOBLASTS and a maternal portion (DECIDUA) derived from the uterine ENDOMETRIUM. The placenta produces an array of steroid, protein and peptide hormones (PLACENTAL HORMONES).
Genetic mechanisms that allow GENES to be expressed at a similar level irrespective of their GENE DOSAGE. This term is usually used in discussing genes that lie on the SEX CHROMOSOMES. Because the sex chromosomes are only partially homologous, there is a different copy number, i.e., dosage, of these genes in males vs. females. In DROSOPHILA, dosage compensation is accomplished by hypertranscription of genes located on the X CHROMOSOME. In mammals, dosage compensation of X chromosome genes is accomplished by random X CHROMOSOME INACTIVATION of one of the two X chromosomes in the female.
Analyses for a specific enzyme activity, or of the level of a specific enzyme that is used to assess health and disease risk, for early detection of disease or disease prediction, diagnosis, and change in disease status.
A genus of gram-negative, anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria. Its organisms are normal inhabitants of the oral, respiratory, intestinal, and urogenital cavities of humans, animals, and insects. Some species may be pathogenic.
A 21-carbon steroid, derived from CHOLESTEROL and found in steroid hormone-producing tissues. Pregnenolone is the precursor to GONADAL STEROID HORMONES and the adrenal CORTICOSTEROIDS.
Substances which are of little or no nutritive value, but are used in the processing or storage of foods or animal feed, especially in the developed countries; includes ANTIOXIDANTS; FOOD PRESERVATIVES; FOOD COLORING AGENTS; FLAVORING AGENTS; ANTI-INFECTIVE AGENTS (both plain and LOCAL); VEHICLES; EXCIPIENTS and other similarly used substances. Many of the same substances are PHARMACEUTIC AIDS when added to pharmaceuticals rather than to foods.
A class of inorganic or organic compounds that contain the borohydride (BH4-) anion.
Compounds that interact with ESTROGEN RECEPTORS in target tissues to bring about the effects similar to those of ESTRADIOL. Estrogens stimulate the female reproductive organs, and the development of secondary female SEX CHARACTERISTICS. Estrogenic chemicals include natural, synthetic, steroidal, or non-steroidal compounds.
Enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of N-acylhexosamine residues in N-acylhexosamides. Hexosaminidases also act on GLUCOSIDES; GALACTOSIDES; and several OLIGOSACCHARIDES.
A characteristic feature of enzyme activity in relation to the kind of substrate on which the enzyme or catalytic molecule reacts.
A non-essential amino acid. It is found primarily in gelatin and silk fibroin and used therapeutically as a nutrient. It is also a fast inhibitory neurotransmitter.
The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.
A non-essential amino acid that occurs in high levels in its free state in plasma. It is produced from pyruvate by transamination. It is involved in sugar and acid metabolism, increases IMMUNITY, and provides energy for muscle tissue, BRAIN, and the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.
Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.
The region of an enzyme that interacts with its substrate to cause the enzymatic reaction.
The 17-beta-isomer of estradiol, an aromatized C18 steroid with hydroxyl group at 3-beta- and 17-beta-position. Estradiol-17-beta is the most potent form of mammalian estrogenic steroids.
A thiol-containing non-essential amino acid that is oxidized to form CYSTINE.
A sulfated mucopolysaccharide initially isolated from bovine cornea. At least two types are known. Type I, found mostly in the cornea, contains D-galactose and D-glucosamine-6-O-sulfate as the repeating unit; type II, found in skeletal tissues, contains D-galactose and D-galactosamine-6-O-sulfate as the repeating unit.
The male sex chromosome, being the differential sex chromosome carried by half the male gametes and none of the female gametes in humans and in some other male-heterogametic species in which the homologue of the X chromosome has been retained.
The co-inheritance of two or more non-allelic GENES due to their being located more or less closely on the same CHROMOSOME.
Chromatographic techniques in which the mobile phase is a liquid.
Errors in metabolic processes resulting from inborn genetic mutations that are inherited or acquired in utero.
A group of compounds that contain the structure SO2NH2.
The process of cleaving a chemical compound by the addition of a molecule of water.
Any of various enzymatically catalyzed post-translational modifications of PEPTIDES or PROTEINS in the cell of origin. These modifications include carboxylation; HYDROXYLATION; ACETYLATION; PHOSPHORYLATION; METHYLATION; GLYCOSYLATION; ubiquitination; oxidation; proteolysis; and crosslinking and result in changes in molecular weight and electrophoretic motility.
Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.
Ubiquitous macromolecules associated with the cell surface and extracellular matrix of a wide range of cells of vertebrate and invertebrate tissues. They are essential cofactors in cell-matrix adhesion processes, in cell-cell recognition systems, and in receptor-growth factor interactions. (From Cancer Metastasis Rev 1996; 15(2): 177-86; Hepatology 1996; 24(3): 524-32)
The occurrence in an individual of two or more cell populations of different chromosomal constitutions, derived from a single ZYGOTE, as opposed to CHIMERISM in which the different cell populations are derived from more than one zygote.
The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.
Liquid chromatographic techniques which feature high inlet pressures, high sensitivity, and high speed.
The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.
Tumors or cancer of the human BREAST.
Absence of hair from areas where it is normally present.
A mutation caused by the substitution of one nucleotide for another. This results in the DNA molecule having a change in a single base pair.
The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.
RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.
A genus of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria widely distributed in nature. Some species are pathogenic for humans, animals, and plants.
Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.
The outer covering of the body that protects it from the environment. It is composed of the DERMIS and the EPIDERMIS.
Artifactual vesicles formed from the endoplasmic reticulum when cells are disrupted. They are isolated by differential centrifugation and are composed of three structural features: rough vesicles, smooth vesicles, and ribosomes. Numerous enzyme activities are associated with the microsomal fraction. (Glick, Glossary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 1990; from Rieger et al., Glossary of Genetics: Classical and Molecular, 5th ed)
An adenocarcinoma characterized by the presence of cells resembling the glandular cells of the ENDOMETRIUM. It is a common histological type of ovarian CARCINOMA and ENDOMETRIAL CARCINOMA. There is a high frequency of co-occurrence of this form of adenocarcinoma in both tissues.
Compounds or agents that combine with an enzyme in such a manner as to prevent the normal substrate-enzyme combination and the catalytic reaction.
The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.
The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
A highly acidic mucopolysaccharide formed of equal parts of sulfated D-glucosamine and D-glucuronic acid with sulfaminic bridges. The molecular weight ranges from six to twenty thousand. Heparin occurs in and is obtained from liver, lung, mast cells, etc., of vertebrates. Its function is unknown, but it is used to prevent blood clotting in vivo and vitro, in the form of many different salts.
White blood cells. These include granular leukocytes (BASOPHILS; EOSINOPHILS; and NEUTROPHILS) as well as non-granular leukocytes (LYMPHOCYTES and MONOCYTES).
Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in enzyme synthesis.
Glucosamine is a naturally occurring amino sugar that plays a crucial role in the formation and maintenance of various tissues, particularly in the synthesis of proteoglycans and glycosaminoglycans, which are essential components of cartilage and synovial fluid in joints.
A non-essential amino acid occurring in natural form as the L-isomer. It is synthesized from GLYCINE or THREONINE. It is involved in the biosynthesis of PURINES; PYRIMIDINES; and other amino acids.
Glycoside Hydrolases are a class of enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of glycosidic bonds, resulting in the breakdown of complex carbohydrates and oligosaccharides into simpler sugars.
A water-soluble extractive mixture of sulfated polysaccharides from RED ALGAE. Chief sources are the Irish moss CHONDRUS CRISPUS (Carrageen), and Gigartina stellata. It is used as a stabilizer, for suspending COCOA in chocolate manufacture, and to clarify BEVERAGES.
Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.
A category of nucleic acid sequences that function as units of heredity and which code for the basic instructions for the development, reproduction, and maintenance of organisms.
A genetic rearrangement through loss of segments of DNA or RNA, bringing sequences which are normally separated into close proximity. This deletion may be detected using cytogenetic techniques and can also be inferred from the phenotype, indicating a deletion at one specific locus.
Electrophoresis in which a pH gradient is established in a gel medium and proteins migrate until they reach the site (or focus) at which the pH is equal to their isoelectric point.
Any method used for determining the location of and relative distances between genes on a chromosome.
Carbohydrates consisting of between two (DISACCHARIDES) and ten MONOSACCHARIDES connected by either an alpha- or beta-glycosidic link. They are found throughout nature in both the free and bound form.
A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.
An individual having different alleles at one or more loci regarding a specific character.
The uptake of naked or purified DNA by CELLS, usually meaning the process as it occurs in eukaryotic cells. It is analogous to bacterial transformation (TRANSFORMATION, BACTERIAL) and both are routinely employed in GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUES.

Report of a mucopolysaccharidosis occurring in Australian aborigines. (1/74)

The first 2 reported cases of a mucopolysaccharidosis occurring in an Australian aboriginal family are presented. Though these children had the characteristic morphological features of the Hurler syndrome, enzyme assay of cultured fibroblasts showed normal levels of alpha-L-iduronidase and decreased activity of arylsulphatase B. Thus, they represented the Hurler syndrome clinically, while they had the enzyme defect of the Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome, and they may represent a new severe form of the Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome. The parents of these children were first cousins. Though the children were not full blood aborigines, examination of the pedigree indicates that the gene originated in the common aboriginal family.  (+info)

Microanalysis of enzyme digests of hyaluronan and chondroitin/dermatan sulfate by fluorophore-assisted carbohydrate electrophoresis (FACE). (2/74)

Hyaluronan and chondroitin/dermatan sulfate are glycosaminoglycans that play major roles in the biomechanical properties of a wide variety of tissues, including cartilage. A chondroitin/dermatan sulfate chain can be divided into three regions: (1) a single linkage region oligosaccharide, through which the chain is attached to its proteoglycan core protein, (2) numerous internal repeat disaccharides, which comprise the bulk of the chain, and (3) a single nonreducing terminal saccharide structure. Each of these regions of a chondroitin/dermatan sulfate chain has its own level of microheterogeneity of structure, which varies with proteoglycan class, tissue source, species, and pathology. We have developed rapid, simple, and sensitive protocols for detection, characterization and quantitation of the saccharide structures from the internal disaccharide and nonreducing terminal regions of hyaluronan and chondroitin/dermatan sulfate chains. These protocols rely on the generation of saccharide structures with free reducing groups by specific enzymatic treatments (hyaluronidase/chondroitinase) which are then quantitatively tagged though their free reducing groups with the fluorescent reporter, 2-aminoacridone. These saccharide structures are further characterized by modification through additional enzymatic (sulfatase) or chemical (mercuric ion) treatments. After separation by fluorophore-assisted carbohydrate electrophoresis, the relative fluorescence in each band is quantitated with a cooled, charge-coupled device camera for analysis. Specifically, the digestion products identified are (1) unsaturated internal Deltadisaccharides including DeltaDiHA, DeltaDi0S, DeltaDi2S, DeltaDi4S, DeltaDi6S, DeltaDi2,4S, DeltaDi2,6S, DeltaDi4,6S, and DeltaDi2,4,6S; (2) saturated nonreducing terminal disaccharides including DiHA, Di0S, Di4S and Di6S; and (3) nonreducing terminal hexosamines including glcNAc, galNAc, 4S-galNAc, 6S-galNAc, and 4, 6S-galNAc.  (+info)

Slow reacting substance as a preformed mediator from human lung. (3/74)

Homogenates from human lung contained a preformed slow reacting substance (pSRS). The pattern of contraction on the guinea-pig ileum by pSRS was indistinguishable from that of SRS-A. The activity of pSRS could not be attributed to the presence of K+, Na+, Ca2+ and Mg2+ ions, or any prostaglandin including PGF2 or its 15-oxo derivative. As with SRS-A, pSRS could be absorbed onto Amberlite XAD-2 and silicic acid. Both were eluted from the former with 80 per cent ethanol and from the latter with a mixture of ethanol, ammonia and water. Both pSRS and SRS-A were resistant to the action of NaOH whereas their activities were destroyed by boiling in HCl. Arylsulphatase II B destroyed the activities of both pSRS and SRS-A. An antagonist of SRS-A, FPL55712, inhibited the action of pSRS at comparable concentrations to that of SRS-A. These experiments suggest that pSRS and SRS-A are identical. Thus SRS joins histamine and ECF-A as a preformed mediator. Although SRS was present in a preformed state the amount of material extractable was more than doubled by the anaphylactic reaction. The extraction of slow reacting substance from human lung without apparent requirement for antigen or antibody points to a possible role of this mediator in inflammatory reactions evoked by mechanisms independent of IgE and other tissue-sensitizing antibodies.  (+info)

Correction of human mucopolysaccharidosis type-VI fibroblasts with recombinant N-acetylgalactosamine-4-sulphatase. (4/74)

A full-length human N-acetylgalactosamine-4-sulphatase (4-sulphatase) cDNA clone was constructed and expressed in CHO-DK1 cells under the transcriptional control of the Rous sarcoma virus long terminal repeat. A clonal cell line expressing high activities of human 4-sulphatase was isolated. The maturation and processing of the human enzyme in this transfected CHO cell line showed it to be identical with that seen in normal human skin fibroblasts. The high-uptake precursor form of the recombinant enzyme was purified from the medium of the transfected cells treated with NH4Cl and was shown to be efficiently endocytosed by control fibroblasts and by fibroblasts from a mucopolysaccharidosis type-VI (MPS VI) patient. Enzyme uptake was inhibitable by mannose 6-phosphate. After uptake, the enzyme was processed normally in both normal and MPS VI fibroblasts and was shown both to correct the enzymic defect and to initiate degradation of [35S]sulphated dermatan sulphate in MPS VI fibroblasts. The stabilities of the recombinant enzyme and enzyme from human fibroblasts appeared to be similar after uptake. However, endocytosed enzyme has a significantly shorter half-life than endogenous human enzyme. The purified precursor 4-sulphatase had a similar pH optimum and catalytic parameters to the mature form of 4-sulphatase isolated from human liver.  (+info)

Multiple sulfatase deficiency: catalytically inactive sulfatases are expressed from retrovirally introduced sulfatase cDNAs. (5/74)

Multiple sulfatase deficiency (MSD) is an inherited lysosomal storage disease characterized by the deficiency of at least seven sulfatases. The basic defect in MSD is thought to be in a post-translational modification common to all sulfatases. In accordance with this concept, RNAs of normal size and amount were detected in MSD fibroblasts for three sulfatases tested. cDNAs encoding arylsulfatase A, arylsulfatase B, or steroid sulfatase were introduced into MSD fibroblasts and fibroblasts with a single sulfatase deficiency by retroviral gene transfer. Infected fibroblasts overexpressed the respective sulfatase polypeptides. While in single-sulfatase-deficiency fibroblasts a concomitant increase of sulfatase activities was observed, MSD fibroblasts expressed sulfatase polypeptides with a severely diminished catalytic activity. From these results we conclude that the mutation in MSD severely decreases the capacity of a co- or post-translational process that renders sulfatases enzymatically active or prevents their premature inactivation.  (+info)

Localization of arylsulphatase A and B activities in rat kidney. (6/74)

Very high arylsulphatase activity has been detected in rat kidney. It is the highest in renal cortex (19 U/g tissue), 3-30 times higher than in other rat organs. Histochemically, arylsulphatase B (N-acetylgalactosamine-4-sulphate sulphatase) activity is localized in large lysosomes of proximal convoluted tubules, where it accounts for over 90% of total arylsulphatase activity. This suggests that the enzyme plays an important role in the degradation of endocytosed sulphated oligosaccharides.  (+info)

Mucopolysaccharidosis VI (Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome). An intermediate clinical phenotype caused by substitution of valine for glycine at position 137 of arylsulfatase B. (7/74)

The Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome (mucopolysaccharidosis type VI) is a lysosomal storage disease with autosomal recessive inheritance caused by deficiency of the enzyme arylsulfatase B. Severe, intermediate, and mild forms of the disease have been described. The molecular correlate of the clinical heterogeneity is not known at present. To identify the molecular defect in a patient with the intermediate form of the disease, arylsulfatase B mRNA from his fibroblasts was reverse-transcribed, amplified by the polymerase chain reaction, and subcloned. Three point mutations were detected by DNA sequence analysis, two of which, a silent A to G transition at nucleotide 1191 and a G to A transition at nucleotide 1126 resulting in a methionine for valine 376 substitution, were polymorphisms. A G to T transversion at nucleotide 410 causing a valine for glycine 137 substitution (G137V) was identified as the mutation underlying the Maroteaux-Lamy phenotype of the patient, who was homozygous for the allele. The kinetic parameters of the mutant arylsulfatase B enzyme toward a radiolabeled trisaccharide substrate were normal excluding an alteration of the active site. The G137V mutation did not affect the synthesis but severely reduced the stability of the arylsulfatase B precursor. While the wild type precursor is converted by limited proteolysis in late endosomes or lysosomes to a mature form, the majority of the mutant precursor was degraded presumably in a compartment proximal to the trans Golgi network and only a small amount escaped to the lysosomes accounting for the low residual enzyme activity in fibroblasts of a patient with the juvenile form of the disease.  (+info)

Evidence for differential regulation of genes in the chondroitin sulfate utilization pathway of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron. (8/74)

Expression of the chondroitin sulfate utilization (csu) genes of Bacterioides thetaiotaomicron is regulated by chondroitin sulfate. We have now found, however, that the csu genes are not all regulated in the same way. In particular, the gene encoding beta-glucuronidase (csuE) is expressed under two different conditions that do not lead to expression of other csu genes.  (+info)

Sulfatases are a group of enzymes that play a crucial role in the metabolism of sulfated steroids, glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), and other sulfated molecules. These enzymes catalyze the hydrolysis of sulfate groups from these substrates, converting them into their respective unsulfated forms.

The human genome encodes for several different sulfatases, each with specificity towards particular types of sulfated substrates. For instance, some sulfatases are responsible for removing sulfate groups from steroid hormones and neurotransmitters, while others target GAGs like heparan sulfate, dermatan sulfate, and keratan sulfate.

Defects in sulfatase enzymes can lead to various genetic disorders, such as multiple sulfatase deficiency (MSD), X-linked ichthyosis, and mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) type IIIC (Sanfilippo syndrome type C). These conditions are characterized by the accumulation of sulfated molecules in different tissues, resulting in progressive damage to multiple organs and systems.

Stearyl-sulfatase is a type of enzyme that is responsible for breaking down certain types of fatty substances called lipids in the body. Specifically, it helps to break down a substance called stearyl sulfate, which is a type of sulfated lipid.

Stearyl-sulfatase is found in various tissues throughout the body, including the brain, skin, and kidneys. Mutations in the gene that provides instructions for making this enzyme can lead to a condition called X-linked ichthyosis, which is characterized by dry, scaly skin. This is because the body is unable to properly break down stearyl sulfate and other related lipids, leading to their accumulation in the skin.

In medical terminology, steruly-sulfatase may also be referred to as arylsulfatase C or Arylsulfatase-C.

Iduronate sulfatase is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the breakdown and recycling of complex sugars called glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). These GAGs are important components of various tissues, including connective tissues, bones, and cartilage.

Iduronate sulfatase is specifically responsible for breaking down a type of GAG known as dermatan sulfate and heparan sulfate by removing sulfate groups from specific sugar molecules in these GAGs. This enzyme is located in the lysosomes, which are membrane-bound organelles within cells that break down and recycle various materials.

Deficiency of iduronate sulfatase leads to a genetic disorder called Mucopolysaccharidosis Type II (MPS II), also known as Hunter syndrome. In this condition, the lack of functional iduronate sulfatase enzyme results in an accumulation of dermatan sulfate and heparan sulfate in various tissues and organs, leading to progressive damage and a range of symptoms, including developmental delays, coarse facial features, hearing loss, heart problems, and joint stiffness.

Chondro-4-sulfatase is an enzyme that belongs to the family of hydrolases, specifically those acting on ester bonds in sulfuric acid esters. It is responsible for catalyzing the hydrolysis of the 4-sulfate ester group from N-acetylgalactosamine 4-sulfate residues found in chondroitin 4-sulfate, a type of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) that is abundant in connective tissues such as cartilage.

Chondroitin 4-sulfate plays important roles in the structure and function of the extracellular matrix, including regulating cell adhesion, migration, and differentiation. The action of chondro-4-sulfatase helps to control the balance between sulfated and non-sulfated GAG chains, which is critical for maintaining normal tissue homeostasis.

Defects in chondro-4-sulfatase activity can lead to a rare genetic disorder called chondrodysplasia punctata type 1B (CDPX1B), also known as multiple sulfatase deficiency (MSD). This condition is characterized by skeletal abnormalities, developmental delay, and other neurological symptoms.

Arylsulfatases are a group of enzymes that play a role in the breakdown and recycling of complex molecules in the body. Specifically, they catalyze the hydrolysis of sulfate ester bonds in certain types of large sugar molecules called glycosaminoglycans (GAGs).

There are several different types of arylsulfatases, each of which targets a specific type of sulfate ester bond. For example, arylsulfatase A is responsible for breaking down sulfate esters in a GAG called cerebroside sulfate, while arylsulfatase B targets a different GAG called dermatan sulfate.

Deficiencies in certain arylsulfatases can lead to genetic disorders. For example, a deficiency in arylsulfatase A can cause metachromatic leukodystrophy, a progressive neurological disorder that affects the nervous system and causes a range of symptoms including muscle weakness, developmental delays, and cognitive decline. Similarly, a deficiency in arylsulfatase B can lead to Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome, a rare genetic disorder that affects the skeleton, eyes, ears, heart, and other organs.

N-Acetylgalactosamine-4-Sulfatase is an enzyme that is responsible for breaking down complex carbohydrates in the body. Its specific function is to remove a sulfate group from a particular type of sugar molecule called N-acetylgalactosamine-4-sulfate, which is found on certain proteoglycans (large, complex sugars attached to proteins) in the body.

This enzyme plays an important role in the normal functioning of cells and tissues, particularly in the development and maintenance of bones, cartilage, and other connective tissues. Deficiencies in this enzyme can lead to a rare genetic disorder called Morquio A syndrome (also known as MPS IVA), which is characterized by skeletal abnormalities, short stature, and other health problems.

Chondroitin sulfatases are a group of enzymes that break down chondroitin sulfate, which is a type of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) found in connective tissues such as cartilage, bone, and skin. Glycosaminoglycans are long, complex chains of sugars that help provide structure, hydration, and elasticity to these tissues.

Chondroitin sulfate is composed of alternating units of glucuronic acid and N-acetylgalactosamine, with various sulfate groups attached at different positions along the chain. Chondroitin sulfatases cleave specific bonds within this structure to help regulate the turnover and remodeling of GAGs in tissues.

There are several types of chondroitin sulfatases (designated as chondroitin sulfatase A, B, C, D, etc.), each with distinct substrate specificities and cellular localizations. Defects in these enzymes can lead to various genetic disorders, such as skeletal dysplasias and neurodegenerative diseases, due to the accumulation of unprocessed or partially degraded chondroitin sulfate in tissues.

Mucopolysaccharidosis II (MPS II), also known as Hunter syndrome, is a rare X-linked recessive genetic disorder caused by the deficiency of an enzyme called iduronate sulfatase. This enzyme is responsible for breaking down complex sugars called glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) or mucopolysaccharides in the body.

When this enzyme is missing or not functioning properly, GAGs accumulate in various tissues and organs, leading to progressive cellular damage and organ dysfunction. The symptoms of MPS II can vary widely but often include developmental delays, coarse facial features, hearing loss, airway obstruction, heart problems, enlarged liver and spleen, and joint stiffness.

The severity of the disease can range from mild to severe, with some individuals experiencing only moderate symptoms while others may have significant intellectual disability and life-threatening complications. Treatment options for MPS II include enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), but there is currently no cure for the disease.

Multiple sulfatase deficiency (MSD) is a rare inherited metabolic disorder that affects multiple organ systems in the body. It is caused by mutations in the SUMF1 gene, which provides instructions for making an enzyme called formylglycine-generating enzyme (FGE). FGE is essential for the function of several sulfatase enzymes, which are responsible for removing sulfate groups from certain sugar molecules attached to proteins and lipids.

In MSD, the activity of all or most of these sulfatase enzymes is reduced or absent, leading to the accumulation of sulfated molecules in various tissues and organs. This can result in a wide range of symptoms that typically appear in infancy or early childhood, including developmental delay, intellectual disability, coarse facial features, skeletal abnormalities, vision and hearing loss, and problems with mobility and coordination.

MSD is an autosomal recessive disorder, which means that an individual must inherit two copies of the mutated gene (one from each parent) in order to develop the disease. The incidence of MSD is estimated to be less than 1 in 1 million people worldwide. Currently, there is no cure for MSD and treatment is focused on managing symptoms and improving quality of life.

X-linked Ichthyosis is a genetic skin disorder that is caused by a deficiency of an enzyme called steroid sulfatase. This enzyme is needed to break down cholesterol sulfate in the skin, and its absence leads to the accumulation of cholesterol sulfate, which disrupts the normal process of skin cell shedding.

The symptoms of X-linked Ichthyosis typically appear at birth or within the first few weeks of life and include:

* Dry, scaly skin that is darker in color than the surrounding skin (hyperkeratosis)
* A buildup of scales on the skin, especially on the back, buttocks, and extremities
* Deep, thick creases on the palms of the hands and soles of the feet
* White scaling on the scalp, eyebrows, and eyelashes
* Increased vulnerability to skin infections
* Small white spots (called milia) on the nose and cheeks
* Affected newborns may also have difficulty closing their eyes due to the thickened skin around the eyelids.

The disorder is inherited through an X-linked recessive pattern, which means that it primarily affects males who inherit the affected gene from their mothers. Females who carry the gene can also be affected but are typically less severely so. There is no cure for X-linked Ichthyosis, but treatment is focused on managing symptoms and preventing complications.

Cerebroside-sulfatase is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the breakdown and recycling of lipids within the body, particularly in the brain. Its primary function is to break down a type of lipid called cerebroside sulfate, which is a major component of the myelin sheath that surrounds and insulates nerve fibers in the brain and nervous system.

Cerebroside-sulfatase deficiency can lead to a group of genetic disorders known as the mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS), specifically MPS IIIB or Sanfilippo syndrome B. In this condition, the lack of cerebroside-sulfatase activity leads to an accumulation of cerebroside sulfate in the lysosomes of cells, resulting in progressive neurological deterioration and developmental delays.

Mucopolysaccharidosis IV (MPS IV), also known as Morquio Syndrome, is a rare genetic disorder that belongs to the family of diseases called mucopolysaccharidoses. It is characterized by the accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs or mucopolysaccharides) in various tissues and organs due to deficiencies in specific enzymes needed to break down these complex carbohydrates.

There are two types of MPS IV: Type A and Type B, which are caused by deficiencies in different enzymes (GALNS and B3GALNT1, respectively). Both types result in similar symptoms but may vary in severity. The accumulation of GAGs primarily affects the bones, cartilage, eyes, ears, heart, and respiratory system.

Common features of MPS IV include:
* Dwarfism with short trunk and long limbs
* Progressive skeletal abnormalities such as kyphosis (hunchback), scoliosis (curvature of the spine), pectus carinatum (protruding breastbone), and joint laxity or stiffness
* Coarse facial features
* Corneal clouding
* Hearing loss
* Heart valve abnormalities
* Respiratory issues
* Hypermobile and dislocated joints
* Carpal tunnel syndrome
* Spinal cord compression

Treatment for MPS IV primarily focuses on managing symptoms, improving quality of life, and preventing complications. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) is available for Type B but not for Type A. Other treatments may include physical therapy, surgery, and medications to address specific symptoms.

Ichthyosis is a group of skin disorders that are characterized by dry, thickened, scaly skin. The name "ichthyosis" comes from the Greek word "ichthys," which means fish, as the skin can have a fish-like scale appearance. These conditions can be inherited or acquired and vary in severity.

The medical definition of ichthyosis is a heterogeneous group of genetic keratinization disorders that result in dry, thickened, and scaly skin. The condition may affect any part of the body, but it most commonly appears on the extremities, scalp, and trunk. Ichthyosis can also have associated symptoms such as redness, itching, and blistering.

The severity of ichthyosis can range from mild to severe, and some forms of the condition may be life-threatening in infancy. The exact symptoms and their severity depend on the specific type of ichthyosis a person has. Treatment for ichthyosis typically involves moisturizing the skin, avoiding irritants, and using medications to help control scaling and inflammation.

Sulfotransferases (STs) are a group of enzymes that play a crucial role in the process of sulfoconjugation, which is the transfer of a sulfo group (-SO3H) from a donor molecule to an acceptor molecule. These enzymes are widely distributed in nature and are found in various organisms, including humans.

In humans, STs are involved in the metabolism and detoxification of numerous xenobiotics, such as drugs, food additives, and environmental pollutants, as well as endogenous compounds, such as hormones, neurotransmitters, and lipids. The sulfoconjugation reaction catalyzed by STs can increase the water solubility of these compounds, facilitating their excretion from the body.

STs can be classified into several families based on their sequence similarity and cofactor specificity. The largest family of STs is the cytosolic sulfotransferases, which use 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (PAPS) as a cofactor to transfer the sulfo group to various acceptor molecules, including phenols, alcohols, amines, and steroids.

Abnormalities in ST activity have been implicated in several diseases, such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, and neurological disorders. Therefore, understanding the function and regulation of STs is essential for developing new therapeutic strategies to treat these conditions.

Mucopolysaccharidosis VI (MPS VI), also known as Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome, is a rare genetic disorder caused by the deficiency of an enzyme called N-acetylgalactosamine 4-sulfatase. This enzyme is responsible for breaking down complex sugars called glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) or mucopolysaccharides, which are found in various tissues and organs throughout the body.

When the enzyme is deficient, GAGs accumulate within the lysosomes of cells, leading to cellular dysfunction and tissue damage. This accumulation results in a range of symptoms that can affect multiple organ systems, including the skeletal system, cardiovascular system, respiratory system, and central nervous system.

The signs and symptoms of MPS VI can vary widely among affected individuals, but common features include: coarse facial features, short stature, stiff joints, restricted mobility, recurrent respiratory infections, hearing loss, heart valve abnormalities, and clouding of the cornea. The severity of the disease can range from mild to severe, and life expectancy is generally reduced in individuals with more severe forms of the disorder.

MPS VI is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait, which means that an individual must inherit two copies of the mutated gene (one from each parent) to develop the condition.

Metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) is a genetic disorder that affects the nervous system's white matter. It is caused by mutations in the arylsulfatase A (ARSA) gene, which leads to an accumulation of sulfatides in the brain and peripheral nerves. This accumulation results in progressive damage to the protective sheath (myelin) that covers nerve fibers, impairing the transmission of nerve impulses and leading to neurological symptoms.

The clinical presentation of MLD varies depending on the age of onset. The late-infantile form is the most common and typically appears between ages 1 and 2. Symptoms include developmental regression, motor difficulties, muscle weakness, and loss of vision and hearing. The juvenile form usually begins between ages 4 and 6, while the adult form can manifest anytime after age 16. These later-onset forms tend to have a slower progression but still result in significant neurological impairment over time.

Currently, there is no cure for MLD, and treatment focuses on managing symptoms and slowing disease progression. Bone marrow transplantation or stem cell transplantation may be beneficial if performed early in the course of the disease.

Sphingolipidoses are a group of inherited metabolic disorders characterized by the accumulation of sphingolipids in various tissues and organs due to deficiencies in enzymes involved in sphingolipid metabolism. Sphingolipids are a type of lipid molecule that play important roles in cell membranes, signal transduction, and cell recognition.

Examples of sphingolipidoses include Gaucher's disease, Tay-Sachs disease, Niemann-Pick disease, Fabry disease, and Krabbe disease, among others. These disorders can affect various organs and systems in the body, including the brain, liver, spleen, bones, and nervous system, leading to a range of symptoms such as developmental delay, seizures, movement disorders, enlarged organs, and skin abnormalities.

Treatment for sphingolipidoses typically involves managing symptoms and addressing complications, although some forms of these disorders may be amenable to enzyme replacement therapy or stem cell transplantation.

Estrone is a type of estrogen, which is a female sex hormone. It's one of the three major naturally occurring estrogens in women, along with estradiol and estriol. Estrone is weaker than estradiol but has a longer half-life, meaning it remains active in the body for a longer period of time.

Estrone is produced primarily in the ovaries, adrenal glands, and fat tissue. In postmenopausal women, when the ovaries stop producing estradiol, estrone becomes the dominant form of estrogen. It plays a role in maintaining bone density, regulating the menstrual cycle, and supporting the development and maintenance of female sexual characteristics.

Like other forms of estrogen, estrone can also have effects on various tissues throughout the body, including the brain, heart, and breast tissue. Abnormal levels of estrone, either too high or too low, can contribute to a variety of health issues, such as osteoporosis, menstrual irregularities, and increased risk of certain types of cancer.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "sulfonic acids" are not a medical term. They are a type of compound in chemistry, specifically strong organic acids that contain the functional group -SO3H. Sulfonic acids are widely used in industry and research, including the production of detergents, dyes, and pharmaceuticals.

If you have any questions related to medical terminology or concepts, please don't hesitate to ask!

Mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS) are a group of inherited metabolic disorders caused by the deficiency of specific enzymes needed to break down complex sugars called glycosaminoglycans (GAGs or mucopolysaccharides). As a result, these GAGs accumulate in various tissues and organs, leading to progressive cellular damage and multi-organ dysfunction. There are several types of MPS, including Hurler syndrome, Hunter syndrome, Sanfilippo syndrome, Morquio syndrome, Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome, and Sly syndrome, each resulting from a deficiency in one of the eleven different enzymes involved in GAGs metabolism. The clinical presentation, severity, and prognosis vary among the types but commonly include features such as developmental delay, coarse facial features, skeletal abnormalities, hearing loss, heart problems, and reduced life expectancy.

Ichthyosis Vulgaris is a genetic skin disorder, which is characterized by dry, scaly, and rough skin. It is one of the most common forms of ichthyosis and is usually inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern, meaning only one copy of the altered gene in each cell is sufficient to cause the condition.

The term "ichthyosis" comes from the Greek word "ichthys," which means fish, reflecting the scaly appearance of the skin in individuals with this disorder.

In people with Ichthyosis Vulgaris, the skin cells do not shed properly and instead, they accumulate in scales on the surface of the skin. These scales are typically small, white to grayish-brown, and polygonal in shape. The scales are most often found on the legs, arms, and trunk but can affect any part of the body.

The condition usually appears during early childhood and tends to get worse in dry weather. In many cases, it improves during adulthood, although the skin remains rough and scaly.

Ichthyosis Vulgaris is caused by mutations in the gene called filaggrin, which is responsible for maintaining a healthy barrier function in the skin. This leads to dryness and increased susceptibility to skin infections.

17-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (17-HSDs) are a group of enzymes that play a crucial role in steroid hormone biosynthesis. They are involved in the conversion of 17-ketosteroids to 17-hydroxy steroids or vice versa, by adding or removing a hydroxyl group (–OH) at the 17th carbon atom of the steroid molecule. This conversion is essential for the production of various steroid hormones, including cortisol, aldosterone, and sex hormones such as estrogen and testosterone.

There are several isoforms of 17-HSDs, each with distinct substrate specificities, tissue distributions, and functions:

1. 17-HSD type 1 (17-HSD1): This isoform primarily catalyzes the conversion of estrone (E1) to estradiol (E2), an active form of estrogen. It is mainly expressed in the ovary, breast, and adipose tissue.
2. 17-HSD type 2 (17-HSD2): This isoform catalyzes the reverse reaction, converting estradiol (E2) to estrone (E1). It is primarily expressed in the placenta, prostate, and breast tissue.
3. 17-HSD type 3 (17-HSD3): This isoform is responsible for the conversion of androstenedione to testosterone, an essential step in male sex hormone biosynthesis. It is predominantly expressed in the testis and adrenal gland.
4. 17-HSD type 4 (17-HSD4): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) to androstenedione, an intermediate step in steroid hormone biosynthesis. It is primarily expressed in the placenta.
5. 17-HSD type 5 (17-HSD5): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of cortisone to cortisol, a critical step in glucocorticoid biosynthesis. It is predominantly expressed in the adrenal gland and liver.
6. 17-HSD type 6 (17-HSD6): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of androstenedione to testosterone, similar to 17-HSD3. However, it has a different substrate specificity and is primarily expressed in the ovary.
7. 17-HSD type 7 (17-HSD7): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of estrone (E1) to estradiol (E2), similar to 17-HSD1. However, it has a different substrate specificity and is primarily expressed in the ovary.
8. 17-HSD type 8 (17-HSD8): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of DHEA to androstenedione, similar to 17-HSD4. However, it has a different substrate specificity and is primarily expressed in the testis.
9. 17-HSD type 9 (17-HSD9): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of estrone (E1) to estradiol (E2), similar to 17-HSD1. However, it has a different substrate specificity and is primarily expressed in the placenta.
10. 17-HSD type 10 (17-HSD10): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of DHEA to androstenedione, similar to 17-HSD4. However, it has a different substrate specificity and is primarily expressed in the testis.
11. 17-HSD type 11 (17-HSD11): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of estrone (E1) to estradiol (E2), similar to 17-HSD1. However, it has a different substrate specificity and is primarily expressed in the placenta.
12. 17-HSD type 12 (17-HSD12): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of DHEA to androstenedione, similar to 17-HSD4. However, it has a different substrate specificity and is primarily expressed in the testis.
13. 17-HSD type 13 (17-HSD13): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of estrone (E1) to estradiol (E2), similar to 17-HSD1. However, it has a different substrate specificity and is primarily expressed in the placenta.
14. 17-HSD type 14 (17-HSD14): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of DHEA to androstenedione, similar to 17-HSD4. However, it has a different substrate specificity and is primarily expressed in the testis.
15. 17-HSD type 15 (17-HSD15): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of estrone (E1) to estradiol (E2), similar to 17-HSD1. However, it has a different substrate specificity and is primarily expressed in the placenta.
16. 17-HSD type 16 (17-HSD16): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of DHEA to androstenedione, similar to 17-HSD4. However, it has a different substrate specificity and is primarily expressed in the testis.
17. 17-HSD type 17 (17-HSD17): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of estrone (E1) to estradiol (E2), similar to 17-HSD1. However, it has a different substrate specificity and is primarily expressed in the placenta.
18. 17-HSD type 18 (17-HSD18): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of DHEA to androstenedione, similar to 17-HSD4. However, it has a different substrate specificity and is primarily expressed in the testis.
19. 17-HSD type 19 (17-HSD19): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of estrone (E1) to estradiol (E2), similar to 17-HSD1. However, it has a different substrate specificity and is primarily expressed in the placenta.
20. 17-HSD type 20 (17-HSD20): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of DHEA to androstenedione, similar to 17-HSD4. However, it has a different substrate specificity and is primarily expressed in the testis.
21. 17-HSD type 21 (17-HSD21): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of estrone (E1) to estradiol (E2), similar to 17-HSD1. However, it has a different substrate specificity and is primarily expressed in the placenta.
22. 17-HSD type 22 (17-HSD22): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of DHEA to androstenedione, similar to 17-HSD4. However, it has a different substrate specificity and is primarily expressed in the testis.
23. 17-HSD type 23 (17-HSD23): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of estrone (E1) to estradiol (E2), similar to 17-HSD1. However, it has a different substrate specificity and is primarily expressed in the placenta.
24. 17-HSD type 24 (17-HSD24): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of DHEA to androstenedione, similar to 17-HSD4. However, it has a different substrate specificity and is primarily expressed in the testis.
25. 17-HSD type 25 (17-HSD25): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of estrone (E1) to estradiol (E2), similar to 17-HSD1. However, it has a different substrate specificity and is primarily expressed in the placenta.
26. 17-HSD type 26 (17-HSD26): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of DHEA to androstenedione, similar to 17-HSD4. However

Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are a group of rare inherited metabolic disorders caused by defects in lysosomal function. Lysosomes are membrane-bound organelles within cells that contain enzymes responsible for breaking down and recycling various biomolecules, such as proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates. In LSDs, the absence or deficiency of specific lysosomal enzymes leads to the accumulation of undigested substrates within the lysosomes, resulting in cellular dysfunction and organ damage.

These disorders can affect various organs and systems in the body, including the brain, nervous system, bones, skin, and visceral organs. Symptoms may include developmental delays, neurological impairment, motor dysfunction, bone abnormalities, coarse facial features, hepatosplenomegaly (enlarged liver and spleen), and recurrent infections.

Examples of LSDs include Gaucher disease, Tay-Sachs disease, Niemann-Pick disease, Fabry disease, Pompe disease, and mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS). Treatment options for LSDs may include enzyme replacement therapy, substrate reduction therapy, or bone marrow transplantation. Early diagnosis and intervention can help improve the prognosis and quality of life for affected individuals.

Mucopolysaccharidosis III, also known as Sanfilippo syndrome, is a genetic disorder caused by the deficiency of specific enzymes needed to break down complex sugar molecules called glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) or mucopolysaccharides. This results in an accumulation of these substances in various tissues and organs, leading to progressive damage.

There are four main types of Mucopolysaccharidosis III (A, B, C, and D), each caused by a deficiency in one of the following enzymes: heparan N-sulfatase (type A), alpha-N-acetylglucosaminidase (type B), acetyl-CoAlpha-glucosaminide acetyltransferase (type C), or N-acetylglucosamine 6-sulfatase (type D).

The symptoms of Mucopolysaccharidosis III typically become apparent between the ages of 2 and 6, and may include developmental delays, hyperactivity, behavioral problems, sleep disturbances, coarse facial features, hirsutism, hepatosplenomegaly (enlarged liver and spleen), and joint stiffness. Over time, individuals with Mucopolysaccharidosis III may experience a decline in cognitive abilities, loss of previously acquired skills, and mobility issues.

Currently, there is no cure for Mucopolysaccharidosis III, and treatment is focused on managing the symptoms and improving quality of life. Enzyme replacement therapy, gene therapy, and stem cell transplantation are some of the experimental treatments being investigated for this condition.

In the context of medicine and biology, sulfates are ions or compounds that contain the sulfate group (SO4−2). Sulfate is a polyatomic anion with the structure of a sphere. It consists of a central sulfur atom surrounded by four oxygen atoms in a tetrahedral arrangement.

Sulfates can be found in various biological molecules, such as glycosaminoglycans and proteoglycans, which are important components of connective tissue and the extracellular matrix. Sulfate groups play a crucial role in these molecules by providing negative charges that help maintain the structural integrity and hydration of tissues.

In addition to their biological roles, sulfates can also be found in various medications and pharmaceutical compounds. For example, some laxatives contain sulfate salts, such as magnesium sulfate (Epsom salt) or sodium sulfate, which work by increasing the water content in the intestines and promoting bowel movements.

It is important to note that exposure to high levels of sulfates can be harmful to human health, particularly in the form of sulfur dioxide (SO2), a common air pollutant produced by burning fossil fuels. Prolonged exposure to SO2 can cause respiratory problems and exacerbate existing lung conditions.

Coumarins are a class of organic compounds that occur naturally in certain plants, such as sweet clover and tonka beans. They have a characteristic aroma and are often used as fragrances in perfumes and flavorings in food products. In addition to their use in consumer goods, coumarins also have important medical applications.

One of the most well-known coumarins is warfarin, which is a commonly prescribed anticoagulant medication used to prevent blood clots from forming or growing larger. Warfarin works by inhibiting the activity of vitamin K-dependent clotting factors in the liver, which helps to prolong the time it takes for blood to clot.

Other medical uses of coumarins include their use as anti-inflammatory agents and antimicrobial agents. Some coumarins have also been shown to have potential cancer-fighting properties, although more research is needed in this area.

It's important to note that while coumarins have many medical uses, they can also be toxic in high doses. Therefore, it's essential to use them only under the guidance of a healthcare professional.

The X chromosome is one of the two types of sex-determining chromosomes in humans (the other being the Y chromosome). It's one of the 23 pairs of chromosomes that make up a person's genetic material. Females typically have two copies of the X chromosome (XX), while males usually have one X and one Y chromosome (XY).

The X chromosome contains hundreds of genes that are responsible for the production of various proteins, many of which are essential for normal bodily functions. Some of the critical roles of the X chromosome include:

1. Sex Determination: The presence or absence of the Y chromosome determines whether an individual is male or female. If there is no Y chromosome, the individual will typically develop as a female.
2. Genetic Disorders: Since females have two copies of the X chromosome, they are less likely to be affected by X-linked genetic disorders than males. Males, having only one X chromosome, will express any recessive X-linked traits they inherit.
3. Dosage Compensation: To compensate for the difference in gene dosage between males and females, a process called X-inactivation occurs during female embryonic development. One of the two X chromosomes is randomly inactivated in each cell, resulting in a single functional copy per cell.

The X chromosome plays a crucial role in human genetics and development, contributing to various traits and characteristics, including sex determination and dosage compensation.

Dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S) is a steroid hormone that is produced by the adrenal glands. It is a modified form of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), which is converted to DHEA-S in the body for storage and later conversion back to DHEA or other steroid hormones, such as testosterone and estrogen. DHEA-S is often measured in the blood as a marker of adrenal function. It is also available as a dietary supplement, although its effectiveness for any medical purpose is not well established.

Dydrogesterone is a synthetic form of the natural hormone progesterone, which is used in various forms of medical therapy. It is primarily used as a hormonal supplement during infertility treatments and to prevent pregnancy loss in women with a history of miscarriage due to progesterone deficiency.

Dydrogesterone works by mimicking the effects of natural progesterone, which helps to prepare the lining of the uterus for implantation of a fertilized egg and supports the early stages of pregnancy. It is also used in the treatment of endometriosis, a condition where tissue similar to the lining of the uterus grows outside of it, causing pain and other symptoms.

Dydrogesterone is available in various forms, including tablets and capsules, and is typically taken orally. The dosage and duration of treatment may vary depending on the specific medical condition being treated and the individual patient's needs. As with any medication, dydrogesterone should only be used under the guidance and supervision of a qualified healthcare provider.

Lysosomes are membrane-bound organelles found in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells. They are responsible for breaking down and recycling various materials, such as waste products, foreign substances, and damaged cellular components, through a process called autophagy or phagocytosis. Lysosomes contain hydrolytic enzymes that can break down biomolecules like proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and carbohydrates into their basic building blocks, which can then be reused by the cell. They play a crucial role in maintaining cellular homeostasis and are often referred to as the "garbage disposal system" of the cell.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Peptococcus" is not a currently recognized or valid genus of bacteria in modern medical or scientific classification. It seems there might be some confusion here, as the correct name for the bacterial group you may be referring to is "Peptostreptococcus."

Peptostreptococcus is a genus of Gram-positive, anaerobic, coccus-shaped bacteria. These bacteria are commonly found in the human mouth, gastrointestinal tract, and female genital tract. They can sometimes cause opportunistic infections in humans, particularly in individuals with weakened immune systems or when they enter areas where they shouldn't be, such as deep tissue or the bloodstream.

I hope this clarification helps! If you have any further questions, please let me know.

Chondroitinases and chondroitin lyases are enzymes that break down chondroitin sulfate, a type of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) found in connective tissues such as cartilage. Glycosaminoglycans are long, unbranched polysaccharides made up of repeating disaccharide units. In the case of chondroitin sulfate, the disaccharide unit consists of a glucuronic acid residue and a N-acetylgalactosamine residue that may be sulfated at various positions.

Chondroitinases are enzymes that cleave the linkage between the two sugars in the chondroitin sulfate chain, specifically between the carbon atom in the fourth position of the glucuronic acid and the nitrogen atom in the first position of the N-acetylgalactosamine. This results in the formation of unsaturated disaccharides. Chondroitinases are produced by certain bacteria and are used in research to study the structure and function of chondroitin sulfate and other GAGs.

Chondroitin lyases, on the other hand, are enzymes that cleave the same linkage but in the opposite direction, resulting in the formation of 4,5-unsaturated disaccharides. Chondroitin lyases are also produced by certain bacteria and are used in research to study the structure and function of chondroitin sulfate and other GAGs.

It is important to note that while both chondroitinases and chondroitin lyases break down chondroitin sulfate, they do so through different mechanisms and produce different products.

Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are long, unbranched polysaccharides composed of repeating disaccharide units. They are a major component of the extracellular matrix and connective tissues in the body. GAGs are negatively charged due to the presence of sulfate and carboxyl groups, which allows them to attract positively charged ions and water molecules, contributing to their ability to retain moisture and maintain tissue hydration and elasticity.

GAGs can be categorized into four main groups: heparin/heparan sulfate, chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate, keratan sulfate, and hyaluronic acid. These different types of GAGs have varying structures and functions in the body, including roles in cell signaling, inflammation, and protection against enzymatic degradation.

Heparin is a highly sulfated form of heparan sulfate that is found in mast cells and has anticoagulant properties. Chondroitin sulfate and dermatan sulfate are commonly found in cartilage and contribute to its resiliency and ability to withstand compressive forces. Keratan sulfate is found in corneas, cartilage, and bone, where it plays a role in maintaining the structure and function of these tissues. Hyaluronic acid is a large, nonsulfated GAG that is widely distributed throughout the body, including in synovial fluid, where it provides lubrication and shock absorption for joints.

Enzyme Replacement Therapy (ERT) is a medical treatment approach in which functional copies of a missing or deficient enzyme are introduced into the body to compensate for the lack of enzymatic activity caused by a genetic disorder. This therapy is primarily used to manage lysosomal storage diseases, such as Gaucher disease, Fabry disease, Pompe disease, and Mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS), among others.

In ERT, the required enzyme is produced recombinantly in a laboratory using biotechnological methods. The purified enzyme is then administered to the patient intravenously at regular intervals. Once inside the body, the exogenous enzyme is taken up by cells, particularly those affected by the disorder, and helps restore normal cellular functions by participating in essential metabolic pathways.

ERT aims to alleviate disease symptoms, slow down disease progression, improve quality of life, and increase survival rates for patients with lysosomal storage disorders. However, it does not cure the underlying genetic defect responsible for the enzyme deficiency.

Chondrodysplasia punctata is a group of genetic disorders that affect the development of bones and cartilage. The condition is characterized by stippled calcifications, or spots of calcium deposits, in the cartilage that can be seen on X-rays. These spots are typically found at the ends of long bones, in the sternum, and in the pelvis.

The symptoms of chondrodysplasia punctata can vary widely depending on the specific type of the disorder. Some people with the condition may have short stature, bowed legs, and other skeletal abnormalities, while others may have only mild symptoms or no symptoms at all. The condition can also be associated with developmental delays, intellectual disability, and other health problems.

There are several different types of chondrodysplasia punctata, each caused by a different genetic mutation. Some forms of the disorder are inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, meaning that an individual must inherit two copies of the mutated gene (one from each parent) in order to develop the condition. Other forms of chondrodysplasia punctata are inherited in an X-linked dominant manner, meaning that a single copy of the mutated gene (on the X chromosome) is enough to cause the disorder in females. Males, who have only one X chromosome, will typically be more severely affected by X-linked dominant disorders.

There is no cure for chondrodysplasia punctata, and treatment is focused on managing the symptoms of the condition. This may include physical therapy, bracing or surgery to correct skeletal abnormalities, and medications to manage pain or other health problems.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Azasteroids" is not a medical term or concept. The term "azasteroids" is used in the field of chemistry to refer to a class of compounds that are structurally similar to steroids but have an aziridine ring (a three-membered ring containing two carbon atoms and one nitrogen atom) instead of the usual four-membered ring in the steroid structure.

These compounds may have potential applications in various fields, including medicinal chemistry, but they are not a medical concept or diagnosis. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health concerns, I would be happy to help you with those!

Aromatase is a enzyme that belongs to the cytochrome P450 superfamily, and it is responsible for converting androgens into estrogens through a process called aromatization. This enzyme plays a crucial role in the steroid hormone biosynthesis pathway, particularly in females where it is primarily expressed in adipose tissue, ovaries, brain, and breast tissue.

Aromatase inhibitors are used as a treatment for estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer in postmenopausal women, as they work by blocking the activity of aromatase and reducing the levels of circulating estrogens in the body.

Preventella is a genus of Gram-negative, anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that are commonly found in the human oral cavity, gastrointestinal tract, and urogenital tract. They are part of the normal microbiota but can also be associated with various infections, particularly in individuals with compromised immune systems or underlying medical conditions.

Prevotella species have been implicated in a variety of diseases, including periodontal disease, dental caries, respiratory tract infections, bacteremia, soft tissue infections, and joint infections. They can also be found in association with abscesses, wound infections, and other types of infections, particularly in the head and neck region.

Prevotella species are generally resistant to antibiotics commonly used to treat anaerobic infections, such as clindamycin and metronidazole, making them difficult to eradicate. Therefore, accurate identification and susceptibility testing of Prevotella isolates is important for the appropriate management of infections caused by these organisms.

Diazomethane is a highly reactive, explosive organic compound with the chemical formula CH2N2. It is a colorless gas or pale yellow liquid that is used as a methylating agent in organic synthesis. Diazomethane is prepared by the reaction of nitrosomethane with a base such as potassium hydroxide.

It is important to handle diazomethane with care, as it can be explosive and toxic. It should only be used in well-ventilated areas, and protective equipment such as gloves and safety glasses should be worn. Diazomethane should not be stored for long periods of time, as it can decompose spontaneously and release nitrogen gas.

Diazomethane is used to introduce methyl groups into organic molecules in a process called methylation. It reacts with carboxylic acids to form methyl esters, and with phenols to form methyl ethers. Diazomethane is also used to synthesize other organic compounds such as pyrazoles and triazoles.

It is important to note that the use of diazomethane in the laboratory has declined due to its hazardous nature, and safer alternatives are now available for many of its applications.

Fibroblasts are specialized cells that play a critical role in the body's immune response and wound healing process. They are responsible for producing and maintaining the extracellular matrix (ECM), which is the non-cellular component present within all tissues and organs, providing structural support and biochemical signals for surrounding cells.

Fibroblasts produce various ECM proteins such as collagens, elastin, fibronectin, and laminins, forming a complex network of fibers that give tissues their strength and flexibility. They also help in the regulation of tissue homeostasis by controlling the turnover of ECM components through the process of remodeling.

In response to injury or infection, fibroblasts become activated and start to proliferate rapidly, migrating towards the site of damage. Here, they participate in the inflammatory response, releasing cytokines and chemokines that attract immune cells to the area. Additionally, they deposit new ECM components to help repair the damaged tissue and restore its functionality.

Dysregulation of fibroblast activity has been implicated in several pathological conditions, including fibrosis (excessive scarring), cancer (where they can contribute to tumor growth and progression), and autoimmune diseases (such as rheumatoid arthritis).

Sex chromosome aberrations refer to structural and numerical abnormalities in the sex chromosomes, which are typically represented as X and Y chromosomes in humans. These aberrations can result in variations in the number of sex chromosomes, such as Klinefelter syndrome (47,XXY), Turner syndrome (45,X), and Jacobs/XYY syndrome (47,XYY). They can also include structural changes, such as deletions, duplications, or translocations of sex chromosome material.

Sex chromosome aberrations may lead to a range of phenotypic effects, including differences in physical characteristics, cognitive development, fertility, and susceptibility to certain health conditions. The manifestation and severity of these impacts can vary widely depending on the specific type and extent of the aberration, as well as individual genetic factors and environmental influences.

It is important to note that while sex chromosome aberrations may pose challenges and require medical management, they do not inherently define or limit a person's potential, identity, or worth. Comprehensive care, support, and education can help individuals with sex chromosome aberrations lead fulfilling lives and reach their full potential.

Norpregnadienes are a type of steroid hormone that are structurally similar to progesterone, but with certain chemical groups (such as the methyl group at C10) removed. They are formed through the metabolism of certain steroid hormones and can be further metabolized into other compounds.

Norpregnadienes have been studied for their potential role in various physiological processes, including the regulation of reproductive function and the development of certain diseases such as cancer. However, more research is needed to fully understand their functions and clinical significance.

Dermatan sulfate is a type of glycosaminoglycan, which is a long, unbranched sugar chain found on the proteoglycan core protein in the extracellular matrix of animal tissues. It is composed of repeating disaccharide units of iduronic acid and N-acetylgalactosamine, with alternating sulfation at the 4-position of the iduronic acid and the 6-position of the galactosamine.

Dermatan sulfate is found in various tissues, including skin, heart valves, and blood vessels, where it plays important roles in regulating cell behavior, tissue development, and homeostasis. It also binds to a variety of growth factors, cytokines, and enzymes, modulating their activities and contributing to the regulation of various biological processes.

Abnormalities in dermatan sulfate metabolism can lead to several genetic disorders, such as Hunter syndrome and Hurler-Scheie syndrome, which are characterized by skeletal abnormalities, cardiac defects, and neurological impairment.

Hydrolases are a class of enzymes that help facilitate the breakdown of various types of chemical bonds through a process called hydrolysis, which involves the addition of water. These enzymes catalyze the cleavage of bonds in substrates by adding a molecule of water, leading to the formation of two or more smaller molecules.

Hydrolases play a crucial role in many biological processes, including digestion, metabolism, and detoxification. They can act on a wide range of substrates, such as proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids, breaking them down into smaller units that can be more easily absorbed or utilized by the body.

Examples of hydrolases include:

1. Proteases: enzymes that break down proteins into smaller peptides or amino acids.
2. Lipases: enzymes that hydrolyze lipids, such as triglycerides, into fatty acids and glycerol.
3. Amylases: enzymes that break down complex carbohydrates, like starches, into simpler sugars, such as glucose.
4. Nucleases: enzymes that cleave nucleic acids, such as DNA or RNA, into smaller nucleotides or oligonucleotides.
5. Phosphatases: enzymes that remove phosphate groups from various substrates, including proteins and lipids.
6. Esterases: enzymes that hydrolyze ester bonds in a variety of substrates, such as those found in some drugs or neurotransmitters.

Hydrolases are essential for maintaining proper cellular function and homeostasis, and their dysregulation can contribute to various diseases and disorders.

Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is a steroid hormone produced by the adrenal glands. It serves as a precursor to other hormones, including androgens such as testosterone and estrogens such as estradiol. DHEA levels typically peak during early adulthood and then gradually decline with age.

DHEA has been studied for its potential effects on various health conditions, including aging, cognitive function, sexual dysfunction, and certain chronic diseases. However, the evidence supporting its use for these purposes is generally limited and inconclusive. As with any supplement or medication, it's important to consult with a healthcare provider before taking DHEA to ensure safety and effectiveness.

Chondroitin lyases are a group of enzymes that breakdown chondroitin, which is a type of proteoglycan found in connective tissues such as cartilage. These enzymes cleave chondroitin at specific points by removing certain sugar units, thereby breaking down the large, complex molecule into smaller fragments. Chondroitin lyases are classified based on their site of action and the type of fragment they produce. They play important roles in various biological processes, including tissue remodeling, growth, and development. In some cases, chondroitin lyases may also be used in research and medical settings to study the structure and function of proteoglycans or for the production of smaller chondroitin fragments with therapeutic potential.

Hormone-dependent neoplasms are a type of tumor that requires the presence of specific hormones to grow and multiply. These neoplasms have receptors on their cell surfaces that bind to the hormones, leading to the activation of signaling pathways that promote cell division and growth.

Examples of hormone-dependent neoplasms include breast cancer, prostate cancer, and endometrial cancer. In breast cancer, for instance, estrogen and/or progesterone can bind to their respective receptors on the surface of cancer cells, leading to the activation of signaling pathways that promote tumor growth. Similarly, in prostate cancer, androgens such as testosterone can bind to androgen receptors on the surface of cancer cells, promoting cell division and tumor growth.

Hormone-dependent neoplasms are often treated with hormonal therapies that aim to reduce or block the production of the relevant hormones or interfere with their ability to bind to their respective receptors. This can help slow down or stop the growth of the tumor and improve outcomes for patients.

Chondroitin sulfates are a type of complex carbohydrate molecules known as glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). They are a major component of cartilage, the tissue that cushions and protects the ends of bones in joints. Chondroitin sulfates are composed of repeating disaccharide units made up of glucuronic acid and N-acetylgalactosamine, which can be sulfated at various positions.

Chondroitin sulfates play a crucial role in the biomechanical properties of cartilage by attracting water and maintaining the resiliency and elasticity of the tissue. They also interact with other molecules in the extracellular matrix, such as collagen and proteoglycans, to form a complex network that provides structural support and regulates cell behavior.

Chondroitin sulfates have been studied for their potential therapeutic benefits in osteoarthritis, a degenerative joint disease characterized by the breakdown of cartilage. Supplementation with chondroitin sulfate has been shown to reduce pain and improve joint function in some studies, although the evidence is not consistent across all trials. The mechanism of action is thought to involve inhibition of enzymes that break down cartilage, as well as stimulation of cartilage repair and synthesis.

Sulfuric acid esters, also known as sulfate esters, are chemical compounds formed when sulfuric acid reacts with alcohols or phenols. These esters consist of a organic group linked to a sulfate group (SO4). They are widely used in industry, for example, as detergents, emulsifiers, and solvents. In the body, they can be found as part of various biomolecules, such as glycosaminoglycans and steroid sulfates. However, excessive exposure to sulfuric acid esters can cause irritation and damage to tissues.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "hybrid cells" is not a standard medical term with a widely accepted or specific definition in the field of medicine. The term "hybrid" is used in various scientific and medical contexts to describe combinations or mixtures of different elements, such as hybridoma cells (a type of fusion cell used in research, created by combining a B cell and a tumor cell) or hybridization (in genetics, the process of combining DNA from two different sources).

Without more specific context, it's difficult to provide an accurate medical definition for "hybrid cells." If you could provide more information about the context in which this term was used, I would be happy to help you further!

Tyramine is not a medical condition but a naturally occurring compound called a biogenic amine, which is formed from the amino acid tyrosine during the fermentation or decay of certain foods. Medically, tyramine is significant because it can interact with certain medications, particularly monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), used to treat depression and other conditions.

The interaction between tyramine and MAOIs can lead to a hypertensive crisis, a rapid and severe increase in blood pressure, which can be life-threatening if not treated promptly. Therefore, individuals taking MAOIs are often advised to follow a low-tyramine diet, avoiding foods high in tyramine, such as aged cheeses, cured meats, fermented foods, and some types of beer and wine.

Megestrol is a synthetic progestin, which is a type of female hormone. It is used to treat certain types of cancer, such as breast cancer and endometrial cancer, in postmenopausal women. Megestrol works by blocking the effects of estrogen, a female hormone that can promote the growth of some breast and endometrial cancers.

Megestrol is also used to treat anorexia (loss of appetite) and cachexia (wasting syndrome) in people with AIDS or cancer. It works by increasing appetite and promoting weight gain.

Megestrol is available as a tablet or a suspension that is taken by mouth, usually two to four times a day. The dosage depends on the condition being treated and the individual patient's response to therapy. Common side effects of megestrol include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, dizziness, headache, breast tenderness, and changes in menstrual periods.

It is important to note that megestrol can cause serious side effects, such as blood clots, fluid retention, and increased risk of certain types of infections. Patients should discuss the risks and benefits of megestrol therapy with their healthcare provider before starting treatment.

Sex chromosomes, often denoted as X and Y, are one of the 23 pairs of human chromosomes found in each cell of the body. Normally, females have two X chromosomes (46,XX), and males have one X and one Y chromosome (46,XY). The sex chromosomes play a significant role in determining the sex of an individual. They contain genes that contribute to physical differences between men and women. Any variations or abnormalities in the number or structure of these chromosomes can lead to various genetic disorders and conditions related to sexual development and reproduction.

Glucuronidase is an enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of glucuronic acid from various substrates, including molecules that have been conjugated with glucuronic acid as part of the detoxification process in the body. This enzyme plays a role in the breakdown and elimination of certain drugs, toxins, and endogenous compounds, such as bilirubin. It is found in various tissues and organisms, including humans, bacteria, and insects. In clinical contexts, glucuronidase activity may be measured to assess liver function or to identify the presence of certain bacterial infections.

I believe there might be a slight confusion in your question. Sulfuric acid is not a medical term, but instead a chemical compound with the formula H2SO4. It's one of the most important industrial chemicals, being a strong mineral acid with numerous applications.

If you are asking for a definition related to human health or medicine, I can tell you that sulfuric acid has no physiological role in humans. Exposure to sulfuric acid can cause irritation and burns to the skin, eyes, and respiratory tract. Prolonged exposure may lead to more severe health issues. However, it is not a term typically used in medical diagnoses or treatments.

Heparin sulfate is not exactly referred to as "heparitin sulfate" in medical terminology. The correct term is heparan sulfate, which is a type of glycosaminoglycan (GAG), a long unbranched chain of repeating disaccharide units composed of a hexuronic acid and a hexosamine.

Heparan sulfate is found on the cell surface and in the extracellular matrix, where it plays crucial roles in various biological processes, including cell signaling, regulation of growth factor activity, and control of blood coagulation. It is also an important component of the proteoglycans, which are complex molecules that help to maintain the structural integrity and function of tissues and organs.

Like heparin, heparan sulfate has a high negative charge due to the presence of sulfate groups, which allows it to bind to and interact with various proteins and growth factors. However, heparan sulfate has a more diverse structure than heparin, with variations in the pattern of sulfation along the chain, which leads to specificity in its interactions with different proteins.

Defects in heparan sulfate biosynthesis or function have been implicated in various human diseases, including certain forms of cancer, developmental disorders, and infectious diseases.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

The placenta is an organ that develops in the uterus during pregnancy and provides oxygen and nutrients to the growing baby through the umbilical cord. It also removes waste products from the baby's blood. The placenta attaches to the wall of the uterus, and the baby's side of the placenta contains many tiny blood vessels that connect to the baby's circulatory system. This allows for the exchange of oxygen, nutrients, and waste between the mother's and baby's blood. After the baby is born, the placenta is usually expelled from the uterus in a process called afterbirth.

Genetic dosage compensation is a process that evens out the effects of genes on an organism's phenotype (observable traits), even when there are differences in the number of copies of those genes present. This is especially important in cases where sex chromosomes are involved, as males and females often have different numbers of sex chromosomes.

In many species, including humans, females have two X chromosomes, while males have one X and one Y chromosome. To compensate for the difference in dosage, one of the female's X chromosomes is randomly inactivated during early embryonic development, resulting in each cell having only one active X chromosome, regardless of sex. This process ensures that both males and females have similar levels of gene expression from their X chromosomes and helps to prevent an imbalance in gene dosage between the sexes.

Defects in dosage compensation can lead to various genetic disorders, such as Turner syndrome (where a female has only one X chromosome) or Klinefelter syndrome (where a male has two or more X chromosomes). These conditions can result in developmental abnormalities and health issues due to the imbalance in gene dosage.

Clinical enzyme tests are laboratory tests that measure the amount or activity of certain enzymes in biological samples, such as blood or bodily fluids. These tests are used to help diagnose and monitor various medical conditions, including organ damage, infection, inflammation, and genetic disorders.

Enzymes are proteins that catalyze chemical reactions in the body. Some enzymes are found primarily within specific organs or tissues, so elevated levels of these enzymes in the blood can indicate damage to those organs or tissues. For example, high levels of creatine kinase (CK) may suggest muscle damage, while increased levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) can indicate liver damage.

There are several types of clinical enzyme tests, including:

1. Serum enzyme tests: These measure the level of enzymes in the blood serum, which is the liquid portion of the blood after clotting. Examples include CK, AST, ALT, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH).
2. Urine enzyme tests: These measure the level of enzymes in the urine. An example is N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG), which can indicate kidney damage.
3. Enzyme immunoassays (EIAs): These use antibodies to detect and quantify specific enzymes or proteins in a sample. They are often used for the diagnosis of infectious diseases, such as HIV or hepatitis.
4. Genetic enzyme tests: These can identify genetic mutations that cause deficiencies in specific enzymes, leading to inherited metabolic disorders like phenylketonuria (PKU) or Gaucher's disease.

It is important to note that the interpretation of clinical enzyme test results should be done by a healthcare professional, taking into account the patient's medical history, symptoms, and other diagnostic tests.

Bacteroides are a genus of gram-negative, anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that are normally present in the human gastrointestinal tract. They are part of the normal gut microbiota and play an important role in breaking down complex carbohydrates and other substances in the gut. However, some species of Bacteroides can cause opportunistic infections, particularly in individuals with weakened immune systems or when they spread to other parts of the body. They are resistant to many commonly used antibiotics, making infections caused by these bacteria difficult to treat.

Pregnenolone is defined as a steroid hormone produced in the body from cholesterol. It's often referred to as the "mother hormone" since many other hormones, including cortisol, aldosterone, progesterone, testosterone, and estrogen, are synthesized from it.

Pregnenolone is primarily produced in the adrenal glands but can also be produced in smaller amounts in the brain, skin, and sex organs (ovaries and testes). It plays a crucial role in various physiological processes such as maintaining membrane fluidity, acting as an antioxidant, and contributing to cognitive function.

However, it's important to note that while pregnenolone is a hormone, over-the-counter supplements containing this compound are not approved by the FDA for any medical use or condition. As always, consult with a healthcare provider before starting any new supplement regimen.

Food additives are substances that are added to food or drink during manufacturing or processing to perform various functions such as preservation, coloring, flavoring, enhancing taste and texture, and increasing nutritional value. These additives can be natural or synthetic and must be approved by regulatory authorities before they can be used in food products. Examples of food additives include salt, sugar, vinegar, spices, artificial flavors, preservatives, emulsifiers, and food dyes. It is important to note that some people may have allergies or sensitivities to certain food additives, and excessive consumption of some additives may have negative health effects.

Borohydrides are a class of chemical compounds that contain boron and hydrogen ions (H-). The most common borohydride is sodium borohydride (NaBH4), which is a white, solid compound often used in chemistry as a reducing agent. Borohydrides are known for their ability to donate hydride ions (H:-) in chemical reactions, making them useful for reducing various organic and inorganic compounds. Other borohydrides include lithium borohydride (LiBH4), potassium borohydride (KBH4), and calcium borohydride (Ca(BH4)2).

Estrogens are a group of steroid hormones that are primarily responsible for the development and regulation of female sexual characteristics and reproductive functions. They are also present in lower levels in males. The main estrogen hormone is estradiol, which plays a key role in promoting the growth and development of the female reproductive system, including the uterus, fallopian tubes, and breasts. Estrogens also help regulate the menstrual cycle, maintain bone density, and have important effects on the cardiovascular system, skin, hair, and cognitive function.

Estrogens are produced primarily by the ovaries in women, but they can also be produced in smaller amounts by the adrenal glands and fat cells. In men, estrogens are produced from the conversion of testosterone, the primary male sex hormone, through a process called aromatization.

Estrogen levels vary throughout a woman's life, with higher levels during reproductive years and lower levels after menopause. Estrogen therapy is sometimes used to treat symptoms of menopause, such as hot flashes and vaginal dryness, or to prevent osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. However, estrogen therapy also carries risks, including an increased risk of certain cancers, blood clots, and stroke, so it is typically recommended only for women who have a high risk of these conditions.

Hexosaminidases are a group of enzymes that play a crucial role in the breakdown of complex carbohydrates, specifically glycoproteins and glycolipids, in the human body. These enzymes are responsible for cleaving the terminal N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc) residues from these molecules during the process of glycosidase digestion.

There are several types of hexosaminidases, including Hexosaminidase A and Hexosaminidase B, which are encoded by different genes and have distinct functions. Deficiencies in these enzymes can lead to serious genetic disorders, such as Tay-Sachs disease and Sandhoff disease, respectively. These conditions are characterized by the accumulation of undigested glycolipids and glycoproteins in various tissues, leading to progressive neurological deterioration and other symptoms.

Substrate specificity in the context of medical biochemistry and enzymology refers to the ability of an enzyme to selectively bind and catalyze a chemical reaction with a particular substrate (or a group of similar substrates) while discriminating against other molecules that are not substrates. This specificity arises from the three-dimensional structure of the enzyme, which has evolved to match the shape, charge distribution, and functional groups of its physiological substrate(s).

Substrate specificity is a fundamental property of enzymes that enables them to carry out highly selective chemical transformations in the complex cellular environment. The active site of an enzyme, where the catalysis takes place, has a unique conformation that complements the shape and charge distribution of its substrate(s). This ensures efficient recognition, binding, and conversion of the substrate into the desired product while minimizing unwanted side reactions with other molecules.

Substrate specificity can be categorized as:

1. Absolute specificity: An enzyme that can only act on a single substrate or a very narrow group of structurally related substrates, showing no activity towards any other molecule.
2. Group specificity: An enzyme that prefers to act on a particular functional group or class of compounds but can still accommodate minor structural variations within the substrate.
3. Broad or promiscuous specificity: An enzyme that can act on a wide range of structurally diverse substrates, albeit with varying catalytic efficiencies.

Understanding substrate specificity is crucial for elucidating enzymatic mechanisms, designing drugs that target specific enzymes or pathways, and developing biotechnological applications that rely on the controlled manipulation of enzyme activities.

Glycine is a simple amino acid that plays a crucial role in the body. According to the medical definition, glycine is an essential component for the synthesis of proteins, peptides, and other biologically important compounds. It is also involved in various metabolic processes, such as the production of creatine, which supports muscle function, and the regulation of neurotransmitters, affecting nerve impulse transmission and brain function. Glycine can be found as a free form in the body and is also present in many dietary proteins.

In the context of medicine and pharmacology, "kinetics" refers to the study of how a drug moves throughout the body, including its absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (often abbreviated as ADME). This field is called "pharmacokinetics."

1. Absorption: This is the process of a drug moving from its site of administration into the bloodstream. Factors such as the route of administration (e.g., oral, intravenous, etc.), formulation, and individual physiological differences can affect absorption.

2. Distribution: Once a drug is in the bloodstream, it gets distributed throughout the body to various tissues and organs. This process is influenced by factors like blood flow, protein binding, and lipid solubility of the drug.

3. Metabolism: Drugs are often chemically modified in the body, typically in the liver, through processes known as metabolism. These changes can lead to the formation of active or inactive metabolites, which may then be further distributed, excreted, or undergo additional metabolic transformations.

4. Excretion: This is the process by which drugs and their metabolites are eliminated from the body, primarily through the kidneys (urine) and the liver (bile).

Understanding the kinetics of a drug is crucial for determining its optimal dosing regimen, potential interactions with other medications or foods, and any necessary adjustments for special populations like pediatric or geriatric patients, or those with impaired renal or hepatic function.

Alanine is an alpha-amino acid that is used in the biosynthesis of proteins. The molecular formula for alanine is C3H7NO2. It is a non-essential amino acid, which means that it can be produced by the human body through the conversion of other nutrients, such as pyruvate, and does not need to be obtained directly from the diet.

Alanine is classified as an aliphatic amino acid because it contains a simple carbon side chain. It is also a non-polar amino acid, which means that it is hydrophobic and tends to repel water. Alanine plays a role in the metabolism of glucose and helps to regulate blood sugar levels. It is also involved in the transfer of nitrogen between tissues and helps to maintain the balance of nitrogen in the body.

In addition to its role as a building block of proteins, alanine is also used as a neurotransmitter in the brain and has been shown to have a calming effect on the nervous system. It is found in many foods, including meats, poultry, fish, eggs, dairy products, and legumes.

"Cells, cultured" is a medical term that refers to cells that have been removed from an organism and grown in controlled laboratory conditions outside of the body. This process is called cell culture and it allows scientists to study cells in a more controlled and accessible environment than they would have inside the body. Cultured cells can be derived from a variety of sources, including tissues, organs, or fluids from humans, animals, or cell lines that have been previously established in the laboratory.

Cell culture involves several steps, including isolation of the cells from the tissue, purification and characterization of the cells, and maintenance of the cells in appropriate growth conditions. The cells are typically grown in specialized media that contain nutrients, growth factors, and other components necessary for their survival and proliferation. Cultured cells can be used for a variety of purposes, including basic research, drug development and testing, and production of biological products such as vaccines and gene therapies.

It is important to note that cultured cells may behave differently than they do in the body, and results obtained from cell culture studies may not always translate directly to human physiology or disease. Therefore, it is essential to validate findings from cell culture experiments using additional models and ultimately in clinical trials involving human subjects.

A catalytic domain is a portion or region within a protein that contains the active site, where the chemical reactions necessary for the protein's function are carried out. This domain is responsible for the catalysis of biological reactions, hence the name "catalytic domain." The catalytic domain is often composed of specific amino acid residues that come together to form the active site, creating a unique three-dimensional structure that enables the protein to perform its specific function.

In enzymes, for example, the catalytic domain contains the residues that bind and convert substrates into products through chemical reactions. In receptors, the catalytic domain may be involved in signal transduction or other regulatory functions. Understanding the structure and function of catalytic domains is crucial to understanding the mechanisms of protein function and can provide valuable insights for drug design and therapeutic interventions.

Estradiol is a type of estrogen, which is a female sex hormone. It is the most potent and dominant form of estrogen in humans. Estradiol plays a crucial role in the development and maintenance of secondary sexual characteristics in women, such as breast development and regulation of the menstrual cycle. It also helps maintain bone density, protect the lining of the uterus, and is involved in cognition and mood regulation.

Estradiol is produced primarily by the ovaries, but it can also be synthesized in smaller amounts by the adrenal glands and fat cells. In men, estradiol is produced from testosterone through a process called aromatization. Abnormal levels of estradiol can contribute to various health issues, such as hormonal imbalances, infertility, osteoporosis, and certain types of cancer.

Cysteine is a semi-essential amino acid, which means that it can be produced by the human body under normal circumstances, but may need to be obtained from external sources in certain conditions such as illness or stress. Its chemical formula is HO2CCH(NH2)CH2SH, and it contains a sulfhydryl group (-SH), which allows it to act as a powerful antioxidant and participate in various cellular processes.

Cysteine plays important roles in protein structure and function, detoxification, and the synthesis of other molecules such as glutathione, taurine, and coenzyme A. It is also involved in wound healing, immune response, and the maintenance of healthy skin, hair, and nails.

Cysteine can be found in a variety of foods, including meat, poultry, fish, dairy products, eggs, legumes, nuts, seeds, and some grains. It is also available as a dietary supplement and can be used in the treatment of various medical conditions such as liver disease, bronchitis, and heavy metal toxicity. However, excessive intake of cysteine may have adverse effects on health, including gastrointestinal disturbances, nausea, vomiting, and headaches.

Keratan sulfate is a type of glycosaminoglycan (GAG), which is a complex carbohydrate found in connective tissues, including the cornea and cartilage. It is composed of repeating disaccharide units of galactose and N-acetylglucosamine, with sulfate groups attached to some of the sugar molecules.

Keratan sulfate is unique among GAGs because it contains a high proportion of non-sulfated sugars and is often found covalently linked to proteins in structures called proteoglycans. In the cornea, keratan sulfate plays important roles in maintaining transparency and regulating hydration. In cartilage, it contributes to the elasticity and resilience of the tissue.

Abnormalities in keratan sulfate metabolism have been associated with several genetic disorders, including corneal dystrophies and skeletal dysplasias.

The Y chromosome is one of the two sex-determining chromosomes in humans and many other animals, along with the X chromosome. The Y chromosome contains the genetic information that helps to determine an individual's sex as male. It is significantly smaller than the X chromosome and contains fewer genes.

The Y chromosome is present in males, who inherit it from their father. Females, on the other hand, have two X chromosomes, one inherited from each parent. The Y chromosome includes a gene called SRY (sex-determining region Y), which initiates the development of male sexual characteristics during embryonic development.

It is worth noting that the Y chromosome has a relatively high rate of genetic mutation and degeneration compared to other chromosomes, leading to concerns about its long-term viability in human evolution. However, current evidence suggests that the Y chromosome has been stable for at least the past 25 million years.

Genetic linkage is the phenomenon where two or more genetic loci (locations on a chromosome) tend to be inherited together because they are close to each other on the same chromosome. This occurs during the process of sexual reproduction, where homologous chromosomes pair up and exchange genetic material through a process called crossing over.

The closer two loci are to each other on a chromosome, the lower the probability that they will be separated by a crossover event. As a result, they are more likely to be inherited together and are said to be linked. The degree of linkage between two loci can be measured by their recombination frequency, which is the percentage of meiotic events in which a crossover occurs between them.

Linkage analysis is an important tool in genetic research, as it allows researchers to identify and map genes that are associated with specific traits or diseases. By analyzing patterns of linkage between markers (identifiable DNA sequences) and phenotypes (observable traits), researchers can infer the location of genes that contribute to those traits or diseases on chromosomes.

Liquid chromatography (LC) is a type of chromatography technique used to separate, identify, and quantify the components in a mixture. In this method, the sample mixture is dissolved in a liquid solvent (the mobile phase) and then passed through a stationary phase, which can be a solid or a liquid that is held in place by a solid support.

The components of the mixture interact differently with the stationary phase and the mobile phase, causing them to separate as they move through the system. The separated components are then detected and measured using various detection techniques, such as ultraviolet (UV) absorbance or mass spectrometry.

Liquid chromatography is widely used in many areas of science and medicine, including drug development, environmental analysis, food safety testing, and clinical diagnostics. It can be used to separate and analyze a wide range of compounds, from small molecules like drugs and metabolites to large biomolecules like proteins and nucleic acids.

Inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) refer to a group of genetic disorders caused by defects in enzymes or transporters that play a role in the body's metabolic processes. These disorders result in the accumulation or deficiency of specific chemicals within the body, which can lead to various clinical manifestations, such as developmental delay, intellectual disability, seizures, organ damage, and in some cases, death.

Examples of IEM include phenylketonuria (PKU), maple syrup urine disease (MSUD), galactosemia, and glycogen storage diseases, among many others. These disorders are typically inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, meaning that an affected individual has two copies of the mutated gene, one from each parent.

Early diagnosis and management of IEM are crucial to prevent or minimize complications and improve outcomes. Treatment options may include dietary modifications, supplementation with missing enzymes or cofactors, medication, and in some cases, stem cell transplantation or gene therapy.

Sulfonamides are a group of synthetic antibacterial drugs that contain the sulfonamide group (SO2NH2) in their chemical structure. They are bacteriostatic agents, meaning they inhibit bacterial growth rather than killing them outright. Sulfonamides work by preventing the bacteria from synthesizing folic acid, which is essential for their survival.

The first sulfonamide drug was introduced in the 1930s and since then, many different sulfonamides have been developed with varying chemical structures and pharmacological properties. They are used to treat a wide range of bacterial infections, including urinary tract infections, respiratory tract infections, skin and soft tissue infections, and ear infections.

Some common sulfonamide drugs include sulfisoxazole, sulfamethoxazole, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (a combination of a sulfonamide and another antibiotic called trimethoprim). While sulfonamides are generally safe and effective when used as directed, they can cause side effects such as rash, nausea, and allergic reactions. It is important to follow the prescribing physician's instructions carefully and to report any unusual symptoms or side effects promptly.

Hydrolysis is a chemical process, not a medical one. However, it is relevant to medicine and biology.

Hydrolysis is the breakdown of a chemical compound due to its reaction with water, often resulting in the formation of two or more simpler compounds. In the context of physiology and medicine, hydrolysis is a crucial process in various biological reactions, such as the digestion of food molecules like proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. Enzymes called hydrolases catalyze these hydrolysis reactions to speed up the breakdown process in the body.

Post-translational protein processing refers to the modifications and changes that proteins undergo after their synthesis on ribosomes, which are complex molecular machines responsible for protein synthesis. These modifications occur through various biochemical processes and play a crucial role in determining the final structure, function, and stability of the protein.

The process begins with the translation of messenger RNA (mRNA) into a linear polypeptide chain, which is then subjected to several post-translational modifications. These modifications can include:

1. Proteolytic cleavage: The removal of specific segments or domains from the polypeptide chain by proteases, resulting in the formation of mature, functional protein subunits.
2. Chemical modifications: Addition or modification of chemical groups to the side chains of amino acids, such as phosphorylation (addition of a phosphate group), glycosylation (addition of sugar moieties), methylation (addition of a methyl group), acetylation (addition of an acetyl group), and ubiquitination (addition of a ubiquitin protein).
3. Disulfide bond formation: The oxidation of specific cysteine residues within the polypeptide chain, leading to the formation of disulfide bonds between them. This process helps stabilize the three-dimensional structure of proteins, particularly in extracellular environments.
4. Folding and assembly: The acquisition of a specific three-dimensional conformation by the polypeptide chain, which is essential for its function. Chaperone proteins assist in this process to ensure proper folding and prevent aggregation.
5. Protein targeting: The directed transport of proteins to their appropriate cellular locations, such as the nucleus, mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, or plasma membrane. This is often facilitated by specific signal sequences within the protein that are recognized and bound by transport machinery.

Collectively, these post-translational modifications contribute to the functional diversity of proteins in living organisms, allowing them to perform a wide range of cellular processes, including signaling, catalysis, regulation, and structural support.

A mutation is a permanent change in the DNA sequence of an organism's genome. Mutations can occur spontaneously or be caused by environmental factors such as exposure to radiation, chemicals, or viruses. They may have various effects on the organism, ranging from benign to harmful, depending on where they occur and whether they alter the function of essential proteins. In some cases, mutations can increase an individual's susceptibility to certain diseases or disorders, while in others, they may confer a survival advantage. Mutations are the driving force behind evolution, as they introduce new genetic variability into populations, which can then be acted upon by natural selection.

Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) are complex molecules composed of a core protein to which one or more heparan sulfate (HS) glycosaminoglycan chains are covalently attached. They are widely distributed in animal tissues and play crucial roles in various biological processes, including cell-cell communication, growth factor signaling, viral infection, and cancer metastasis.

The HS chains are long, linear polysaccharides composed of repeating disaccharide units of glucosamine and uronic acid (either glucuronic or iduronic acid). These chains contain sulfate groups at various positions, which give them a negative charge and allow them to interact with numerous proteins, growth factors, and enzymes.

HSPGs can be found on the cell surface (syndecans and glypicans) or in the extracellular matrix (perlecans and agrin). They act as co-receptors for many signaling molecules, such as fibroblast growth factors (FGFs), wingless-type MMTV integration site family members (WNTs), and hedgehog proteins. By modulating the activity of these signaling pathways, HSPGs help regulate various cellular functions, including proliferation, differentiation, migration, and adhesion.

Dysregulation of HSPGs has been implicated in several diseases, such as cancer, fibrosis, and viral infections (e.g., HIV and herpes simplex virus). Therefore, understanding the structure and function of HSPGs is essential for developing new therapeutic strategies to target these diseases.

Mosaicism, in the context of genetics and medicine, refers to the presence of two or more cell lines with different genetic compositions in an individual who has developed from a single fertilized egg. This means that some cells have one genetic makeup, while others have a different genetic makeup. This condition can occur due to various reasons such as errors during cell division after fertilization.

Mosaicism can involve chromosomes (where whole or parts of chromosomes are present in some cells but not in others) or it can involve single genes (where a particular gene is present in one form in some cells and a different form in others). The symptoms and severity of mosaicism can vary widely, depending on the type and location of the genetic difference and the proportion of cells that are affected. Some individuals with mosaicism may not experience any noticeable effects, while others may have significant health problems.

An amino acid sequence is the specific order of amino acids in a protein or peptide molecule, formed by the linking of the amino group (-NH2) of one amino acid to the carboxyl group (-COOH) of another amino acid through a peptide bond. The sequence is determined by the genetic code and is unique to each type of protein or peptide. It plays a crucial role in determining the three-dimensional structure and function of proteins.

High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is a type of chromatography that separates and analyzes compounds based on their interactions with a stationary phase and a mobile phase under high pressure. The mobile phase, which can be a gas or liquid, carries the sample mixture through a column containing the stationary phase.

In HPLC, the mobile phase is a liquid, and it is pumped through the column at high pressures (up to several hundred atmospheres) to achieve faster separation times and better resolution than other types of liquid chromatography. The stationary phase can be a solid or a liquid supported on a solid, and it interacts differently with each component in the sample mixture, causing them to separate as they travel through the column.

HPLC is widely used in analytical chemistry, pharmaceuticals, biotechnology, and other fields to separate, identify, and quantify compounds present in complex mixtures. It can be used to analyze a wide range of substances, including drugs, hormones, vitamins, pigments, flavors, and pollutants. HPLC is also used in the preparation of pure samples for further study or use.

A base sequence in the context of molecular biology refers to the specific order of nucleotides in a DNA or RNA molecule. In DNA, these nucleotides are adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T). In RNA, uracil (U) takes the place of thymine. The base sequence contains genetic information that is transcribed into RNA and ultimately translated into proteins. It is the exact order of these bases that determines the genetic code and thus the function of the DNA or RNA molecule.

Breast neoplasms refer to abnormal growths in the breast tissue that can be benign or malignant. Benign breast neoplasms are non-cancerous tumors or growths, while malignant breast neoplasms are cancerous tumors that can invade surrounding tissues and spread to other parts of the body.

Breast neoplasms can arise from different types of cells in the breast, including milk ducts, milk sacs (lobules), or connective tissue. The most common type of breast cancer is ductal carcinoma, which starts in the milk ducts and can spread to other parts of the breast and nearby structures.

Breast neoplasms are usually detected through screening methods such as mammography, ultrasound, or MRI, or through self-examination or clinical examination. Treatment options for breast neoplasms depend on several factors, including the type and stage of the tumor, the patient's age and overall health, and personal preferences. Treatment may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, hormone therapy, or targeted therapy.

Alopecia is a medical term that refers to the loss of hair or baldness. It can occur in various parts of the body, but it's most commonly used to describe hair loss from the scalp. Alopecia can have several causes, including genetics, hormonal changes, medical conditions, and aging.

There are different types of alopecia, such as:

* Alopecia Areata: It is a condition that causes round patches of hair loss on the scalp or other parts of the body. The immune system attacks the hair follicles, causing the hair to fall out.
* Androgenetic Alopecia: Also known as male pattern baldness or female pattern baldness, it's a genetic condition that causes gradual hair thinning and eventual hair loss, typically following a specific pattern.
* Telogen Effluvium: It is a temporary hair loss condition caused by stress, medication, pregnancy, or other factors that can cause the hair follicles to enter a resting phase, leading to shedding and thinning of the hair.

The treatment for alopecia depends on the underlying cause. In some cases, such as with telogen effluvium, hair growth may resume without any treatment. However, other forms of alopecia may require medical intervention, including topical treatments, oral medications, or even hair transplant surgery in severe cases.

A point mutation is a type of genetic mutation where a single nucleotide base (A, T, C, or G) in DNA is altered, deleted, or substituted with another nucleotide. Point mutations can have various effects on the organism, depending on the location of the mutation and whether it affects the function of any genes. Some point mutations may not have any noticeable effect, while others might lead to changes in the amino acids that make up proteins, potentially causing diseases or altering traits. Point mutations can occur spontaneously due to errors during DNA replication or be inherited from parents.

A phenotype is the physical or biochemical expression of an organism's genes, or the observable traits and characteristics resulting from the interaction of its genetic constitution (genotype) with environmental factors. These characteristics can include appearance, development, behavior, and resistance to disease, among others. Phenotypes can vary widely, even among individuals with identical genotypes, due to differences in environmental influences, gene expression, and genetic interactions.

Messenger RNA (mRNA) is a type of RNA (ribonucleic acid) that carries genetic information copied from DNA in the form of a series of three-base code "words," each of which specifies a particular amino acid. This information is used by the cell's machinery to construct proteins, a process known as translation. After being transcribed from DNA, mRNA travels out of the nucleus to the ribosomes in the cytoplasm where protein synthesis occurs. Once the protein has been synthesized, the mRNA may be degraded and recycled. Post-transcriptional modifications can also occur to mRNA, such as alternative splicing and addition of a 5' cap and a poly(A) tail, which can affect its stability, localization, and translation efficiency.

"Pseudomonas" is a genus of Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria that are widely found in soil, water, and plants. Some species of Pseudomonas can cause disease in animals and humans, with P. aeruginosa being the most clinically relevant as it's an opportunistic pathogen capable of causing various types of infections, particularly in individuals with weakened immune systems.

P. aeruginosa is known for its remarkable ability to resist many antibiotics and disinfectants, making infections caused by this bacterium difficult to treat. It can cause a range of healthcare-associated infections, such as pneumonia, bloodstream infections, urinary tract infections, and surgical site infections. In addition, it can also cause external ear infections and eye infections.

Prompt identification and appropriate antimicrobial therapy are crucial for managing Pseudomonas infections, although the increasing antibiotic resistance poses a significant challenge in treatment.

Recombinant proteins are artificially created proteins produced through the use of recombinant DNA technology. This process involves combining DNA molecules from different sources to create a new set of genes that encode for a specific protein. The resulting recombinant protein can then be expressed, purified, and used for various applications in research, medicine, and industry.

Recombinant proteins are widely used in biomedical research to study protein function, structure, and interactions. They are also used in the development of diagnostic tests, vaccines, and therapeutic drugs. For example, recombinant insulin is a common treatment for diabetes, while recombinant human growth hormone is used to treat growth disorders.

The production of recombinant proteins typically involves the use of host cells, such as bacteria, yeast, or mammalian cells, which are engineered to express the desired protein. The host cells are transformed with a plasmid vector containing the gene of interest, along with regulatory elements that control its expression. Once the host cells are cultured and the protein is expressed, it can be purified using various chromatography techniques.

Overall, recombinant proteins have revolutionized many areas of biology and medicine, enabling researchers to study and manipulate proteins in ways that were previously impossible.

In medical terms, the skin is the largest organ of the human body. It consists of two main layers: the epidermis (outer layer) and dermis (inner layer), as well as accessory structures like hair follicles, sweat glands, and oil glands. The skin plays a crucial role in protecting us from external factors such as bacteria, viruses, and environmental hazards, while also regulating body temperature and enabling the sense of touch.

Microsomes are subcellular membranous vesicles that are obtained as a byproduct during the preparation of cellular homogenates. They are not naturally occurring structures within the cell, but rather formed due to fragmentation of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) during laboratory procedures. Microsomes are widely used in various research and scientific studies, particularly in the fields of biochemistry and pharmacology.

Microsomes are rich in enzymes, including the cytochrome P450 system, which is involved in the metabolism of drugs, toxins, and other xenobiotics. These enzymes play a crucial role in detoxifying foreign substances and eliminating them from the body. As such, microsomes serve as an essential tool for studying drug metabolism, toxicity, and interactions, allowing researchers to better understand and predict the effects of various compounds on living organisms.

Carcinoma, endometrioid is a type of cancer that arises from the glandular cells of the endometrium, which is the lining of the uterus. This type of cancer is named for its similarity in appearance to the normal endometrial cells, and it is the second most common type of endometrial cancer after serous carcinoma.

Endometrioid carcinomas are typically divided into different grades based on how abnormal the cells look under a microscope. Low-grade tumors tend to grow more slowly and are less likely to spread beyond the uterus than high-grade tumors.

Risk factors for endometrioid carcinoma include obesity, older age, early menstruation, late menopause, never having been pregnant, and a history of taking estrogen hormone replacement therapy without progesterone. Treatment typically involves surgery to remove the uterus, fallopian tubes, ovaries, and nearby lymph nodes, followed by radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or hormonal therapy in some cases.

Enzyme inhibitors are substances that bind to an enzyme and decrease its activity, preventing it from catalyzing a chemical reaction in the body. They can work by several mechanisms, including blocking the active site where the substrate binds, or binding to another site on the enzyme to change its shape and prevent substrate binding. Enzyme inhibitors are often used as drugs to treat various medical conditions, such as high blood pressure, abnormal heart rhythms, and bacterial infections. They can also be found naturally in some foods and plants, and can be used in research to understand enzyme function and regulation.

Sequence homology, amino acid, refers to the similarity in the order of amino acids in a protein or a portion of a protein between two or more species. This similarity can be used to infer evolutionary relationships and functional similarities between proteins. The higher the degree of sequence homology, the more likely it is that the proteins are related and have similar functions. Sequence homology can be determined through various methods such as pairwise alignment or multiple sequence alignment, which compare the sequences and calculate a score based on the number and type of matching amino acids.

Hydrogen-ion concentration, also known as pH, is a measure of the acidity or basicity of a solution. It is defined as the negative logarithm (to the base 10) of the hydrogen ion activity in a solution. The standard unit of measurement is the pH unit. A pH of 7 is neutral, less than 7 is acidic, and greater than 7 is basic.

In medical terms, hydrogen-ion concentration is important for maintaining homeostasis within the body. For example, in the stomach, a high hydrogen-ion concentration (low pH) is necessary for the digestion of food. However, in other parts of the body such as blood, a high hydrogen-ion concentration can be harmful and lead to acidosis. Conversely, a low hydrogen-ion concentration (high pH) in the blood can lead to alkalosis. Both acidosis and alkalosis can have serious consequences on various organ systems if not corrected.

Heparin is defined as a highly sulfated glycosaminoglycan (a type of polysaccharide) that is widely present in many tissues, but is most commonly derived from the mucosal tissues of mammalian lungs or intestinal mucosa. It is an anticoagulant that acts as an inhibitor of several enzymes involved in the blood coagulation cascade, primarily by activating antithrombin III which then neutralizes thrombin and other clotting factors.

Heparin is used medically to prevent and treat thromboembolic disorders such as deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and certain types of heart attacks. It can also be used during hemodialysis, cardiac bypass surgery, and other medical procedures to prevent the formation of blood clots.

It's important to note that while heparin is a powerful anticoagulant, it does not have any fibrinolytic activity, meaning it cannot dissolve existing blood clots. Instead, it prevents new clots from forming and stops existing clots from growing larger.

Leukocytes, also known as white blood cells (WBCs), are a crucial component of the human immune system. They are responsible for protecting the body against infections and foreign substances. Leukocytes are produced in the bone marrow and circulate throughout the body in the bloodstream and lymphatic system.

There are several types of leukocytes, including:

1. Neutrophils - These are the most abundant type of leukocyte and are primarily responsible for fighting bacterial infections. They contain enzymes that can destroy bacteria.
2. Lymphocytes - These are responsible for producing antibodies and destroying virus-infected cells, as well as cancer cells. There are two main types of lymphocytes: B-lymphocytes and T-lymphocytes.
3. Monocytes - These are the largest type of leukocyte and help to break down and remove dead or damaged tissues, as well as microorganisms.
4. Eosinophils - These play a role in fighting parasitic infections and are also involved in allergic reactions and inflammation.
5. Basophils - These release histamine and other chemicals that cause inflammation in response to allergens or irritants.

An abnormal increase or decrease in the number of leukocytes can indicate an underlying medical condition, such as an infection, inflammation, or a blood disorder.

Gene expression regulation, enzymologic refers to the biochemical processes and mechanisms that control the transcription and translation of specific genes into functional proteins or enzymes. This regulation is achieved through various enzymatic activities that can either activate or repress gene expression at different levels, such as chromatin remodeling, transcription factor activation, mRNA processing, and protein degradation.

Enzymologic regulation of gene expression involves the action of specific enzymes that catalyze chemical reactions involved in these processes. For example, histone-modifying enzymes can alter the structure of chromatin to make genes more or less accessible for transcription, while RNA polymerase and its associated factors are responsible for transcribing DNA into mRNA. Additionally, various enzymes are involved in post-transcriptional modifications of mRNA, such as splicing, capping, and tailing, which can affect the stability and translation of the transcript.

Overall, the enzymologic regulation of gene expression is a complex and dynamic process that allows cells to respond to changes in their environment and maintain proper physiological function.

Glucosamine is a natural compound found in the body, primarily in the fluid around joints. It is a building block of cartilage, which is the tissue that cushions bones and allows for smooth joint movement. Glucosamine can also be produced in a laboratory and is commonly sold as a dietary supplement.

Medical definitions of glucosamine describe it as a type of amino sugar that plays a crucial role in the formation and maintenance of cartilage, ligaments, tendons, and other connective tissues. It is often used as a supplement to help manage osteoarthritis symptoms, such as pain, stiffness, and swelling in the joints, by potentially reducing inflammation and promoting cartilage repair.

There are different forms of glucosamine available, including glucosamine sulfate, glucosamine hydrochloride, and N-acetyl glucosamine. Glucosamine sulfate is the most commonly used form in supplements and has been studied more extensively than other forms. While some research suggests that glucosamine may provide modest benefits for osteoarthritis symptoms, its effectiveness remains a topic of ongoing debate among medical professionals.

Serine is an amino acid, which is a building block of proteins. More specifically, it is a non-essential amino acid, meaning that the body can produce it from other compounds, and it does not need to be obtained through diet. Serine plays important roles in the body, such as contributing to the formation of the protective covering of nerve fibers (myelin sheath), helping to synthesize another amino acid called tryptophan, and taking part in the metabolism of fatty acids. It is also involved in the production of muscle tissues, the immune system, and the forming of cell structures. Serine can be found in various foods such as soy, eggs, cheese, meat, peanuts, lentils, and many others.

Glycoside hydrolases are a class of enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of glycosidic bonds found in various substrates such as polysaccharides, oligosaccharides, and glycoproteins. These enzymes break down complex carbohydrates into simpler sugars by cleaving the glycosidic linkages that connect monosaccharide units.

Glycoside hydrolases are classified based on their mechanism of action and the type of glycosidic bond they hydrolyze. The classification system is maintained by the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (IUBMB). Each enzyme in this class is assigned a unique Enzyme Commission (EC) number, which reflects its specificity towards the substrate and the type of reaction it catalyzes.

These enzymes have various applications in different industries, including food processing, biofuel production, pulp and paper manufacturing, and biomedical research. In medicine, glycoside hydrolases are used to diagnose and monitor certain medical conditions, such as carbohydrate-deficient glycoprotein syndrome, a rare inherited disorder affecting the structure of glycoproteins.

Carriageenans are a family of linear sulfated polysaccharides that are extracted from red edible seaweeds. They have been widely used in the food industry as thickening, gelling, and stabilizing agents. In the medical field, they have been studied for their potential therapeutic applications, such as in the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders and inflammation. However, some studies have suggested that certain types of carriageenans may have negative health effects, including promoting inflammation and damaging the gut lining. Therefore, more research is needed to fully understand their safety and efficacy.

A cell line is a culture of cells that are grown in a laboratory for use in research. These cells are usually taken from a single cell or group of cells, and they are able to divide and grow continuously in the lab. Cell lines can come from many different sources, including animals, plants, and humans. They are often used in scientific research to study cellular processes, disease mechanisms, and to test new drugs or treatments. Some common types of human cell lines include HeLa cells (which come from a cancer patient named Henrietta Lacks), HEK293 cells (which come from embryonic kidney cells), and HUVEC cells (which come from umbilical vein endothelial cells). It is important to note that cell lines are not the same as primary cells, which are cells that are taken directly from a living organism and have not been grown in the lab.

A gene is a specific sequence of nucleotides in DNA that carries genetic information. Genes are the fundamental units of heredity and are responsible for the development and function of all living organisms. They code for proteins or RNA molecules, which carry out various functions within cells and are essential for the structure, function, and regulation of the body's tissues and organs.

Each gene has a specific location on a chromosome, and each person inherits two copies of every gene, one from each parent. Variations in the sequence of nucleotides in a gene can lead to differences in traits between individuals, including physical characteristics, susceptibility to disease, and responses to environmental factors.

Medical genetics is the study of genes and their role in health and disease. It involves understanding how genes contribute to the development and progression of various medical conditions, as well as identifying genetic risk factors and developing strategies for prevention, diagnosis, and treatment.

Gene deletion is a type of mutation where a segment of DNA, containing one or more genes, is permanently lost or removed from a chromosome. This can occur due to various genetic mechanisms such as homologous recombination, non-homologous end joining, or other types of genomic rearrangements.

The deletion of a gene can have varying effects on the organism, depending on the function of the deleted gene and its importance for normal physiological processes. If the deleted gene is essential for survival, the deletion may result in embryonic lethality or developmental abnormalities. However, if the gene is non-essential or has redundant functions, the deletion may not have any noticeable effects on the organism's phenotype.

Gene deletions can also be used as a tool in genetic research to study the function of specific genes and their role in various biological processes. For example, researchers may use gene deletion techniques to create genetically modified animal models to investigate the impact of gene deletion on disease progression or development.

Isoelectric focusing (IEF) is a technique used in electrophoresis, which is a method for separating proteins or other molecules based on their electrical charges. In IEF, a mixture of ampholytes (molecules that can carry both positive and negative charges) is used to create a pH gradient within a gel matrix. When an electric field is applied, the proteins or molecules migrate through the gel until they reach the point in the gradient where their net charge is zero, known as their isoelectric point (pI). At this point, they focus into a sharp band and stop moving, resulting in a highly resolved separation of the different components based on their pI. This technique is widely used in protein research for applications such as protein identification, characterization, and purification.

Chromosome mapping, also known as physical mapping, is the process of determining the location and order of specific genes or genetic markers on a chromosome. This is typically done by using various laboratory techniques to identify landmarks along the chromosome, such as restriction enzyme cutting sites or patterns of DNA sequence repeats. The resulting map provides important information about the organization and structure of the genome, and can be used for a variety of purposes, including identifying the location of genes associated with genetic diseases, studying evolutionary relationships between organisms, and developing genetic markers for use in breeding or forensic applications.

Oligosaccharides are complex carbohydrates composed of relatively small numbers (3-10) of monosaccharide units joined together by glycosidic linkages. They occur naturally in foods such as milk, fruits, vegetables, and legumes. In the body, oligosaccharides play important roles in various biological processes, including cell recognition, signaling, and protection against pathogens.

There are several types of oligosaccharides, classified based on their structures and functions. Some common examples include:

1. Disaccharides: These consist of two monosaccharide units, such as sucrose (glucose + fructose), lactose (glucose + galactose), and maltose (glucose + glucose).
2. Trisaccharides: These contain three monosaccharide units, like maltotriose (glucose + glucose + glucose) and raffinose (galactose + glucose + fructose).
3. Oligosaccharides found in human milk: Human milk contains unique oligosaccharides that serve as prebiotics, promoting the growth of beneficial bacteria in the gut. These oligosaccharides also help protect infants from pathogens by acting as decoy receptors and inhibiting bacterial adhesion to intestinal cells.
4. N-linked and O-linked glycans: These are oligosaccharides attached to proteins in the body, playing crucial roles in protein folding, stability, and function.
5. Plant-derived oligosaccharides: Fructooligosaccharides (FOS) and galactooligosaccharides (GOS) are examples of plant-derived oligosaccharides that serve as prebiotics, promoting the growth of beneficial gut bacteria.

Overall, oligosaccharides have significant impacts on human health and disease, particularly in relation to gastrointestinal function, immunity, and inflammation.

The liver is a large, solid organ located in the upper right portion of the abdomen, beneath the diaphragm and above the stomach. It plays a vital role in several bodily functions, including:

1. Metabolism: The liver helps to metabolize carbohydrates, fats, and proteins from the food we eat into energy and nutrients that our bodies can use.
2. Detoxification: The liver detoxifies harmful substances in the body by breaking them down into less toxic forms or excreting them through bile.
3. Synthesis: The liver synthesizes important proteins, such as albumin and clotting factors, that are necessary for proper bodily function.
4. Storage: The liver stores glucose, vitamins, and minerals that can be released when the body needs them.
5. Bile production: The liver produces bile, a digestive juice that helps to break down fats in the small intestine.
6. Immune function: The liver plays a role in the immune system by filtering out bacteria and other harmful substances from the blood.

Overall, the liver is an essential organ that plays a critical role in maintaining overall health and well-being.

A heterozygote is an individual who has inherited two different alleles (versions) of a particular gene, one from each parent. This means that the individual's genotype for that gene contains both a dominant and a recessive allele. The dominant allele will be expressed phenotypically (outwardly visible), while the recessive allele may or may not have any effect on the individual's observable traits, depending on the specific gene and its function. Heterozygotes are often represented as 'Aa', where 'A' is the dominant allele and 'a' is the recessive allele.

Transfection is a term used in molecular biology that refers to the process of deliberately introducing foreign genetic material (DNA, RNA or artificial gene constructs) into cells. This is typically done using chemical or physical methods, such as lipofection or electroporation. Transfection is widely used in research and medical settings for various purposes, including studying gene function, producing proteins, developing gene therapies, and creating genetically modified organisms. It's important to note that transfection is different from transduction, which is the process of introducing genetic material into cells using viruses as vectors.

The enzyme chondro-4-sulfatase (EC 3.1.6.9) catalyzes the reaction 4-deoxy-β-D-gluc-4-enuronosyl-(1→3)-N-acetyl-D-galactosamine ... The systematic name is 4-deoxy-β-D-gluc-4-enuronosyl-(1→3)-N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-4-sulfate 4-sulfohydrolase. This enzyme is ... Demonstration, purification and properties of a chondroitin-4-sulfatase from bovine aorta]". Hoppe-Seyler's Z. Physiol. Chem. ... 4-deoxy-β-D-gluc-4-enuronosyl-(1→3)-N-acetyl-D-galactosamine + sulfate This enzyme belongs to the family of hydrolases, ...
The enzyme chondro-6-sulfatase (EC 3.1.6.10) catalyzes the reaction 4-deoxy-β-D-gluc-4-enuronosyl-(1→3)-N-acetyl-D- ... The systematic name is 4-deoxy-β-D-gluc-4-enuronosyl-(1→3)-N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-6-sulfate 6-sulfohydrolase. Yamagata T, ... 4-deoxy-β-D-gluc-4-enuronosyl-(1→3)-N-acetyl-D-galactosamine + sulfate This enzyme belongs to the family of hydrolases, ...
... cerebroside-sulfatase MeSH D08.811.277.352.827.070.625 - steryl-sulfatase MeSH D08.811.277.352.827.180 - chondroitinases and ... chondro-4-sulfatase MeSH D08.811.277.352.827.500 - iduronate sulfatase MeSH D08.811.277.352.897 - thiolester hydrolases MeSH ... sulfatases MeSH D08.811.277.352.827.070 - arylsulfatases MeSH D08.811.277.352.827.070.060 - n-acetylgalactosamine-4-sulfatase ... 4-beta-glucosidase MeSH D08.811.277.450.420.200.600 - glucan endo-1,3-beta-d-glucosidase MeSH D08.811.277.450.420.375 - glucan ...
... chondro-6-sulfatase EC 3.1.6.11: disulfoglucosamine-6-sulfatase EC 3.1.6.12: N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfatase EC 3.1.6.13: ... choline-sulfatase EC 3.1.6.7: cellulose-polysulfatase EC 3.1.6.8: cerebroside-sulfatase EC 3.1.6.9: chondro-4-sulfatase EC 3.1. ... N-sulfoglucosamine-3-sulfatase EC 3.1.6.16: monomethyl-sulfatase EC 3.1.6.17: D-lactate-2-sulfatase EC 3.1.6.19: (R)-specific ... steryl-sulfatase EC 3.1.6.3: glycosulfatase EC 3.1.6.4: N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfatase EC 3.1.6.5: deleted EC 3.1.6.6: ...
The enzyme chondro-4-sulfatase (EC 3.1.6.9) catalyzes the reaction 4-deoxy-β-D-gluc-4-enuronosyl-(1→3)-N-acetyl-D-galactosamine ... The systematic name is 4-deoxy-β-D-gluc-4-enuronosyl-(1→3)-N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-4-sulfate 4-sulfohydrolase. This enzyme is ... Demonstration, purification and properties of a chondroitin-4-sulfatase from bovine aorta]". Hoppe-Seylers Z. Physiol. Chem. ... 4-deoxy-β-D-gluc-4-enuronosyl-(1→3)-N-acetyl-D-galactosamine + sulfate This enzyme belongs to the family of hydrolases, ...
Galactose-6-sulfatase (namely, N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase; GALNS): The sulfatase that cleaves the sulfate from ... The classics: Chondro-osteo-dystrophy. roentgenographic and clinical features of a child with dislocation of vertebrae, James F ... Galactose-6-sulfatase (namely, N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase; GALNS): The sulfatase that cleaves the sulfate from ... Galactose-6-sulfatase (namely, N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase; GALNS): The sulfatase that cleaves the sulfate from ...
Galactose-6-sulfatase (namely, N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase; GALNS): The sulfatase that cleaves the sulfate from ... The classics: Chondro-osteo-dystrophy. roentgenographic and clinical features of a child with dislocation of vertebrae, James F ... Galactose-6-sulfatase (namely, N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase; GALNS): The sulfatase that cleaves the sulfate from ... Galactose-6-sulfatase (namely, N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase; GALNS): The sulfatase that cleaves the sulfate from ...
Multiple sulfatase deficiency is an inherited disorder characterized by a deficiency of several sulfatases and the accumulation ... Chondro-4-Sulfatase / deficiency Actions. * Search in PubMed * Search in MeSH * Add to Search ... Multiple sulfatase deficiency is an inherited disorder characterized by a deficiency of several sulfatases and the accumulation ... We discuss the importance of measuring the sulfatase activities in the leukocytes, and the instability of sulfatases in the ...
Sulfatases (1974-1975). Public MeSH Note. 91; was see under SULFATASES 1976-90. History Note. 91(76); was see under SULFATASES ... Chondro-4-Sulfatase Preferred Term Term UI T008173. Date01/01/1999. LexicalTag NON. ThesaurusID NLM (1976). ... Chondro-4-Sulfatase Preferred Concept UI. M0004303. Registry Number. EC 3.1.6.9. Scope Note. An enzyme from the sulfuric ester ... Sulfatases [D08.811.277.352.827] * Chondroitinases and Chondroitin Lyases [D08.811.277.352.827.180] * Chondroitinsulfatases [ ...
Sulfatases (1974-1975). Public MeSH Note. 91; was see under SULFATASES 1976-90. History Note. 91(76); was see under SULFATASES ... Chondro-4-Sulfatase Preferred Term Term UI T008173. Date01/01/1999. LexicalTag NON. ThesaurusID NLM (1976). ... Chondro-4-Sulfatase Preferred Concept UI. M0004303. Registry Number. EC 3.1.6.9. Scope Note. An enzyme from the sulfuric ester ... Sulfatases [D08.811.277.352.827] * Chondroitinases and Chondroitin Lyases [D08.811.277.352.827.180] * Chondroitinsulfatases [ ...
Chondro-4-sulphatase Current Synonym true false 91586013 Chondro-4-sulfatase Current Synonym true false ...
Chondro-4-Sulfatase - Preferred Concept UI. M0004303. Scope note. An enzyme from the sulfuric ester hydrolase class that breaks ... Sulfatases (1974-1975). Public MeSH Note:. 91; was see under SULFATASES 1976-90. ... condro-4-sulfatasa. Scope note:. Enzima de la clase éster sulfúrico hidrolasa que descompone uno de los productos de la ... 4-Deoxy-beta-D-gluc-4-enuronosyl-(1,3)-N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-4-sulfate 4-sulfohydrolase ...
CS-A treated with chondro-4-sulfatase. Each test substance was immobilized onto a PLL-coated coverslip and the behavior of ... Chondroitin-4-sulfation negatively regulates axonal guidance and growth Hang Wang 1 , Yasuhiro Katagiri, Thomas E McCann, ... Chondroitin-4-sulfation negatively regulates axonal guidance and growth Hang Wang et al. J Cell Sci. 2008. . ... Figure 4. Reactive astrocytes produce more 4-sulfated than 6-sulfated CS GAG chains (A) CM from 3-day culture was concentrated ...
N0000167585 Metalloexopeptidases N0000167600 Sulfatases N0000167602 Chondroitinsulfatases N0000167603 Chondro-4-Sulfatase ... N0000167604 Arylsulfatases N0000167605 Cerebroside-Sulfatase N0000167606 Steryl-Sulfatase N0000167607 N-Acetylgalactosamine-4- ... Sulfatase N0000167621 Ribonucleases N0000167623 Acetylesterase N0000167626 Pseudocholinesterase N0000167627 ... Amino Sugars N0000168504 Imino Sugars N0000168555 Deoxy Sugars N0000006194 Silver Sulfadiazine N0000167601 Iduronate Sulfatase ...
... normal human serum at ph 4.5 or 7.0 followed by chondro-4-sulfatase at ph 7.0. analyses of the reaction products indicate ... degradation of chondroitin 4-sulphate was inhibited by hyaluronic acid but not by keratan sulphate. the results are discussed ... a steady state had been achieved by the third dose of medication and accumulation of either component during days 1 through 4 ... only two derivatives, the ethyl and butyl esters of 1-ethyl-1,2-dihydro-4-hydroxy-7-methyl-1,8-naphthyridine-3-carboxylic acid ...
HYDROLASES CHONDRO-4-SULFATASE HYDROLASES CHONDROITINASES AND CHONDROITIN LYASES HYDROLASES CHONDROITINSULFATASES HYDROLASES ... HYDROLASES IDURONATE SULFATASE HYDROLASES IDURONIDASE HYDROLASES INSULYSIN HYDROLASES INTERSTITIAL COLLAGENASE HYDROLASES ... HYDROLASES SULFATASES HYDROLASES THERMOLYSIN HYDROLASES THIAMIN-TRIPHOSPHATASE HYDROLASES THIAMINE PYROPHOSPHATASE HYDROLASES ... HYDROLASES CEREBROSIDE-SULFATASE HYDROLASES CHITINASE HYDROLASES CHOLESTEROL ESTERASE HYDROLASES CHOLINESTERASES ...
The multiple sulfatase deficiency gene encodes an essential and limiting factor for the activity of sulfatases. Cell. 2003 May ... The classics: Chondro-osteo-dystrophy. roentgenographic and clinical features of a child with dislocation of vertebrae, James F ... Murine model (Galns(tm(C76S)slu)) of MPS IVA with missense mutation at the active site cysteine conserved among sulfatase ... Murine model (Galns(tm(C76S)slu)) of MPS IVA with missense mutation at the active site cysteine conserved among sulfatase ...
The intermediatezone (/Z) contains round chondro-cytes.Thedeep zone(DZ)containschondrocytes arranged in shortcolumns. ... February 4, 2016 - Hometown Hero and Medal of Honor Recipient Sammy Davis returns to… ... multinational study ofrecombinant human N-acetylgalactosamine 4-sulfatase (recombinant human arylsulfatase B orrhASB) and ...
  • Chondroitin-4-sulfate (CS-A), but not chondroitin-6-sulfate (CS-C), exhibits a strong negative guidance cue to mouse cerebellar granule neurons. (nih.gov)
  • Furthermore, 4-sulfated chondroitin sulfate GAG chains are rapidly and significantly increased in regions that do not support axonal regeneration proximal to spinal cord lesions in mice. (nih.gov)
  • Multiple sulfatase deficiency is an inherited disorder characterized by a deficiency of several sulfatases and the accumulation of sulfatides, glycosaminoglycans, sphingolipids, and steroid sulfates in tissues and body fluids. (nih.gov)
  • Early manifestations of multiple sulfatase deficiency. (nih.gov)
  • Multiple deficiency of mucopolysaccharide sulfatases in mucosulfatidosis. (nih.gov)
  • OMIM 253010), based on a deficiency of different lysosomal enzymes-N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS) and β-galactosidase, respectively. (medscape.com)