An enzyme that is active in the first step of choline phosphoglyceride (lecithin) biosynthesis by catalyzing the phosphorylation of choline to phosphorylcholine in the presence of ATP. Ethanolamine and its methyl and ethyl derivatives can also act as acceptors. EC 2.7.1.32.
An enzyme that catalyzes the formation of acetylcholine from acetyl-CoA and choline. EC 2.3.1.6.
A condition produced by a deficiency of CHOLINE in animals. Choline is known as a lipotropic agent because it has been shown to promote the transport of excess fat from the liver under certain conditions in laboratory animals. Combined deficiency of choline (included in the B vitamin complex) and all other methyl group donors causes liver cirrhosis in some animals. Unlike compounds normally considered as vitamins, choline does not serve as a cofactor in enzymatic reactions. (From Saunders Dictionary & Encyclopedia of Laboratory Medicine and Technology, 1984)
A potent inhibitor of the high affinity uptake system for CHOLINE. It has less effect on the low affinity uptake system. Since choline is one of the components of ACETYLCHOLINE, treatment with hemicholinium can deplete acetylcholine from cholinergic terminals. Hemicholinium 3 is commonly used as a research tool in animal and in vitro experiments.
A naturally occurring compound that has been of interest for its role in osmoregulation. As a drug, betaine hydrochloride has been used as a source of hydrochloric acid in the treatment of hypochlorhydria. Betaine has also been used in the treatment of liver disorders, for hyperkalemia, for homocystinuria, and for gastrointestinal disturbances. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1341)
Donor of choline in biosynthesis of choline-containing phosphoglycerides.
An enzyme bound to the inner mitochondrial membrane that catalyzes the oxidation of CHOLINE to BETAINE.
Derivatives of phosphatidic acids in which the phosphoric acid is bound in ester linkage to a choline moiety. Complete hydrolysis yields 1 mole of glycerol, phosphoric acid and choline and 2 moles of fatty acids.
Calcium and magnesium salts used therapeutically in hepatobiliary dysfunction.
An enzyme that catalyses three sequential METHYLATION reactions for conversion of phosphatidylethanolamine to PHOSPHATIDYLCHOLINE.
A component of PHOSPHATIDYLCHOLINES or LECITHINS, in which the two hydroxy groups of GLYCEROL are esterified with fatty acids. (From Stedman, 26th ed) It counteracts the effects of urea on enzymes and other macromolecules.
A viscous, hygroscopic amino alcohol with an ammoniacal odor. It is widely distributed in biological tissue and is a component of lecithin. It is used as a surfactant, fluorimetric reagent, and to remove CO2 and H2S from natural gas and other gases.
Endogenous factors or drugs that increase the transport and metabolism of LIPIDS including the synthesis of LIPOPROTEINS by the LIVER and their uptake by extrahepatic tissues.
An antidepressive agent that has also been used in the treatment of movement disorders. The mechanism of action is not well understood.
A neurotransmitter found at neuromuscular junctions, autonomic ganglia, parasympathetic effector junctions, a subset of sympathetic effector junctions, and at many sites in the central nervous system.
An amino acid intermediate in the metabolism of choline.
Lipids containing one or more phosphate groups, particularly those derived from either glycerol (phosphoglycerides see GLYCEROPHOSPHOLIPIDS) or sphingosine (SPHINGOLIPIDS). They are polar lipids that are of great importance for the structure and function of cell membranes and are the most abundant of membrane lipids, although not stored in large amounts in the system.
AMINO ALCOHOLS containing the ETHANOLAMINE; (-NH2CH2CHOH) group and its derivatives.
An amino acid that occurs in vertebrate tissues and in urine. In muscle tissue, creatine generally occurs as phosphocreatine. Creatine is excreted as CREATININE in the urine.
Derivatives of phosphatidic acids in which the phosphoric acid is bound in ester linkage to an ethanolamine moiety. Complete hydrolysis yields 1 mole of glycerol, phosphoric acid and ethanolamine and 2 moles of fatty acids.
Spectroscopic method of measuring the magnetic moment of elementary particles such as atomic nuclei, protons or electrons. It is employed in clinical applications such as NMR Tomography (MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING).
A sulfur-containing essential L-amino acid that is important in many body functions.
An isomer of glucose that has traditionally been considered to be a B vitamin although it has an uncertain status as a vitamin and a deficiency syndrome has not been identified in man. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1379) Inositol phospholipids are important in signal transduction.
An enzyme that catalyzes the transfer of cytidylate (CMP) to choline phosphate to form CDPcholine. It is the rate-limiting enzyme in the choline pathway for the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine. Its activity is increased by glucocorticoids. EC 2.7.7.15.
Nerve fibers liberating acetylcholine at the synapse after an impulse.
An enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of ACETYLCHOLINE to CHOLINE and acetate. In the CNS, this enzyme plays a role in the function of peripheral neuromuscular junctions. EC 3.1.1.7.
Vesicular amine transporter proteins that transport the neurotransmitter ACETYLCHOLINE into small SECRETORY VESICLES. Proteins of this family contain 12 transmembrane domains and exchange vesicular PROTONS for cytoplasmic acetylcholine.
An NAD+ dependent enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of betain aldehyde to BETAINE.
An enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of phosphatidylcholines from CDPcholine and 1,2-diacylglycerols. EC 2.7.8.2.
Drugs used to specifically facilitate learning or memory, particularly to prevent the cognitive deficits associated with dementias. These drugs act by a variety of mechanisms. While no potent nootropic drugs have yet been accepted for general use, several are being actively investigated.
A mercaptocholine used as a reagent for the determination of CHOLINESTERASES. It also serves as a highly selective nerve stain.
The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.
One of the non-essential amino acids commonly occurring in the L-form. It is found in animals and plants, especially in sugar cane and sugar beets. It may be a neurotransmitter.
Any drug used for its actions on cholinergic systems. Included here are agonists and antagonists, drugs that affect the life cycle of ACETYLCHOLINE, and drugs that affect the survival of cholinergic neurons. The term cholinergic agents is sometimes still used in the narrower sense of MUSCARINIC AGONISTS, although most modern texts discourage that usage.
Compounds possessing both a hydroxyl (-OH) and an amino group (-NH2).
Membrane proteins whose primary function is to facilitate the transport of molecules across a biological membrane. Included in this broad category are proteins involved in active transport (BIOLOGICAL TRANSPORT, ACTIVE), facilitated transport and ION CHANNELS.
A member of the alkali group of metals. It has the atomic symbol Na, atomic number 11, and atomic weight 23.
Derivatives of PHOSPHATIDYLCHOLINES obtained by their partial hydrolysis which removes one of the fatty acid moieties.
A cholinesterase inhibitor that is rapidly absorbed through membranes. It can be applied topically to the conjunctiva. It also can cross the blood-brain barrier and is used when central nervous system effects are desired, as in the treatment of severe anticholinergic toxicity.
Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.
The movement of materials (including biochemical substances and drugs) through a biological system at the cellular level. The transport can be across cell membranes and epithelial layers. It also can occur within intracellular compartments and extracellular compartments.
The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.
A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.
Tritium is an isotope of hydrogen (specifically, hydrogen-3) that contains one proton and two neutrons in its nucleus, making it radioactive with a half-life of about 12.3 years, and is used in various applications including nuclear research, illumination, and dating techniques due to its low energy beta decay.
A class of sphingolipids found largely in the brain and other nervous tissue. They contain phosphocholine or phosphoethanolamine as their polar head group so therefore are the only sphingolipids classified as PHOSPHOLIPIDS.
Unstable isotopes of carbon that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. C atoms with atomic weights 10, 11, and 14-16 are radioactive carbon isotopes.
A ZINC metalloenzyme that catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from BETAINE to HOMOCYSTEINE to produce dimethylglycine and METHIONINE, respectively. This enzyme is a member of a family of ZINC-dependent METHYLTRANSFERASES that use THIOLS or selenols as methyl acceptors.
GLYCEROPHOSPHOLIPIDS in which one of the two acyl chains is attached to glycerol with an ether alkenyl linkage instead of an ester as with the other glycerophospholipids.
The craniosacral division of the autonomic nervous system. The cell bodies of the parasympathetic preganglionic fibers are in brain stem nuclei and in the sacral spinal cord. They synapse in cranial autonomic ganglia or in terminal ganglia near target organs. The parasympathetic nervous system generally acts to conserve resources and restore homeostasis, often with effects reciprocal to the sympathetic nervous system.
Neurons whose primary neurotransmitter is ACETYLCHOLINE.
An enzyme found mostly in plant tissue. It hydrolyzes glycerophosphatidates with the formation of a phosphatidic acid and a nitrogenous base such as choline. This enzyme also catalyzes transphosphatidylation reactions. EC 3.1.4.4.
A class of enzymes that transfers nucleotidyl residues. EC 2.7.7.
A class of enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of phosphoglycerides or glycerophosphatidates. EC 3.1.-.
An element in the alkali metals family. It has the atomic symbol Li, atomic number 3, and atomic weight [6.938; 6.997]. Salts of lithium are used in treating BIPOLAR DISORDER.
Chromatography on thin layers of adsorbents rather than in columns. The adsorbent can be alumina, silica gel, silicates, charcoals, or cellulose. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
GRAY MATTER structures of the telencephalon and LIMBIC SYSTEM in the brain, but containing widely varying definitions among authors. Included here is the cortical septal area, subcortical SEPTAL NUCLEI, and the SEPTUM PELLUCIDUM.
An enzyme that catalyzes reversibly the transfer of phosphoethanolamine from CDP-ethanolamine to diacylglycerol to yield phosphatidylethanolamine (cephalin) and CMP. The enzyme is found in the endoplasmic reticulum. EC 2.7.8.1.
A family of proteins involved in the transport of organic cations. They play an important role in the elimination of a variety of endogenous substances, xenobiotics, and their metabolites from the body.
The movement of materials across cell membranes and epithelial layers against an electrochemical gradient, requiring the expenditure of metabolic energy.
An element in the alkali group of metals with an atomic symbol K, atomic number 19, and atomic weight 39.10. It is the chief cation in the intracellular fluid of muscle and other cells. Potassium ion is a strong electrolyte that plays a significant role in the regulation of fluid volume and maintenance of the WATER-ELECTROLYTE BALANCE.
A rather large group of enzymes comprising not only those transferring phosphate but also diphosphate, nucleotidyl residues, and others. These have also been subdivided according to the acceptor group. (From Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992) EC 2.7.
A member of the vitamin B family that stimulates the hematopoietic system. It is present in the liver and kidney and is found in mushrooms, spinach, yeast, green leaves, and grasses (POACEAE). Folic acid is used in the treatment and prevention of folate deficiencies and megaloblastic anemia.
The amounts of various substances in food needed by an organism to sustain healthy life.
A genus of asporogenous bacteria isolated from soil that displays a distinctive rod-coccus growth cycle.
One of the two major classes of cholinergic receptors. Nicotinic receptors were originally distinguished by their preference for NICOTINE over MUSCARINE. They are generally divided into muscle-type and neuronal-type (previously ganglionic) based on pharmacology, and subunit composition of the receptors.
A thiol-containing amino acid formed by a demethylation of METHIONINE.
A nutritional condition produced by a deficiency of FOLIC ACID in the diet. Many plant and animal tissues contain folic acid, abundant in green leafy vegetables, yeast, liver, and mushrooms but destroyed by long-term cooking. Alcohol interferes with its intermediate metabolism and absorption. Folic acid deficiency may develop in long-term anticonvulsant therapy or with use of oral contraceptives. This deficiency causes anemia, macrocytic anemia, and megaloblastic anemia. It is indistinguishable from vitamin B 12 deficiency in peripheral blood and bone marrow findings, but the neurologic lesions seen in B 12 deficiency do not occur. (Merck Manual, 16th ed)
Drugs that inhibit cholinesterases. The neurotransmitter ACETYLCHOLINE is rapidly hydrolyzed, and thereby inactivated, by cholinesterases. When cholinesterases are inhibited, the action of endogenously released acetylcholine at cholinergic synapses is potentiated. Cholinesterase inhibitors are widely used clinically for their potentiation of cholinergic inputs to the gastrointestinal tract and urinary bladder, the eye, and skeletal muscles; they are also used for their effects on the heart and the central nervous system.
Stable elementary particles having the smallest known positive charge, found in the nuclei of all elements. The proton mass is less than that of a neutron. A proton is the nucleus of the light hydrogen atom, i.e., the hydrogen ion.
A subclass of enzymes which includes all dehydrogenases acting on primary and secondary alcohols as well as hemiacetals. They are further classified according to the acceptor which can be NAD+ or NADP+ (subclass 1.1.1), cytochrome (1.1.2), oxygen (1.1.3), quinone (1.1.5), or another acceptor (1.1.99).
Stable carbon atoms that have the same atomic number as the element carbon, but differ in atomic weight. C-13 is a stable carbon isotope.
The basic cellular units of nervous tissue. Each neuron consists of a body, an axon, and dendrites. Their purpose is to receive, conduct, and transmit impulses in the NERVOUS SYSTEM.
Pinched-off nerve endings and their contents of vesicles and cytoplasm together with the attached subsynaptic area of the membrane of the post-synaptic cell. They are largely artificial structures produced by fractionation after selective centrifugation of nervous tissue homogenates.
Diglycerides are a type of glyceride, specifically a form of lipid, that contains two fatty acid chains linked to a glycerol molecule by ester bonds.
Derivatives of ammonium compounds, NH4+ Y-, in which all four of the hydrogens bonded to nitrogen have been replaced with hydrocarbyl groups. These are distinguished from IMINES which are RN=CR2.
A family of neurotransmitter transporter proteins that facilitate NEUROTRANSMITTER reuptake into PRESYNAPTIC TERMINALS. They may play a role in regulating the intensity and duration of neurotransmission.
Cytidine 5'-(trihydrogen diphosphate). A cytosine nucleotide containing two phosphate groups esterified to the sugar moiety. Synonyms: CRPP; cytidine pyrophosphate.
A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.
The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Genetically identical individuals developed from brother and sister matings which have been carried out for twenty or more generations or by parent x offspring matings carried out with certain restrictions. This also includes animals with a long history of closed colony breeding.
Tissue in the BASAL FOREBRAIN inferior to the anterior perforated substance, and anterior to the GLOBUS PALLIDUS and ansa lenticularis. It contains the BASAL NUCLEUS OF MEYNERT.
A cardioactive glycoside consisting of rhamnose and ouabagenin, obtained from the seeds of Strophanthus gratus and other plants of the Apocynaceae; used like DIGITALIS. It is commonly used in cell biological studies as an inhibitor of the NA(+)-K(+)-EXCHANGING ATPASE.
Drugs that bind to nicotinic cholinergic receptors (RECEPTORS, NICOTINIC) and block the actions of acetylcholine or cholinergic agonists. Nicotinic antagonists block synaptic transmission at autonomic ganglia, the skeletal neuromuscular junction, and at central nervous system nicotinic synapses.
A subclass of enzymes of the transferase class that catalyze the transfer of a methyl group from one compound to another. (Dorland, 28th ed) EC 2.1.1.
The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.
Physiologic methyl radical donor involved in enzymatic transmethylation reactions and present in all living organisms. It possesses anti-inflammatory activity and has been used in treatment of chronic liver disease. (From Merck, 11th ed)
Cholinesterases are a group of enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of acetylcholine and other choline esters, playing crucial roles in the termination of impulse transmission at cholinergic synapses and neuro-muscular junctions, and in the metabolism of certain drugs and toxic substances.
Clusters of neurons and their processes in the autonomic nervous system. In the autonomic ganglia, the preganglionic fibers from the central nervous system synapse onto the neurons whose axons are the postganglionic fibers innervating target organs. The ganglia also contain intrinsic neurons and supporting cells and preganglionic fibers passing through to other ganglia.
Fatty acid derivatives of glycerophosphates. They are composed of glycerol bound in ester linkage with 1 mole of phosphoric acid at the terminal 3-hydroxyl group and with 2 moles of fatty acids at the other two hydroxyl groups.
Changes in the amounts of various chemicals (neurotransmitters, receptors, enzymes, and other metabolites) specific to the area of the central nervous system contained within the head. These are monitored over time, during sensory stimulation, or under different disease states.
The lipid- and protein-containing, selectively permeable membrane that surrounds the cytoplasm in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.
Compounds that contain the decamethylenebis(trimethyl)ammonium radical. These compounds frequently act as neuromuscular depolarizing agents.
Physiological processes in biosynthesis (anabolism) and degradation (catabolism) of LIPIDS.
Stable sulfur atoms that have the same atomic number as the element sulfur, but differ in atomic weight. S-33, 34, and 36 are stable sulfur isotopes.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
A C19 norditerpenoid alkaloid (DITERPENES) from the root of ACONITUM plants. It activates VOLTAGE-GATED SODIUM CHANNELS. It has been used to induce ARRHYTHMIAS in experimental animals and it has antiinflammatory and antineuralgic properties.
An alkaloid, originally from Atropa belladonna, but found in other plants, mainly SOLANACEAE. Hyoscyamine is the 3(S)-endo isomer of atropine.
Products in capsule, tablet or liquid form that provide dietary ingredients, and that are intended to be taken by mouth to increase the intake of nutrients. Dietary supplements can include macronutrients, such as proteins, carbohydrates, and fats; and/or MICRONUTRIENTS, such as VITAMINS; MINERALS; and PHYTOCHEMICALS.
Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.
2-Amino-4-(ethylthio)butyric acid. An antimetabolite and methionine antagonist that interferes with amino acid incorporation into proteins and with cellular ATP utilization. It also produces liver neoplasms.
A basic element found in nearly all organized tissues. It is a member of the alkaline earth family of metals with the atomic symbol Ca, atomic number 20, and atomic weight 40. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body and combines with phosphorus to form calcium phosphate in the bones and teeth. It is essential for the normal functioning of nerves and muscles and plays a role in blood coagulation (as factor IV) and in many enzymatic processes.
Addition of methyl groups. In histo-chemistry methylation is used to esterify carboxyl groups and remove sulfate groups by treating tissue sections with hot methanol in the presence of hydrochloric acid. (From Stedman, 25th ed)
Drugs that interrupt transmission at the skeletal neuromuscular junction by causing sustained depolarization of the motor end plate. These agents are primarily used as adjuvants in surgical anesthesia to cause skeletal muscle relaxation.
An autolytic enzyme bound to the surface of bacterial cell walls. It catalyzes the hydrolysis of the link between N-acetylmuramoyl residues and L-amino acid residues in certain cell wall glycopeptides, particularly peptidoglycan. EC 3.5.1.28.
Phospholipids which have an alcohol moiety in ethereal linkage with a saturated or unsaturated aliphatic alcohol. They are usually derivatives of phosphoglycerols or phosphatidates. The other two alcohol groups of the glycerol backbone are usually in ester linkage. These compounds are widely distributed in animal tissues.
Ganglia of the sympathetic nervous system including the paravertebral and the prevertebral ganglia. Among these are the sympathetic chain ganglia, the superior, middle, and inferior cervical ganglia, and the aorticorenal, celiac, and stellate ganglia.
A curved elevation of GRAY MATTER extending the entire length of the floor of the TEMPORAL HORN of the LATERAL VENTRICLE (see also TEMPORAL LOBE). The hippocampus proper, subiculum, and DENTATE GYRUS constitute the hippocampal formation. Sometimes authors include the ENTORHINAL CORTEX in the hippocampal formation.
The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
'Methylamines' are organic compounds consisting of a methyl group (CH3) linked to an amino group (-NH2), with the general formula of CH3-NH-R, where R can be a hydrogen atom or any organic group, and they exist as colorless gases or liquids at room temperature.
Dimethylamines are organic compounds that contain two methyl groups (-CH3) bonded to a nitrogen atom (N), with the general formula (CH3)2NH. They can act as secondary amines and are commonly used in chemical synthesis, but they are not typically found as natural components in the human body.
Enzymes that catalyze the transfer of nitrogenous groups, primarily amino groups, from a donor, generally an amino acid, to an acceptor, usually a 2-oxoacid. EC 2.6.
The concentration of osmotically active particles in solution expressed in terms of osmoles of solute per liter of solution. Osmolality is expressed in terms of osmoles of solute per kilogram of solvent.
A group of water-soluble vitamins, some of which are COENZYMES.
A class of enzymes that transfers substituted phosphate groups. EC 2.7.8.
A common name used for the genus Cavia. The most common species is Cavia porcellus which is the domesticated guinea pig used for pets and biomedical research.
Branch-like terminations of NERVE FIBERS, sensory or motor NEURONS. Endings of sensory neurons are the beginnings of afferent pathway to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. Endings of motor neurons are the terminals of axons at the muscle cells. Nerve endings which release neurotransmitters are called PRESYNAPTIC TERMINALS.
Red blood cells. Mature erythrocytes are non-nucleated, biconcave disks containing HEMOGLOBIN whose function is to transport OXYGEN.
NERVE FIBERS which project from the central nervous system to AUTONOMIC GANGLIA. In the sympathetic division most preganglionic fibers originate with neurons in the intermediolateral column of the SPINAL CORD, exit via ventral roots from upper thoracic through lower lumbar segments, and project to the paravertebral ganglia; there they either terminate in SYNAPSES or continue through the SPLANCHNIC NERVES to the prevertebral ganglia. In the parasympathetic division the fibers originate in neurons of the BRAIN STEM and sacral spinal cord. In both divisions the principal transmitter is ACETYLCHOLINE but peptide cotransmitters may also be released.
An NADP-dependent oxidoreductase that catalyses the conversion of 5,10-methyleneterahydrofolate to 5,10-methenyl-tetrahydrofolate. In higher eukaryotes a trifunctional enzyme exists with additional METHENYLTETRAHYDROFOLATE CYCLOHYDROLASE and FORMATE-TETRAHYDROFOLATE LIGASE activity. The enzyme plays an important role in the synthesis of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate, the methyl donor for the VITAMIN B12-dependent remethylation of HOMOCYSTEINE to METHIONINE via METHIONINE SYNTHETASE.
The thin layer of GRAY MATTER on the surface of the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES that develops from the TELENCEPHALON and folds into gyri and sulchi. It reaches its highest development in humans and is responsible for intellectual faculties and higher mental functions.
A ubiquitous sodium salt that is commonly used to season food.
GLYCEROL esterified with FATTY ACIDS.
Lipids, predominantly phospholipids, cholesterol and small amounts of glycolipids found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. These lipids may be arranged in bilayers in the membranes with integral proteins between the layers and peripheral proteins attached to the outside. Membrane lipids are required for active transport, several enzymatic activities and membrane formation.
A local anesthetic of the amide type now generally used for surface anesthesia. It is one of the most potent and toxic of the long-acting local anesthetics and its parenteral use is restricted to spinal anesthesia. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1006)
A cholinesterase inhibitor used in the treatment of myasthenia gravis and to reverse the effects of muscle relaxants such as gallamine and tubocurarine. Neostigmine, unlike PHYSOSTIGMINE, does not cross the blood-brain barrier.
A generic term for fats and lipoids, the alcohol-ether-soluble constituents of protoplasm, which are insoluble in water. They comprise the fats, fatty oils, essential oils, waxes, phospholipids, glycolipids, sulfolipids, aminolipids, chromolipids (lipochromes), and fatty acids. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
4-Hydroxy-1-(beta-D-ribofuranosyl)-2-pyridinone. Analog of uridine lacking a ring-nitrogen in the 3-position. Functions as an antineoplastic agent.
A constituent of STRIATED MUSCLE and LIVER. It is an amino acid derivative and an essential cofactor for fatty acid metabolism.
An enzyme that catalyzes the formation of O-acetylcarnitine from acetyl-CoA plus carnitine. EC 2.3.1.7.
Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.
The consequences of exposing the FETUS in utero to certain factors, such as NUTRITION PHYSIOLOGICAL PHENOMENA; PHYSIOLOGICAL STRESS; DRUGS; RADIATION; and other physical or chemical factors. These consequences are observed later in the offspring after BIRTH.
The study of the composition, chemical structures, and chemical reactions of the NERVOUS SYSTEM or its components.
Nutrition of a mother which affects the health of the FETUS and INFANT as well as herself.
The anterior of the three primitive cerebral vesicles of the embryonic brain arising from the NEURAL TUBE. It subdivides to form DIENCEPHALON and TELENCEPHALON. (Stedmans Medical Dictionary, 27th ed)
Drugs that bind to and activate nicotinic cholinergic receptors (RECEPTORS, NICOTINIC). Nicotinic agonists act at postganglionic nicotinic receptors, at neuroeffector junctions in the peripheral nervous system, and at nicotinic receptors in the central nervous system. Agents that function as neuromuscular depolarizing blocking agents are included here because they activate nicotinic receptors, although they are used clinically to block nicotinic transmission.
Lipid infiltration of the hepatic parenchymal cells resulting in a yellow-colored liver. The abnormal lipid accumulation is usually in the form of TRIGLYCERIDES, either as a single large droplet or multiple small droplets. Fatty liver is caused by an imbalance in the metabolism of FATTY ACIDS.
A triangular double membrane separating the anterior horns of the LATERAL VENTRICLES of the brain. It is situated in the median plane and bounded by the CORPUS CALLOSUM and the body and columns of the FORNIX (BRAIN).
The study of the relationship between NUTRITIONAL PHYSIOLOGY and genetic makeup. It includes the effect of different food components on GENE EXPRESSION and how variations in GENES effect responses to food components.
An analytical technique for resolution of a chemical mixture into its component compounds. Compounds are separated on an adsorbent paper (stationary phase) by their varied degree of solubility/mobility in the eluting solvent (mobile phase).
The voltage differences across a membrane. For cellular membranes they are computed by subtracting the voltage measured outside the membrane from the voltage measured inside the membrane. They result from differences of inside versus outside concentration of potassium, sodium, chloride, and other ions across cells' or ORGANELLES membranes. For excitable cells, the resting membrane potentials range between -30 and -100 millivolts. Physical, chemical, or electrical stimuli can make a membrane potential more negative (hyperpolarization), or less negative (depolarization).
Positively charged atoms, radicals or group of atoms with a valence of plus 1, which travel to the cathode or negative pole during electrolysis.
The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.
The process of cleaving a chemical compound by the addition of a molecule of water.
An enzyme that catalyzes the formation of phosphatidylserine and CMP from CDPdiglyceride plus serine. EC 2.7.8.8.
A quality of cell membranes which permits the passage of solvents and solutes into and out of cells.
The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.
Organic, monobasic acids derived from hydrocarbons by the equivalent of oxidation of a methyl group to an alcohol, aldehyde, and then acid. Fatty acids are saturated and unsaturated (FATTY ACIDS, UNSATURATED). (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
An organic cation transporter found in kidney. It is localized to the basal lateral membrane and is likely to be involved in the renal secretion of organic cations.
Alkaloids extracted from various species of Cinchona.
The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.
Transport proteins that carry specific substances in the blood or across cell membranes.
A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.
Drugs that inhibit the transport of neurotransmitters into axon terminals or into storage vesicles within terminals. For many transmitters, uptake determines the time course of transmitter action so inhibiting uptake prolongs the activity of the transmitter. Blocking uptake may also deplete available transmitter stores. Many clinically important drugs are uptake inhibitors although the indirect reactions of the brain rather than the acute block of uptake itself is often responsible for the therapeutic effects.
The pressure required to prevent the passage of solvent through a semipermeable membrane that separates a pure solvent from a solution of the solvent and solute or that separates different concentrations of a solution. It is proportional to the osmolality of the solution.
The balance of fluid in the BODY FLUID COMPARTMENTS; total BODY WATER; BLOOD VOLUME; EXTRACELLULAR SPACE; INTRACELLULAR SPACE, maintained by processes in the body that regulate the intake and excretion of WATER and ELECTROLYTES, particularly SODIUM and POTASSIUM.
A metallic element that has the atomic symbol Mg, atomic number 12, and atomic weight 24.31. It is important for the activity of many enzymes, especially those involved in OXIDATIVE PHOSPHORYLATION.
Inorganic compounds derived from hydrochloric acid that contain the Cl- ion.
Deuterium. The stable isotope of hydrogen. It has one neutron and one proton in the nucleus.
A piperidine botanical insecticide.
Derivatives of phosphatidic acid in which the hydrophobic regions are composed of two fatty acids and a polar alcohol is joined to the C-3 position of glycerol through a phosphodiester bond. They are named according to their polar head groups, such as phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine.
Any liquid or solid preparation made specifically for the growth, storage, or transport of microorganisms or other types of cells. The variety of media that exist allow for the culturing of specific microorganisms and cell types, such as differential media, selective media, test media, and defined media. Solid media consist of liquid media that have been solidified with an agent such as AGAR or GELATIN.
In ruminants, the stomach is a complex, multi-chambered organ consisting of the rumen, reticulum, omasum, and abomasum, which functions to soften and breakdown ingested plant material through microbial fermentation and mechanical churning before further digestion in the small intestine.
Nutrition of FEMALE during PREGNANCY.
Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.
A characteristic feature of enzyme activity in relation to the kind of substrate on which the enzyme or catalytic molecule reacts.
Clusters of multipolar neurons surrounded by a capsule of loosely organized CONNECTIVE TISSUE located outside the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.
The fourth stomach of ruminating animals. It is also called the "true" stomach. It is an elongated pear-shaped sac lying on the floor of the abdomen, on the right-hand side, and roughly between the seventh and twelfth ribs. It leads to the beginning of the small intestine. (From Black's Veterinary Dictionary, 17th ed)
Learning the correct route through a maze to obtain reinforcement. It is used for human or animal populations. (Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 6th ed)
Refers to animals in the period of time just after birth.
Drugs that bind to but do not activate MUSCARINIC RECEPTORS, thereby blocking the actions of endogenous ACETYLCHOLINE or exogenous agonists. Muscarinic antagonists have widespread effects including actions on the iris and ciliary muscle of the eye, the heart and blood vessels, secretions of the respiratory tract, GI system, and salivary glands, GI motility, urinary bladder tone, and the central nervous system.
5'-S-(3-Amino-3-carboxypropyl)-5'-thioadenosine. Formed from S-adenosylmethionine after transmethylation reactions.
Enzymes from the transferase class that catalyze the transfer of acyl groups from donor to acceptor, forming either esters or amides. (From Enzyme Nomenclature 1992) EC 2.3.
One of the two major classes of cholinergic receptors. Muscarinic receptors were originally defined by their preference for MUSCARINE over NICOTINE. There are several subtypes (usually M1, M2, M3....) that are characterized by their cellular actions, pharmacology, and molecular biology.
A species of the genus SACCHAROMYCES, family Saccharomycetaceae, order Saccharomycetales, known as "baker's" or "brewer's" yeast. The dried form is used as a dietary supplement.
RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.
A gram-positive organism found in the upper respiratory tract, inflammatory exudates, and various body fluids of normal and/or diseased humans and, rarely, domestic animals.
An agent used as a substrate in assays for cholinesterases, especially to discriminate among enzyme types.
Any diagnostic evaluation using radioactive (unstable) isotopes. This diagnosis includes many nuclear medicine procedures as well as radioimmunoassay tests.
The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.
An enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of a single fatty acid ester bond in lysoglycerophosphatidates with the formation of glyceryl phosphatidates and a fatty acid. EC 3.1.1.5.
The decrease in a measurable parameter of a PHYSIOLOGICAL PROCESS, including cellular, microbial, and plant; immunological, cardiovascular, respiratory, reproductive, urinary, digestive, neural, musculoskeletal, ocular, and skin physiological processes; or METABOLIC PROCESS, including enzymatic and other pharmacological processes, by a drug or other chemical.
Butanes are flammable, colorless gases with a mild petroleum-like odor, consisting of either one of two isomeric forms of butane (n-butane or isobutane), used primarily as fuel, in the production of a wide range of chemicals, and as a refrigerant.
Accumulation of a drug or chemical substance in various organs (including those not relevant to its pharmacologic or therapeutic action). This distribution depends on the blood flow or perfusion rate of the organ, the ability of the drug to penetrate organ membranes, tissue specificity, protein binding. The distribution is usually expressed as tissue to plasma ratios.
A freshwater fish used as an experimental organism and for food. This genus of the family Cichlidae (CICHLIDS) inhabits Central and South America (one species extends north into Texas), West Indies, Africa, Madagascar, Syria, and coastal India.
Substances used for their pharmacological actions on any aspect of neurotransmitter systems. Neurotransmitter agents include agonists, antagonists, degradation inhibitors, uptake inhibitors, depleters, precursors, and modulators of receptor function.
Cell surface proteins that bind acetylcholine with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes influencing the behavior of cells. Cholinergic receptors are divided into two major classes, muscarinic and nicotinic, based originally on their affinity for nicotine and muscarine. Each group is further subdivided based on pharmacology, location, mode of action, and/or molecular biology.
Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.
A complex mixture of PHOSPHOLIPIDS; GLYCOLIPIDS; and TRIGLYCERIDES; with substantial amounts of PHOSPHATIDYLCHOLINES; PHOSPHATIDYLETHANOLAMINES; and PHOSPHATIDYLINOSITOLS, which are sometimes loosely termed as 1,2-diacyl-3-phosphocholines. Lecithin is a component of the CELL MEMBRANE and commercially extracted from SOYBEANS and EGG YOLK. The emulsifying and surfactant properties are useful in FOOD ADDITIVES and for forming organogels (GELS).
An alkaloid from SOLANACEAE, especially DATURA and SCOPOLIA. Scopolamine and its quaternary derivatives act as antimuscarinics like ATROPINE, but may have more central nervous system effects. Among the many uses are as an anesthetic premedication, in URINARY INCONTINENCE, in MOTION SICKNESS, as an antispasmodic, and as a mydriatic and cycloplegic.
Neurotoxic proteins from the venom of the banded or Formosan krait (Bungarus multicinctus, an elapid snake). alpha-Bungarotoxin blocks nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and has been used to isolate and study them; beta- and gamma-bungarotoxins act presynaptically causing acetylcholine release and depletion. Both alpha and beta forms have been characterized, the alpha being similar to the large, long or Type II neurotoxins from other elapid venoms.
A nonmetallic element with atomic symbol C, atomic number 6, and atomic weight [12.0096; 12.0116]. It may occur as several different allotropes including DIAMOND; CHARCOAL; and GRAPHITE; and as SOOT from incompletely burned fuel.
Compounds in which one or more of the three hydroxyl groups of glycerol are in ethereal linkage with a saturated or unsaturated aliphatic alcohol; one or two of the hydroxyl groups of glycerol may be esterified. These compounds have been found in various animal tissue.
Contractile tissue that produces movement in animals.
An element that is an alkali metal. It has an atomic symbol Rb, atomic number 37, and atomic weight 85.47. It is used as a chemical reagent and in the manufacture of photoelectric cells.
Derivatives of phosphatidic acids in which the phosphoric acid is bound in ester linkage to a serine moiety. Complete hydrolysis yields 1 mole of glycerol, phosphoric acid and serine and 2 moles of fatty acids.
Coenzyme A is an essential coenzyme that plays a crucial role in various metabolic processes, particularly in the transfer and activation of acetyl groups in important biochemical reactions such as fatty acid synthesis and oxidation, and the citric acid cycle.
Cytosine nucleotides are organic compounds that consist of a nitrogenous base (cytosine), a pentose sugar (ribose in RNA or deoxyribose in DNA), and at least one phosphate group, playing crucial roles in genetic information storage, transmission, and expression within nucleic acids.
Compounds containing polymethylene bis-trimethylammonium cations. Members of this group frequently act as ganglionic blockers and neuromuscular depolarizing agents.
Derivatives of phosphatidic acids in which the phosphoric acid is bound in ester linkage to the hexahydroxy alcohol, myo-inositol. Complete hydrolysis yields 1 mole of glycerol, phosphoric acid, myo-inositol, and 2 moles of fatty acids.
Use of electric potential or currents to elicit biological responses.
A butyryl-beta-alanine that can also be viewed as pantoic acid complexed with BETA ALANINE. It is incorporated into COENZYME A and protects cells against peroxidative damage by increasing the level of GLUTATHIONE.

Dietary control of triglyceride and phospholipid synthesis in rat liver slices. (1/2759)

1. The effect of dietary manipulation on the synthesis of triglycerides and phospholipids was investigated by determining the incorporation of labeled long-chain fatty acid or glycerol into these lipids in liver slices derived from normally fed, fasted, and fat-free refed rats. 2. Triglyceride synthesis was affected markedly by the dietary regime of the animal; the lowest rates were measured with fasted rats, and the highest ones with fat-free refed rats. 3. In contrast to triglyceride synthesis, phospholipid synthesis occured at virtually constant rates regardless of the dietary conditions. 4. Addition of large amounts of fatty acid to the incubation mixture resulted in a marked stimulation of triglyceride synthesis, whereas phospholipid synthesis was affected to a much smaller extent. 5. These results indicate that the synthesis of triglycerides and that of phospholipids are controlled independently, and that the availability of fatty acid in the cell contributes to the control of triglyceride synthesis.  (+info)

Inhibition of Echovirus-12 multiplication by N-carbobenzoxy-D-glucosamine. (2/2759)

The glucosamine derivative, N-carbobenzoxy-D-glucosamine (NCBZG) inhibits the multiplication of Echovirus-12 and the synthesis of both virus RNA and protein at a stage in the virus growth cycle after attachment and penetration. However, the compound does not inhibit virus multiplication after the appearance of progeny virus nor after virus RNA has accumulated. Incorporation of radioactive glucosamine and choline into infected and uninfected cultures is inhibited by NCBZG as is the virus-induced increase in choline incorporation. The compound also prevents the appearance of radioactive choline in isolated membranous structures. The compound did not alter significantly the cellular RNA or protein synthesis, plating efficiency of the cells, their growth over a period of several days, nor the virus-directed inhibition of cellular RNA and protein. These findings suggest that the compound inhibits virus multiplication by its effect on the initiation of biosynthesis which appears to require membrane synthesis.  (+info)

Glycine betaine: reserve form of choline in Penicillium fellutanum in low-sulfate medium. (3/2759)

In spite of choline's importance in fungal metabolism, its sources in cytoplasm have not been fully established. 13C nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of mycelial extracts from day-5 Penicillium fellutanum cultures showed that, as well as choline-O-sulfate, intracellular glycine betaine is another reserve form of choline, depending on the availability of sulfate in the culture medium. These observations are discussed relative to the multiple roles of choline and its precursors in P. fellutanum.  (+info)

Central nervous system-mediated hyperglycemic effects of NIK-247, a cholinesterase inhibitor, and MKC-231, a choline uptake enhancer, in rats. (4/2759)

We investigated the effects of intracerebroventricular administration of NIK-247 (9-amino-2,3,5,6,7,8-hexahydro-1H-cyclo-penta(b)-quinoline monohydrate hydrochloride; a cholinesterase inhibitor) or MKC-231 (2-(2-oxypyrrolidin-1-yl)-N-(2,3-dimethyl-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrofur o[2,3-b]quinolin-4-yl) acetoamide; a choline uptake enhancer) on plasma glucose level in comparison with that of neostigmine administration in rats. The extents of NIK-247- and MKC-231-induced hyperglycemia were considerably less than that by neostigmine, suggesting that the potencies of the drugs to produce the peripheral hyperglycemia may be pharmacologically negligible.  (+info)

Folate nutriture alters choline status of women and men fed low choline diets. (5/2759)

Choline and folate share methylation pathways and, in studies of rats, were shown to be metabolically inter-related. To determine whether choline status is related to folate intake in humans, we measured the effect of controlled folate depletion and repletion on the plasma choline and phosphatidylcholine concentrations of 11 healthy men (33-46 y) and 10 healthy women (49-63 y) fed low-choline diets in two separate metabolic unit studies. Total folate intake was varied by supplementing low folate (25 and 56 microg/d for men and women, respectively) and low choline (238 and 147 mg/d for men and women, respectively) diets with pteroylglutamic acid for 2-6 wk following folate-depletion periods of 4-5 wk. The low folate/choline intakes resulted in subclinical folate deficiencies; mean plasma choline decreases of 28 and 25% in the men and women, respectively; and a plasma phosphatidylcholine decrease of 26% in the men (P < 0. 05). No functional choline deficiency occurred, as measured by serum transaminase and lipid concentrations. The decreases in choline status measures returned to baseline or higher upon moderate folate repletion and were more responsive to folate repletion than plasma folate and homocysteine. Feeding methionine supplements to the men did not prevent plasma choline depletion, indicating that folate is a more limiting nutrient for these methylation pathways. The results indicate that 1) choline is utilized as a methyl donor when folate intake is low, 2) the de novo synthesis of phosphatidylcholine is insufficient to maintain choline status when intakes of folate and choline are low, and 3) dietary choline is required by adults in an amount > 250 mg/d to maintain plasma choline and phosphatidylcholine when folate intake is low.  (+info)

Choline and selective antagonists identify two subtypes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors that modulate GABA release from CA1 interneurons in rat hippocampal slices. (6/2759)

Neuronal nicotinic receptors (nAChR) are known to control transmitter release in the CNS. Thus, this study was aimed at exploring the diversity and localization of nAChRs present in CA1 interneurons in rat hippocampal slices. The use of a U-tube as the agonist delivery system was critical for the reliable detection of nicotinic responses induced by brief exposure of the neurons to ACh or to the alpha7 nAChR-selective agonist choline. The present study demonstrated that CA1 interneurons, in addition to expressing functional alpha7 nAChRs, also express functional alpha4beta2-like nAChRs and that activation of both receptors facilitates an action potential-dependent release of GABA. Depending on the experimental condition, one of the following nicotinic responses was recorded from the interneurons by means of the patch-clamp technique: a nicotinic whole-cell current, depolarization accompanied by action potentials, or GABA-mediated postsynaptic currents (PSCs). Responses mediated by alpha7 nAChRs were short-lasting, whereas those mediated by alpha4beta2 nAChRs were long-lasting. Thus, phasic or tonic inhibition of CA1 interneurons may be achieved by selective activation of alpha7 or alpha4beta2 nAChRs, respectively. It can also be suggested that synaptic levels of choline generated by hydrolysis of ACh in vivo may be sufficient to control the activity of the alpha7 nAChRs. The finding that methyllycaconitine and dihydro-beta-erythroidine (antagonists of alpha7 and alpha4beta2 nAChRs, respectively) increased the frequency and amplitude of GABAergic PSCs suggests that there is an intrinsic cholinergic activity that sustains a basal level of nAChR activity in these interneurons.  (+info)

Absolute quantification of brain metabolites by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in normal-appearing white matter of multiple sclerosis patients. (7/2759)

The aim of this research was to obtain an absolute quantification of the N-acetyl-aspartate, choline, creatine and phosphocreatine levels in normal-appearing white matter by means of 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy in a group of multiple sclerosis patients (27 with the relapsing-remitting form and 13 with the secondary progressive form). These values were compared with those of a group of 12 age-matched healthy control subjects. A significant decrease in the N-acetyl-aspartate concentration was found in normal-appearing white matter of frontal and parietal brain areas in multiple sclerosis patients compared with the same areas in control subjects. This reduction was more evident in progressive patients. The decrease in the N-acetyl-aspartate concentration in normal-appearing white matter significantly correlated with the Expanded Disability Status and the lesional load. No significant change was found in the concentration of creatine or choline. This finding concurs with previous evidence of heterogeneity in the multiple sclerosis pathological process which is not confined to the lesions and involves not only myelin, but also axons, even in white matter which appears normal on MRI.  (+info)

The choline-converting pathway in Staphylococcus xylosus C2A: genetic and physiological characterization. (8/2759)

A Staphylococcus xylosus C2A gene cluster, which encodes enzymes in the pathway for choline uptake and dehydrogenation (cud), to form the osmoprotectant glycine betaine, was identified. The cud locus comprises four genes, three of which encode proteins with significant similarities to those known to be involved in choline transport and conversion in other organisms. The physiological role of the gene products was confirmed by analysis of cud deletion mutants. The fourth gene possibly codes for a regulator protein. Part of the gene cluster was shown to be transcriptionally regulated by choline and elevated NaCl concentrations as inducers.  (+info)

Choline kinase is an enzyme that plays a role in the synthesis of phosphatidylcholine, a major component of cell membranes. It catalyzes the phosphorylation of choline to form phosphocholine, which is then used in the synthesis of phosphatidylcholine. Choline kinase exists as multiple isoforms, and its activity has been found to be elevated in some types of cancer cells, making it a potential target for cancer therapy.

Choline O-Acetyltransferase (COAT, ChAT) is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the synthesis of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. It catalyzes the transfer of an acetyl group from acetyl CoA to choline, resulting in the formation of acetylcholine. Acetylcholine is a vital neurotransmitter involved in various physiological processes such as memory, cognition, and muscle contraction. COAT is primarily located in cholinergic neurons, which are nerve cells that use acetylcholine to transmit signals to other neurons or muscles. Inhibition of ChAT can lead to a decrease in acetylcholine levels and may contribute to neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and myasthenia gravis.

Choline deficiency is a condition that occurs when an individual's diet does not provide adequate amounts of choline, which is an essential nutrient required for various bodily functions. Choline plays a crucial role in the synthesis of phospholipids, which are critical components of cell membranes, and it also serves as a precursor to the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, which is involved in memory, muscle control, and other nervous system functions.

Choline deficiency can lead to several health problems, including fatty liver disease, muscle damage, and cognitive impairment. Symptoms of choline deficiency may include fatigue, memory loss, cognitive decline, and peripheral neuropathy. In severe cases, it can also cause liver dysfunction and even liver failure.

It is important to note that choline deficiency is relatively rare in the general population, as many foods contain choline, including eggs, meat, fish, dairy products, and certain vegetables such as broccoli and Brussels sprouts. However, some individuals may be at higher risk of choline deficiency, including pregnant women, postmenopausal women, and those with certain genetic mutations that affect choline metabolism. In these cases, supplementation with choline may be necessary to prevent deficiency.

Hemicholinium 3 is not a medical term, but it is a chemical compound that has been used in research related to the nervous system. It is primarily used as a research tool to study the transmission of nerve impulses.

In scientific terms, Hemicholinium 3 is an inhibitor of choline transport. Choline is a molecule required for the synthesis of acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter that plays a crucial role in transmitting signals between nerves and muscles. By blocking the reuptake of choline into the presynaptic nerve terminal, Hemicholinium 3 reduces the amount of acetylcholine available for release, which can affect nerve impulse transmission.

While Hemicholinium 3 has been used in research to help understand the mechanisms of nerve impulse transmission and cholinergic neurotransmission, it is not used clinically in medical practice.

Betaine, also known as trimethylglycine, is a naturally occurring compound that can be found in various foods such as beets, spinach, and whole grains. In the body, betaine functions as an osmolyte, helping to regulate water balance in cells, and as a methyl donor, contributing to various metabolic processes including the conversion of homocysteine to methionine.

In medical terms, betaine is also used as a dietary supplement and medication. Betaine hydrochloride is a form of betaine that is sometimes used as a supplement to help with digestion by providing additional stomach acid. Betaine anhydrous, on the other hand, is often used as a supplement for improving athletic performance and promoting liver health.

Betaine has also been studied for its potential role in protecting against various diseases, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and neurological disorders. However, more research is needed to fully understand its mechanisms of action and therapeutic potential.

Cytidine diphosphate choline (CDP-choline) is a biomolecule that plays a crucial role in the synthesis of phosphatidylcholine, a major component of cellular membranes. It is formed from the reaction between cytidine triphosphate (CTP) and choline, catalyzed by the enzyme CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase. CDP-choline serves as an essential intermediate in the Kennedy pathway of phosphatidylcholine synthesis. This molecule is also involved in various cellular processes, including signal transduction and neurotransmitter synthesis. CDP-choline has been studied for its potential therapeutic benefits in several neurological disorders due to its role in supporting membrane integrity and promoting neuronal health.

Choline dehydrogenase is an enzyme that plays a role in the metabolism of choline, a nutrient that is essential for the normal functioning of cells. Specifically, choline dehydrogenase helps to catalyze the oxidation of choline to betaine aldehyde, which is then further metabolized to betaine. This reaction is an important step in the conversion of choline to a molecule called glycine betaine, which helps to regulate cell volume and protect cells from osmotic stress. Choline dehydrogenase is found in various tissues throughout the body, including the liver, kidneys, and brain. Deficiencies in choline or dysfunction of choline dehydrogenase can lead to a variety of health problems, including fatty liver disease, muscle damage, and neurological disorders.

Phosphatidylcholines (PtdCho) are a type of phospholipids that are essential components of cell membranes in living organisms. They are composed of a hydrophilic head group, which contains a choline moiety, and two hydrophobic fatty acid chains. Phosphatidylcholines are crucial for maintaining the structural integrity and function of cell membranes, and they also serve as important precursors for the synthesis of signaling molecules such as acetylcholine. They can be found in various tissues and biological fluids, including blood, and are abundant in foods such as soybeans, eggs, and meat. Phosphatidylcholines have been studied for their potential health benefits, including their role in maintaining healthy lipid metabolism and reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease.

Phosphorylcholine is not a medical condition or disease, but rather a chemical compound. It is the choline ester of phosphoric acid, and it plays an important role in the structure and function of cell membranes. Phosphorylcholine is also found in certain types of lipoproteins, including low-density lipoprotein (LDL) or "bad" cholesterol.

In the context of medical research and therapy, phosphorylcholine has been studied for its potential role in various diseases, such as atherosclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, and other inflammatory conditions. Some studies have suggested that phosphorylcholine may contribute to the development of these diseases by promoting inflammation and immune responses. However, more research is needed to fully understand the role of phosphorylcholine in human health and disease.

Phosphatidylethanolamine N-Methyltransferase (PEMT) is an enzyme that plays a role in the synthesis of phosphatidylcholine, a major phospholipid component of cell membranes. The enzyme catalyzes the transfer of methyl groups from S-adenosylmethionine to phosphatidylethanolamine, converting it into phosphatidylcholine in a three-step methylation process. This enzyme is found primarily in the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria of cells and has implications in lipid metabolism, liver function, and inflammation. Genetic variations and altered expression levels of PEMT have been associated with various diseases, including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, cardiovascular disease, and neurological disorders.

Glycerylphosphorylcholine (GPC) is not typically considered a medical term, but it is a choline-containing phospholipid that can be found in various tissues and fluids within the human body. It is also available as a dietary supplement. Here's a definition of Glycerylphosphorylcholine:

Glycerylphosphorylcholine (GPC) is a natural choline-containing compound that is present in various tissues and fluids within the human body, including neural tissue, muscle, and blood. It plays an essential role in the synthesis of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, which is involved in memory, learning, and other cognitive functions. GPC can also be found in some foods, such as egg yolks and soybeans, and is available as a dietary supplement. In the body, GPC can be converted to phosphatidylcholine, another important phospholipid that is necessary for maintaining cell membrane structure and function.

Ethanolamine is an organic compound that is a primary amine and a secondary alcohol. It is a colorless, viscous liquid with an odor similar to ammonia. Ethanolamine is used in the manufacture of a wide variety of products including detergents, pharmaceuticals, polishes, inks, textiles, and plastics. In the body, ethanolamine is a component of many important molecules, such as phosphatidylethanolamine, which is a major constituent of cell membranes. It is also involved in the synthesis of neurotransmitters and hormones.

Lipotropic agents are substances that help to promote the breakdown and removal of fats from the liver. They are often used in weight loss supplements because they can help to speed up the metabolism of fat and prevent the accumulation of excess fat in the liver. Some common lipotropic agents include methionine, choline, inositol, and betaine. These compounds work by increasing the production of lecithin, which helps to emulsify fats in the liver and facilitate their transport out of the body. Additionally, lipotropic agents can also help to protect the liver from damage caused by toxins such as alcohol and drugs.

Deanol, also known as dimethylaminoethanol or DMAE, is a naturally occurring compound that is found in small amounts in certain foods, such as anchovies and sardines. It is also available as a dietary supplement. Deanol is a precursor to choline, which is a nutrient that is essential for the synthesis of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine.

Deanol has been studied for its potential effects on various aspects of mental and physical health. Some proponents of deanol claim that it can improve memory, concentration, and intelligence, as well as reduce symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and Alzheimer's disease. However, there is limited scientific evidence to support these claims, and more research is needed to confirm the potential benefits of deanol.

It is important to note that deanol can have side effects, including headache, dizziness, insomnia, and increased blood pressure. It may also interact with certain medications, so it is important to speak with a healthcare provider before taking deanol or any other dietary supplement.

Acetylcholine is a neurotransmitter, a type of chemical messenger that transmits signals across a chemical synapse from one neuron (nerve cell) to another "target" neuron, muscle cell, or gland cell. It is involved in both peripheral and central nervous system functions.

In the peripheral nervous system, acetylcholine acts as a neurotransmitter at the neuromuscular junction, where it transmits signals from motor neurons to activate muscles. Acetylcholine also acts as a neurotransmitter in the autonomic nervous system, where it is involved in both the sympathetic and parasympathetic systems.

In the central nervous system, acetylcholine plays a role in learning, memory, attention, and arousal. Disruptions in cholinergic neurotransmission have been implicated in several neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and myasthenia gravis.

Acetylcholine is synthesized from choline and acetyl-CoA by the enzyme choline acetyltransferase and is stored in vesicles at the presynaptic terminal of the neuron. When a nerve impulse arrives, the vesicles fuse with the presynaptic membrane, releasing acetylcholine into the synapse. The acetylcholine then binds to receptors on the postsynaptic membrane, triggering a response in the target cell. Acetylcholine is subsequently degraded by the enzyme acetylcholinesterase, which terminates its action and allows for signal transduction to be repeated.

Sarcosine is not a medical condition or disease, but rather it is an organic compound that is classified as a natural amino acid. It is a metabolite that can be found in the human body, and it is involved in various biochemical processes. Specifically, sarcosine is formed from the conversion of the amino acid glycine by the enzyme glycine sarcosine N-methyltransferase (GSMT) and is then converted to glycine betaine (also known as trimethylglycine) by the enzyme betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase (BHMT).

Abnormal levels of sarcosine have been found in various disease states, including cancer. Some studies have suggested that high levels of sarcosine in urine or prostate tissue may be associated with an increased risk of developing prostate cancer or a more aggressive form of the disease. However, more research is needed to confirm these findings and establish the clinical significance of sarcosine as a biomarker for cancer or other diseases.

Phospholipids are a major class of lipids that consist of a hydrophilic (water-attracting) head and two hydrophobic (water-repelling) tails. The head is composed of a phosphate group, which is often bound to an organic molecule such as choline, ethanolamine, serine or inositol. The tails are made up of two fatty acid chains.

Phospholipids are a key component of cell membranes and play a crucial role in maintaining the structural integrity and function of the cell. They form a lipid bilayer, with the hydrophilic heads facing outwards and the hydrophobic tails facing inwards, creating a barrier that separates the interior of the cell from the outside environment.

Phospholipids are also involved in various cellular processes such as signal transduction, intracellular trafficking, and protein function regulation. Additionally, they serve as emulsifiers in the digestive system, helping to break down fats in the diet.

Ethanolamines are a class of organic compounds that contain an amino group (-NH2) and a hydroxyl group (-OH) attached to a carbon atom. They are derivatives of ammonia (NH3) in which one or two hydrogen atoms have been replaced by a ethanol group (-CH2CH2OH).

The most common ethanolamines are:

* Monethanolamine (MEA), also called 2-aminoethanol, with the formula HOCH2CH2NH2.
* Diethanolamine (DEA), also called 2,2'-iminobisethanol, with the formula HOCH2CH2NHCH2CH2OH.
* Triethanolamine (TEA), also called 2,2',2''-nitrilotrisethanol, with the formula N(CH2CH2OH)3.

Ethanolamines are used in a wide range of industrial and consumer products, including as solvents, emulsifiers, detergents, pharmaceuticals, and personal care products. They also have applications as intermediates in the synthesis of other chemicals. In the body, ethanolamines play important roles in various biological processes, such as neurotransmission and cell signaling.

Creatine is a organic acid that is produced naturally in the liver, kidneys and pancreas. It is also found in small amounts in certain foods such as meat and fish. The chemical formula for creatine is C4H9N3O2. In the body, creatine is converted into creatine phosphate, which is used to help produce energy during high-intensity exercise, such as weightlifting or sprinting.

Creatine can also be taken as a dietary supplement, in the form of creatine monohydrate, with the goal of increasing muscle creatine and phosphocreatine levels, which may improve athletic performance and help with muscle growth. However, it is important to note that while some studies have found that creatine supplementation can improve exercise performance and muscle mass in certain populations, others have not found significant benefits.

Creatine supplements are generally considered safe when used as directed, but they can cause side effects such as weight gain, stomach discomfort, and muscle cramps in some people. It is always recommended to consult a healthcare professional before starting any new supplement regimen.

Phosphatidylethanolamines (PE) are a type of phospholipid that are abundantly found in the cell membranes of living organisms. They play a crucial role in maintaining the structural integrity and functionality of the cell membrane. PE contains a hydrophilic head, which consists of an ethanolamine group linked to a phosphate group, and two hydrophobic fatty acid chains. This unique structure allows PE to form a lipid bilayer, where the hydrophilic heads face outwards and interact with the aqueous environment, while the hydrophobic tails face inwards and interact with each other.

PE is also involved in various cellular processes, such as membrane trafficking, autophagy, and signal transduction. Additionally, PE can be modified by the addition of various functional groups or molecules, which can further regulate its functions and interactions within the cell. Overall, phosphatidylethanolamines are essential components of cellular membranes and play a critical role in maintaining cellular homeostasis.

Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) is a non-invasive diagnostic technique that provides information about the biochemical composition of tissues, including their metabolic state. It is often used in conjunction with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) to analyze various metabolites within body tissues, such as the brain, heart, liver, and muscles.

During MRS, a strong magnetic field, radio waves, and a computer are used to produce detailed images and data about the concentration of specific metabolites in the targeted tissue or organ. This technique can help detect abnormalities related to energy metabolism, neurotransmitter levels, pH balance, and other biochemical processes, which can be useful for diagnosing and monitoring various medical conditions, including cancer, neurological disorders, and metabolic diseases.

There are different types of MRS, such as Proton (^1^H) MRS, Phosphorus-31 (^31^P) MRS, and Carbon-13 (^13^C) MRS, each focusing on specific elements or metabolites within the body. The choice of MRS technique depends on the clinical question being addressed and the type of information needed for diagnosis or monitoring purposes.

Methionine is an essential amino acid, which means that it cannot be synthesized by the human body and must be obtained through the diet. It plays a crucial role in various biological processes, including:

1. Protein synthesis: Methionine is one of the building blocks of proteins, helping to create new proteins and maintain the structure and function of cells.
2. Methylation: Methionine serves as a methyl group donor in various biochemical reactions, which are essential for DNA synthesis, gene regulation, and neurotransmitter production.
3. Antioxidant defense: Methionine can be converted to cysteine, which is involved in the formation of glutathione, a potent antioxidant that helps protect cells from oxidative damage.
4. Homocysteine metabolism: Methionine is involved in the conversion of homocysteine back to methionine through a process called remethylation, which is essential for maintaining normal homocysteine levels and preventing cardiovascular disease.
5. Fat metabolism: Methionine helps facilitate the breakdown and metabolism of fats in the body.

Foods rich in methionine include meat, fish, dairy products, eggs, and some nuts and seeds.

Inositol is not considered a true "vitamin" because it can be created by the body from glucose. However, it is an important nutrient and is sometimes referred to as vitamin B8. It is a type of sugar alcohol that is found in both animals and plants. Inositol is involved in various biological processes, including:

1. Signal transduction: Inositol phospholipids are key components of cell membranes and play a crucial role in intracellular signaling pathways. They act as secondary messengers in response to hormones, neurotransmitters, and growth factors.
2. Insulin sensitivity: Inositol and its derivatives, such as myo-inositol and D-chiro-inositol, are involved in insulin signal transduction. Abnormalities in inositol metabolism have been linked to insulin resistance and conditions like polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).
3. Cerebral and ocular functions: Inositol is essential for the proper functioning of neurons and has been implicated in various neurological and psychiatric disorders, such as depression, anxiety, and bipolar disorder. It also plays a role in maintaining eye health.
4. Lipid metabolism: Inositol participates in the breakdown and transport of fats within the body.
5. Gene expression: Inositol and its derivatives are involved in regulating gene expression through epigenetic modifications.

Inositol can be found in various foods, including fruits, beans, grains, nuts, and vegetables. It is also available as a dietary supplement for those who wish to increase their intake.

Choline-phosphate cytidylyltransferase is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the synthesis of phosphatidylcholine, a major component of cell membranes. This enzyme catalyzes the reaction between cytidine triphosphate (CTP) and phosphocholine to produce cytidine diphosphate-choline (CDP-choline), which is then used to synthesize phosphatidylcholine.

The enzyme exists in two forms: an inner mitochondrial membrane-bound form (CM-ChoCT) and an endoplasmic reticulum/nuclear envelope-associated form (ER-ChoCT). These two forms have different regulatory mechanisms and functions, with CM-ChoCT being responsible for the majority of CDP-choline production in the liver.

Deficiencies or mutations in choline-phosphate cytidylyltransferase can lead to a variety of health issues, including fatty liver disease, muscle damage, and neurological disorders. Proper regulation and function of this enzyme are essential for maintaining cell membrane integrity and overall health.

Cholinergic fibers are nerve cell extensions (neurons) that release the neurotransmitter acetylcholine at their synapses, which are the junctions where they transmit signals to other neurons or effector cells such as muscles and glands. These fibers are a part of the cholinergic system, which plays crucial roles in various physiological processes including learning and memory, attention, arousal, sleep, and muscle contraction.

Cholinergic fibers can be found in both the central nervous system (CNS) and the peripheral nervous system (PNS). In the CNS, cholinergic neurons are primarily located in the basal forebrain and brainstem, and their projections innervate various regions of the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, thalamus, and other brain areas. In the PNS, cholinergic fibers are responsible for activating skeletal muscles through neuromuscular junctions, as well as regulating functions in smooth muscles, cardiac muscles, and glands via the autonomic nervous system.

Dysfunction of the cholinergic system has been implicated in several neurological disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and myasthenia gravis.

Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is an enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of acetylcholine (ACh), a neurotransmitter, into choline and acetic acid. This enzyme plays a crucial role in regulating the transmission of nerve impulses across the synapse, the junction between two neurons or between a neuron and a muscle fiber.

Acetylcholinesterase is located in the synaptic cleft, the narrow gap between the presynaptic and postsynaptic membranes. When ACh is released from the presynaptic membrane and binds to receptors on the postsynaptic membrane, it triggers a response in the target cell. Acetylcholinesterase rapidly breaks down ACh, terminating its action and allowing for rapid cycling of neurotransmission.

Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase leads to an accumulation of ACh in the synaptic cleft, prolonging its effects on the postsynaptic membrane. This can result in excessive stimulation of cholinergic receptors and overactivation of the cholinergic system, which may cause a range of symptoms, including muscle weakness, fasciculations, sweating, salivation, lacrimation, urination, defecation, bradycardia, and bronchoconstriction.

Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors are used in the treatment of various medical conditions, such as Alzheimer's disease, myasthenia gravis, and glaucoma. However, they can also be used as chemical weapons, such as nerve agents, due to their ability to disrupt the nervous system and cause severe toxicity.

Vesicular Acetylcholine Transport Proteins (VAChT) are specialized integral membrane proteins that play a crucial role in the storage and release of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) within synaptic vesicles. These transport proteins are located in the membranes of synaptic vesicles, which are small, membrane-bound organelles found in nerve terminals.

VAChT is responsible for actively transporting ACh from the cytosol (the fluid inside the cell) into these synaptic vesicles. The protein uses the energy derived from the hydrolysis of ATP to move ACh against its concentration gradient, accumulating it within the vesicles to high concentrations. This allows for the efficient and rapid release of ACh into the synapse upon stimulation of the nerve terminal, facilitating neurotransmission between neurons.

Defects in VAChT function or expression have been implicated in several neurological disorders, including certain forms of epilepsy and mental retardation, highlighting its importance in maintaining normal neural communication.

Betaine-aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH) is an enzyme involved in the metabolic pathway of betaine, a compound that helps protect cells from environmental stress and is important for maintaining cell volume and osmotic balance. The enzyme catalyzes the conversion of betaine aldehyde to betaine, using NAD+ as a cofactor.

Deficiency in BADH has been associated with certain genetic disorders, such as hyperbetalipoproteinemia type I, which is characterized by elevated levels of lipids and lipoproteins in the blood. Additionally, mutations in the BADH gene have been linked to an increased risk of alcoholism and alcohol-related disorders.

Diacylglycerol cholinephosphotransferase is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the synthesis of phosphatidylcholine, which is a major component of biological membranes in animals and plants. The systematic name for this enzyme is CDP-choline:1,2-diacylglycerol cholinephosphotransferase.

The reaction catalyzed by this enzyme is as follows:
CDP-choline + 1,2-diacylglycerol → CMP + phosphatidylcholine

In this reaction, CDP-choline donates its phosphocholine headgroup to the acceptor molecule, diacylglycerol, forming phosphatidylcholine and releasing CMP as a byproduct. Phosphatidylcholine is an essential structural lipid in cell membranes and is also involved in various signaling pathways.

Deficiencies or mutations in the genes encoding this enzyme can lead to neurological disorders, highlighting its importance in maintaining proper cellular function.

Nootropic agents, also known as cognition enhancers or smart drugs, are substances that are believed to improve cognitive functions such as memory, motivation, creativity, and executive functions. The term "nootropic" is derived from the Greek words "nous," meaning mind, and "tropos," meaning a turn or bend.

Nootropics can be divided into several categories, including dietary supplements, prescription medications, and illicit substances. Some examples of nootropics include:

* Piracetam and other racetams
* Caffeine and other stimulants
* Nicotine and other cholinergic compounds
* Modafinil and other wakefulness-promoting agents
* Certain antidepressants, such as fluoxetine and bupropion
* Illicit substances, such as methylphenidate (Ritalin) and amphetamines (Adderall), which are sometimes used off-label for cognitive enhancement.

It is important to note that while some nootropic agents have been shown to have cognitive benefits in certain studies, their effectiveness and safety are not fully understood. Additionally, the long-term use of some nootropics can have potential risks and side effects. Therefore, it is recommended to consult with a healthcare professional before starting any new supplement or medication regimen for cognitive enhancement.

Thiocholine is not a medical term per se, but it is a chemical compound that has applications in the medical and biological fields. Thiocholine is the reduced form of thiochrome, which is a derivative of vitamin B1 (thiamine). It is often used as a reagent in biochemical assays to measure the activity of acetylcholinesterase, an enzyme that breaks down the neurotransmitter acetylcholine.

In this context, thiocholine iodide (S-[2-(hydroxyethyl)thio]ethan-1-oniuim iodide) is commonly used as a substrate for acetylcholinesterase. When the enzyme hydrolyzes thiocholine iodide, it produces thiocholine, which can be detected and quantified through its reaction with ferric chloride to form a colored complex. This assay is useful in diagnosing certain neurological conditions or monitoring the effectiveness of treatments that target the cholinergic system.

In the context of medicine and pharmacology, "kinetics" refers to the study of how a drug moves throughout the body, including its absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (often abbreviated as ADME). This field is called "pharmacokinetics."

1. Absorption: This is the process of a drug moving from its site of administration into the bloodstream. Factors such as the route of administration (e.g., oral, intravenous, etc.), formulation, and individual physiological differences can affect absorption.

2. Distribution: Once a drug is in the bloodstream, it gets distributed throughout the body to various tissues and organs. This process is influenced by factors like blood flow, protein binding, and lipid solubility of the drug.

3. Metabolism: Drugs are often chemically modified in the body, typically in the liver, through processes known as metabolism. These changes can lead to the formation of active or inactive metabolites, which may then be further distributed, excreted, or undergo additional metabolic transformations.

4. Excretion: This is the process by which drugs and their metabolites are eliminated from the body, primarily through the kidneys (urine) and the liver (bile).

Understanding the kinetics of a drug is crucial for determining its optimal dosing regimen, potential interactions with other medications or foods, and any necessary adjustments for special populations like pediatric or geriatric patients, or those with impaired renal or hepatic function.

Aspartic acid is an α-amino acid with the chemical formula HO2CCH(NH2)CO2H. It is one of the twenty standard amino acids, and it is a polar, negatively charged, and hydrophilic amino acid. In proteins, aspartic acid usually occurs in its ionized form, aspartate, which has a single negative charge.

Aspartic acid plays important roles in various biological processes, including metabolism, neurotransmitter synthesis, and energy production. It is also a key component of many enzymes and proteins, where it often contributes to the formation of ionic bonds and helps stabilize protein structure.

In addition to its role as a building block of proteins, aspartic acid is also used in the synthesis of other important biological molecules, such as nucleotides, which are the building blocks of DNA and RNA. It is also a component of the dipeptide aspartame, an artificial sweetener that is widely used in food and beverages.

Like other amino acids, aspartic acid is essential for human health, but it cannot be synthesized by the body and must be obtained through the diet. Foods that are rich in aspartic acid include meat, poultry, fish, dairy products, eggs, legumes, and some fruits and vegetables.

Cholinergic agents are a class of drugs that mimic the action of acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter in the body that is involved in the transmission of nerve impulses. These agents work by either increasing the amount of acetylcholine in the synapse (the space between two neurons) or enhancing its action on receptors.

Cholinergic agents can be classified into two main categories: direct-acting and indirect-acting. Direct-acting cholinergic agents, also known as parasympathomimetics, directly stimulate muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Examples of direct-acting cholinergic agents include pilocarpine, bethanechol, and carbamate.

Indirect-acting cholinergic agents, on the other hand, work by inhibiting the enzyme acetylcholinesterase, which is responsible for breaking down acetylcholine in the synapse. By inhibiting this enzyme, indirect-acting cholinergic agents increase the amount of acetylcholine available to stimulate receptors. Examples of indirect-acting cholinergic agents include physostigmine, neostigmine, and edrophonium.

Cholinergic agents are used in the treatment of a variety of medical conditions, including myasthenia gravis, Alzheimer's disease, glaucoma, and gastrointestinal disorders. However, they can also have significant side effects, such as bradycardia, bronchoconstriction, and increased salivation, due to their stimulation of muscarinic receptors. Therefore, they must be used with caution and under the close supervision of a healthcare provider.

Amino alcohols are organic compounds containing both amine and hydroxyl (alcohol) functional groups. They have the general structure R-NH-OH, where R represents a carbon-containing group. Amino alcohols can be primary, secondary, or tertiary, depending on the number of alkyl or aryl groups attached to the nitrogen atom.

These compounds are important in many chemical and biological processes. For example, some amino alcohols serve as intermediates in the synthesis of pharmaceuticals, dyes, and polymers. In biochemistry, certain amino alcohols function as neurotransmitters or components of lipids.

Some common examples of amino alcohols include:

* Ethanolamine (monoethanolamine, MEA): a primary amino alcohol used in the production of detergents, emulsifiers, and pharmaceuticals
* Serinol: a primary amino alcohol that occurs naturally in some foods and is used as a flavoring agent
* Choline: a quaternary ammonium compound with a hydroxyl group, essential for human nutrition and found in various foods such as eggs, liver, and peanuts
* Trimethylamine (TMA): a tertiary amino alcohol that occurs naturally in some marine animals and is responsible for the "fishy" odor of their flesh.

Membrane transport proteins are specialized biological molecules, specifically integral membrane proteins, that facilitate the movement of various substances across the lipid bilayer of cell membranes. They are responsible for the selective and regulated transport of ions, sugars, amino acids, nucleotides, and other molecules into and out of cells, as well as within different cellular compartments. These proteins can be categorized into two main types: channels and carriers (or pumps). Channels provide a passive transport mechanism, allowing ions or small molecules to move down their electrochemical gradient, while carriers actively transport substances against their concentration gradient, requiring energy usually in the form of ATP. Membrane transport proteins play a crucial role in maintaining cell homeostasis, signaling processes, and many other physiological functions.

Sodium is an essential mineral and electrolyte that is necessary for human health. In a medical context, sodium is often discussed in terms of its concentration in the blood, as measured by serum sodium levels. The normal range for serum sodium is typically between 135 and 145 milliequivalents per liter (mEq/L).

Sodium plays a number of important roles in the body, including:

* Regulating fluid balance: Sodium helps to regulate the amount of water in and around your cells, which is important for maintaining normal blood pressure and preventing dehydration.
* Facilitating nerve impulse transmission: Sodium is involved in the generation and transmission of electrical signals in the nervous system, which is necessary for proper muscle function and coordination.
* Assisting with muscle contraction: Sodium helps to regulate muscle contractions by interacting with other minerals such as calcium and potassium.

Low sodium levels (hyponatremia) can cause symptoms such as confusion, seizures, and coma, while high sodium levels (hypernatremia) can lead to symptoms such as weakness, muscle cramps, and seizures. Both conditions require medical treatment to correct.

Lysophosphatidylcholines (LPCs) are a type of glycerophospholipids, which are major components of cell membranes. They are formed by the hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholines, another type of glycerophospholipids, catalyzed by the enzyme phospholipase A2. LPCs contain a single fatty acid chain attached to a glycerol backbone and a choline headgroup.

In medical terms, LPCs have been implicated in various physiological and pathological processes, such as cell signaling, membrane remodeling, and inflammation. Elevated levels of LPCs have been found in several diseases, including cardiovascular disease, neurodegenerative disorders, and cancer. They can also serve as biomarkers for the diagnosis and prognosis of these conditions.

Physostigmine is a medication that belongs to a class of drugs called cholinesterase inhibitors. It works by blocking the breakdown of a neurotransmitter called acetylcholine, which is important for communication between nerves and muscles. This results in an increase in acetylcholine levels in the body, improving nerve impulse transmission and helping to restore normal muscle function.

Physostigmine is used in the treatment of certain medical conditions that are caused by a deficiency of acetylcholine, such as myasthenia gravis, which is a neuromuscular disorder characterized by weakness and fatigue of the muscles. It may also be used to reverse the effects of certain medications that block the action of acetylcholine, such as anticholinergics, which are sometimes used in anesthesia or to treat conditions like Parkinson's disease.

It is important to note that physostigmine should only be used under the close supervision of a healthcare provider, as it can have serious side effects if not used properly.

A diet, in medical terms, refers to the planned and regular consumption of food and drinks. It is a balanced selection of nutrient-rich foods that an individual eats on a daily or periodic basis to meet their energy needs and maintain good health. A well-balanced diet typically includes a variety of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean proteins, and low-fat dairy products.

A diet may also be prescribed for therapeutic purposes, such as in the management of certain medical conditions like diabetes, hypertension, or obesity. In these cases, a healthcare professional may recommend specific restrictions or modifications to an individual's regular diet to help manage their condition and improve their overall health.

It is important to note that a healthy and balanced diet should be tailored to an individual's age, gender, body size, activity level, and any underlying medical conditions. Consulting with a healthcare professional, such as a registered dietitian or nutritionist, can help ensure that an individual's dietary needs are being met in a safe and effective way.

Biological transport refers to the movement of molecules, ions, or solutes across biological membranes or through cells in living organisms. This process is essential for maintaining homeostasis, regulating cellular functions, and enabling communication between cells. There are two main types of biological transport: passive transport and active transport.

Passive transport does not require the input of energy and includes:

1. Diffusion: The random movement of molecules from an area of high concentration to an area of low concentration until equilibrium is reached.
2. Osmosis: The diffusion of solvent molecules (usually water) across a semi-permeable membrane from an area of lower solute concentration to an area of higher solute concentration.
3. Facilitated diffusion: The assisted passage of polar or charged substances through protein channels or carriers in the cell membrane, which increases the rate of diffusion without consuming energy.

Active transport requires the input of energy (in the form of ATP) and includes:

1. Primary active transport: The direct use of ATP to move molecules against their concentration gradient, often driven by specific transport proteins called pumps.
2. Secondary active transport: The coupling of the movement of one substance down its electrochemical gradient with the uphill transport of another substance, mediated by a shared transport protein. This process is also known as co-transport or counter-transport.

The brain is the central organ of the nervous system, responsible for receiving and processing sensory information, regulating vital functions, and controlling behavior, movement, and cognition. It is divided into several distinct regions, each with specific functions:

1. Cerebrum: The largest part of the brain, responsible for higher cognitive functions such as thinking, learning, memory, language, and perception. It is divided into two hemispheres, each controlling the opposite side of the body.
2. Cerebellum: Located at the back of the brain, it is responsible for coordinating muscle movements, maintaining balance, and fine-tuning motor skills.
3. Brainstem: Connects the cerebrum and cerebellum to the spinal cord, controlling vital functions such as breathing, heart rate, and blood pressure. It also serves as a relay center for sensory information and motor commands between the brain and the rest of the body.
4. Diencephalon: A region that includes the thalamus (a major sensory relay station) and hypothalamus (regulates hormones, temperature, hunger, thirst, and sleep).
5. Limbic system: A group of structures involved in emotional processing, memory formation, and motivation, including the hippocampus, amygdala, and cingulate gyrus.

The brain is composed of billions of interconnected neurons that communicate through electrical and chemical signals. It is protected by the skull and surrounded by three layers of membranes called meninges, as well as cerebrospinal fluid that provides cushioning and nutrients.

The liver is a large, solid organ located in the upper right portion of the abdomen, beneath the diaphragm and above the stomach. It plays a vital role in several bodily functions, including:

1. Metabolism: The liver helps to metabolize carbohydrates, fats, and proteins from the food we eat into energy and nutrients that our bodies can use.
2. Detoxification: The liver detoxifies harmful substances in the body by breaking them down into less toxic forms or excreting them through bile.
3. Synthesis: The liver synthesizes important proteins, such as albumin and clotting factors, that are necessary for proper bodily function.
4. Storage: The liver stores glucose, vitamins, and minerals that can be released when the body needs them.
5. Bile production: The liver produces bile, a digestive juice that helps to break down fats in the small intestine.
6. Immune function: The liver plays a role in the immune system by filtering out bacteria and other harmful substances from the blood.

Overall, the liver is an essential organ that plays a critical role in maintaining overall health and well-being.

Tritium is not a medical term, but it is a term used in the field of nuclear physics and chemistry. Tritium (symbol: T or 3H) is a radioactive isotope of hydrogen with two neutrons and one proton in its nucleus. It is also known as heavy hydrogen or superheavy hydrogen.

Tritium has a half-life of about 12.3 years, which means that it decays by emitting a low-energy beta particle (an electron) to become helium-3. Due to its radioactive nature and relatively short half-life, tritium is used in various applications, including nuclear weapons, fusion reactors, luminous paints, and medical research.

In the context of medicine, tritium may be used as a radioactive tracer in some scientific studies or medical research, but it is not a term commonly used to describe a medical condition or treatment.

Sphingomyelins are a type of sphingolipids, which are a class of lipids that contain sphingosine as a backbone. Sphingomyelins are composed of phosphocholine or phosphoethanolamine bound to the ceramide portion of the molecule through a phosphodiester linkage. They are important components of cell membranes, particularly in the myelin sheath that surrounds nerve fibers. Sphingomyelins can be hydrolyzed by the enzyme sphingomyelinase to form ceramide and phosphorylcholine or phosphorylethanolamine. Abnormalities in sphingomyelin metabolism have been implicated in several diseases, including Niemann-Pick disease, a group of inherited lipid storage disorders.

Carbon radioisotopes are radioactive isotopes of carbon, which is an naturally occurring chemical element with the atomic number 6. The most common and stable isotope of carbon is carbon-12 (^12C), but there are also several radioactive isotopes, including carbon-11 (^11C), carbon-14 (^14C), and carbon-13 (^13C). These radioisotopes have different numbers of neutrons in their nuclei, which makes them unstable and causes them to emit radiation.

Carbon-11 has a half-life of about 20 minutes and is used in medical imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) scans. It is produced by bombarding nitrogen-14 with protons in a cyclotron.

Carbon-14, also known as radiocarbon, has a half-life of about 5730 years and is used in archaeology and geology to date organic materials. It is produced naturally in the atmosphere by cosmic rays.

Carbon-13 is stable and has a natural abundance of about 1.1% in carbon. It is not radioactive, but it can be used as a tracer in medical research and in the study of metabolic processes.

Betaine-Homocysteine S-Methyltransferase (BHMT) is an enzyme that catalyzes the methylation of homocysteine to methionine using betaine as a methyl donor. This reaction plays a crucial role in maintaining the homeostasis of methionine and homocysteine, which are important for various biological processes such as methylation reactions, protein synthesis, and neurotransmitter production.

The BHMT enzyme is primarily found in the liver and kidneys, where it helps to regulate the levels of homocysteine in the body. Elevated levels of homocysteine have been linked to several health issues, including cardiovascular disease, neurological disorders, and bone diseases. Therefore, BHMT plays an essential role in maintaining overall health by regulating homocysteine metabolism.

Plasmalogens are a type of complex lipid called glycerophospholipids, which are essential components of cell membranes. They are characterized by having a unique chemical structure that includes a vinyl ether bond at the sn-1 position of the glycerol backbone and an ester bond at the sn-2 position, with the majority of them containing polyunsaturated fatty acids. The headgroup attached to the sn-3 position is typically choline or ethanolamine.

Plasmalogens are abundant in certain tissues, such as the brain, heart, and skeletal muscle. They have been suggested to play important roles in cellular functions, including membrane fluidity, signal transduction, and protection against oxidative stress. Reduced levels of plasmalogens have been associated with various diseases, including neurological disorders, cardiovascular diseases, and aging-related conditions.

The Parasympathetic Nervous System (PNS) is the part of the autonomic nervous system that primarily controls vegetative functions during rest, relaxation, and digestion. It is responsible for the body's "rest and digest" activities including decreasing heart rate, lowering blood pressure, increasing digestive activity, and stimulating sexual arousal. The PNS utilizes acetylcholine as its primary neurotransmitter and acts in opposition to the Sympathetic Nervous System (SNS), which is responsible for the "fight or flight" response.

Cholinergic neurons are specialized types of nerve cells (neurons) that release the neurotransmitter acetylcholine to transmit signals to other neurons or effector cells, such as muscle cells. These neurons play important roles in various physiological functions, including modulation of motor control, cognition, memory, arousal, and sensory perception. Cholinergic neurons are widely distributed throughout the nervous system, with significant concentrations found in the basal forebrain, brainstem, and spinal cord. Dysfunction or degeneration of cholinergic neurons has been implicated in several neurological disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and various forms of dementia.

Phospholipase D is an enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine and other glycerophospholipids to produce phosphatidic acid and a corresponding alcohol. This reaction plays a crucial role in various cellular processes, including signal transduction, membrane trafficking, and lipid metabolism. There are several isoforms of Phospholipase D identified in different tissues and organisms, each with distinct regulatory mechanisms and functions. The enzyme's activity can be modulated by various factors such as calcium ions, protein kinases, and G proteins, making it a critical component in the regulation of cellular homeostasis.

Nucleotidyltransferases are a class of enzymes that catalyze the transfer of nucleotides to an acceptor molecule, such as RNA or DNA. These enzymes play crucial roles in various biological processes, including DNA replication, repair, and recombination, as well as RNA synthesis and modification.

The reaction catalyzed by nucleotidyltransferases typically involves the donation of a nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) to an acceptor molecule, resulting in the formation of a phosphodiester bond between the nucleotides. The reaction can be represented as follows:

NTP + acceptor → NMP + pyrophosphate

where NTP is the nucleoside triphosphate donor and NMP is the nucleoside monophosphate product.

There are several subclasses of nucleotidyltransferases, including polymerases, ligases, and terminases. These enzymes have distinct functions and substrate specificities, but all share the ability to transfer nucleotides to an acceptor molecule.

Examples of nucleotidyltransferases include DNA polymerase, RNA polymerase, reverse transcriptase, telomerase, and ligase. These enzymes are essential for maintaining genome stability and function, and their dysregulation has been implicated in various diseases, including cancer and neurodegenerative disorders.

Phospholipases are a group of enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of phospholipids, which are major components of cell membranes. Phospholipases cleave specific ester bonds in phospholipids, releasing free fatty acids and other lipophilic molecules. Based on the site of action, phospholipases are classified into four types:

1. Phospholipase A1 (PLA1): This enzyme hydrolyzes the ester bond at the sn-1 position of a glycerophospholipid, releasing a free fatty acid and a lysophospholipid.
2. Phospholipase A2 (PLA2): PLA2 cleaves the ester bond at the sn-2 position of a glycerophospholipid, releasing a free fatty acid (often arachidonic acid) and a lysophospholipid. Arachidonic acid is a precursor for eicosanoids, which are signaling molecules involved in inflammation and other physiological processes.
3. Phospholipase C (PLC): PLC hydrolyzes the phosphodiester bond in the headgroup of a glycerophospholipid, releasing diacylglycerol (DAG) and a soluble head group, such as inositol trisphosphate (IP3). DAG acts as a secondary messenger in intracellular signaling pathways, while IP3 mediates the release of calcium ions from intracellular stores.
4. Phospholipase D (PLD): PLD cleaves the phosphoester bond between the headgroup and the glycerol moiety of a glycerophospholipid, releasing phosphatidic acid (PA) and a free head group. PA is an important signaling molecule involved in various cellular processes, including membrane trafficking, cytoskeletal reorganization, and cell survival.

Phospholipases have diverse roles in normal physiology and pathophysiological conditions, such as inflammation, immunity, and neurotransmission. Dysregulation of phospholipase activity can contribute to the development of various diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, and neurological disorders.

Lithium is not a medical term per se, but it is a chemical element with symbol Li and atomic number 3. In the field of medicine, lithium is most commonly referred to as a medication, specifically as "lithium carbonate" or "lithium citrate," which are used primarily to treat bipolar disorder. These medications work by stabilizing mood and reducing the severity and frequency of manic episodes.

Lithium is a naturally occurring substance, and it is an alkali metal. In its elemental form, lithium is highly reactive and flammable. However, when combined with carbonate or citrate ions to form lithium salts, it becomes more stable and safe for medical use.

It's important to note that lithium levels in the body must be closely monitored while taking this medication because too much lithium can lead to toxicity, causing symptoms such as tremors, nausea, diarrhea, and in severe cases, seizures, coma, or even death. Regular blood tests are necessary to ensure that lithium levels remain within the therapeutic range.

Thin-layer chromatography (TLC) is a type of chromatography used to separate, identify, and quantify the components of a mixture. In TLC, the sample is applied as a small spot onto a thin layer of adsorbent material, such as silica gel or alumina, which is coated on a flat, rigid support like a glass plate. The plate is then placed in a developing chamber containing a mobile phase, typically a mixture of solvents.

As the mobile phase moves up the plate by capillary action, it interacts with the stationary phase and the components of the sample. Different components of the mixture travel at different rates due to their varying interactions with the stationary and mobile phases, resulting in distinct spots on the plate. The distance each component travels can be measured and compared to known standards to identify and quantify the components of the mixture.

TLC is a simple, rapid, and cost-effective technique that is widely used in various fields, including forensics, pharmaceuticals, and research laboratories. It allows for the separation and analysis of complex mixtures with high resolution and sensitivity, making it an essential tool in many analytical applications.

The term "septum" in the context of the brain refers to the septal nuclei, which are a collection of neurons located in the basal forebrain. Specifically, they make up the septal area, which is part of the limbic system and plays a role in reward, reinforcement, and positive motivational states.

There isn't a structure called the "septum of brain" in medical terminology. However, there are several structures in the brain that contain a septum or have a partitioning septum within them, such as:

1. Septal nuclei (as mentioned above)
2. The nasal septum, which is a thin wall of bone and cartilage that separates the two nostrils in the nose
3. The interventricular septum, which is a thin muscular wall that separates the left and right lateral ventricles within the brain
4. The membranous septum, a part of the heart's structure that separates the left and right ventricles

Confusion might arise due to the term "septum" being used in different contexts. In this case, there is no specific medical definition for 'Septum of Brain'.

Ethanolaminephosphotransferase is an enzyme that plays a role in the biosynthesis of phosphatidylethanolamine, which is a type of phospholipid found in biological membranes. Phosphatidylethanolamine is an essential component of cell membranes and is involved in various cellular processes, including signal transduction and membrane trafficking.

Ethanolaminephosphotrtransferase catalyzes the transfer of a phosphoethanolamine group from CDP-ethanolamine to the hydroxyl group of diacylglycerol (DAG), resulting in the formation of phosphatidylethanolamine. This enzyme is widely distributed in nature and is found in various organisms, including bacteria, plants, and animals.

Defects in ethanolaminephosphotransferase have been associated with certain genetic disorders, such as congenital disorder of glycosylation type Ia (CDG-Ia) and autosomal recessive intellectual disability syndrome 26 (ARID26). These disorders can result in a range of symptoms, including developmental delays, seizures, and movement disorders.

Organic cation transport proteins (OCTs) are a group of membrane transporters that facilitate the movement of organic cations across biological membranes. These transporters play an essential role in the absorption, distribution, and elimination of various endogenous and exogenous substances, including drugs and toxins.

There are four main types of OCTs, namely OCT1, OCT2, OCT3, and OCTN1 (also known as novel organic cation transporter 1 or OCT6). These proteins belong to the solute carrier (SLC) family, specifically SLC22A.

OCTs have a broad substrate specificity and can transport various organic cations, such as neurotransmitters (e.g., serotonin, dopamine, histamine), endogenous compounds (e.g., creatinine, choline), and drugs (e.g., metformin, quinidine, morphine). The transport process is typically sodium-independent and can occur in both directions, depending on the concentration gradient of the substrate.

OCTs are widely expressed in various tissues, including the liver, kidney, intestine, brain, heart, and placenta. Their expression patterns and functions vary among different OCT types, contributing to their diverse roles in physiology and pharmacology. Dysfunction of OCTs has been implicated in several diseases, such as drug toxicity, neurodegenerative disorders, and cancer.

In summary, organic cation transport proteins are membrane transporters that facilitate the movement of organic cations across biological membranes, playing crucial roles in the absorption, distribution, and elimination of various substances, including drugs and toxins.

Biological transport, active is the process by which cells use energy to move materials across their membranes from an area of lower concentration to an area of higher concentration. This type of transport is facilitated by specialized proteins called transporters or pumps that are located in the cell membrane. These proteins undergo conformational changes to physically carry the molecules through the lipid bilayer of the membrane, often against their concentration gradient.

Active transport requires energy because it works against the natural tendency of molecules to move from an area of higher concentration to an area of lower concentration, a process known as diffusion. Cells obtain this energy in the form of ATP (adenosine triphosphate), which is produced through cellular respiration.

Examples of active transport include the uptake of glucose and amino acids into cells, as well as the secretion of hormones and neurotransmitters. The sodium-potassium pump, which helps maintain resting membrane potential in nerve and muscle cells, is a classic example of an active transporter.

Potassium is a essential mineral and an important electrolyte that is widely distributed in the human body. The majority of potassium in the body (approximately 98%) is found within cells, with the remaining 2% present in blood serum and other bodily fluids. Potassium plays a crucial role in various physiological processes, including:

1. Regulation of fluid balance and maintenance of normal blood pressure through its effects on vascular tone and sodium excretion.
2. Facilitation of nerve impulse transmission and muscle contraction by participating in the generation and propagation of action potentials.
3. Protein synthesis, enzyme activation, and glycogen metabolism.
4. Regulation of acid-base balance through its role in buffering systems.

The normal serum potassium concentration ranges from 3.5 to 5.0 mEq/L (milliequivalents per liter) or mmol/L (millimoles per liter). Potassium levels outside this range can have significant clinical consequences, with both hypokalemia (low potassium levels) and hyperkalemia (high potassium levels) potentially leading to serious complications such as cardiac arrhythmias, muscle weakness, and respiratory failure.

Potassium is primarily obtained through the diet, with rich sources including fruits (e.g., bananas, oranges, and apricots), vegetables (e.g., leafy greens, potatoes, and tomatoes), legumes, nuts, dairy products, and meat. In cases of deficiency or increased needs, potassium supplements may be recommended under the guidance of a healthcare professional.

Phosphotransferases are a group of enzymes that catalyze the transfer of a phosphate group from a donor molecule to an acceptor molecule. This reaction is essential for various cellular processes, including energy metabolism, signal transduction, and biosynthesis.

The systematic name for this group of enzymes is phosphotransferase, which is derived from the general reaction they catalyze: D-donor + A-acceptor = D-donor minus phosphate + A-phosphate. The donor molecule can be a variety of compounds, such as ATP or a phosphorylated protein, while the acceptor molecule is typically a compound that becomes phosphorylated during the reaction.

Phosphotransferases are classified into several subgroups based on the type of donor and acceptor molecules they act upon. For example, kinases are a subgroup of phosphotransferases that transfer a phosphate group from ATP to a protein or other organic compound. Phosphatases, another subgroup, remove phosphate groups from molecules by transferring them to water.

Overall, phosphotransferases play a critical role in regulating many cellular functions and are important targets for drug development in various diseases, including cancer and neurological disorders.

Folic acid is the synthetic form of folate, a type of B vitamin (B9). It is widely used in dietary supplements and fortified foods because it is more stable and has a longer shelf life than folate. Folate is essential for normal cell growth and metabolism, and it plays a critical role in the formation of DNA and RNA, the body's genetic material. Folic acid is also crucial during early pregnancy to prevent birth defects of the brain and spine called neural tube defects.

Medical Definition: "Folic acid is the synthetic form of folate (vitamin B9), a water-soluble vitamin involved in DNA synthesis, repair, and methylation. It is used in dietary supplementation and food fortification due to its stability and longer shelf life compared to folate. Folic acid is critical for normal cell growth, development, and red blood cell production."

Nutritional requirements refer to the necessary amount of nutrients, including macronutrients (carbohydrates, proteins, and fats) and micronutrients (vitamins and minerals), that an individual requires to maintain good health, support normal growth and development, and promote optimal bodily functions. These requirements vary based on factors such as age, sex, body size, pregnancy status, and physical activity level. Meeting one's nutritional requirements typically involves consuming a balanced and varied diet, with additional consideration given to any specific dietary restrictions or medical conditions that may influence nutrient needs.

Arthrobacter is a genus of Gram-positive, catalase-positive, aerobic bacteria that are commonly found in soil and water. These bacteria are known for their ability to degrade various organic compounds, including hydrocarbons, and are often used in bioremediation applications. The cells of Arthrobacter species are typically rod-shaped and may appear slightly curved or irregular. They can form dormant structures called exospores that allow them to survive in harsh environments. Arthrobacter species are not considered human pathogens and do not cause disease in humans.

Nicotinic receptors are a type of ligand-gated ion channel receptor that are activated by the neurotransmitter acetylcholine and the alkaloid nicotine. They are widely distributed throughout the nervous system and play important roles in various physiological processes, including neuronal excitability, neurotransmitter release, and cognitive functions such as learning and memory. Nicotinic receptors are composed of five subunits that form a ion channel pore, which opens to allow the flow of cations (positively charged ions) when the receptor is activated by acetylcholine or nicotine. There are several subtypes of nicotinic receptors, which differ in their subunit composition and functional properties. These receptors have been implicated in various neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and schizophrenia.

Homocysteine is an amino acid that is formed in the body during the metabolism of another amino acid called methionine. It's an important intermediate in various biochemical reactions, including the synthesis of proteins, neurotransmitters, and other molecules. However, elevated levels of homocysteine in the blood (a condition known as hyperhomocysteinemia) have been linked to several health issues, such as cardiovascular disease, stroke, and cognitive decline.

Homocysteine can be converted back to methionine with the help of vitamin B12 and a cofactor called betaine, or it can be converted to another amino acid called cystathionine with the help of vitamin B6 and folate (vitamin B9). Imbalances in these vitamins and other factors can lead to an increase in homocysteine levels.

It is crucial to maintain normal homocysteine levels for overall health, as high levels may contribute to the development of various diseases. Regular monitoring and maintaining a balanced diet rich in folate, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12 can help regulate homocysteine levels and reduce the risk of related health issues.

Folic Acid Deficiency is a condition characterized by insufficient levels of folic acid (Vitamin B9) in the body. Folic acid plays an essential role in the synthesis of DNA and RNA, the production of red blood cells, and the prevention of neural tube defects during fetal development.

A deficiency in folic acid can lead to a variety of health issues, including:
- Megaloblastic anemia: A type of anemia characterized by large, structurally abnormal, immature red blood cells (megaloblasts) that are unable to function properly. This results in fatigue, weakness, shortness of breath, and a pale appearance.
- Neural tube defects: In pregnant women, folic acid deficiency can increase the risk of neural tube defects, such as spina bifida and anencephaly, in the developing fetus.
- Developmental delays and neurological disorders: In infants and children, folic acid deficiency during pregnancy can lead to developmental delays, learning difficulties, and neurological disorders.
- Increased risk of cardiovascular disease: Folate plays a role in maintaining healthy homocysteine levels. Deficiency can result in elevated homocysteine levels, which is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease.

Folic acid deficiency can be caused by various factors, including poor dietary intake, malabsorption syndromes (such as celiac disease or Crohn's disease), pregnancy, alcoholism, certain medications (like methotrexate and phenytoin), and genetic disorders affecting folate metabolism. To prevent or treat folic acid deficiency, dietary supplementation with folic acid is often recommended, especially for pregnant women and individuals at risk of deficiency.

Cholinesterase inhibitors are a class of drugs that work by blocking the action of cholinesterase, an enzyme that breaks down the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in the body. By inhibiting this enzyme, the levels of acetylcholine in the brain increase, which can help to improve symptoms of cognitive decline and memory loss associated with conditions such as Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia.

Cholinesterase inhibitors are also used to treat other medical conditions, including myasthenia gravis, a neuromuscular disorder that causes muscle weakness, and glaucoma, a condition that affects the optic nerve and can lead to vision loss. Some examples of cholinesterase inhibitors include donepezil (Aricept), galantamine (Razadyne), and rivastigmine (Exelon).

It's important to note that while cholinesterase inhibitors can help to improve symptoms in some people with dementia, they do not cure the underlying condition or stop its progression. Side effects of these drugs may include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and increased salivation. In rare cases, they may also cause seizures, fainting, or cardiac arrhythmias.

In the context of medicine, particularly in relation to cancer treatment, protons refer to positively charged subatomic particles found in the nucleus of an atom. Proton therapy, a type of radiation therapy, uses a beam of protons to target and destroy cancer cells with high precision, minimizing damage to surrounding healthy tissue. The concentrated dose of radiation is delivered directly to the tumor site, reducing side effects and improving quality of life during treatment.

Alcohol oxidoreductases are a class of enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes or ketones, while reducing nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) to NADH. These enzymes play an important role in the metabolism of alcohols and other organic compounds in living organisms.

The most well-known example of an alcohol oxidoreductase is alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), which is responsible for the oxidation of ethanol to acetaldehyde in the liver during the metabolism of alcoholic beverages. Other examples include aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH) and sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH).

These enzymes are important targets for the development of drugs used to treat alcohol use disorder, as inhibiting their activity can help to reduce the rate of ethanol metabolism and the severity of its effects on the body.

Carbon isotopes are variants of the chemical element carbon that have different numbers of neutrons in their atomic nuclei. The most common and stable isotope of carbon is carbon-12 (^{12}C), which contains six protons and six neutrons. However, carbon can also come in other forms, known as isotopes, which contain different numbers of neutrons.

Carbon-13 (^{13}C) is a stable isotope of carbon that contains seven neutrons in its nucleus. It makes up about 1.1% of all carbon found on Earth and is used in various scientific applications, such as in tracing the metabolic pathways of organisms or in studying the age of fossilized materials.

Carbon-14 (^{14}C), also known as radiocarbon, is a radioactive isotope of carbon that contains eight neutrons in its nucleus. It is produced naturally in the atmosphere through the interaction of cosmic rays with nitrogen gas. Carbon-14 has a half-life of about 5,730 years, which makes it useful for dating organic materials, such as archaeological artifacts or fossils, up to around 60,000 years old.

Carbon isotopes are important in many scientific fields, including geology, biology, and medicine, and are used in a variety of applications, from studying the Earth's climate history to diagnosing medical conditions.

Neurons, also known as nerve cells or neurocytes, are specialized cells that constitute the basic unit of the nervous system. They are responsible for receiving, processing, and transmitting information and signals within the body. Neurons have three main parts: the dendrites, the cell body (soma), and the axon. The dendrites receive signals from other neurons or sensory receptors, while the axon transmits these signals to other neurons, muscles, or glands. The junction between two neurons is called a synapse, where neurotransmitters are released to transmit the signal across the gap (synaptic cleft) to the next neuron. Neurons vary in size, shape, and structure depending on their function and location within the nervous system.

Synaptosomes are subcellular structures that can be isolated from the brain tissue. They are formed during the fractionation process of brain homogenates and consist of intact presynaptic terminals, including the synaptic vesicles, mitochondria, and cytoskeletal elements. Synaptosomes are often used in neuroscience research to study the biochemical properties and functions of neuronal synapses, such as neurotransmitter release, uptake, and metabolism.

Diacylglycerols (also known as diglycerides) are a type of glyceride, which is a compound that consists of glycerol and one or more fatty acids. Diacylglycerols contain two fatty acid chains bonded to a glycerol molecule through ester linkages. They are important intermediates in the metabolism of lipids and can be found in many types of food, including vegetable oils and dairy products. In the body, diacylglycerols can serve as a source of energy and can also play roles in cell signaling processes.

Quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs) are a group of disinfectants and antiseptics that contain a nitrogen atom surrounded by four organic groups, resulting in a charged "quat" structure. They are widely used in healthcare settings due to their broad-spectrum activity against bacteria, viruses, fungi, and spores. QACs work by disrupting the cell membrane of microorganisms, leading to their death. Common examples include benzalkonium chloride and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide. It is important to note that some microorganisms have developed resistance to QACs, and they may not be effective against all types of pathogens.

Plasma membrane neurotransmitter transport proteins are a type of transmembrane protein found in the plasma membrane of neurons and other cells. They are responsible for the active transport of neurotransmitters, which are chemical messengers that transmit signals between neurons, from the extracellular space into the cell. This process helps to terminate the signal transmission and regulate the concentration of neurotransmitters in the synaptic cleft, which is the narrow gap between the presynaptic and postsynaptic neurons.

There are two main types of plasma membrane neurotransmitter transport proteins: sodium-dependent transporters and sodium-independent transporters. Sodium-dependent transporters use the energy generated by the movement of sodium ions across the membrane to move neurotransmitters against their concentration gradient, while sodium-independent transporters do not require sodium ions and use other sources of energy.

These transport proteins play a crucial role in maintaining the homeostasis of neurotransmitter levels in the brain and are targets for many drugs used to treat neurological and psychiatric disorders, such as antidepressants, antipsychotics, and stimulants.

Cytidine diphosphate (CDP) is a nucleotide that is a constituent of coenzymes and plays a role in the synthesis of lipids, such as phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin, which are important components of cell membranes. It is formed from cytidine monophosphate (CMP) through the addition of a second phosphate group by the enzyme CTP synthase. CDP can also be converted to other nucleotides, such as uridine diphosphate (UDP) and deoxythymidine diphosphate (dTDP), through the action of various enzymes. These nucleotides play important roles in the biosynthesis of carbohydrates, lipids, and other molecules in the cell.

Sprague-Dawley rats are a strain of albino laboratory rats that are widely used in scientific research. They were first developed by researchers H.H. Sprague and R.C. Dawley in the early 20th century, and have since become one of the most commonly used rat strains in biomedical research due to their relatively large size, ease of handling, and consistent genetic background.

Sprague-Dawley rats are outbred, which means that they are genetically diverse and do not suffer from the same limitations as inbred strains, which can have reduced fertility and increased susceptibility to certain diseases. They are also characterized by their docile nature and low levels of aggression, making them easier to handle and study than some other rat strains.

These rats are used in a wide variety of research areas, including toxicology, pharmacology, nutrition, cancer, and behavioral studies. Because they are genetically diverse, Sprague-Dawley rats can be used to model a range of human diseases and conditions, making them an important tool in the development of new drugs and therapies.

Pregnancy is a physiological state or condition where a fertilized egg (zygote) successfully implants and grows in the uterus of a woman, leading to the development of an embryo and finally a fetus. This process typically spans approximately 40 weeks, divided into three trimesters, and culminates in childbirth. Throughout this period, numerous hormonal and physical changes occur to support the growing offspring, including uterine enlargement, breast development, and various maternal adaptations to ensure the fetus's optimal growth and well-being.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

"Inbred strains of rats" are genetically identical rodents that have been produced through many generations of brother-sister mating. This results in a high degree of homozygosity, where the genes at any particular locus in the genome are identical in all members of the strain.

Inbred strains of rats are widely used in biomedical research because they provide a consistent and reproducible genetic background for studying various biological phenomena, including the effects of drugs, environmental factors, and genetic mutations on health and disease. Additionally, inbred strains can be used to create genetically modified models of human diseases by introducing specific mutations into their genomes.

Some commonly used inbred strains of rats include the Wistar Kyoto (WKY), Sprague-Dawley (SD), and Fischer 344 (F344) rat strains. Each strain has its own unique genetic characteristics, making them suitable for different types of research.

The Substantia Innominata is not a widely used medical term and it doesn't have a standardized anatomical or clinical definition. However, in historical neuroanatomy, it refers to a region of the brain located in the forebrain, specifically within the basal forebrain. It's a somewhat vague term that has been used to describe a collection of cell groups and nerve fibers that are not easily classified under other specific names.

These cell groups include the diagonal band of Broca, the medial septal nucleus, and the nucleus basalis of Meynert. The Substantia Innominata is known to be involved in various functions such as memory, learning, and regulation of the sleep-wake cycle. However, due to its complex and not well-defined nature, it's not commonly used in modern medical or scientific contexts.

Ouabain is defined as a cardiac glycoside, a type of steroid, that is found in the seeds and roots of certain plants native to Africa. It is used in medicine as a digitalis-like agent to increase the force of heart contractions and slow the heart rate, particularly in the treatment of congestive heart failure and atrial fibrillation. Ouabain functions by inhibiting the sodium-potassium pump (Na+/K+-ATPase) in the cell membrane, leading to an increase in intracellular sodium and calcium ions, which ultimately enhances cardiac muscle contractility. It is also known as g-strophanthin or ouabaine.

Nicotinic antagonists are a class of drugs that block the action of nicotine at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). These receptors are found in the nervous system and are activated by the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, as well as by nicotine. When nicotine binds to these receptors, it can cause the release of various neurotransmitters, including dopamine, which can lead to rewarding effects and addiction.

Nicotinic antagonists work by binding to nAChRs and preventing nicotine from activating them. This can help to reduce the rewarding effects of nicotine and may be useful in treating nicotine addiction. Examples of nicotinic antagonists include mecamylamine, varenicline, and cytisine.

It's important to note that while nicotinic antagonists can help with nicotine addiction, they can also have side effects, such as nausea, vomiting, and abnormal dreams. Additionally, some people may experience more serious side effects, such as seizures or cardiovascular problems, so it's important to use these medications under the close supervision of a healthcare provider.

Methyltransferases are a class of enzymes that catalyze the transfer of a methyl group (-CH3) from a donor molecule to an acceptor molecule, which is often a protein, DNA, or RNA. This transfer of a methyl group can modify the chemical and physical properties of the acceptor molecule, playing a crucial role in various cellular processes such as gene expression, signal transduction, and DNA repair.

In biochemistry, methyltransferases are classified based on the type of donor molecule they use for the transfer of the methyl group. The most common methyl donor is S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), a universal methyl group donor found in many organisms. Methyltransferases that utilize SAM as a cofactor are called SAM-dependent methyltransferases.

Abnormal regulation or function of methyltransferases has been implicated in several diseases, including cancer and neurological disorders. Therefore, understanding the structure, function, and regulation of these enzymes is essential for developing targeted therapies to treat these conditions.

A dose-response relationship in the context of drugs refers to the changes in the effects or symptoms that occur as the dose of a drug is increased or decreased. Generally, as the dose of a drug is increased, the severity or intensity of its effects also increases. Conversely, as the dose is decreased, the effects of the drug become less severe or may disappear altogether.

The dose-response relationship is an important concept in pharmacology and toxicology because it helps to establish the safe and effective dosage range for a drug. By understanding how changes in the dose of a drug affect its therapeutic and adverse effects, healthcare providers can optimize treatment plans for their patients while minimizing the risk of harm.

The dose-response relationship is typically depicted as a curve that shows the relationship between the dose of a drug and its effect. The shape of the curve may vary depending on the drug and the specific effect being measured. Some drugs may have a steep dose-response curve, meaning that small changes in the dose can result in large differences in the effect. Other drugs may have a more gradual dose-response curve, where larger changes in the dose are needed to produce significant effects.

In addition to helping establish safe and effective dosages, the dose-response relationship is also used to evaluate the potential therapeutic benefits and risks of new drugs during clinical trials. By systematically testing different doses of a drug in controlled studies, researchers can identify the optimal dosage range for the drug and assess its safety and efficacy.

S-Adenosylmethionine (SAMe) is a physiological compound involved in methylation reactions, transulfuration pathways, and aminopropylation processes in the body. It is formed from the coupling of methionine, an essential sulfur-containing amino acid, and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) through the action of methionine adenosyltransferase enzymes.

SAMe serves as a major methyl donor in various biochemical reactions, contributing to the synthesis of numerous compounds such as neurotransmitters, proteins, phospholipids, nucleic acids, and other methylated metabolites. Additionally, SAMe plays a crucial role in the detoxification process within the liver by participating in glutathione production, which is an important antioxidant and detoxifying agent.

In clinical settings, SAMe supplementation has been explored as a potential therapeutic intervention for various conditions, including depression, osteoarthritis, liver diseases, and fibromyalgia, among others. However, its efficacy remains a subject of ongoing research and debate within the medical community.

Cholinesterases are a group of enzymes that play an essential role in the nervous system by regulating the transmission of nerve impulses. They work by breaking down a type of chemical messenger called acetylcholine, which is released by nerves to transmit signals to other nerves or muscles.

There are two main types of cholinesterases: acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). AChE is found primarily in the nervous system, where it rapidly breaks down acetylcholine to terminate nerve impulses. BChE, on the other hand, is found in various tissues throughout the body, including the liver and plasma, and plays a less specific role in breaking down various substances, including some drugs and toxins.

Inhibition of cholinesterases can lead to an accumulation of acetylcholine in the synaptic cleft, which can result in excessive stimulation of nerve impulses and muscle contractions. This effect is exploited by certain medications used to treat conditions such as myasthenia gravis, Alzheimer's disease, and glaucoma, but can also be caused by exposure to certain chemicals or toxins, such as organophosphate pesticides and nerve agents.

Autonomic ganglia are collections of neurons located outside the central nervous system (CNS) that are a part of the autonomic nervous system (ANS). The ANS is responsible for controlling various involuntary physiological functions such as heart rate, digestion, respiratory rate, pupillary response, urination, and sexual arousal.

Autonomic ganglia receive inputs from preganglionic neurons, whose cell bodies are located in the CNS, and send outputs to effector organs through postganglionic neurons. The autonomic ganglia can be divided into two main subsystems: the sympathetic and parasympathetic systems.

Sympathetic ganglia are typically located close to the spinal cord and receive inputs from preganglionic neurons whose cell bodies are located in the thoracic and lumbar regions of the spinal cord. The postganglionic neurons of the sympathetic system release noradrenaline (also known as norepinephrine) as their primary neurotransmitter, which acts on effector organs to produce a range of responses such as increasing heart rate and blood pressure, dilating pupils, and promoting glucose mobilization.

Parasympathetic ganglia are typically located closer to the target organs and receive inputs from preganglionic neurons whose cell bodies are located in the brainstem and sacral regions of the spinal cord. The postganglionic neurons of the parasympathetic system release acetylcholine as their primary neurotransmitter, which acts on effector organs to produce a range of responses such as decreasing heart rate and blood pressure, constricting pupils, and promoting digestion and urination.

Overall, autonomic ganglia play a critical role in regulating various physiological functions that are essential for maintaining homeostasis in the body.

Phosphatidic acids (PAs) are a type of phospholipid that are essential components of cell membranes. They are composed of a glycerol backbone linked to two fatty acid chains and a phosphate group. The phosphate group is esterified to another molecule, usually either serine, inositol, or choline, forming different types of phosphatidic acids.

PAs are particularly important as they serve as key regulators of many cellular processes, including signal transduction, membrane trafficking, and autophagy. They can act as signaling molecules by binding to and activating specific proteins, such as the enzyme phospholipase D, which generates second messengers involved in various signaling pathways.

PAs are also important intermediates in the synthesis of other phospholipids, such as phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, and phosphatidylinositol. They are produced by the enzyme diacylglycerol kinase (DGK), which adds a phosphate group to diacylglycerol (DAG) to form PA.

Abnormal levels of PAs have been implicated in various diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders. Therefore, understanding the regulation and function of PAs is an active area of research with potential therapeutic implications.

Brain chemistry refers to the chemical processes that occur within the brain, particularly those involving neurotransmitters, neuromodulators, and neuropeptides. These chemicals are responsible for transmitting signals between neurons (nerve cells) in the brain, allowing for various cognitive, emotional, and physical functions.

Neurotransmitters are chemical messengers that transmit signals across the synapse (the tiny gap between two neurons). Examples of neurotransmitters include dopamine, serotonin, norepinephrine, GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid), and glutamate. Each neurotransmitter has a specific role in brain function, such as regulating mood, motivation, attention, memory, and movement.

Neuromodulators are chemicals that modify the effects of neurotransmitters on neurons. They can enhance or inhibit the transmission of signals between neurons, thereby modulating brain activity. Examples of neuromodulators include acetylcholine, histamine, and substance P.

Neuropeptides are small protein-like molecules that act as neurotransmitters or neuromodulators. They play a role in various physiological functions, such as pain perception, stress response, and reward processing. Examples of neuropeptides include endorphins, enkephalins, and oxytocin.

Abnormalities in brain chemistry can lead to various neurological and psychiatric conditions, such as depression, anxiety disorders, schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease, and Alzheimer's disease. Understanding brain chemistry is crucial for developing effective treatments for these conditions.

A cell membrane, also known as the plasma membrane, is a thin semi-permeable phospholipid bilayer that surrounds all cells in animals, plants, and microorganisms. It functions as a barrier to control the movement of substances in and out of the cell, allowing necessary molecules such as nutrients, oxygen, and signaling molecules to enter while keeping out harmful substances and waste products. The cell membrane is composed mainly of phospholipids, which have hydrophilic (water-loving) heads and hydrophobic (water-fearing) tails. This unique structure allows the membrane to be flexible and fluid, yet selectively permeable. Additionally, various proteins are embedded in the membrane that serve as channels, pumps, receptors, and enzymes, contributing to the cell's overall functionality and communication with its environment.

Decamethonium compounds are a type of neuromuscular blocking agent used in anesthesia to induce paralysis and relaxation of skeletal muscles. These compounds work by binding to and inhibiting the action of acetylcholine receptors at the neuromuscular junction, which is the site where nerve impulses are transmitted to muscle fibers.

Decamethonium bromide is a commonly used example of a decamethonium compound. It has a rapid onset of action and causes paralysis that lasts for several minutes. This makes it useful for procedures such as endotracheal intubation, where it is important to temporarily paralyze the muscles of the throat to facilitate insertion of a breathing tube.

It's important to note that decamethonium compounds do not have any analgesic or sedative effects, so they are typically used in conjunction with other medications that provide pain relief and sedation during surgical procedures. Additionally, because these compounds can cause respiratory depression, patients must be carefully monitored and provided with mechanical ventilation as needed during their use.

Lipid metabolism is the process by which the body breaks down and utilizes lipids (fats) for various functions, such as energy production, cell membrane formation, and hormone synthesis. This complex process involves several enzymes and pathways that regulate the digestion, absorption, transport, storage, and consumption of fats in the body.

The main types of lipids involved in metabolism include triglycerides, cholesterol, phospholipids, and fatty acids. The breakdown of these lipids begins in the digestive system, where enzymes called lipases break down dietary fats into smaller molecules called fatty acids and glycerol. These molecules are then absorbed into the bloodstream and transported to the liver, which is the main site of lipid metabolism.

In the liver, fatty acids may be further broken down for energy production or used to synthesize new lipids. Excess fatty acids may be stored as triglycerides in specialized cells called adipocytes (fat cells) for later use. Cholesterol is also metabolized in the liver, where it may be used to synthesize bile acids, steroid hormones, and other important molecules.

Disorders of lipid metabolism can lead to a range of health problems, including obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). These conditions may be caused by genetic factors, lifestyle habits, or a combination of both. Proper diagnosis and management of lipid metabolism disorders typically involves a combination of dietary changes, exercise, and medication.

Sulfur isotopes are different forms of the chemical element sulfur, each with a distinct number of neutrons in their atomic nuclei. The most common sulfur isotopes are sulfur-32 (with 16 neutrons) and sulfur-34 (with 18 neutrons). These isotopes have similar chemical properties but different atomic masses, which can be used to trace the movement and cycling of sulfur through various environmental processes, such as volcanic emissions, bacterial metabolism, and fossil fuel combustion. The relative abundances of sulfur isotopes can also provide information about the origins and history of sulfur-containing minerals and compounds.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

Aconitine is a toxic alkaloid compound that can be found in various plants of the Aconitum genus, also known as monkshood or wolf's bane. It is a highly poisonous substance that can cause serious medical symptoms, including numbness, tingling, and paralysis of the muscles, as well as potentially life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias and seizures. Aconitine works by binding to sodium channels in nerve cells, causing them to become overactive and leading to the release of large amounts of neurotransmitters.

In medical contexts, aconitine is not used as a therapeutic agent due to its high toxicity. However, it has been studied for its potential medicinal properties, such as its analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects. Despite these potential benefits, the risks associated with using aconitine as a medicine far outweigh any possible advantages, and it is not considered a viable treatment option.

Atropine is an anticholinergic drug that blocks the action of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in the central and peripheral nervous system. It is derived from the belladonna alkaloids, which are found in plants such as deadly nightshade (Atropa belladonna), Jimson weed (Datura stramonium), and Duboisia spp.

In clinical medicine, atropine is used to reduce secretions, increase heart rate, and dilate the pupils. It is often used before surgery to dry up secretions in the mouth, throat, and lungs, and to reduce salivation during the procedure. Atropine is also used to treat certain types of nerve agent and pesticide poisoning, as well as to manage bradycardia (slow heart rate) and hypotension (low blood pressure) caused by beta-blockers or calcium channel blockers.

Atropine can have several side effects, including dry mouth, blurred vision, dizziness, confusion, and difficulty urinating. In high doses, it can cause delirium, hallucinations, and seizures. Atropine should be used with caution in patients with glaucoma, prostatic hypertrophy, or other conditions that may be exacerbated by its anticholinergic effects.

A dietary supplement is a product that contains nutrients, such as vitamins, minerals, amino acids, herbs or other botanicals, and is intended to be taken by mouth, to supplement the diet. Dietary supplements can include a wide range of products, such as vitamin and mineral supplements, herbal supplements, and sports nutrition products.

Dietary supplements are not intended to treat, diagnose, cure, or alleviate the effects of diseases. They are intended to be used as a way to add extra nutrients to the diet or to support specific health functions. It is important to note that dietary supplements are not subject to the same rigorous testing and regulations as drugs, so it is important to choose products carefully and consult with a healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns about using them.

"Cells, cultured" is a medical term that refers to cells that have been removed from an organism and grown in controlled laboratory conditions outside of the body. This process is called cell culture and it allows scientists to study cells in a more controlled and accessible environment than they would have inside the body. Cultured cells can be derived from a variety of sources, including tissues, organs, or fluids from humans, animals, or cell lines that have been previously established in the laboratory.

Cell culture involves several steps, including isolation of the cells from the tissue, purification and characterization of the cells, and maintenance of the cells in appropriate growth conditions. The cells are typically grown in specialized media that contain nutrients, growth factors, and other components necessary for their survival and proliferation. Cultured cells can be used for a variety of purposes, including basic research, drug development and testing, and production of biological products such as vaccines and gene therapies.

It is important to note that cultured cells may behave differently than they do in the body, and results obtained from cell culture studies may not always translate directly to human physiology or disease. Therefore, it is essential to validate findings from cell culture experiments using additional models and ultimately in clinical trials involving human subjects.

Ethionine is a toxic, synthetic analog of the amino acid methionine. It is an antimetabolite that inhibits the enzyme methionine adenosyltransferase, which plays a crucial role in methionine metabolism. Ethionine is often used in research to study the effects of methionine deficiency and to create animal models of various human diseases. It is not a natural component of human nutrition and has no known medical uses. Prolonged exposure or high levels of ethionine can lead to liver damage, growth impairment, and other harmful health effects.

Calcium is an essential mineral that is vital for various physiological processes in the human body. The medical definition of calcium is as follows:

Calcium (Ca2+) is a crucial cation and the most abundant mineral in the human body, with approximately 99% of it found in bones and teeth. It plays a vital role in maintaining structural integrity, nerve impulse transmission, muscle contraction, hormonal secretion, blood coagulation, and enzyme activation.

Calcium homeostasis is tightly regulated through the interplay of several hormones, including parathyroid hormone (PTH), calcitonin, and vitamin D. Dietary calcium intake, absorption, and excretion are also critical factors in maintaining optimal calcium levels in the body.

Hypocalcemia refers to low serum calcium levels, while hypercalcemia indicates high serum calcium levels. Both conditions can have detrimental effects on various organ systems and require medical intervention to correct.

Methylation, in the context of genetics and epigenetics, refers to the addition of a methyl group (CH3) to a molecule, usually to the nitrogenous base of DNA or to the side chain of amino acids in proteins. In DNA methylation, this process typically occurs at the 5-carbon position of cytosine residues that precede guanine residues (CpG sites) and is catalyzed by enzymes called DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs).

DNA methylation plays a crucial role in regulating gene expression, genomic imprinting, X-chromosome inactivation, and suppression of repetitive elements. Hypermethylation or hypomethylation of specific genes can lead to altered gene expression patterns, which have been associated with various human diseases, including cancer.

In summary, methylation is a fundamental epigenetic modification that influences genomic stability, gene regulation, and cellular function by introducing methyl groups to DNA or proteins.

Neuromuscular depolarizing agents are a type of muscle relaxant used in anesthesia and critical care medicine. These drugs work by causing depolarization of the post-synaptic membrane at the neuromuscular junction, which is the site where nerve impulses are transmitted to muscles. This results in the binding of the drug to the receptor and the activation of ion channels, leading to muscle contraction.

The most commonly used depolarizing agent is suxamethonium (also known as succinylcholine), which has a rapid onset and short duration of action. It is often used during rapid sequence intubation, where there is a need for immediate muscle relaxation to facilitate endotracheal intubation.

However, the use of depolarizing agents can also lead to several side effects, including increased potassium levels in the blood (hyperkalemia), muscle fasciculations, and an increase in intracranial and intraocular pressure. Therefore, these drugs should be used with caution and only under the close supervision of a trained healthcare provider.

N-Acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine Amidase (also known as NAM Amidase or MurNAc-LAA Amidase) is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the bacterial cell wall metabolism. It is responsible for cleaving the amide bond between N-acetylmuramic acid (NAM) and L-alanine (L-Ala) in the peptidoglycan, which is a major component of the bacterial cell wall.

The enzyme's systematic name is N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase, but it can also be referred to as:

* N-acetylmuramic acid lyase
* Peptidoglycan N-acetylmuramoylhydrolase
* N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine glycohydrolase
* N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidohydrolase

N-Acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine Amidase is an essential enzyme for bacterial cell division and morphogenesis, as it facilitates the separation of daughter cells by cleaving peptidoglycan crosslinks. This enzyme has been studied extensively due to its potential as a target for developing new antibiotics that can selectively inhibit bacterial cell wall biosynthesis without affecting human cells.

Phospholipid ethers are a type of phospholipid in which the traditional fatty acid chains are replaced by alkyl or alkenyl groups linked to the glycerol backbone via an ether bond. They are a significant component of lipoproteins and cell membranes, particularly in archaea, where they contribute to the stability and rigidity of the membrane at extreme temperatures and pressures.

The two main types of phospholipid ethers are plasmalogens and diether lipids. Plasmalogens contain a vinyl ether bond at the sn-1 position, while diether lipids have an ether bond at both the sn-1 and sn-2 positions. These unique structures give phospholipid ethers distinct chemical and biological properties compared to conventional phospholipids with ester-linked fatty acids.

Sympathetic ganglia are part of the autonomic nervous system, which controls involuntary bodily functions. These ganglia are clusters of nerve cell bodies located outside the central nervous system, along the spinal cord. They serve as a relay station for signals sent from the central nervous system to the organs and glands. The sympathetic ganglia are responsible for the "fight or flight" response, releasing neurotransmitters such as norepinephrine that prepare the body for action in response to stress or danger.

The hippocampus is a complex, curved formation in the brain that resembles a seahorse (hence its name, from the Greek word "hippos" meaning horse and "kampos" meaning sea monster). It's part of the limbic system and plays crucial roles in the formation of memories, particularly long-term ones.

This region is involved in spatial navigation and cognitive maps, allowing us to recognize locations and remember how to get to them. Additionally, it's one of the first areas affected by Alzheimer's disease, which often results in memory loss as an early symptom.

Anatomically, it consists of two main parts: the Ammon's horn (or cornu ammonis) and the dentate gyrus. These structures are made up of distinct types of neurons that contribute to different aspects of learning and memory.

Hydrogen-ion concentration, also known as pH, is a measure of the acidity or basicity of a solution. It is defined as the negative logarithm (to the base 10) of the hydrogen ion activity in a solution. The standard unit of measurement is the pH unit. A pH of 7 is neutral, less than 7 is acidic, and greater than 7 is basic.

In medical terms, hydrogen-ion concentration is important for maintaining homeostasis within the body. For example, in the stomach, a high hydrogen-ion concentration (low pH) is necessary for the digestion of food. However, in other parts of the body such as blood, a high hydrogen-ion concentration can be harmful and lead to acidosis. Conversely, a low hydrogen-ion concentration (high pH) in the blood can lead to alkalosis. Both acidosis and alkalosis can have serious consequences on various organ systems if not corrected.

Methylamines are organic compounds that contain a methyl group (CH3) and an amino group (-NH2). They have the general formula of CH3-NH-R, where R can be a hydrogen atom or any organic group. Methylamines are derivatives of ammonia (NH3), in which one or more hydrogen atoms have been replaced by methyl groups.

There are several types of methylamines, including:

1. Methylamine (CH3-NH2): This is the simplest methylamine and is a colorless gas at room temperature with a strong odor. It is highly flammable and reactive.
2. Dimethylamine (CH3)2-NH: This is a colorless liquid at room temperature with an unpleasant fishy odor. It is less reactive than methylamine but still highly flammable.
3. Trimethylamine (CH3)3-N: This is a colorless liquid at room temperature that has a strong, unpleasant odor often described as "fishy." It is less reactive than dimethylamine and is used in various industrial applications.

Methylamines are used in the production of various chemicals, including pesticides, dyes, and pharmaceuticals. They can also be found naturally in some foods and are produced by certain types of bacteria in the body. Exposure to high levels of methylamines can cause irritation to the eyes, skin, and respiratory tract, and prolonged exposure can lead to more serious health effects.

Dimethylamine is an organic compound with the formula (CH3)2NH. It is a colorless gas that is highly soluble in water and polar solvents. Dimethylamine is a derivative of ammonia (NH3) in which two hydrogen atoms are replaced by methyl groups (CH3).

Dimethylamines, in medical terminology, typically refer to compounds that contain the functional group -N(CH3)2. These compounds can have various biological activities and may be used as drugs or therapeutic agents. For example, dimethylamine is a metabolite of choline, a nutrient important for brain function.

However, it's worth noting that "dimethylamines" is not typically used as a medical term to describe a specific condition or diagnosis. If you have any concerns about exposure to dimethylamine or its potential health effects, it would be best to consult with a healthcare professional.

Nitrogenous group transferases are a class of enzymes that catalyze the transfer of nitrogen-containing groups from one molecule to another. These enzymes play a crucial role in various metabolic pathways, including the biosynthesis and degradation of amino acids, nucleotides, and other nitrogen-containing compounds.

The term "nitrogenous group" refers to any chemical group that contains nitrogen atoms. Examples of nitrogenous groups include amino groups (-NH2), amide groups (-CONH2), and cyano groups (-CN). Transferases that move these groups from one molecule to another are classified as nitrogenous group transferases.

These enzymes typically require cofactors such as ATP, NAD+, or other small molecules to facilitate the transfer of the nitrogenous group. They follow the general reaction mechanism of a transferase enzyme, where the substrate (donor) binds to the active site of the enzyme and transfers its nitrogenous group to an acceptor molecule, resulting in the formation of a new product.

Examples of nitrogenous group transferases include:

* Glutamine synthetase, which catalyzes the conversion of glutamate to glutamine by adding an ammonia group (-NH3) from ATP.
* Aspartate transcarbamylase, which catalyzes the transfer of a carbamoyl group (-CO-NH2) from carbamoyl phosphate to aspartate during pyrimidine biosynthesis.
* Argininosuccinate synthetase, which catalyzes the formation of argininosuccinate by transferring an aspartate group from aspartate to citrulline during the urea cycle.

Understanding nitrogenous group transferases is essential for understanding various metabolic pathways and their regulation in living organisms.

Osmolar concentration is a measure of the total number of solute particles (such as ions or molecules) dissolved in a solution per liter of solvent (usually water), which affects the osmotic pressure. It is expressed in units of osmoles per liter (osmol/L). Osmolarity and osmolality are related concepts, with osmolarity referring to the number of osmoles per unit volume of solution, typically measured in liters, while osmolality refers to the number of osmoles per kilogram of solvent. In clinical contexts, osmolar concentration is often used to describe the solute concentration of bodily fluids such as blood or urine.

Vitamin B Complex refers to a group of water-soluble vitamins that play essential roles in cell metabolism, cellular function, and formation of red blood cells. This complex includes 8 distinct vitamins, all of which were originally thought to be the same vitamin when first discovered. They are now known to have individual structures and specific functions.

1. Vitamin B1 (Thiamin): Necessary for energy production and nerve function.
2. Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin): Involved in energy production and growth.
3. Vitamin B3 (Niacin): Assists in energy production, DNA repair, and acts as a co-factor for various enzymes.
4. Vitamin B5 (Pantothenic Acid): Plays a role in the synthesis of Coenzyme A, which is vital for fatty acid metabolism.
5. Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine): Needed for protein metabolism, neurotransmitter synthesis, hemoglobin formation, and immune function.
6. Vitamin B7 (Biotin): Involved in fatty acid synthesis, glucose metabolism, and nail and hair health.
7. Vitamin B9 (Folate or Folic Acid): Essential for DNA replication, cell division, and the production of red blood cells.
8. Vitamin B12 (Cobalamin): Necessary for nerve function, DNA synthesis, and the production of red blood cells.

These vitamins are often found together in various foods, and a balanced diet usually provides sufficient amounts of each. Deficiencies can lead to specific health issues related to the functions of each particular vitamin.

I must clarify that the term "Guinea Pigs" is not typically used in medical definitions. However, in colloquial or informal language, it may refer to people who are used as the first to try out a new medical treatment or drug. This is known as being a "test subject" or "in a clinical trial."

In the field of scientific research, particularly in studies involving animals, guinea pigs are small rodents that are often used as experimental subjects due to their size, cost-effectiveness, and ease of handling. They are not actually pigs from Guinea, despite their name's origins being unclear. However, they do not exactly fit the description of being used in human medical experiments.

Nerve endings, also known as terminal branches or sensory receptors, are the specialized structures present at the termination point of nerve fibers (axons) that transmit electrical signals to and from the central nervous system (CNS). They primarily function in detecting changes in the external environment or internal body conditions and converting them into electrical impulses.

There are several types of nerve endings, including:

1. Free Nerve Endings: These are unencapsulated nerve endings that respond to various stimuli like temperature, pain, and touch. They are widely distributed throughout the body, especially in the skin, mucous membranes, and visceral organs.

2. Encapsulated Nerve Endings: These are wrapped by specialized connective tissue sheaths, which can modify their sensitivity to specific stimuli. Examples include Pacinian corpuscles (responsible for detecting deep pressure and vibration), Meissner's corpuscles (for light touch), Ruffini endings (for stretch and pressure), and Merkel cells (for sustained touch).

3. Specialised Nerve Endings: These are nerve endings that respond to specific stimuli, such as auditory, visual, olfactory, gustatory, and vestibular information. They include hair cells in the inner ear, photoreceptors in the retina, taste buds in the tongue, and olfactory receptors in the nasal cavity.

Nerve endings play a crucial role in relaying sensory information to the CNS for processing and initiating appropriate responses, such as reflex actions or conscious perception of the environment.

Erythrocytes, also known as red blood cells (RBCs), are the most common type of blood cell in circulating blood in mammals. They are responsible for transporting oxygen from the lungs to the body's tissues and carbon dioxide from the tissues to the lungs.

Erythrocytes are formed in the bone marrow and have a biconcave shape, which allows them to fold and bend easily as they pass through narrow blood vessels. They do not have a nucleus or mitochondria, which makes them more flexible but also limits their ability to reproduce or repair themselves.

In humans, erythrocytes are typically disc-shaped and measure about 7 micrometers in diameter. They contain the protein hemoglobin, which binds to oxygen and gives blood its red color. The lifespan of an erythrocyte is approximately 120 days, after which it is broken down in the liver and spleen.

Abnormalities in erythrocyte count or function can lead to various medical conditions, such as anemia, polycythemia, and sickle cell disease.

Preganglionic autonomic fibers are the nerve fibers that originate from neurons located in the brainstem and spinal cord, and synapse with postganglionic neurons in autonomic ganglia. These preganglionic fibers release acetylcholine as a neurotransmitter to activate the postganglionic neurons, which then innervate effector organs such as smooth muscle, cardiac muscle, and glands.

The autonomic nervous system is divided into two main subdivisions: the sympathetic and parasympathetic systems. The preganglionic fibers of the sympathetic nervous system originate from the lateral horn of the spinal cord from levels T1 to L2/L3, while those of the parasympathetic nervous system originate from cranial nerves III, VII, IX, and X, as well as sacral segments S2 to S4.

Preganglionic fibers are generally longer than postganglionic fibers, and their cell bodies are located in the central nervous system. They are responsible for transmitting signals from the CNS to the peripheral autonomic ganglia, where they synapse with postganglionic neurons that innervate target organs.

The cerebral cortex is the outermost layer of the brain, characterized by its intricate folded structure and wrinkled appearance. It is a region of great importance as it plays a key role in higher cognitive functions such as perception, consciousness, thought, memory, language, and attention. The cerebral cortex is divided into two hemispheres, each containing four lobes: the frontal, parietal, temporal, and occipital lobes. These areas are responsible for different functions, with some regions specializing in sensory processing while others are involved in motor control or associative functions. The cerebral cortex is composed of gray matter, which contains neuronal cell bodies, and is covered by a layer of white matter that consists mainly of myelinated nerve fibers.

Sodium Chloride is defined as the inorganic compound with the chemical formula NaCl, representing a 1:1 ratio of sodium and chloride ions. It is commonly known as table salt or halite, and it is used extensively in food seasoning and preservation due to its ability to enhance flavor and inhibit bacterial growth. In medicine, sodium chloride is used as a balanced electrolyte solution for rehydration and as a topical wound irrigant and antiseptic. It is also an essential component of the human body's fluid balance and nerve impulse transmission.

Glycerides are esters formed from glycerol and one, two, or three fatty acids. They include monoglycerides (one fatty acid), diglycerides (two fatty acids), and triglycerides (three fatty acids). Triglycerides are the main constituents of natural fats and oils, and they are a major form of energy storage in animals and plants. High levels of triglycerides in the blood, also known as hypertriglyceridemia, can increase the risk of heart disease and stroke.

Membrane lipids are the main component of biological membranes, forming a lipid bilayer in which various cellular processes take place. These lipids include phospholipids, glycolipids, and cholesterol. Phospholipids are the most abundant type, consisting of a hydrophilic head (containing a phosphate group) and two hydrophobic tails (composed of fatty acid chains). Glycolipids contain a sugar group attached to the lipid molecule. Cholesterol helps regulate membrane fluidity and permeability. Together, these lipids create a selectively permeable barrier that separates cells from their environment and organelles within cells.

Dibucaine is a local anesthetic drug that is used to numb the skin or mucous membranes before medical procedures. It works by blocking the nerve signals in the area where it is applied, preventing the sensation of pain. Dibucaine is available as a topical cream, ointment, or gel, and it may also be used as an ingredient in lozenges or throat sprays to relieve sore throats.

Dibucaine has been largely replaced by other local anesthetics due to its potential for causing allergic reactions and other side effects. It is important to follow your healthcare provider's instructions carefully when using dibucaine, and to inform them of any medical conditions or medications you are taking that may interact with the drug.

Neostigmine is a medication that belongs to a class of drugs called cholinesterase inhibitors. It works by blocking the breakdown of acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter in the body, leading to an increase in its levels at the neuromuscular junction. This helps to improve muscle strength and tone by enhancing the transmission of nerve impulses to muscles.

Neostigmine is primarily used in the treatment of myasthenia gravis, a neurological disorder characterized by muscle weakness and fatigue. It can also be used to reverse the effects of non-depolarizing muscle relaxants administered during surgery. Additionally, neostigmine may be used to diagnose and manage certain conditions that cause decreased gut motility or urinary retention.

It is important to note that neostigmine should be used under the close supervision of a healthcare professional due to its potential side effects, which can include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, increased salivation, sweating, and muscle cramps. In some cases, it may also cause respiratory distress or cardiac arrhythmias.

Lipids are a broad group of organic compounds that are insoluble in water but soluble in nonpolar organic solvents. They include fats, waxes, sterols, fat-soluble vitamins (such as vitamins A, D, E, and K), monoglycerides, diglycerides, triglycerides, and phospholipids. Lipids serve many important functions in the body, including energy storage, acting as structural components of cell membranes, and serving as signaling molecules. High levels of certain lipids, particularly cholesterol and triglycerides, in the blood are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease.

3-Deazauridine is a chemical compound that is an analog of the nucleoside uridine. In this case, the nitrogen atom at the 3 position of the uracil ring has been replaced with a carbon atom. This modification can affect the way the molecule is processed in cells and can be used in research to study various biological processes. It's important to note that 3-Deazauridine itself does not have any specific medical definition or application, but it might be used in certain biochemical or pharmacological studies.

Carnitine is a naturally occurring substance in the body that plays a crucial role in energy production. It transports long-chain fatty acids into the mitochondria, where they can be broken down to produce energy. Carnitine is also available as a dietary supplement and is often used to treat or prevent carnitine deficiency.

The medical definition of Carnitine is:

"A quaternary ammonium compound that occurs naturally in animal tissues, especially in muscle, heart, brain, and liver. It is essential for the transport of long-chain fatty acids into the mitochondria, where they can be oxidized to produce energy. Carnitine also functions as an antioxidant and has been studied as a potential treatment for various conditions, including heart disease, diabetes, and kidney disease."

Carnitine is also known as L-carnitine or levocarnitine. It can be found in foods such as red meat, dairy products, fish, poultry, and tempeh. In the body, carnitine is synthesized from the amino acids lysine and methionine with the help of vitamin C and iron. Some people may have a deficiency in carnitine due to genetic factors, malnutrition, or certain medical conditions, such as kidney disease or liver disease. In these cases, supplementation may be necessary to prevent or treat symptoms of carnitine deficiency.

Carnitine O-acetyltransferase (COAT) is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the transport and metabolism of fatty acids within cells. It is also known as carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT I).

The primary function of COAT is to catalyze the transfer of an acetyl group from acetyl-CoA to carnitine, forming acetylcarnitine and free CoA. This reaction is essential for the entry of long-chain fatty acids into the mitochondrial matrix, where they undergo beta-oxidation to produce energy in the form of ATP.

COAT is located on the outer membrane of the mitochondria and functions as a rate-limiting enzyme in fatty acid oxidation. Its activity can be inhibited by malonyl-CoA, which is an intermediate in fatty acid synthesis. This inhibition helps regulate the balance between fatty acid oxidation and synthesis, ensuring that cells have enough energy while preventing excessive accumulation of lipids.

Deficiencies or mutations in COAT can lead to various metabolic disorders, such as carnitine palmitoyltransferase I deficiency (CPT I deficiency), which may cause symptoms like muscle weakness, hypoglycemia, and cardiomyopathy. Proper diagnosis and management of these conditions often involve dietary modifications, supplementation with carnitine, and avoidance of fasting to prevent metabolic crises.

A cell line is a culture of cells that are grown in a laboratory for use in research. These cells are usually taken from a single cell or group of cells, and they are able to divide and grow continuously in the lab. Cell lines can come from many different sources, including animals, plants, and humans. They are often used in scientific research to study cellular processes, disease mechanisms, and to test new drugs or treatments. Some common types of human cell lines include HeLa cells (which come from a cancer patient named Henrietta Lacks), HEK293 cells (which come from embryonic kidney cells), and HUVEC cells (which come from umbilical vein endothelial cells). It is important to note that cell lines are not the same as primary cells, which are cells that are taken directly from a living organism and have not been grown in the lab.

"Prenatal exposure delayed effects" refer to the adverse health outcomes or symptoms that become apparent in an individual during their development or later in life, which are caused by exposure to certain environmental factors or substances while they were still in the womb. These effects may not be immediately observable at birth and can take weeks, months, years, or even decades to manifest. They can result from maternal exposure to various agents such as infectious diseases, medications, illicit drugs, tobacco smoke, alcohol, or environmental pollutants during pregnancy. The delayed effects can impact multiple organ systems and may include physical, cognitive, behavioral, and developmental abnormalities. It is important to note that the risk and severity of these effects can depend on several factors, including the timing, duration, and intensity of the exposure, as well as the individual's genetic susceptibility.

Neurochemistry is a branch of neuroscience that deals with the study of biochemical processes and molecules, including neurotransmitters, neuropeptides, neuromodulators, enzymes, and receptors, that are involved in the functioning and integration of the nervous system. It investigates how these chemicals contribute to various brain functions such as cognition, memory, emotion, behavior, and perception. Additionally, neurochemistry examines the alterations in these chemical processes associated with neurological disorders and psychiatric illnesses, providing insights into potential therapeutic targets for treatments.

Maternal nutritional physiological phenomena refer to the various changes and processes that occur in a woman's body during pregnancy, lactation, and postpartum periods to meet the increased nutritional demands and support the growth and development of the fetus or infant. These phenomena involve complex interactions between maternal nutrition, hormonal regulation, metabolism, and physiological functions to ensure optimal pregnancy outcomes and offspring health.

Examples of maternal nutritional physiological phenomena include:

1. Adaptations in maternal nutrient metabolism: During pregnancy, the mother's body undergoes various adaptations to increase the availability of essential nutrients for fetal growth and development. For instance, there are increased absorption and utilization of glucose, amino acids, and fatty acids, as well as enhanced storage of glycogen and lipids in maternal tissues.
2. Placental transfer of nutrients: The placenta plays a crucial role in facilitating the exchange of nutrients between the mother and fetus. It selectively transports essential nutrients such as glucose, amino acids, fatty acids, vitamins, and minerals from the maternal circulation to the fetal compartment while removing waste products.
3. Maternal weight gain: Pregnant women typically experience an increase in body weight due to the growth of the fetus, placenta, amniotic fluid, and maternal tissues such as the uterus and breasts. Adequate gestational weight gain is essential for ensuring optimal pregnancy outcomes and reducing the risk of adverse perinatal complications.
4. Changes in maternal hormonal regulation: Pregnancy is associated with significant changes in hormonal profiles, including increased levels of estrogen, progesterone, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), and other hormones that regulate various physiological functions such as glucose metabolism, appetite regulation, and maternal-fetal immune tolerance.
5. Lactation: Following childbirth, the mother's body undergoes further adaptations to support lactation and breastfeeding. This involves the production and secretion of milk, which contains essential nutrients and bioactive components that promote infant growth, development, and immunity.
6. Nutrient requirements: Pregnancy and lactation increase women's nutritional demands for various micronutrients such as iron, calcium, folate, vitamin D, and omega-3 fatty acids. Meeting these increased nutritional needs is crucial for ensuring optimal pregnancy outcomes and supporting maternal health during the postpartum period.

Understanding these physiological adaptations and their implications for maternal and fetal health is essential for developing evidence-based interventions to promote positive pregnancy outcomes, reduce the risk of adverse perinatal complications, and support women's health throughout the reproductive lifespan.

The prosencephalon is a term used in the field of neuroembryology, which refers to the developmental stage of the forebrain in the embryonic nervous system. It is one of the three primary vesicles that form during the initial stages of neurulation, along with the mesencephalon (midbrain) and rhombencephalon (hindbrain).

The prosencephalon further differentiates into two secondary vesicles: the telencephalon and diencephalon. The telencephalon gives rise to structures such as the cerebral cortex, basal ganglia, and olfactory bulbs, while the diencephalon develops into structures like the thalamus, hypothalamus, and epithalamus.

It is important to note that 'prosencephalon' itself is not used as a medical term in adult neuroanatomy, but it is crucial for understanding the development of the human brain during embryogenesis.

Nicotinic agonists are substances that bind to and activate nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), which are ligand-gated ion channels found in the nervous system of many organisms, including humans. These receptors are activated by the endogenous neurotransmitter acetylcholine and the exogenous compound nicotine.

When a nicotinic agonist binds to the receptor, it triggers a conformational change that leads to the opening of an ion channel, allowing the influx of cations such as calcium, sodium, and potassium. This ion flux can depolarize the postsynaptic membrane and generate or modulate electrical signals in excitable tissues, such as neurons and muscles.

Nicotinic agonists have various therapeutic and recreational uses, but they can also produce harmful effects, depending on the dose, duration of exposure, and individual sensitivity. Some examples of nicotinic agonists include:

1. Nicotine: A highly addictive alkaloid found in tobacco plants, which is the prototypical nicotinic agonist. It is used in smoking cessation therapies, such as nicotine gum and patches, but it can also lead to dependence and various health issues when consumed through smoking or vaping.
2. Varenicline: A medication approved for smoking cessation that acts as a partial agonist of nAChRs. It reduces the rewarding effects of nicotine and alleviates withdrawal symptoms, helping smokers quit.
3. Rivastigmine: A cholinesterase inhibitor used to treat Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia. It increases the concentration of acetylcholine in the synaptic cleft, enhancing its activity at nicotinic receptors and improving cognitive function.
4. Succinylcholine: A neuromuscular blocking agent used during surgical procedures to induce paralysis and facilitate intubation. It acts as a depolarizing nicotinic agonist, causing transient muscle fasciculations followed by prolonged relaxation.
5. Curare and related compounds: Plant-derived alkaloids that act as competitive antagonists of nicotinic receptors. They are used in anesthesia to induce paralysis and facilitate mechanical ventilation during surgery.

In summary, nicotinic agonists are substances that bind to and activate nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, leading to various physiological responses. These compounds have diverse applications in medicine, from smoking cessation therapies to treatments for neurodegenerative disorders and anesthesia. However, they can also pose risks when misused or abused, as seen with nicotine addiction and the potential side effects of certain medications.

Fatty liver, also known as hepatic steatosis, is a medical condition characterized by the abnormal accumulation of fat in the liver. The liver's primary function is to process nutrients, filter blood, and fight infections, among other tasks. When excess fat builds up in the liver cells, it can impair liver function and lead to inflammation, scarring, and even liver failure if left untreated.

Fatty liver can be caused by various factors, including alcohol consumption, obesity, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), viral hepatitis, and certain medications or medical conditions. NAFLD is the most common cause of fatty liver in the United States and other developed countries, affecting up to 25% of the population.

Symptoms of fatty liver may include fatigue, weakness, weight loss, loss of appetite, nausea, abdominal pain or discomfort, and jaundice (yellowing of the skin and eyes). However, many people with fatty liver do not experience any symptoms, making it essential to diagnose and manage the condition through regular check-ups and blood tests.

Treatment for fatty liver depends on the underlying cause. Lifestyle changes such as weight loss, exercise, and dietary modifications are often recommended for people with NAFLD or alcohol-related fatty liver disease. Medications may also be prescribed to manage related conditions such as diabetes, high cholesterol, or metabolic syndrome. In severe cases of liver damage, a liver transplant may be necessary.

The Septum Pellucidum is a thin, delicate, and almost transparent partition in the brain that separates the lateral ventricles, which are fluid-filled spaces within the brain. It consists of two laminae (plates) that fuse together during fetal development, forming a single structure. The Septum Pellucidum is an essential component of the brain's ventricular system and plays a role in maintaining the structural integrity of the brain. Any abnormalities or damage to the Septum Pellucidum can lead to neurological disorders or cognitive impairments.

Nutrigenomics is a branch of nutrition research that studies the relationship between genes, nutrition, and health. It focuses on understanding how individual genetic variations can affect the way we respond to nutrients in our diet and how these responses may contribute to the risk of developing certain diseases. By examining these gene-diet interactions, nutrigenomics aims to provide personalized nutrition recommendations that can help improve overall health, prevent chronic diseases, and optimize athletic performance.

In simpler terms, nutrigenomics explores how our genes influence our nutritional needs and how our dietary choices can impact the expression of our genes. This knowledge can be used to develop targeted nutritional strategies for individuals based on their unique genetic profiles.

Paper chromatography is a type of chromatography technique that involves the separation and analysis of mixtures based on their components' ability to migrate differently upon capillary action on a paper medium. This simple and cost-effective method utilizes a paper, typically made of cellulose, as the stationary phase. The sample mixture is applied as a small spot near one end of the paper, and then the other end is dipped into a developing solvent or a mixture of solvents (mobile phase) in a shallow container.

As the mobile phase moves up the paper by capillary action, components within the sample mixture separate based on their partition coefficients between the stationary and mobile phases. The partition coefficient describes how much a component prefers to be in either the stationary or mobile phase. Components with higher partition coefficients in the mobile phase will move faster and further than those with lower partition coefficients.

Once separation is complete, the paper is dried and can be visualized under ultraviolet light or by using chemical reagents specific for the components of interest. The distance each component travels from the origin (point of application) and its corresponding solvent front position are measured, allowing for the calculation of Rf values (retardation factors). Rf is a dimensionless quantity calculated as the ratio of the distance traveled by the component to the distance traveled by the solvent front.

Rf = (distance traveled by component) / (distance traveled by solvent front)

Paper chromatography has been widely used in various applications, such as:

1. Identification and purity analysis of chemical compounds in pharmaceuticals, forensics, and research laboratories.
2. Separation and detection of amino acids, sugars, and other biomolecules in biological samples.
3. Educational purposes to demonstrate the principles of chromatography and separation techniques.

Despite its limitations, such as lower resolution compared to high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and less compatibility with volatile or nonpolar compounds, paper chromatography remains a valuable tool for quick, qualitative analysis in various fields.

Membrane potential is the electrical potential difference across a cell membrane, typically for excitable cells such as nerve and muscle cells. It is the difference in electric charge between the inside and outside of a cell, created by the selective permeability of the cell membrane to different ions. The resting membrane potential of a typical animal cell is around -70 mV, with the interior being negative relative to the exterior. This potential is generated and maintained by the active transport of ions across the membrane, primarily through the action of the sodium-potassium pump. Membrane potentials play a crucial role in many physiological processes, including the transmission of nerve impulses and the contraction of muscle cells.

A monovalent cation is a type of ion that has a single positive charge. In the context of medical and biological sciences, monovalent cations are important because they play crucial roles in various physiological processes, such as maintaining electrical neutrality in cells, facilitating nerve impulse transmission, and regulating fluid balance.

The most common monovalent cation is sodium (Na+), which is the primary cation in the extracellular fluid. Other examples of monovalent cations include potassium (K+), which is the main cation inside cells, and hydrogen (H+) ions, which are involved in acid-base balance.

Monovalent cations are typically measured in milliequivalents per liter (mEq/L) in clinical settings to express their concentration in biological fluids.

An amino acid sequence is the specific order of amino acids in a protein or peptide molecule, formed by the linking of the amino group (-NH2) of one amino acid to the carboxyl group (-COOH) of another amino acid through a peptide bond. The sequence is determined by the genetic code and is unique to each type of protein or peptide. It plays a crucial role in determining the three-dimensional structure and function of proteins.

Hydrolysis is a chemical process, not a medical one. However, it is relevant to medicine and biology.

Hydrolysis is the breakdown of a chemical compound due to its reaction with water, often resulting in the formation of two or more simpler compounds. In the context of physiology and medicine, hydrolysis is a crucial process in various biological reactions, such as the digestion of food molecules like proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. Enzymes called hydrolases catalyze these hydrolysis reactions to speed up the breakdown process in the body.

CDP-diacylglycerol-serine O-phosphatidyltransferase is an enzyme that plays a role in the synthesis of phosphatidylserine, a type of phospholipid found in cell membranes. The systematic name for this enzyme is CDP-diacylglycerol:L-serine O-phosphatidyltransferase. It catalyzes the following chemical reaction:

CDP-diacylglycerol + L-serine = CMP + O-phosphatidylserine

This enzyme is involved in the Kennedy pathway, which is the main pathway for the biosynthesis of glycerophospholipids in eukaryotic cells. CDP-diacylglycerol-serine O-phosphatidyltransferase is located in the endoplasmic reticulum and is essential for the synthesis of phosphatidylserine, which is an important structural component of cell membranes and also serves as a precursor for the biosynthesis of other phospholipids. Defects in this enzyme have been associated with neurological disorders.

Cell membrane permeability refers to the ability of various substances, such as molecules and ions, to pass through the cell membrane. The cell membrane, also known as the plasma membrane, is a thin, flexible barrier that surrounds all cells, controlling what enters and leaves the cell. Its primary function is to protect the cell's internal environment and maintain homeostasis.

The permeability of the cell membrane depends on its structure, which consists of a phospholipid bilayer interspersed with proteins. The hydrophilic (water-loving) heads of the phospholipids face outward, while the hydrophobic (water-fearing) tails face inward, creating a barrier that is generally impermeable to large, polar, or charged molecules.

However, specific proteins within the membrane, called channels and transporters, allow certain substances to cross the membrane. Channels are protein structures that span the membrane and provide a pore for ions or small uncharged molecules to pass through. Transporters, on the other hand, are proteins that bind to specific molecules and facilitate their movement across the membrane, often using energy in the form of ATP.

The permeability of the cell membrane can be influenced by various factors, such as temperature, pH, and the presence of certain chemicals or drugs. Changes in permeability can have significant consequences for the cell's function and survival, as they can disrupt ion balances, nutrient uptake, waste removal, and signal transduction.

I believe there may be some confusion in your question. "Rabbits" is a common name used to refer to the Lagomorpha species, particularly members of the family Leporidae. They are small mammals known for their long ears, strong legs, and quick reproduction.

However, if you're referring to "rabbits" in a medical context, there is a term called "rabbit syndrome," which is a rare movement disorder characterized by repetitive, involuntary movements of the fingers, resembling those of a rabbit chewing. It is also known as "finger-chewing chorea." This condition is usually associated with certain medications, particularly antipsychotics, and typically resolves when the medication is stopped or adjusted.

Fatty acids are carboxylic acids with a long aliphatic chain, which are important components of lipids and are widely distributed in living organisms. They can be classified based on the length of their carbon chain, saturation level (presence or absence of double bonds), and other structural features.

The two main types of fatty acids are:

1. Saturated fatty acids: These have no double bonds in their carbon chain and are typically solid at room temperature. Examples include palmitic acid (C16:0) and stearic acid (C18:0).
2. Unsaturated fatty acids: These contain one or more double bonds in their carbon chain and can be further classified into monounsaturated (one double bond) and polyunsaturated (two or more double bonds) fatty acids. Examples of unsaturated fatty acids include oleic acid (C18:1, monounsaturated), linoleic acid (C18:2, polyunsaturated), and alpha-linolenic acid (C18:3, polyunsaturated).

Fatty acids play crucial roles in various biological processes, such as energy storage, membrane structure, and cell signaling. Some essential fatty acids cannot be synthesized by the human body and must be obtained through dietary sources.

Organic Cation Transporter 1 (OCT1) is a protein that belongs to the solute carrier family 22 (SLC22A). It is primarily expressed in the liver and plays an essential role in the uptake and elimination of various organic cations, including many drugs, from the systemic circulation into hepatocytes. OCT1 also transports some endogenous substances such as neurotransmitters and hormones. Mutations or variants in the OCT1 gene can affect drug response and disposition, making it an important factor to consider in personalized medicine.

Cinchona alkaloids are a group of naturally occurring chemical compounds that are found in the bark of Cinchona trees, which are native to South America. These alkaloids have been used for centuries in traditional medicine to treat various ailments, most notably malaria. The main cinchona alkaloids include quinine, quinidine, cinchonine, and cinchonidine.

Quinine is the most well-known of these alkaloids and has been used for centuries as an effective antimalarial agent. It works by interfering with the reproduction of the malaria parasite in the red blood cells. Quinine is also used to treat other medical conditions, such as leg cramps and restless legs syndrome.

Quinidine is another important cinchona alkaloid that is used primarily as an antiarrhythmic agent to treat irregular heart rhythms. It works by slowing down the electrical conduction in the heart and stabilizing its rhythm.

Cinchonine and cinchonidine have more limited medical uses, mainly as bitter-tasting ingredients in tonics and other beverages. However, they also have some medicinal properties, such as being used as antimalarial agents and antiarrhythmic drugs in some countries.

It is important to note that cinchona alkaloids can have serious side effects if not used properly, so they should only be taken under the supervision of a healthcare professional.

Temperature, in a medical context, is a measure of the degree of hotness or coldness of a body or environment. It is usually measured using a thermometer and reported in degrees Celsius (°C), degrees Fahrenheit (°F), or kelvin (K). In the human body, normal core temperature ranges from about 36.5-37.5°C (97.7-99.5°F) when measured rectally, and can vary slightly depending on factors such as time of day, physical activity, and menstrual cycle. Elevated body temperature is a common sign of infection or inflammation, while abnormally low body temperature can indicate hypothermia or other medical conditions.

Carrier proteins, also known as transport proteins, are a type of protein that facilitates the movement of molecules across cell membranes. They are responsible for the selective and active transport of ions, sugars, amino acids, and other molecules from one side of the membrane to the other, against their concentration gradient. This process requires energy, usually in the form of ATP (adenosine triphosphate).

Carrier proteins have a specific binding site for the molecule they transport, and undergo conformational changes upon binding, which allows them to move the molecule across the membrane. Once the molecule has been transported, the carrier protein returns to its original conformation, ready to bind and transport another molecule.

Carrier proteins play a crucial role in maintaining the balance of ions and other molecules inside and outside of cells, and are essential for many physiological processes, including nerve impulse transmission, muscle contraction, and nutrient uptake.

"Wistar rats" are a strain of albino rats that are widely used in laboratory research. They were developed at the Wistar Institute in Philadelphia, USA, and were first introduced in 1906. Wistar rats are outbred, which means that they are genetically diverse and do not have a fixed set of genetic characteristics like inbred strains.

Wistar rats are commonly used as animal models in biomedical research because of their size, ease of handling, and relatively low cost. They are used in a wide range of research areas, including toxicology, pharmacology, nutrition, cancer, cardiovascular disease, and behavioral studies. Wistar rats are also used in safety testing of drugs, medical devices, and other products.

Wistar rats are typically larger than many other rat strains, with males weighing between 500-700 grams and females weighing between 250-350 grams. They have a lifespan of approximately 2-3 years. Wistar rats are also known for their docile and friendly nature, making them easy to handle and work with in the laboratory setting.

Neurotransmitter uptake inhibitors are a class of drugs that work by blocking the reuptake of neurotransmitters, such as serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine, into the presynaptic neuron after they have been released into the synapse. This results in an increased concentration of these neurotransmitters in the synapse, which can enhance their signal transduction and lead to therapeutic effects.

These drugs are commonly used in the treatment of various psychiatric disorders, such as depression, anxiety, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). They include selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (NRIs).

It's important to note that while neurotransmitter uptake inhibitors can be effective in treating certain conditions, they may also have potential side effects and risks. Therefore, it is essential to use them under the guidance and supervision of a healthcare professional.

Osmotic pressure is a fundamental concept in the field of physiology and biochemistry. It refers to the pressure that is required to be applied to a solution to prevent the flow of solvent (like water) into it, through a semi-permeable membrane, when the solution is separated from a pure solvent or a solution of lower solute concentration.

In simpler terms, osmotic pressure is the force that drives the natural movement of solvent molecules from an area of lower solute concentration to an area of higher solute concentration, across a semi-permeable membrane. This process is crucial for maintaining the fluid balance and nutrient transport in living organisms.

The osmotic pressure of a solution can be determined by its solute concentration, temperature, and the ideal gas law. It is often expressed in units of atmospheres (atm), millimeters of mercury (mmHg), or pascals (Pa). In medical contexts, understanding osmotic pressure is essential for managing various clinical conditions such as dehydration, fluid and electrolyte imbalances, and dialysis treatments.

Water-electrolyte balance refers to the regulation of water and electrolytes (sodium, potassium, chloride, bicarbonate) in the body to maintain homeostasis. This is crucial for various bodily functions such as nerve impulse transmission, muscle contraction, fluid balance, and pH regulation. The body maintains this balance through mechanisms that control water intake, excretion, and electrolyte concentration in various body fluids like blood and extracellular fluid. Disruptions in water-electrolyte balance can lead to dehydration or overhydration, and imbalances in electrolytes can cause conditions such as hyponatremia (low sodium levels) or hyperkalemia (high potassium levels).

Magnesium is an essential mineral that plays a crucial role in various biological processes in the human body. It is the fourth most abundant cation in the body and is involved in over 300 enzymatic reactions, including protein synthesis, muscle and nerve function, blood glucose control, and blood pressure regulation. Magnesium also contributes to the structural development of bones and teeth.

In medical terms, magnesium deficiency can lead to several health issues, such as muscle cramps, weakness, heart arrhythmias, and seizures. On the other hand, excessive magnesium levels can cause symptoms like diarrhea, nausea, and muscle weakness. Magnesium supplements or magnesium-rich foods are often recommended to maintain optimal magnesium levels in the body.

Some common dietary sources of magnesium include leafy green vegetables, nuts, seeds, legumes, whole grains, and dairy products. Magnesium is also available in various forms as a dietary supplement, including magnesium oxide, magnesium citrate, magnesium chloride, and magnesium glycinate.

Chlorides are simple inorganic ions consisting of a single chlorine atom bonded to a single charged hydrogen ion (H+). Chloride is the most abundant anion (negatively charged ion) in the extracellular fluid in the human body. The normal range for chloride concentration in the blood is typically between 96-106 milliequivalents per liter (mEq/L).

Chlorides play a crucial role in maintaining electrical neutrality, acid-base balance, and osmotic pressure in the body. They are also essential for various physiological processes such as nerve impulse transmission, maintenance of membrane potentials, and digestion (as hydrochloric acid in the stomach).

Chloride levels can be affected by several factors, including diet, hydration status, kidney function, and certain medical conditions. Increased or decreased chloride levels can indicate various disorders, such as dehydration, kidney disease, Addison's disease, or diabetes insipidus. Therefore, monitoring chloride levels is essential for assessing a person's overall health and diagnosing potential medical issues.

Deuterium is a stable and non-radioactive isotope of hydrogen. The atomic nucleus of deuterium, called a deuteron, contains one proton and one neutron, giving it an atomic weight of approximately 2.014 atomic mass units (amu). It is also known as heavy hydrogen or heavy water because its hydrogen atoms contain one neutron in addition to the usual one proton found in common hydrogen atoms.

Deuterium occurs naturally in trace amounts in water and other organic compounds, typically making up about 0.015% to 0.018% of all hydrogen atoms. It can be separated from regular hydrogen through various methods such as electrolysis or distillation, and it has many applications in scientific research, particularly in the fields of chemistry and physics.

In medical contexts, deuterium is sometimes used as a tracer to study metabolic processes in the body. By replacing hydrogen atoms in specific molecules with deuterium atoms, researchers can track the movement and transformation of those molecules within living organisms. This technique has been used to investigate various physiological processes, including drug metabolism, energy production, and lipid synthesis.

Anabasine is a type of toxic alkaloid that can be found in certain plants, including the leaves of the tobacco plant Nicotiana glauca (also known as tree tobacco). It has a similar structure to nicotine and can have similar physiological effects, such as stimulating the nervous system and increasing heart rate. However, anabasine is generally considered to be more toxic than nicotine.

Anabasine can also be produced synthetically in a laboratory. It has been used in research as a tool for studying the mechanisms of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, which are important targets for drugs that affect the nervous system.

In terms of medical definitions, anabasine is not a term that is commonly used in clinical medicine. It is more likely to be encountered in the context of research or toxicology.

Glycerophospholipids, also known as phosphoglycerides, are a major class of lipids that constitute the structural components of biological membranes. They are composed of a glycerol backbone to which two fatty acid chains and a phosphate group are attached. The phosphate group is esterified to an alcohol, typically choline, ethanolamine, serine, or inositol, forming what is called a phosphatidyl headgroup.

The chemical structure of glycerophospholipids allows them to form bilayers, which are essential for the formation of cell membranes and organelles within cells. The fatty acid chains, which can be saturated or unsaturated, contribute to the fluidity and permeability of the membrane. Glycerophospholipids also play important roles in various cellular processes, including signal transduction, cell recognition, and metabolism.

Culture media is a substance that is used to support the growth of microorganisms or cells in an artificial environment, such as a petri dish or test tube. It typically contains nutrients and other factors that are necessary for the growth and survival of the organisms being cultured. There are many different types of culture media, each with its own specific formulation and intended use. Some common examples include blood agar, which is used to culture bacteria; Sabouraud dextrose agar, which is used to culture fungi; and Eagle's minimum essential medium, which is used to culture animal cells.

A ruminant stomach is not a term that is typically used in human medicine, but it is a key feature of the digestive system in animals that are classified as ruminants. Ruminants are hoofed mammals that chew their cud, such as cattle, deer, sheep, and goats.

The ruminant stomach is actually composed of four distinct compartments: the rumen, reticulum, omasum, and abomasum. These compartments work together to break down plant material through a process of fermentation by microbes.

The rumen is the largest of the compartments and functions as a fermentation vat where plant material is broken down by microbes into simpler molecules that can be absorbed and utilized by the animal. The reticulum is connected to the rumen and helps sort and move the partially digested food particles.

The omasum is a smaller compartment that absorbs water and some nutrients from the digesta before it passes into the abomasum, which is the final compartment and functions similarly to the human stomach, where digestive enzymes are secreted to further break down the food and absorb nutrients.

Therefore, a ruminant stomach refers to the complex and specialized digestive system found in animals that chew their cud, allowing them to efficiently extract nutrients from plant material.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Prenatal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena" is not a standard or widely recognized medical term. It seems to be a rather broad and vague phrase that combines several concepts: prenatal (occurring before birth), nutritional (relating to nutrition), physiological (relating to the functioning of living organisms and their parts), and phenomena (observable events or occurrences).

If you're interested in a specific aspect of maternal and fetal nutrition, physiology, or related processes during pregnancy, I would be happy to help further if you could provide a more precise term or question. For example, prenatal nutritional physiological phenomena could refer to the process of how certain nutrients are transported across the placenta, how maternal nutrition affects fetal growth and development, or how various hormonal and metabolic changes occur during pregnancy.

Medical Definition:

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive diagnostic imaging technique that uses a strong magnetic field and radio waves to create detailed cross-sectional or three-dimensional images of the internal structures of the body. The patient lies within a large, cylindrical magnet, and the scanner detects changes in the direction of the magnetic field caused by protons in the body. These changes are then converted into detailed images that help medical professionals to diagnose and monitor various medical conditions, such as tumors, injuries, or diseases affecting the brain, spinal cord, heart, blood vessels, joints, and other internal organs. MRI does not use radiation like computed tomography (CT) scans.

Substrate specificity in the context of medical biochemistry and enzymology refers to the ability of an enzyme to selectively bind and catalyze a chemical reaction with a particular substrate (or a group of similar substrates) while discriminating against other molecules that are not substrates. This specificity arises from the three-dimensional structure of the enzyme, which has evolved to match the shape, charge distribution, and functional groups of its physiological substrate(s).

Substrate specificity is a fundamental property of enzymes that enables them to carry out highly selective chemical transformations in the complex cellular environment. The active site of an enzyme, where the catalysis takes place, has a unique conformation that complements the shape and charge distribution of its substrate(s). This ensures efficient recognition, binding, and conversion of the substrate into the desired product while minimizing unwanted side reactions with other molecules.

Substrate specificity can be categorized as:

1. Absolute specificity: An enzyme that can only act on a single substrate or a very narrow group of structurally related substrates, showing no activity towards any other molecule.
2. Group specificity: An enzyme that prefers to act on a particular functional group or class of compounds but can still accommodate minor structural variations within the substrate.
3. Broad or promiscuous specificity: An enzyme that can act on a wide range of structurally diverse substrates, albeit with varying catalytic efficiencies.

Understanding substrate specificity is crucial for elucidating enzymatic mechanisms, designing drugs that target specific enzymes or pathways, and developing biotechnological applications that rely on the controlled manipulation of enzyme activities.

A ganglion is a cluster of neuron cell bodies in the peripheral nervous system. Ganglia are typically associated with nerves and serve as sites for sensory processing, integration, and relay of information between the periphery and the central nervous system (CNS). The two main types of ganglia are sensory ganglia, which contain pseudounipolar neurons that transmit sensory information to the CNS, and autonomic ganglia, which contain multipolar neurons that control involuntary physiological functions.

Examples of sensory ganglia include dorsal root ganglia (DRG), which are associated with spinal nerves, and cranial nerve ganglia, such as the trigeminal ganglion. Autonomic ganglia can be further divided into sympathetic and parasympathetic ganglia, which regulate different aspects of the autonomic nervous system.

It's worth noting that in anatomy, "ganglion" refers to a group of nerve cell bodies, while in clinical contexts, "ganglion" is often used to describe a specific type of cystic structure that forms near joints or tendons, typically in the wrist or foot. These ganglia are not related to the peripheral nervous system's ganglia but rather are fluid-filled sacs that may cause discomfort or pain due to their size or location.

The abomasum is the fourth and final stomach chamber in ruminant animals, such as cows, sheep, and goats. It is often referred to as the "true" stomach because its structure and function are most similar to the stomachs of non-ruminant animals, including humans.

In the abomasum, gastric juices containing hydrochloric acid and digestive enzymes are secreted, which help to break down proteins and fats in the ingested feed. The abomasum also serves as a site for nutrient absorption and further mechanical breakdown of food particles before they enter the small intestine.

The term "abomasum" is derived from Latin, where "ab-" means "away from," and "omassum" refers to the "stomach." This name reflects its location away from the other three stomach chambers in ruminants.

Maze learning is not a medical term per se, but it is a concept that is often used in the field of neuroscience and psychology. It refers to the process by which an animal or human learns to navigate through a complex environment, such as a maze, in order to find its way to a goal or target.

Maze learning involves several cognitive processes, including spatial memory, learning, and problem-solving. As animals or humans navigate through the maze, they encode information about the location of the goal and the various landmarks within the environment. This information is then used to form a cognitive map that allows them to navigate more efficiently in subsequent trials.

Maze learning has been widely used as a tool for studying learning and memory processes in both animals and humans. For example, researchers may use maze learning tasks to investigate the effects of brain damage or disease on cognitive function, or to evaluate the efficacy of various drugs or interventions for improving cognitive performance.

"Newborn animals" refers to the very young offspring of animals that have recently been born. In medical terminology, newborns are often referred to as "neonates," and they are classified as such from birth until about 28 days of age. During this time period, newborn animals are particularly vulnerable and require close monitoring and care to ensure their survival and healthy development.

The specific needs of newborn animals can vary widely depending on the species, but generally, they require warmth, nutrition, hydration, and protection from harm. In many cases, newborns are unable to regulate their own body temperature or feed themselves, so they rely heavily on their mothers for care and support.

In medical settings, newborn animals may be examined and treated by veterinarians to ensure that they are healthy and receiving the care they need. This can include providing medical interventions such as feeding tubes, antibiotics, or other treatments as needed to address any health issues that arise. Overall, the care and support of newborn animals is an important aspect of animal medicine and conservation efforts.

Muscarinic antagonists, also known as muscarinic receptor antagonists or parasympatholytics, are a class of drugs that block the action of acetylcholine at muscarinic receptors. Acetylcholine is a neurotransmitter that plays an important role in the parasympathetic nervous system, which helps to regulate various bodily functions such as heart rate, digestion, and respiration.

Muscarinic antagonists work by binding to muscarinic receptors, which are found in various organs throughout the body, including the eyes, lungs, heart, and gastrointestinal tract. By blocking the action of acetylcholine at these receptors, muscarinic antagonists can produce a range of effects depending on the specific receptor subtype that is affected.

For example, muscarinic antagonists may be used to treat conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma by relaxing the smooth muscle in the airways and reducing bronchoconstriction. They may also be used to treat conditions such as urinary incontinence or overactive bladder by reducing bladder contractions.

Some common muscarinic antagonists include atropine, scopolamine, ipratropium, and tiotropium. It's important to note that these drugs can have significant side effects, including dry mouth, blurred vision, constipation, and confusion, especially when used in high doses or for prolonged periods of time.

S-Adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) is a metabolic byproduct formed from the demethylation of various compounds or from the breakdown of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), which is a major methyl group donor in the body. SAH is rapidly hydrolyzed to homocysteine and adenosine by the enzyme S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase. Increased levels of SAH can inhibit many methyltransferases, leading to disturbances in cellular metabolism and potential negative health effects.

Acyltransferases are a group of enzymes that catalyze the transfer of an acyl group (a functional group consisting of a carbon atom double-bonded to an oxygen atom and single-bonded to a hydrogen atom) from one molecule to another. This transfer involves the formation of an ester bond between the acyl group donor and the acyl group acceptor.

Acyltransferases play important roles in various biological processes, including the biosynthesis of lipids, fatty acids, and other metabolites. They are also involved in the detoxification of xenobiotics (foreign substances) by catalyzing the addition of an acyl group to these compounds, making them more water-soluble and easier to excrete from the body.

Examples of acyltransferases include serine palmitoyltransferase, which is involved in the biosynthesis of sphingolipids, and cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), which facilitates the transfer of cholesteryl esters between lipoproteins.

Acyltransferases are classified based on the type of acyl group they transfer and the nature of the acyl group donor and acceptor molecules. They can be further categorized into subclasses based on their sequence similarities, three-dimensional structures, and evolutionary relationships.

Muscarinic receptors are a type of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that bind to the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. They are found in various organ systems, including the nervous system, cardiovascular system, and respiratory system. Muscarinic receptors are activated by muscarine, a type of alkaloid found in certain mushrooms, and are classified into five subtypes (M1-M5) based on their pharmacological properties and signaling pathways.

Muscarinic receptors play an essential role in regulating various physiological functions, such as heart rate, smooth muscle contraction, glandular secretion, and cognitive processes. Activation of M1, M3, and M5 muscarinic receptors leads to the activation of phospholipase C (PLC) and the production of inositol trisphosphate (IP3) and diacylglycerol (DAG), which increase intracellular calcium levels and activate protein kinase C (PKC). Activation of M2 and M4 muscarinic receptors inhibits adenylyl cyclase, reducing the production of cAMP and modulating ion channel activity.

In summary, muscarinic receptors are a type of GPCR that binds to acetylcholine and regulates various physiological functions in different organ systems. They are classified into five subtypes based on their pharmacological properties and signaling pathways.

"Saccharomyces cerevisiae" is not typically considered a medical term, but it is a scientific name used in the field of microbiology. It refers to a species of yeast that is commonly used in various industrial processes, such as baking and brewing. It's also widely used in scientific research due to its genetic tractability and eukaryotic cellular organization.

However, it does have some relevance to medical fields like medicine and nutrition. For example, certain strains of S. cerevisiae are used as probiotics, which can provide health benefits when consumed. They may help support gut health, enhance the immune system, and even assist in the digestion of certain nutrients.

In summary, "Saccharomyces cerevisiae" is a species of yeast with various industrial and potential medical applications.

Messenger RNA (mRNA) is a type of RNA (ribonucleic acid) that carries genetic information copied from DNA in the form of a series of three-base code "words," each of which specifies a particular amino acid. This information is used by the cell's machinery to construct proteins, a process known as translation. After being transcribed from DNA, mRNA travels out of the nucleus to the ribosomes in the cytoplasm where protein synthesis occurs. Once the protein has been synthesized, the mRNA may be degraded and recycled. Post-transcriptional modifications can also occur to mRNA, such as alternative splicing and addition of a 5' cap and a poly(A) tail, which can affect its stability, localization, and translation efficiency.

Streptococcus pneumoniae, also known as the pneumococcus, is a gram-positive, alpha-hemolytic bacterium frequently found in the upper respiratory tract of healthy individuals. It is a leading cause of community-acquired pneumonia and can also cause other infectious diseases such as otitis media (ear infection), sinusitis, meningitis, and bacteremia (bloodstream infection). The bacteria are encapsulated, and there are over 90 serotypes based on variations in the capsular polysaccharide. Some serotypes are more virulent or invasive than others, and the polysaccharide composition is crucial for vaccine development. S. pneumoniae infection can be treated with antibiotics, but the emergence of drug-resistant strains has become a significant global health concern.

Acetylthiocholine is a synthetic chemical compound that is widely used in scientific research, particularly in the field of neuroscience. It is the acetylated form of thiocholine, which is a choline ester. Acetylthiocholine is often used as a substrate for enzymes called cholinesterases, including acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE).

When Acetylthiocholine is hydrolyzed by AChE, it produces choline and thioacetic acid. This reaction is important because it terminates the signal transduction of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine at the synapse between neurons. Inhibition of AChE can lead to an accumulation of Acetylthiocholine and acetylcholine, which can have various effects on the nervous system, depending on the dose and duration of inhibition.

Acetylthiocholine is also used as a reagent in the Ellman's assay, a colorimetric method for measuring AChE activity. In this assay, Acetylthiocholine is hydrolyzed by AChE, releasing thiocholine, which then reacts with dithiobisnitrobenzoic acid (DTNB) to produce a yellow color. The intensity of the color is proportional to the amount of thiocholine produced and can be used to quantify AChE activity.

Diagnostic techniques using radioisotopes, also known as nuclear medicine, are medical diagnostic procedures that use small amounts of radioactive material, called radioisotopes or radionuclides, to diagnose and monitor various diseases and conditions. The radioisotopes are introduced into the body through different routes (such as injection, inhalation, or ingestion) and accumulate in specific organs or tissues.

The gamma rays or photons emitted by these radioisotopes are then detected by specialized imaging devices, such as gamma cameras or PET scanners, which generate images that provide information about the structure and function of the organ or tissue being examined. This information helps healthcare professionals to make accurate diagnoses, monitor disease progression, assess treatment response, and plan appropriate therapies.

Common diagnostic techniques using radioisotopes include:

1. Radionuclide imaging (also known as scintigraphy): A gamma camera is used to produce images of specific organs or tissues after the administration of a radioisotope. Examples include bone scans, lung scans, heart scans, and brain scans.
2. Positron emission tomography (PET) scans: A PET scanner detects pairs of gamma rays emitted indirectly by a positron-emitting radionuclide, such as fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), which is often used in oncology to assess metabolic activity and identify cancerous lesions.
3. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT): A specialized gamma camera rotates around the patient, acquiring multiple images from different angles that are then reconstructed into a 3D image, providing detailed information about organ function and structure.

Diagnostic techniques using radioisotopes offer several advantages, including high sensitivity, non-invasiveness, and the ability to assess both anatomical and functional aspects of organs and tissues. However, they also involve exposure to ionizing radiation, so their use should be balanced against potential risks and benefits, and alternative diagnostic methods should be considered when appropriate.

Molecular cloning is a laboratory technique used to create multiple copies of a specific DNA sequence. This process involves several steps:

1. Isolation: The first step in molecular cloning is to isolate the DNA sequence of interest from the rest of the genomic DNA. This can be done using various methods such as PCR (polymerase chain reaction), restriction enzymes, or hybridization.
2. Vector construction: Once the DNA sequence of interest has been isolated, it must be inserted into a vector, which is a small circular DNA molecule that can replicate independently in a host cell. Common vectors used in molecular cloning include plasmids and phages.
3. Transformation: The constructed vector is then introduced into a host cell, usually a bacterial or yeast cell, through a process called transformation. This can be done using various methods such as electroporation or chemical transformation.
4. Selection: After transformation, the host cells are grown in selective media that allow only those cells containing the vector to grow. This ensures that the DNA sequence of interest has been successfully cloned into the vector.
5. Amplification: Once the host cells have been selected, they can be grown in large quantities to amplify the number of copies of the cloned DNA sequence.

Molecular cloning is a powerful tool in molecular biology and has numerous applications, including the production of recombinant proteins, gene therapy, functional analysis of genes, and genetic engineering.

Lysophospholipase is an enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of a single fatty acid from lysophospholipids, producing a glycerophosphocholine and free fatty acid. This enzyme plays a role in the metabolism of lipids and membrane homeostasis. There are several types of lysophospholipases that differ based on their specificity for the head group of the lysophospholipid substrate, such as lysophosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase or lysophospholipase 1 (LPLA1), and lysophosphatidic acid-specific phospholipase D or autotaxin (ATX).

Deficiency or mutations in lysophospholipases can lead to various diseases, such as LPI (lysophosphatidylinositol lipidosis) caused by a deficiency of the lysophospholipase superfamily member called Ptdlns-specific phospholipase C (PLC).

Note: This definition is for general information purposes only and may not include all the latest findings or medical terminologies. For accurate and comprehensive understanding, it's recommended to consult authoritative medical textbooks or resources.

I couldn't find a medical definition for "Depression, Chemical" as it is not a recognized medical term. However, I can provide you with information about chemical imbalances in the brain that are associated with depression.

Major depressive disorder (MDD), commonly referred to as depression, is believed to be caused by a combination of genetic, environmental, and physiological factors. While there is no definitive evidence that depression is solely caused by a "chemical imbalance," neurotransmitter irregularities in the brain are associated with depressive symptoms. Neurotransmitters are chemical messengers that transmit signals in the brain and other parts of the body. Some of the primary neurotransmitters involved in mood regulation include serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine.

In depression, it is thought that there may be alterations in the functioning of these neurotransmitter systems, leading to an imbalance. For example:

1. Serotonin: Low levels of serotonin are associated with depressive symptoms. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), a common class of antidepressants, work by increasing the availability of serotonin in the synapse (the space between neurons) to improve communication between brain cells.
2. Norepinephrine: Imbalances in norepinephrine levels can contribute to depressive symptoms and anxiety. Norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (NRIs), tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), and monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) are medications that target norepinephrine to help alleviate depression.
3. Dopamine: Deficiencies in dopamine can lead to depressive symptoms, anhedonia (the inability to feel pleasure), and motivation loss. Some antidepressants, like bupropion, work by increasing dopamine levels in the brain.

In summary, while "Chemical Depression" is not a recognized medical term, chemical imbalances in neurotransmitter systems are associated with depressive symptoms. However, depression is a complex disorder that cannot be solely attributed to a single cause or a simple chemical imbalance. It is essential to consider multiple factors when diagnosing and treating depression.

Butanes are a group of flammable, colorless gases that are often used as fuel or in the production of other chemicals. They have the chemical formula C4H10 and are composed of four carbon atoms and ten hydrogen atoms. Butanes are commonly found in natural gas and crude oil, and they can be extracted through a process called distillation.

There are two main types of butane: n-butane and isobutane. N-butane has a straight chain of four carbon atoms, while isobutane has a branched chain with one carbon atom branching off the main chain. Both forms of butane are used as fuel for lighters, stoves, and torches, and they are also used as refrigerants and in the production of aerosols.

Butanes are highly flammable and can be dangerous if not handled properly. They should be stored in a cool, well-ventilated area away from sources of ignition, and they should never be used near an open flame or other source of heat. Ingesting or inhaling butane can be harmful and can cause symptoms such as dizziness, nausea, and vomiting. If you suspect that you have been exposed to butane, it is important to seek medical attention immediately.

Tissue distribution, in the context of pharmacology and toxicology, refers to the way that a drug or xenobiotic (a chemical substance found within an organism that is not naturally produced by or expected to be present within that organism) is distributed throughout the body's tissues after administration. It describes how much of the drug or xenobiotic can be found in various tissues and organs, and is influenced by factors such as blood flow, lipid solubility, protein binding, and the permeability of cell membranes. Understanding tissue distribution is important for predicting the potential effects of a drug or toxin on different parts of the body, and for designing drugs with improved safety and efficacy profiles.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Tilapia" is not a medical term. It is a common name used to refer to various species of freshwater fish that belong to the cichlid family. They are often farmed and consumed as a food source due to their mild flavor and high protein content. If you have any questions about a medical condition or term, I'd be happy to help with those!

Neurotransmitter agents are substances that affect the synthesis, storage, release, uptake, degradation, or reuptake of neurotransmitters, which are chemical messengers that transmit signals across a chemical synapse from one neuron to another. These agents can be either agonists, which mimic the action of a neurotransmitter and bind to its receptor, or antagonists, which block the action of a neurotransmitter by binding to its receptor without activating it. They are used in medicine to treat various neurological and psychiatric disorders, such as depression, anxiety, and Parkinson's disease.

Cholinergic receptors are a type of receptor in the body that are activated by the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. Acetylcholine is a chemical that nerve cells use to communicate with each other and with muscles. There are two main types of cholinergic receptors: muscarinic and nicotinic.

Muscarinic receptors are found in the heart, smooth muscle, glands, and the central nervous system. They are activated by muscarine, a type of alkaloid found in certain mushrooms. When muscarinic receptors are activated, they can cause changes in heart rate, blood pressure, and other bodily functions.

Nicotinic receptors are found in the nervous system and at the junction between nerves and muscles (the neuromuscular junction). They are activated by nicotine, a type of alkaloid found in tobacco plants. When nicotinic receptors are activated, they can cause the release of neurotransmitters and the contraction of muscles.

Cholinergic receptors play an important role in many physiological processes, including learning, memory, and movement. They are also targets for drugs used to treat a variety of medical conditions, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and myasthenia gravis (a disorder that causes muscle weakness).

A mutation is a permanent change in the DNA sequence of an organism's genome. Mutations can occur spontaneously or be caused by environmental factors such as exposure to radiation, chemicals, or viruses. They may have various effects on the organism, ranging from benign to harmful, depending on where they occur and whether they alter the function of essential proteins. In some cases, mutations can increase an individual's susceptibility to certain diseases or disorders, while in others, they may confer a survival advantage. Mutations are the driving force behind evolution, as they introduce new genetic variability into populations, which can then be acted upon by natural selection.

Lecithins are a group of naturally occurring compounds called phospholipids, which are essential components of biological membranes. They are composed of a molecule that contains a hydrophilic (water-attracting) head and two hydrophobic (water-repelling) tails. This unique structure allows lecithins to act as emulsifiers, helping to mix oil-based and water-based substances together.

Lecithins are found in various foods such as egg yolks, soybeans, sunflower seeds, and some other plants. In the medical field, lecithins may be used in dietary supplements or as a component of nutritional support for patients with certain conditions. They have been studied for their potential benefits in improving liver function, supporting brain health, and reducing cholesterol levels; however, more research is needed to confirm these effects and establish recommended dosages.

Scopolamine hydrobromide is a synthetic anticholinergic drug, which means it blocks the action of acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter in the nervous system. It is primarily used for its anti-motion sickness and anti-nausea effects. It can also be used to help with symptoms of Parkinson's disease, such as muscle stiffness and tremors.

In medical settings, scopolamine hydrobromide may be administered as a transdermal patch, which is placed behind the ear to allow for slow release into the body over several days. It can also be given as an injection or taken orally in the form of tablets or liquid solutions.

It's important to note that scopolamine hydrobromide can have various side effects, including dry mouth, blurred vision, dizziness, and drowsiness. It may also cause confusion, especially in older adults, and should be used with caution in patients with glaucoma, enlarged prostate, or certain heart conditions.

Bungarotoxins are a group of neurotoxins that come from the venom of some species of elapid snakes, particularly members of the genus Bungarus, which includes kraits. These toxins specifically bind to and inhibit the function of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), which are crucial for the transmission of signals at the neuromuscular junction.

There are three main types of bungarotoxins: α, β, and κ. Among these, α-bungarotoxin is the most well-studied. It binds irreversibly to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors at the neuromuscular junction, preventing the binding of acetylcholine and thus blocking nerve impulse transmission. This results in paralysis and can ultimately lead to respiratory failure and death in severe cases.

Bungarotoxins are widely used in research as molecular tools to study the structure and function of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, helping us better understand neuromuscular transmission and develop potential therapeutic strategies for various neurological disorders.

In the context of medical definitions, 'carbon' is not typically used as a standalone term. Carbon is an element with the symbol C and atomic number 6, which is naturally abundant in the human body and the environment. It is a crucial component of all living organisms, forming the basis of organic compounds, such as proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids (DNA and RNA).

Carbon forms strong covalent bonds with various elements, allowing for the creation of complex molecules that are essential to life. In this sense, carbon is a fundamental building block of life on Earth. However, it does not have a specific medical definition as an isolated term.

Glyceryl ethers, also known as glycerol ethers or alkyl glycosides, are a class of compounds formed by the reaction between glycerol and alcohols. In the context of medical definitions, glyceryl ethers may refer to a group of naturally occurring compounds found in some organisms, including humans.

These compounds are characterized by an ether linkage between the glycerol molecule and one or more alkyl chains, which can vary in length. Glyceryl ethers have been identified as components of various biological tissues, such as lipid fractions of human blood and lung surfactant.

In some cases, glyceryl ethers may also be used as pharmaceutical excipients or drug delivery systems due to their unique physicochemical properties. For example, they can enhance the solubility and bioavailability of certain drugs, making them useful in formulation development. However, it is important to note that specific medical applications and uses of glyceryl ethers may vary depending on the particular compound and its properties.

A muscle is a soft tissue in our body that contracts to produce force and motion. It is composed mainly of specialized cells called muscle fibers, which are bound together by connective tissue. There are three types of muscles: skeletal (voluntary), smooth (involuntary), and cardiac. Skeletal muscles attach to bones and help in movement, while smooth muscles are found within the walls of organs and blood vessels, helping with functions like digestion and circulation. Cardiac muscle is the specific type that makes up the heart, allowing it to pump blood throughout the body.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Rubidium" is not a medical term. It is a chemical element with the symbol Rb and atomic number 37. Rubidium is a soft, silvery-white metal that is highly reactive and flammable. It is found in trace amounts in minerals such as leucite and pollucite.

While rubidium itself does not have a direct medical application, its radioisotopes (such as rubidium-82) are used in medical imaging, particularly in positron emission tomography (PET) scans, to study heart function and blood flow. However, the term "Rubidium" itself is not used in a medical context to define a condition or disease.

Phosphatidylserines are a type of phospholipids that are essential components of the cell membrane, particularly in the brain. They play a crucial role in maintaining the fluidity and permeability of the cell membrane, and are involved in various cellular processes such as signal transduction, protein anchorage, and apoptosis (programmed cell death). Phosphatidylserines contain a polar head group made up of serine amino acids and two non-polar fatty acid tails. They are abundant in the inner layer of the cell membrane but can be externalized to the outer layer during apoptosis, where they serve as signals for recognition and removal of dying cells by the immune system. Phosphatidylserines have been studied for their potential benefits in various medical conditions, including cognitive decline, Alzheimer's disease, and depression.

Coenzyme A, often abbreviated as CoA or sometimes holo-CoA, is a coenzyme that plays a crucial role in several important chemical reactions in the body, particularly in the metabolism of carbohydrates, fatty acids, and amino acids. It is composed of a pantothenic acid (vitamin B5) derivative called pantothenate, an adenosine diphosphate (ADP) molecule, and a terminal phosphate group.

Coenzyme A functions as a carrier molecule for acetyl groups, which are formed during the breakdown of carbohydrates, fatty acids, and some amino acids. The acetyl group is attached to the sulfur atom in CoA, forming acetyl-CoA, which can then be used as a building block for various biochemical pathways, such as the citric acid cycle (Krebs cycle) and fatty acid synthesis.

In summary, Coenzyme A is a vital coenzyme that helps facilitate essential metabolic processes by carrying and transferring acetyl groups in the body.

Cytosine nucleotides are the chemical units or building blocks that make up DNA and RNA, one of the four nitrogenous bases that form the rung of the DNA ladder. A cytosine nucleotide is composed of a cytosine base attached to a sugar molecule (deoxyribose in DNA and ribose in RNA) and at least one phosphate group. The sequence of these nucleotides determines the genetic information stored in an organism's genome. In particular, cytosine nucleotides pair with guanine nucleotides through hydrogen bonding to form base pairs that are held together by weak interactions. This pairing is specific and maintains the structure and integrity of the DNA molecule during replication and transcription.

Bis-trimethylammonium compounds are a type of organic compound that contain two positively charged trimethylammonium groups ([CH3]3N+) in their structure. These compounds are often used as disinfectants, antimicrobial agents, and cationic surfactants due to their ability to interact with negatively charged cell membranes and disrupt their function.

The general formula for a bis-trimethylammonium compound is [(CH3)3N+]2X-, where X- represents anions that balance the positive charge of the two trimethylammonium groups. Examples of bis-trimethylammonium compounds include benzalkonium chloride, didecyldimethylammonium chloride, and cetylpyridinium chloride.

It is important to note that while these compounds can be effective at killing microorganisms, they can also have harmful effects on human health and the environment. Therefore, they should be used with caution and in accordance with recommended guidelines.

Phosphatidylinositols (PIs) are a type of phospholipid that are abundant in the cell membrane. They contain a glycerol backbone, two fatty acid chains, and a head group consisting of myo-inositol, a cyclic sugar molecule, linked to a phosphate group.

Phosphatidylinositols can be phosphorylated at one or more of the hydroxyl groups on the inositol ring, forming various phosphoinositides (PtdInsPs) with different functions. These signaling molecules play crucial roles in regulating cellular processes such as membrane trafficking, cytoskeletal organization, and signal transduction pathways that control cell growth, differentiation, and survival.

Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) is a prominent phosphoinositide involved in the regulation of ion channels, enzymes, and cytoskeletal proteins. Upon activation of certain receptors, PIP2 can be cleaved by the enzyme phospholipase C into diacylglycerol (DAG) and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3), which act as second messengers to trigger downstream signaling events.

Electric stimulation, also known as electrical nerve stimulation or neuromuscular electrical stimulation, is a therapeutic treatment that uses low-voltage electrical currents to stimulate nerves and muscles. It is often used to help manage pain, promote healing, and improve muscle strength and mobility. The electrical impulses can be delivered through electrodes placed on the skin or directly implanted into the body.

In a medical context, electric stimulation may be used for various purposes such as:

1. Pain management: Electric stimulation can help to block pain signals from reaching the brain and promote the release of endorphins, which are natural painkillers produced by the body.
2. Muscle rehabilitation: Electric stimulation can help to strengthen muscles that have become weak due to injury, illness, or surgery. It can also help to prevent muscle atrophy and improve range of motion.
3. Wound healing: Electric stimulation can promote tissue growth and help to speed up the healing process in wounds, ulcers, and other types of injuries.
4. Urinary incontinence: Electric stimulation can be used to strengthen the muscles that control urination and reduce symptoms of urinary incontinence.
5. Migraine prevention: Electric stimulation can be used as a preventive treatment for migraines by applying electrical impulses to specific nerves in the head and neck.

It is important to note that electric stimulation should only be administered under the guidance of a qualified healthcare professional, as improper use can cause harm or discomfort.

Pantothenic Acid, also known as Vitamin B5, is a water-soluble vitamin that plays a vital role in the metabolism of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. It is essential for the synthesis of coenzyme A (CoA), which is involved in various biochemical reactions in the body, including energy production, fatty acid synthesis, and cholesterol metabolism.

Pantothenic Acid is widely distributed in foods, including meat, poultry, fish, whole grains, legumes, and vegetables. Deficiency of this vitamin is rare but can lead to symptoms such as fatigue, irritability, sleep disturbances, muscle cramps, and gastrointestinal problems.

In addition to its role in metabolism, Pantothenic Acid also has potential benefits for wound healing, reducing inflammation, and supporting the immune system.

Weight gain is defined as an increase in body weight over time, which can be attributed to various factors such as an increase in muscle mass, fat mass, or total body water. It is typically measured in terms of pounds or kilograms and can be intentional or unintentional. Unintentional weight gain may be a cause for concern if it's significant or accompanied by other symptoms, as it could indicate an underlying medical condition such as hypothyroidism, diabetes, or heart disease.

It is important to note that while body mass index (BMI) can be used as a general guideline for weight status, it does not differentiate between muscle mass and fat mass. Therefore, an increase in muscle mass through activities like strength training could result in a higher BMI, but this may not necessarily be indicative of increased health risks associated with excess body fat.

Acetyltransferases are a type of enzyme that facilitates the transfer of an acetyl group (a chemical group consisting of an acetyl molecule, which is made up of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen atoms) from a donor molecule to a recipient molecule. This transfer of an acetyl group can modify the function or activity of the recipient molecule.

In the context of biology and medicine, acetyltransferases are important for various cellular processes, including gene expression, DNA replication, and protein function. For example, histone acetyltransferases (HATs) are a type of acetyltransferase that add an acetyl group to the histone proteins around which DNA is wound. This modification can alter the structure of the chromatin, making certain genes more or less accessible for transcription, and thereby influencing gene expression.

Abnormal regulation of acetyltransferases has been implicated in various diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and infectious diseases. Therefore, understanding the function and regulation of these enzymes is an important area of research in biomedicine.

Cytidine diphosphate-diacylglycerol (CDP-DAG) is a bioactive lipid molecule that plays a crucial role in the synthesis of other lipids and is also involved in cell signaling pathways. It is formed from the reaction between cytidine diphosphocholine (CDP-choline) and phosphatidic acid, catalyzed by the enzyme CDP-choline:1,2-diacylglycerol cholinephosphotransferase.

CDP-DAG is a critical intermediate in the biosynthesis of several important lipids, including phosphatidylglycerol (PG), cardiolipin (CL), and platelet-activating factor (PAF). These lipids are essential components of cell membranes and have various functions in cell signaling, energy metabolism, and other physiological processes.

CDP-DAG also acts as a second messenger in intracellular signaling pathways, particularly those involved in the regulation of gene expression, cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival. It activates several protein kinases, including protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms, which phosphorylate and regulate various target proteins, leading to changes in their activity and function.

Abnormalities in CDP-DAG metabolism have been implicated in several diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, and neurological disorders. Therefore, understanding the regulation and function of CDP-DAG and its downstream signaling pathways is an active area of research with potential therapeutic implications.

A base sequence in the context of molecular biology refers to the specific order of nucleotides in a DNA or RNA molecule. In DNA, these nucleotides are adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T). In RNA, uracil (U) takes the place of thymine. The base sequence contains genetic information that is transcribed into RNA and ultimately translated into proteins. It is the exact order of these bases that determines the genetic code and thus the function of the DNA or RNA molecule.

Phosphoric acids are a group of mineral acids known chemically as orthophosphoric acid and its salts or esters. The chemical formula for orthophosphoric acid is H3PO4. It is a weak acid that partially dissociates in solution to release hydrogen ions (H+), making it acidic. Phosphoric acid has many uses in various industries, including food additives, fertilizers, and detergents.

In the context of medical definitions, phosphoric acids are not typically referred to directly. However, they can be relevant in certain medical contexts, such as:

* In dentistry, phosphoric acid is used as an etching agent to prepare tooth enamel for bonding with dental materials.
* In nutrition, phosphorus is an essential mineral that plays a crucial role in many bodily functions, including energy metabolism, bone and teeth formation, and nerve function. Phosphoric acid is one form of phosphorus found in some foods and beverages.
* In medical research, phosphoric acids can be used as buffers to maintain a stable pH in laboratory experiments or as reagents in various analytical techniques.

F344 is a strain code used to designate an outbred stock of rats that has been inbreeded for over 100 generations. The F344 rats, also known as Fischer 344 rats, were originally developed at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and are now widely used in biomedical research due to their consistent and reliable genetic background.

Inbred strains, like the F344, are created by mating genetically identical individuals (siblings or parents and offspring) for many generations until a state of complete homozygosity is reached, meaning that all members of the strain have identical genomes. This genetic uniformity makes inbred strains ideal for use in studies where consistent and reproducible results are important.

F344 rats are known for their longevity, with a median lifespan of around 27-31 months, making them useful for aging research. They also have a relatively low incidence of spontaneous tumors compared to other rat strains. However, they may be more susceptible to certain types of cancer and other diseases due to their inbred status.

It's important to note that while F344 rats are often used as a standard laboratory rat strain, there can still be some genetic variation between individual animals within the same strain, particularly if they come from different suppliers or breeding colonies. Therefore, it's always important to consider the source and history of any animal model when designing experiments and interpreting results.

Cell fractionation is a laboratory technique used to separate different cellular components or organelles based on their size, density, and other physical properties. This process involves breaking open the cell (usually through homogenization), and then separating the various components using various methods such as centrifugation, filtration, and ultracentrifugation.

The resulting fractions can include the cytoplasm, mitochondria, nuclei, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, lysosomes, peroxisomes, and other organelles. Each fraction can then be analyzed separately to study the biochemical and functional properties of the individual components.

Cell fractionation is a valuable tool in cell biology research, allowing scientists to study the structure, function, and interactions of various cellular components in a more detailed and precise manner.

"Cat" is a common name that refers to various species of small carnivorous mammals that belong to the family Felidae. The domestic cat, also known as Felis catus or Felis silvestris catus, is a popular pet and companion animal. It is a subspecies of the wildcat, which is found in Europe, Africa, and Asia.

Domestic cats are often kept as pets because of their companionship, playful behavior, and ability to hunt vermin. They are also valued for their ability to provide emotional support and therapy to people. Cats are obligate carnivores, which means that they require a diet that consists mainly of meat to meet their nutritional needs.

Cats are known for their agility, sharp senses, and predatory instincts. They have retractable claws, which they use for hunting and self-defense. Cats also have a keen sense of smell, hearing, and vision, which allow them to detect prey and navigate their environment.

In medical terms, cats can be hosts to various parasites and diseases that can affect humans and other animals. Some common feline diseases include rabies, feline leukemia virus (FeLV), feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), and toxoplasmosis. It is important for cat owners to keep their pets healthy and up-to-date on vaccinations and preventative treatments to protect both the cats and their human companions.

Sucrose is a type of simple sugar, also known as a carbohydrate. It is a disaccharide, which means that it is made up of two monosaccharides: glucose and fructose. Sucrose occurs naturally in many fruits and vegetables and is often extracted and refined for use as a sweetener in food and beverages.

The chemical formula for sucrose is C12H22O11, and it has a molecular weight of 342.3 g/mol. In its pure form, sucrose is a white, odorless, crystalline solid that is highly soluble in water. It is commonly used as a reference compound for determining the sweetness of other substances, with a standard sucrose solution having a sweetness value of 1.0.

Sucrose is absorbed by the body through the small intestine and metabolized into glucose and fructose, which are then used for energy or stored as glycogen in the liver and muscles. While moderate consumption of sucrose is generally considered safe, excessive intake can contribute to weight gain, tooth decay, and other health problems.

Glycerol, also known as glycerine or glycerin, is a simple polyol (a sugar alcohol) with a sweet taste and a thick, syrupy consistency. It is a colorless, odorless, viscous liquid that is slightly soluble in water and freely miscible with ethanol and ether.

In the medical field, glycerol is often used as a medication or supplement. It can be used as a laxative to treat constipation, as a source of calories and energy for people who cannot eat by mouth, and as a way to prevent dehydration in people with certain medical conditions.

Glycerol is also used in the production of various medical products, such as medications, skin care products, and vaccines. It acts as a humectant, which means it helps to keep things moist, and it can also be used as a solvent or preservative.

In addition to its medical uses, glycerol is also widely used in the food industry as a sweetener, thickening agent, and moisture-retaining agent. It is generally recognized as safe (GRAS) by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

A fetus is the developing offspring in a mammal, from the end of the embryonic period (approximately 8 weeks after fertilization in humans) until birth. In humans, the fetal stage of development starts from the eleventh week of pregnancy and continues until childbirth, which is termed as full-term pregnancy at around 37 to 40 weeks of gestation. During this time, the organ systems become fully developed and the body grows in size. The fetus is surrounded by the amniotic fluid within the amniotic sac and is connected to the placenta via the umbilical cord, through which it receives nutrients and oxygen from the mother. Regular prenatal care is essential during this period to monitor the growth and development of the fetus and ensure a healthy pregnancy and delivery.

Phosphoric diester hydrolases are a class of enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of phosphoric diester bonds. These enzymes are also known as phosphatases or nucleotidases. They play important roles in various biological processes, such as signal transduction, metabolism, and regulation of cellular activities.

Phosphoric diester hydrolases can be further classified into several subclasses based on their substrate specificity and catalytic mechanism. For example, alkaline phosphatases (ALPs) are a group of phosphoric diester hydrolases that preferentially hydrolyze phosphomonoester bonds in a variety of organic molecules, releasing phosphate ions and alcohols. On the other hand, nucleotidases are a subclass of phosphoric diester hydrolases that specifically hydrolyze the phosphodiester bonds in nucleotides, releasing nucleosides and phosphate ions.

Overall, phosphoric diester hydrolases are essential for maintaining the balance of various cellular processes by regulating the levels of phosphorylated molecules and nucleotides.

The neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is the specialized synapse or chemical communication point, where the motor neuron's nerve terminal (presynaptic element) meets the muscle fiber's motor end plate (postsynaptic element). This junction plays a crucial role in controlling muscle contraction and relaxation.

At the NMJ, the neurotransmitter acetylcholine is released from the presynaptic nerve terminal into the synaptic cleft, following an action potential. Acetylcholine then binds to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors on the postsynaptic membrane of the muscle fiber, leading to the generation of an end-plate potential. If sufficient end-plate potentials are generated and summate, they will trigger an action potential in the muscle fiber, ultimately causing muscle contraction.

Dysfunction at the neuromuscular junction can result in various neuromuscular disorders, such as myasthenia gravis, where autoantibodies attack acetylcholine receptors, leading to muscle weakness and fatigue.

'Amaranthus' is the scientific name for a genus of plants that includes around 60-75 species, many of which are commonly known as amaranths. These plants belong to the family Amaranthaceae and are native to both temperate and tropical regions around the world. Some amaranth species are grown for their edible leaves and seeds, while others are cultivated as ornamental plants due to their attractive foliage and flowers.

The term 'Amaranthus' does not have a specific medical definition, but some amaranth species do have various health benefits and uses. For instance, the seeds of certain amaranth species are rich in protein, fiber, and essential minerals like iron, magnesium, and manganese. They also contain a good amount of lysine, an essential amino acid that is often lacking in cereal grains. As a result, amaranth seeds have been used as a nutritious food source in many cultures throughout history.

Additionally, some research suggests that certain amaranth extracts may possess medicinal properties. For example, a study published in the Journal of Ethnopharmacology found that an ethanolic extract of Amaranthus retroflexus (a common weed known as redroot pigweed) exhibited antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities in vitro. However, more research is needed to confirm these potential health benefits and determine the safety and efficacy of amaranth-based treatments.

Nutrition policy refers to a set of guidelines, regulations, or laws established by governmental or organizational bodies to promote healthy eating habits and reduce the risk of diet-related chronic diseases. These policies aim to create an environment that supports and encourages individuals to make healthier food choices. Nutrition policies can cover various aspects such as food labeling, nutrition education, food safety, agricultural practices, and access to affordable and nutritious foods. They may also address issues related to marketing and advertising of unhealthy food products, particularly to children. The ultimate goal of nutrition policy is to improve public health by creating a food environment that supports optimal nutrition and well-being.

Serine is an amino acid, which is a building block of proteins. More specifically, it is a non-essential amino acid, meaning that the body can produce it from other compounds, and it does not need to be obtained through diet. Serine plays important roles in the body, such as contributing to the formation of the protective covering of nerve fibers (myelin sheath), helping to synthesize another amino acid called tryptophan, and taking part in the metabolism of fatty acids. It is also involved in the production of muscle tissues, the immune system, and the forming of cell structures. Serine can be found in various foods such as soy, eggs, cheese, meat, peanuts, lentils, and many others.

The metabolome is the complete set of small molecule metabolites, such as carbohydrates, lipids, nucleic acids, and amino acids, present in a biological sample at a given moment. It reflects the physiological state of a cell, tissue, or organism and provides information about the biochemical processes that are taking place. The metabolome is dynamic and constantly changing due to various factors such as genetics, environment, diet, and disease. Studying the metabolome can help researchers understand the underlying mechanisms of health and disease and develop diagnostic tools and treatments for various medical conditions.

Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) is a high-energy molecule that stores and transports energy within cells. It is the main source of energy for most cellular processes, including muscle contraction, nerve impulse transmission, and protein synthesis. ATP is composed of a base (adenine), a sugar (ribose), and three phosphate groups. The bonds between these phosphate groups contain a significant amount of energy, which can be released when the bond between the second and third phosphate group is broken, resulting in the formation of adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and inorganic phosphate. This process is known as hydrolysis and can be catalyzed by various enzymes to drive a wide range of cellular functions. ATP can also be regenerated from ADP through various metabolic pathways, such as oxidative phosphorylation or substrate-level phosphorylation, allowing for the continuous supply of energy to cells.

In chemistry, an alcohol is a broad term that refers to any organic compound characterized by the presence of a hydroxyl (-OH) functional group attached to a carbon atom. This means that alcohols are essentially hydrocarbons with a hydroxyl group. The simplest alcohol is methanol (CH3OH), and ethanol (C2H5OH), also known as ethyl alcohol, is the type of alcohol found in alcoholic beverages.

In the context of medical definitions, alcohol primarily refers to ethanol, which has significant effects on the human body when consumed. Ethanol can act as a central nervous system depressant, leading to various physiological and psychological changes depending on the dose and frequency of consumption. Excessive or prolonged use of ethanol can result in various health issues, including addiction, liver disease, neurological damage, and increased risk of injuries due to impaired judgment and motor skills.

It is important to note that there are other types of alcohols (e.g., methanol, isopropyl alcohol) with different chemical structures and properties, but they are not typically consumed by humans and can be toxic or even lethal in high concentrations.

Congenital Myasthenic Syndromes (CMS) are a heterogeneous group of inherited neuromuscular disorders characterized by muscle weakness and fatigability. They are caused by genetic defects that affect the function of the neuromuscular junction, which is the site where nerve impulses are transmitted to muscles.

Unlike acquired myasthenia gravis, CMS are present at birth or develop in early childhood. The muscle weakness can vary from mild to severe and can affect any part of the body, including the eyes, face, neck, limbs, and respiratory muscles. The severity and distribution of symptoms can differ widely among individuals with CMS, depending on the specific genetic defect involved.

CMS are caused by mutations in genes that encode proteins involved in the formation, maintenance, or function of the neuromuscular junction. These proteins include receptors for neurotransmitters, enzymes involved in neurotransmitter metabolism, and structural components of the synaptic cleft.

The diagnosis of CMS is based on clinical features, electrophysiological studies, and genetic testing. Treatment options depend on the specific type of CMS and may include medications that improve neuromuscular transmission, such as cholinesterase inhibitors, or therapies that modulate the immune system, such as plasma exchange or intravenous immunoglobulin. In some cases, supportive care, such as respiratory assistance or physical therapy, may be necessary to manage symptoms and prevent complications.

Phospholipases A are a group of enzymes that hydrolyze phospholipids into fatty acids and lysophospholipids by cleaving the ester bond at the sn-1 or sn-2 position of the glycerol backbone. There are three main types of Phospholipases A:

* Phospholipase A1 (PLA1): This enzyme specifically hydrolyzes the ester bond at the sn-1 position, releasing a free fatty acid and a lysophospholipid.
* Phospholipase A2 (PLA2): This enzyme specifically hydrolyzes the ester bond at the sn-2 position, releasing a free fatty acid (often arachidonic acid, which is a precursor for eicosanoids) and a lysophospholipid.
* Phospholipase A/B (PLA/B): This enzyme has both PLA1 and PLA2 activity and can hydrolyze the ester bond at either the sn-1 or sn-2 position.

Phospholipases A play important roles in various biological processes, including cell signaling, membrane remodeling, and host defense. They are also involved in several diseases, such as atherosclerosis, neurodegenerative disorders, and cancer.

A serous membrane is a type of thin, smooth tissue that lines the inside of body cavities and surrounds certain organs. It consists of two layers: an outer parietal layer that lines the cavity wall, and an inner visceral layer that covers the organ. Between these two layers is a small amount of fluid called serous fluid, which reduces friction and allows for easy movement of the organs within the body cavity.

Serous membranes are found in several areas of the body, including the pleural cavity (around the lungs), the pericardial cavity (around the heart), and the peritoneal cavity (around the abdominal organs). They play an important role in protecting these organs and allowing them to move smoothly within their respective cavities.

A cation is a type of ion, which is a charged particle, that has a positive charge. In chemistry and biology, cations are formed when a neutral atom loses one or more electrons during chemical reactions. The removal of electrons results in the atom having more protons than electrons, giving it a net positive charge.

Cations are important in many biological processes, including nerve impulse transmission, muscle contraction, and enzyme function. For example, sodium (Na+), potassium (K+), calcium (Ca2+), and magnesium (Mg2+) are all essential cations that play critical roles in various physiological functions.

In medical contexts, cations can also be relevant in the diagnosis and treatment of various conditions. For instance, abnormal levels of certain cations, such as potassium or calcium, can indicate specific diseases or disorders. Additionally, medications used to treat various conditions may work by altering cation concentrations or activity within the body.

Subcellular fractions refer to the separation and collection of specific parts or components of a cell, including organelles, membranes, and other structures, through various laboratory techniques such as centrifugation and ultracentrifugation. These fractions can be used in further biochemical and molecular analyses to study the structure, function, and interactions of individual cellular components. Examples of subcellular fractions include nuclear extracts, mitochondrial fractions, microsomal fractions (membrane vesicles), and cytosolic fractions (cytoplasmic extracts).

Phospholipase A2 (PLA2) is a type of enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of the sn-2 ester bond in glycerophospholipids, releasing free fatty acids, such as arachidonic acid, and lysophospholipids. These products are important precursors for the biosynthesis of various signaling molecules, including eicosanoids, platelet-activating factor (PAF), and lipoxins, which play crucial roles in inflammation, immunity, and other cellular processes.

Phospholipases A2 are classified into several groups based on their structure, mechanism of action, and cellular localization. The secreted PLA2s (sPLA2s) are found in extracellular fluids and are characterized by a low molecular weight, while the calcium-dependent cytosolic PLA2s (cPLA2s) are larger proteins that reside within cells.

Abnormal regulation or activity of Phospholipase A2 has been implicated in various pathological conditions, such as inflammation, neurodegenerative diseases, and cancer. Therefore, understanding the biology and function of these enzymes is essential for developing novel therapeutic strategies to target these disorders.

Fats, also known as lipids, are a broad group of organic compounds that are insoluble in water but soluble in nonpolar organic solvents. In the body, fats serve as a major fuel source, providing twice the amount of energy per gram compared to carbohydrates and proteins. They also play crucial roles in maintaining cell membrane structure and function, serving as precursors for various signaling molecules, and assisting in the absorption and transport of fat-soluble vitamins.

There are several types of fats:

1. Saturated fats: These fats contain no double bonds between their carbon atoms and are typically solid at room temperature. They are mainly found in animal products, such as meat, dairy, and eggs, as well as in some plant-based sources like coconut oil and palm kernel oil. Consuming high amounts of saturated fats can raise levels of harmful low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol in the blood, increasing the risk of heart disease.
2. Unsaturated fats: These fats contain one or more double bonds between their carbon atoms and are usually liquid at room temperature. They can be further divided into monounsaturated fats (one double bond) and polyunsaturated fats (two or more double bonds). Unsaturated fats, especially those from plant sources, tend to have beneficial effects on heart health by lowering LDL cholesterol levels and increasing high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels.
3. Trans fats: These are unsaturated fats that have undergone a process called hydrogenation, which adds hydrogen atoms to the double bonds, making them more saturated and solid at room temperature. Partially hydrogenated trans fats are commonly found in processed foods, such as baked goods, fried foods, and snack foods. Consumption of trans fats has been linked to increased risks of heart disease, stroke, and type 2 diabetes.
4. Omega-3 fatty acids: These are a specific type of polyunsaturated fat that is essential for human health. They cannot be synthesized by the body and must be obtained through diet. Omega-3 fatty acids have been shown to have numerous health benefits, including reducing inflammation, improving heart health, and supporting brain function.
5. Omega-6 fatty acids: These are another type of polyunsaturated fat that is essential for human health. They can be synthesized by the body but must also be obtained through diet. While omega-6 fatty acids are necessary for various bodily functions, excessive consumption can contribute to inflammation and other health issues. It is recommended to maintain a balanced ratio of omega-3 to omega-6 fatty acids in the diet.

Biochemical phenomena refer to the chemical processes and reactions that occur within living organisms. These phenomena are essential for the structure, function, and regulation of all cells and tissues in the body. They involve a wide range of molecular interactions, including enzyme-catalyzed reactions, signal transduction pathways, and gene expression regulatory mechanisms.

Biochemical phenomena can be studied at various levels, from individual molecules to complex biological systems. They are critical for understanding the underlying mechanisms of many physiological processes, as well as the basis of various diseases and medical conditions.

Examples of biochemical phenomena include:

1. Metabolism: the chemical reactions that occur within cells to maintain life, including the breakdown of nutrients to produce energy and the synthesis of new molecules.
2. Protein folding: the process by which a protein molecule assumes its three-dimensional structure, which is critical for its function.
3. Signal transduction: the molecular mechanisms by which cells respond to external signals, such as hormones or neurotransmitters, and convert them into intracellular responses.
4. Gene expression regulation: the complex network of molecular interactions that control the production of proteins from DNA, including transcription, RNA processing, and translation.
5. Cell-cell communication: the mechanisms by which cells communicate with each other to coordinate their functions and maintain tissue homeostasis.
6. Apoptosis: the programmed cell death pathway that eliminates damaged or unnecessary cells.
7. DNA repair: the molecular mechanisms that detect and correct damage to DNA, preventing mutations and maintaining genomic stability.

In the medical context, the term "eggs" is not typically used as a formal medical definition. However, if you are referring to reproductive biology, an egg or ovum is a female reproductive cell (gamete) that, when fertilized by a male sperm, can develop into a new individual.

In humans, eggs are produced in the ovaries and are released during ovulation, usually once per month. They are much larger than sperm and contain all the genetic information necessary to create a human being, along with nutrients that help support the early stages of embryonic development.

It's worth noting that the term "eggs" is also commonly used in everyday language to refer to chicken eggs or eggs from other birds, which are not relevant to medical definitions.

Myo-Inositol-1-Phosphate Synthase (MIPS) is an enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of glucose-6-phosphate to inositol 1,4-bisphosphate, which is the first and rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of myo-inositol. Myo-inositol is a six-carbon cyclic polyol that serves as a precursor for various secondary messengers and structural lipids, including phosphatidylinositols and inositol phosphates, which play crucial roles in cell signaling pathways.

MIPS is widely distributed in nature and has been identified in bacteria, plants, fungi, and animals. In humans, MIPS is encoded by the ISO1 gene and is primarily localized in the cytoplasm of cells. Defects in MIPS have been associated with several diseases, including neurological disorders and cancer, highlighting its importance in maintaining cellular homeostasis.

Aldehyde oxidoreductases are a class of enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of aldehydes to carboxylic acids using NAD+ or FAD as cofactors. They play a crucial role in the detoxification of aldehydes generated from various metabolic processes, such as lipid peroxidation and alcohol metabolism. These enzymes are widely distributed in nature and have been identified in bacteria, yeast, plants, and animals.

The oxidation reaction catalyzed by aldehyde oxidoreductases involves the transfer of electrons from the aldehyde substrate to the cofactor, resulting in the formation of a carboxylic acid and reduced NAD+ or FAD. The enzymes are classified into several families based on their sequence similarity and cofactor specificity.

One of the most well-known members of this family is alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), which catalyzes the oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes or ketones as part of the alcohol metabolism pathway. Another important member is aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), which further oxidizes the aldehydes generated by ADH to carboxylic acids, thereby preventing the accumulation of toxic aldehydes in the body.

Deficiencies in ALDH enzymes have been linked to several human diseases, including alcoholism and certain types of cancer. Therefore, understanding the structure and function of aldehyde oxidoreductases is essential for developing new therapeutic strategies to treat these conditions.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "perches" is not a term commonly used in medical terminology. It is most often used to refer to a place where a bird or small animal perches, or in measurements of height (such as "perches above ground"). If you have any questions about a medical term or concept, I would be happy to help clarify!

Lactic acid, also known as 2-hydroxypropanoic acid, is a chemical compound that plays a significant role in various biological processes. In the context of medicine and biochemistry, lactic acid is primarily discussed in relation to muscle metabolism and cellular energy production. Here's a medical definition for lactic acid:

Lactic acid (LA): A carboxylic acid with the molecular formula C3H6O3 that plays a crucial role in anaerobic respiration, particularly during strenuous exercise or conditions of reduced oxygen availability. It is formed through the conversion of pyruvate, catalyzed by the enzyme lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), when there is insufficient oxygen to complete the final step of cellular respiration in the Krebs cycle. The accumulation of lactic acid can lead to acidosis and muscle fatigue. Additionally, lactic acid serves as a vital intermediary in various metabolic pathways and is involved in the production of glucose through gluconeogenesis in the liver.

"Sinorhizobium meliloti" is a species of nitrogen-fixing bacteria that forms nodules on the roots of leguminous plants, such as alfalfa and clover. These bacteria have the ability to convert atmospheric nitrogen into ammonia, which can then be used by the plant for growth and development. This symbiotic relationship benefits both the bacterium and the plant, as the plant provides carbon sources to the bacterium, while the bacterium provides the plant with a source of nitrogen.

"Sinorhizobium meliloti" is gram-negative, motile, and rod-shaped, and it can be found in soil and root nodules of leguminous plants. It has a complex genome consisting of a circular chromosome and several plasmids, which carry genes involved in nitrogen fixation and other important functions. The bacteria are able to sense and respond to various environmental signals, allowing them to adapt to changing conditions and establish successful symbioses with their host plants.

In addition to its agricultural importance, "Sinorhizobium meliloti" is also a model organism for studying the molecular mechanisms of symbiotic nitrogen fixation and bacterial genetics.

In the context of medicine, "chemistry" often refers to the field of study concerned with the properties, composition, and structure of elements and compounds, as well as their reactions with one another. It is a fundamental science that underlies much of modern medicine, including pharmacology (the study of drugs), toxicology (the study of poisons), and biochemistry (the study of the chemical processes that occur within living organisms).

In addition to its role as a basic science, chemistry is also used in medical testing and diagnosis. For example, clinical chemistry involves the analysis of bodily fluids such as blood and urine to detect and measure various substances, such as glucose, cholesterol, and electrolytes, that can provide important information about a person's health status.

Overall, chemistry plays a critical role in understanding the mechanisms of diseases, developing new treatments, and improving diagnostic tests and techniques.

Carbachol is a cholinergic agonist, which means it stimulates the parasympathetic nervous system by mimicking the action of acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter that is involved in transmitting signals between nerves and muscles. Carbachol binds to both muscarinic and nicotinic receptors, but its effects are more pronounced on muscarinic receptors.

Carbachol is used in medical treatments to produce miosis (pupil constriction), lower intraocular pressure, and stimulate gastrointestinal motility. It can also be used as a diagnostic tool to test for certain conditions such as Hirschsprung's disease.

Like any medication, carbachol can have side effects, including sweating, salivation, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, bradycardia (slow heart rate), and bronchoconstriction (narrowing of the airways in the lungs). It should be used with caution and under the supervision of a healthcare professional.

Phosphorus isotopes are different forms of the element phosphorus that have different numbers of neutrons in their atomic nuclei, while the number of protons remains the same. The most common and stable isotope of phosphorus is 31P, which contains 15 protons and 16 neutrons. However, there are also several other isotopes of phosphorus that exist, including 32P and 33P, which are radioactive and have 15 protons and 17 or 18 neutrons, respectively. These radioactive isotopes are often used in medical research and treatment, such as in the form of radiopharmaceuticals to diagnose and treat various diseases.

Chromatography is a technique used in analytical chemistry for the separation, identification, and quantification of the components of a mixture. It is based on the differential distribution of the components of a mixture between a stationary phase and a mobile phase. The stationary phase can be a solid or liquid, while the mobile phase is a gas, liquid, or supercritical fluid that moves through the stationary phase carrying the sample components.

The interaction between the sample components and the stationary and mobile phases determines how quickly each component will move through the system. Components that interact more strongly with the stationary phase will move more slowly than those that interact more strongly with the mobile phase. This difference in migration rates allows for the separation of the components, which can then be detected and quantified.

There are many different types of chromatography, including paper chromatography, thin-layer chromatography (TLC), gas chromatography (GC), liquid chromatography (LC), and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Each type has its own strengths and weaknesses, and is best suited for specific applications.

In summary, chromatography is a powerful analytical technique used to separate, identify, and quantify the components of a mixture based on their differential distribution between a stationary phase and a mobile phase.

The ileum is the third and final segment of the small intestine, located between the jejunum and the cecum (the beginning of the large intestine). It plays a crucial role in nutrient absorption, particularly for vitamin B12 and bile salts. The ileum is characterized by its thin, lined walls and the presence of Peyer's patches, which are part of the immune system and help surveil for pathogens.

Calbindin 2 is a calcium-binding protein that belongs to the calbindin family and is found in various tissues, including the brain and intestines. It has a molecular weight of approximately 28 kDa and plays a crucial role in regulating intracellular calcium levels, neurotransmitter release, and protecting neurons from excitotoxicity. Calbindin 2 is also known as calbindin D-28k or calbindin-D9k, depending on the species and its molecular weight. It has multiple isoforms generated by alternative splicing and is involved in various physiological processes, including muscle contraction, hormone secretion, and cell proliferation. In the nervous system, calbindin 2 is expressed in specific populations of neurons and glial cells, where it functions as a neuroprotective agent and modulates synaptic plasticity.

Pulmonary surfactants are a complex mixture of lipids and proteins that are produced by the alveolar type II cells in the lungs. They play a crucial role in reducing the surface tension at the air-liquid interface within the alveoli, which helps to prevent collapse of the lungs during expiration. Surfactants also have important immunological functions, such as inhibiting the growth of certain bacteria and modulating the immune response. Deficiency or dysfunction of pulmonary surfactants can lead to respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in premature infants and other lung diseases.

"Fortified food" is a term used in the context of nutrition and dietary guidelines. It refers to a food product that has had nutrients added to it during manufacturing to enhance its nutritional value. These added nutrients can include vitamins, minerals, proteins, or other beneficial components. The goal of fortifying foods is often to address specific nutrient deficiencies in populations or to improve the overall nutritional quality of a food product. Examples of fortified foods include certain breakfast cereals that have added vitamins and minerals, as well as plant-based milk alternatives that are fortified with calcium and vitamin D to mimic the nutritional profile of cow's milk. It is important to note that while fortified foods can be a valuable source of essential nutrients, they should not replace whole, unprocessed foods in a balanced diet.

Radioactive tracers are radioisotopes or radiolabeled compounds that are introduced into a biological system, such as the human body, in very small amounts to allow tracking or monitoring of specific physiological processes or locations. The radiation emitted by the tracer can be detected and measured, providing information about the distribution, metabolism, or binding of the compound within the body. This technique is widely used in medical imaging and research for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Examples of radioactive tracers include technetium-99m for bone scans, fluorine-18 for positron emission tomography (PET) scans, and iodine-131 for thyroid studies.

Chemical phenomena refer to the changes and interactions that occur at the molecular or atomic level when chemicals are involved. These phenomena can include chemical reactions, in which one or more substances (reactants) are converted into different substances (products), as well as physical properties that change as a result of chemical interactions, such as color, state of matter, and solubility. Chemical phenomena can be studied through various scientific disciplines, including chemistry, biochemistry, and physics.

Gene expression regulation, enzymologic refers to the biochemical processes and mechanisms that control the transcription and translation of specific genes into functional proteins or enzymes. This regulation is achieved through various enzymatic activities that can either activate or repress gene expression at different levels, such as chromatin remodeling, transcription factor activation, mRNA processing, and protein degradation.

Enzymologic regulation of gene expression involves the action of specific enzymes that catalyze chemical reactions involved in these processes. For example, histone-modifying enzymes can alter the structure of chromatin to make genes more or less accessible for transcription, while RNA polymerase and its associated factors are responsible for transcribing DNA into mRNA. Additionally, various enzymes are involved in post-transcriptional modifications of mRNA, such as splicing, capping, and tailing, which can affect the stability and translation of the transcript.

Overall, the enzymologic regulation of gene expression is a complex and dynamic process that allows cells to respond to changes in their environment and maintain proper physiological function.

Benzoylcholine, also known as benzoylcholine or physostigmine salicylate, is not a medical term commonly used to define a specific medical condition or disease. Instead, it is a chemical compound that has been used in medical research and some therapeutic applications.

Benzoylcholine is a synthetic derivative of physostigmine, a natural alkaloid found in the Calabar bean. Physostigmine is an inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase, an enzyme that breaks down the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in the body. Benzoylcholine also acts as an inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase and has been used in research to study the cholinergic system, which is involved in various physiological processes such as memory, attention, and muscle contraction.

In clinical settings, benzoylcholine has been used as a diagnostic tool to test for myasthenia gravis, a neuromuscular disorder characterized by weakness and fatigue of the skeletal muscles. The administration of benzoylcholine in patients with myasthenia gravis can cause a transient worsening of symptoms due to the accumulation of acetylcholine at the neuromuscular junction.

It is important to note that benzoylcholine should only be used under medical supervision and its use is generally limited to research or diagnostic settings.

A kidney, in medical terms, is one of two bean-shaped organs located in the lower back region of the body. They are essential for maintaining homeostasis within the body by performing several crucial functions such as:

1. Regulation of water and electrolyte balance: Kidneys help regulate the amount of water and various electrolytes like sodium, potassium, and calcium in the bloodstream to maintain a stable internal environment.

2. Excretion of waste products: They filter waste products from the blood, including urea (a byproduct of protein metabolism), creatinine (a breakdown product of muscle tissue), and other harmful substances that result from normal cellular functions or external sources like medications and toxins.

3. Endocrine function: Kidneys produce several hormones with important roles in the body, such as erythropoietin (stimulates red blood cell production), renin (regulates blood pressure), and calcitriol (activated form of vitamin D that helps regulate calcium homeostasis).

4. pH balance regulation: Kidneys maintain the proper acid-base balance in the body by excreting either hydrogen ions or bicarbonate ions, depending on whether the blood is too acidic or too alkaline.

5. Blood pressure control: The kidneys play a significant role in regulating blood pressure through the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), which constricts blood vessels and promotes sodium and water retention to increase blood volume and, consequently, blood pressure.

Anatomically, each kidney is approximately 10-12 cm long, 5-7 cm wide, and 3 cm thick, with a weight of about 120-170 grams. They are surrounded by a protective layer of fat and connected to the urinary system through the renal pelvis, ureters, bladder, and urethra.

In medical terms, membranes refer to thin layers of tissue that cover or line various structures in the body. They are composed of connective tissue and epithelial cells, and they can be found lining the outer surface of the body, internal organs, blood vessels, and nerves. There are several types of membranes in the human body, including:

1. Serous Membranes: These membranes line the inside of body cavities and cover the organs contained within them. They produce a lubricating fluid that reduces friction between the organ and the cavity wall. Examples include the pleura (lungs), pericardium (heart), and peritoneum (abdominal cavity).
2. Mucous Membranes: These membranes line the respiratory, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary tracts, as well as the inner surface of the eyelids and the nasal passages. They produce mucus to trap particles, bacteria, and other substances, which helps protect the body from infection.
3. Synovial Membranes: These membranes line the joint cavities and produce synovial fluid, which lubricates the joints and allows for smooth movement.
4. Meninges: These are three layers of membranes that cover and protect the brain and spinal cord. They include the dura mater (outermost layer), arachnoid mater (middle layer), and pia mater (innermost layer).
5. Amniotic Membrane: This is a thin, transparent membrane that surrounds and protects the fetus during pregnancy. It produces amniotic fluid, which provides a cushion for the developing baby and helps regulate its temperature.

Tyrosine 3-Monooxygenase (also known as Tyrosinase or Tyrosine hydroxylase) is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the synthesis of catecholamines, which are neurotransmitters and hormones in the body. This enzyme catalyzes the conversion of the amino acid L-tyrosine to 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) by adding a hydroxyl group to the 3rd carbon atom of the tyrosine molecule.

The reaction is as follows:

L-Tyrosine + O2 + pterin (co-factor) -> L-DOPA + pterin (oxidized) + H2O

This enzyme requires molecular oxygen and a co-factor such as tetrahydrobiopterin to carry out the reaction. Tyrosine 3-Monooxygenase is found in various tissues, including the brain and adrenal glands, where it helps regulate the production of catecholamines like dopamine, norepinephrine, and epinephrine. Dysregulation of this enzyme has been implicated in several neurological disorders, such as Parkinson's disease.

Glutamic acid is an alpha-amino acid, which is one of the 20 standard amino acids in the genetic code. The systematic name for this amino acid is (2S)-2-Aminopentanedioic acid. Its chemical formula is HO2CCH(NH2)CH2CH2CO2H.

Glutamic acid is a crucial excitatory neurotransmitter in the human brain, and it plays an essential role in learning and memory. It's also involved in the metabolism of sugars and amino acids, the synthesis of proteins, and the removal of waste nitrogen from the body.

Glutamic acid can be found in various foods such as meat, fish, beans, eggs, dairy products, and vegetables. In the human body, glutamic acid can be converted into gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), another important neurotransmitter that has a calming effect on the nervous system.

Sulfatases are a group of enzymes that play a crucial role in the metabolism of sulfated steroids, glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), and other sulfated molecules. These enzymes catalyze the hydrolysis of sulfate groups from these substrates, converting them into their respective unsulfated forms.

The human genome encodes for several different sulfatases, each with specificity towards particular types of sulfated substrates. For instance, some sulfatases are responsible for removing sulfate groups from steroid hormones and neurotransmitters, while others target GAGs like heparan sulfate, dermatan sulfate, and keratan sulfate.

Defects in sulfatase enzymes can lead to various genetic disorders, such as multiple sulfatase deficiency (MSD), X-linked ichthyosis, and mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) type IIIC (Sanfilippo syndrome type C). These conditions are characterized by the accumulation of sulfated molecules in different tissues, resulting in progressive damage to multiple organs and systems.

Tetraphenylborate is not typically considered a medical term, but rather a chemical one. However, it can be encountered in the context of medical research or pharmaceutical chemistry. Here's a basic definition:

Tetraphenylborate (TPB-) is an anion of tetraphenylboric acid (C6H5B(OH)3), with the chemical formula [B(C6H5)4]-. It is often used in chemistry as a non-coordinating anion, which means it does not readily form bonds with other ions. This property makes it useful in the preparation of salts of cations that are easily hydrolyzed or oxidized.

In a medical context, tetraphenylborate salts have been used in research to study various biological processes. For instance, rubidium tetraphenylborate has been used in studies investigating the function of ion channels in cells. However, these uses are typically within the realm of laboratory research and not in clinical medicine.

Tetraethylammonium (TEA) is not typically defined in the context of medical terminology, but rather it is a chemical compound with the formula (C2H5)4N+. It is used in research and development, particularly in the field of electrophysiology where it is used as a blocking agent for certain types of ion channels.

Medically, TEA may be mentioned in the context of its potential toxicity or adverse effects on the human body. Exposure to TEA can cause symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, headache, dizziness, and confusion. Severe exposure can lead to more serious complications, including seizures, respiratory failure, and cardiac arrest.

Therefore, while Tetraethylammonium is not a medical term per se, it is important for healthcare professionals to be aware of its potential health hazards and take appropriate precautions when handling or working with this compound.

Quinacrine is a medication that belongs to the class of drugs called antimalarials. It is primarily used in the treatment and prevention of malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax parasites. Quinacrine works by inhibiting the growth of the malarial parasites in the red blood cells.

In addition to its antimalarial properties, quinacrine has been used off-label for various other medical conditions, including the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE), a type of skin lupus. However, its use in these conditions is not approved by regulatory authorities such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) due to limited evidence and potential side effects.

Quinacrine has several known side effects, including gastrointestinal disturbances, skin rashes, headache, dizziness, and potential neuropsychiatric symptoms like depression, anxiety, or confusion. Long-term use of quinacrine may also lead to yellowing of the skin and eyes (known as quinacrine jaundice) and other eye-related issues. It is essential to consult a healthcare professional before starting quinacrine or any other medication for appropriate dosage, duration, and potential side effects.

C57BL/6 (C57 Black 6) is an inbred strain of laboratory mouse that is widely used in biomedical research. The term "inbred" refers to a strain of animals where matings have been carried out between siblings or other closely related individuals for many generations, resulting in a population that is highly homozygous at most genetic loci.

The C57BL/6 strain was established in 1920 by crossing a female mouse from the dilute brown (DBA) strain with a male mouse from the black strain. The resulting offspring were then interbred for many generations to create the inbred C57BL/6 strain.

C57BL/6 mice are known for their robust health, longevity, and ease of handling, making them a popular choice for researchers. They have been used in a wide range of biomedical research areas, including studies of cancer, immunology, neuroscience, cardiovascular disease, and metabolism.

One of the most notable features of the C57BL/6 strain is its sensitivity to certain genetic modifications, such as the introduction of mutations that lead to obesity or impaired glucose tolerance. This has made it a valuable tool for studying the genetic basis of complex diseases and traits.

Overall, the C57BL/6 inbred mouse strain is an important model organism in biomedical research, providing a valuable resource for understanding the genetic and molecular mechanisms underlying human health and disease.

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Biomolecular is a research technique that uses magnetic fields and radio waves to study the structure and dynamics of biological molecules, such as proteins and nucleic acids. This technique measures the magnetic properties of atomic nuclei within these molecules, specifically their spin, which can be influenced by the application of an external magnetic field.

When a sample is placed in a strong magnetic field, the nuclei absorb and emit electromagnetic radiation at specific frequencies, known as resonance frequencies, which are determined by the molecular structure and environment of the nuclei. By analyzing these resonance frequencies and their interactions, researchers can obtain detailed information about the three-dimensional structure, dynamics, and interactions of biomolecules.

NMR spectroscopy is a non-destructive technique that allows for the study of biological molecules in solution, which makes it an important tool for understanding the function and behavior of these molecules in their natural environment. Additionally, NMR can be used to study the effects of drugs, ligands, and other small molecules on biomolecular structure and dynamics, making it a valuable tool in drug discovery and development.

Autoradiography is a medical imaging technique used to visualize and localize the distribution of radioactively labeled compounds within tissues or organisms. In this process, the subject is first exposed to a radioactive tracer that binds to specific molecules or structures of interest. The tissue is then placed in close contact with a radiation-sensitive film or detector, such as X-ray film or an imaging plate.

As the radioactive atoms decay, they emit particles (such as beta particles) that interact with the film or detector, causing chemical changes and leaving behind a visible image of the distribution of the labeled compound. The resulting autoradiogram provides information about the location, quantity, and sometimes even the identity of the molecules or structures that have taken up the radioactive tracer.

Autoradiography has been widely used in various fields of biology and medical research, including pharmacology, neuroscience, genetics, and cell biology, to study processes such as protein-DNA interactions, gene expression, drug metabolism, and neuronal connectivity. However, due to the use of radioactive materials and potential hazards associated with them, this technique has been gradually replaced by non-radioactive alternatives like fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) or immunofluorescence techniques.

In the context of medicine and biology, sulfates are ions or compounds that contain the sulfate group (SO4−2). Sulfate is a polyatomic anion with the structure of a sphere. It consists of a central sulfur atom surrounded by four oxygen atoms in a tetrahedral arrangement.

Sulfates can be found in various biological molecules, such as glycosaminoglycans and proteoglycans, which are important components of connective tissue and the extracellular matrix. Sulfate groups play a crucial role in these molecules by providing negative charges that help maintain the structural integrity and hydration of tissues.

In addition to their biological roles, sulfates can also be found in various medications and pharmaceutical compounds. For example, some laxatives contain sulfate salts, such as magnesium sulfate (Epsom salt) or sodium sulfate, which work by increasing the water content in the intestines and promoting bowel movements.

It is important to note that exposure to high levels of sulfates can be harmful to human health, particularly in the form of sulfur dioxide (SO2), a common air pollutant produced by burning fossil fuels. Prolonged exposure to SO2 can cause respiratory problems and exacerbate existing lung conditions.

Oleic acid is a monounsaturated fatty acid that is commonly found in various natural oils such as olive oil, sunflower oil, and grapeseed oil. Its chemical formula is cis-9-octadecenoic acid, and it is a colorless liquid at room temperature. Oleic acid is an important component of human diet and has been shown to have potential health benefits, including reducing the risk of heart disease and improving immune function. It is also used in the manufacture of soaps, cosmetics, and other personal care products.

Liposomes are artificially prepared, small, spherical vesicles composed of one or more lipid bilayers that enclose an aqueous compartment. They can encapsulate both hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs, making them useful for drug delivery applications in the medical field. The lipid bilayer structure of liposomes is similar to that of biological membranes, which allows them to merge with and deliver their contents into cells. This property makes liposomes a valuable tool in delivering drugs directly to targeted sites within the body, improving drug efficacy while minimizing side effects.

Nicotine is defined as a highly addictive psychoactive alkaloid and stimulant found in the nightshade family of plants, primarily in tobacco leaves. It is the primary component responsible for the addiction to cigarettes and other forms of tobacco. Nicotine can also be produced synthetically.

When nicotine enters the body, it activates the release of several neurotransmitters such as dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin, leading to feelings of pleasure, stimulation, and relaxation. However, with regular use, tolerance develops, requiring higher doses to achieve the same effects, which can contribute to the development of nicotine dependence.

Nicotine has both short-term and long-term health effects. Short-term effects include increased heart rate and blood pressure, increased alertness and concentration, and arousal. Long-term use can lead to addiction, lung disease, cardiovascular disease, and reproductive problems. It is important to note that nicotine itself is not the primary cause of many tobacco-related diseases, but rather the result of other harmful chemicals found in tobacco smoke.

Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is a technique used in pathology and laboratory medicine to identify specific proteins or antigens in tissue sections. It combines the principles of immunology and histology to detect the presence and location of these target molecules within cells and tissues. This technique utilizes antibodies that are specific to the protein or antigen of interest, which are then tagged with a detection system such as a chromogen or fluorophore. The stained tissue sections can be examined under a microscope, allowing for the visualization and analysis of the distribution and expression patterns of the target molecule in the context of the tissue architecture. Immunohistochemistry is widely used in diagnostic pathology to help identify various diseases, including cancer, infectious diseases, and immune-mediated disorders.

High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is a type of chromatography that separates and analyzes compounds based on their interactions with a stationary phase and a mobile phase under high pressure. The mobile phase, which can be a gas or liquid, carries the sample mixture through a column containing the stationary phase.

In HPLC, the mobile phase is a liquid, and it is pumped through the column at high pressures (up to several hundred atmospheres) to achieve faster separation times and better resolution than other types of liquid chromatography. The stationary phase can be a solid or a liquid supported on a solid, and it interacts differently with each component in the sample mixture, causing them to separate as they travel through the column.

HPLC is widely used in analytical chemistry, pharmaceuticals, biotechnology, and other fields to separate, identify, and quantify compounds present in complex mixtures. It can be used to analyze a wide range of substances, including drugs, hormones, vitamins, pigments, flavors, and pollutants. HPLC is also used in the preparation of pure samples for further study or use.

The myenteric plexus, also known as Auerbach's plexus, is a component of the enteric nervous system located in the wall of the gastrointestinal tract. It is a network of nerve cells (neurons) and supporting cells (neuroglia) that lies between the inner circular layer and outer longitudinal muscle layers of the digestive system's muscularis externa.

The myenteric plexus plays a crucial role in controlling gastrointestinal motility, secretion, and blood flow, primarily through its intrinsic nerve circuits called reflex arcs. These reflex arcs regulate peristalsis (the coordinated muscle contractions that move food through the digestive tract) and segmentation (localized contractions that mix and churn the contents within a specific region of the gut).

Additionally, the myenteric plexus receives input from both the sympathetic and parasympathetic divisions of the autonomic nervous system, allowing for central nervous system regulation of gastrointestinal functions. Dysfunction in the myenteric plexus has been implicated in various gastrointestinal disorders, such as irritable bowel syndrome, achalasia, and intestinal pseudo-obstruction.

Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) is a statistical technique used to compare the means of two or more groups and determine whether there are any significant differences between them. It is a way to analyze the variance in a dataset to determine whether the variability between groups is greater than the variability within groups, which can indicate that the groups are significantly different from one another.

ANOVA is based on the concept of partitioning the total variance in a dataset into two components: variance due to differences between group means (also known as "between-group variance") and variance due to differences within each group (also known as "within-group variance"). By comparing these two sources of variance, ANOVA can help researchers determine whether any observed differences between groups are statistically significant, or whether they could have occurred by chance.

ANOVA is a widely used technique in many areas of research, including biology, psychology, engineering, and business. It is often used to compare the means of two or more experimental groups, such as a treatment group and a control group, to determine whether the treatment had a significant effect. ANOVA can also be used to compare the means of different populations or subgroups within a population, to identify any differences that may exist between them.

Biological models, also known as physiological models or organismal models, are simplified representations of biological systems, processes, or mechanisms that are used to understand and explain the underlying principles and relationships. These models can be theoretical (conceptual or mathematical) or physical (such as anatomical models, cell cultures, or animal models). They are widely used in biomedical research to study various phenomena, including disease pathophysiology, drug action, and therapeutic interventions.

Examples of biological models include:

1. Mathematical models: These use mathematical equations and formulas to describe complex biological systems or processes, such as population dynamics, metabolic pathways, or gene regulation networks. They can help predict the behavior of these systems under different conditions and test hypotheses about their underlying mechanisms.
2. Cell cultures: These are collections of cells grown in a controlled environment, typically in a laboratory dish or flask. They can be used to study cellular processes, such as signal transduction, gene expression, or metabolism, and to test the effects of drugs or other treatments on these processes.
3. Animal models: These are living organisms, usually vertebrates like mice, rats, or non-human primates, that are used to study various aspects of human biology and disease. They can provide valuable insights into the pathophysiology of diseases, the mechanisms of drug action, and the safety and efficacy of new therapies.
4. Anatomical models: These are physical representations of biological structures or systems, such as plastic models of organs or tissues, that can be used for educational purposes or to plan surgical procedures. They can also serve as a basis for developing more sophisticated models, such as computer simulations or 3D-printed replicas.

Overall, biological models play a crucial role in advancing our understanding of biology and medicine, helping to identify new targets for therapeutic intervention, develop novel drugs and treatments, and improve human health.

Acetates, in a medical context, most commonly refer to compounds that contain the acetate group, which is an functional group consisting of a carbon atom bonded to two hydrogen atoms and an oxygen atom (-COO-). An example of an acetate is sodium acetate (CH3COONa), which is a salt formed from acetic acid (CH3COOH) and is often used as a buffering agent in medical solutions.

Acetates can also refer to a group of medications that contain acetate as an active ingredient, such as magnesium acetate, which is used as a laxative, or calcium acetate, which is used to treat high levels of phosphate in the blood.

In addition, acetates can also refer to a process called acetylation, which is the addition of an acetyl group (-COCH3) to a molecule. This process can be important in the metabolism and regulation of various substances within the body.

Glycine is a simple amino acid that plays a crucial role in the body. According to the medical definition, glycine is an essential component for the synthesis of proteins, peptides, and other biologically important compounds. It is also involved in various metabolic processes, such as the production of creatine, which supports muscle function, and the regulation of neurotransmitters, affecting nerve impulse transmission and brain function. Glycine can be found as a free form in the body and is also present in many dietary proteins.

Brain neoplasms, also known as brain tumors, are abnormal growths of cells within the brain. These growths can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Benign brain tumors typically grow slowly and do not spread to other parts of the body. However, they can still cause serious problems if they press on sensitive areas of the brain. Malignant brain tumors, on the other hand, are cancerous and can grow quickly, invading surrounding brain tissue and spreading to other parts of the brain or spinal cord.

Brain neoplasms can arise from various types of cells within the brain, including glial cells (which provide support and insulation for nerve cells), neurons (nerve cells that transmit signals in the brain), and meninges (the membranes that cover the brain and spinal cord). They can also result from the spread of cancer cells from other parts of the body, known as metastatic brain tumors.

Symptoms of brain neoplasms may vary depending on their size, location, and growth rate. Common symptoms include headaches, seizures, weakness or paralysis in the limbs, difficulty with balance and coordination, changes in speech or vision, confusion, memory loss, and changes in behavior or personality.

Treatment for brain neoplasms depends on several factors, including the type, size, location, and grade of the tumor, as well as the patient's age and overall health. Treatment options may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, targeted therapy, or a combination of these approaches. Regular follow-up care is essential to monitor for recurrence and manage any long-term effects of treatment.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Naphthylvinylpyridine" is not a widely recognized medical term or concept. It appears to be more related to organic chemistry than to medicine. Naphthylvinylpyridine is an aromatic compound consisting of a pyridine ring (a six-membered ring with five carbon atoms and one nitrogen atom) substituted with a naphthalene ring and a vinyl group.

This compound may have potential uses in various chemical reactions or processes, but it does not have a direct relevance to medical definitions as far as I am aware. If you have any further questions about organic chemistry or related topics, I would be happy to try to help answer them, to the best of my ability.

Sodium is an element with the atomic number 11 and symbol Na. An isotope of an element is a variant that has the same number of protons in its nucleus (and therefore the same atomic number), but a different number of neutrons, resulting in a different atomic mass.

There are several isotopes of sodium, including:

* Sodium-23: This is the most common isotope, making up about 99.9% of natural sodium. It has 11 protons and 12 neutrons in its nucleus, giving it an atomic mass of 23.00 u (unified atomic mass units).
* Sodium-22: This is a radioactive isotope that decays via beta plus decay to neon-22 with a half-life of about 2.6 years. It has 11 protons and 11 neutrons in its nucleus, giving it an atomic mass of 22.00 u.
* Sodium-24: This is another radioactive isotope that decays via beta minus decay to magnesium-24 with a half-life of about 15 hours. It has 11 protons and 13 neutrons in its nucleus, giving it an atomic mass of 24.00 u.

Isotopes of sodium are used in various applications, including as tracers in medical research and as a source of radiation in cancer treatment.

The Radioisotope Dilution Technique is a method used in nuclear medicine to measure the volume and flow rate of a particular fluid in the body. It involves introducing a known amount of a radioactive isotope, or radioisotope, into the fluid, such as blood. The isotope mixes with the fluid, and samples are then taken from the fluid at various time points.

By measuring the concentration of the radioisotope in each sample, it is possible to calculate the total volume of the fluid based on the amount of the isotope introduced and the dilution factor. The flow rate can also be calculated by measuring the concentration of the isotope over time and using the formula:

Flow rate = Volume/Time

This technique is commonly used in medical research and clinical settings to measure cardiac output, cerebral blood flow, and renal function, among other applications. It is a safe and reliable method that has been widely used for many years. However, it does require the use of radioactive materials and specialized equipment, so it should only be performed by trained medical professionals in appropriate facilities.

Metabolism is the complex network of chemical reactions that occur within our bodies to maintain life. It involves two main types of processes: catabolism, which is the breaking down of molecules to release energy, and anabolism, which is the building up of molecules using energy. These reactions are necessary for the body to grow, reproduce, respond to environmental changes, and repair itself. Metabolism is a continuous process that occurs at the cellular level and is regulated by enzymes, hormones, and other signaling molecules. It is influenced by various factors such as age, genetics, diet, physical activity, and overall health status.

Ciliophora is a phylum in the taxonomic classification system that consists of unicellular organisms commonly known as ciliates. These are characterized by the presence of hair-like structures called cilia, which are attached to the cell surface and beat in a coordinated manner to facilitate movement and feeding. Ciliophora includes a diverse group of organisms, many of which are found in aquatic environments. Examples of ciliates include Paramecium, Tetrahymena, and Vorticella.

Quinuclidinyl benzilate is a synthetic chemical compound that acts as a potent anticholinergic drug. Its chemical formula is C18H26N2O2. It is an odorless, white crystalline powder that is slightly soluble in water and more soluble in organic solvents.

Quinuclidinyl benzilate is a deliriant drug, which means it can cause delirium, confusion, hallucinations, and other altered mental states. It works by blocking the action of acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter in the brain that is involved in memory, attention, and perception.

This compound has been used in research as a tool to study the nervous system and has also been explored for its potential use as a chemical weapon. It is classified as a Schedule II controlled substance in the United States due to its high potential for abuse and the risk of severe psychological harm.

In medical or clinical terms, "ethers" do not have a specific relevance as a single medical condition or diagnosis. However, in a broader chemical context, ethers are a class of organic compounds characterized by an oxygen atom connected to two alkyl or aryl groups. Ethers are not typically used as therapeutic agents but can be found in certain medications as solvents or as part of the drug's chemical structure.

An example of a medication with an ether group is the antihistamine diphenhydramine (Benadryl), which has a phenyl ether moiety in its chemical structure. Another example is the anesthetic sevoflurane, which is a fluorinated methyl isopropyl ether used for inducing and maintaining general anesthesia during surgeries.

It's important to note that 'ethers' as a term primarily belongs to the field of chemistry rather than medicine.

"Halomonas" is a genus of bacteria that are found in saline environments, such as salt lakes, marine habitats, and salted food products. These bacteria are characterized by their ability to grow optimally in media with high salt concentrations (up to 20-30% sodium chloride). They are generally rod-shaped and motile, with a gram-negative cell wall structure. Some species of Halomonas have been studied for their potential applications in biotechnology, such as the production of compatible solutes, enzymes, and biofuels. However, it is important to note that "Halomonas" is not a medical term per se, but rather a taxonomic designation used in microbiology and related fields.

Phosphorus is an essential mineral that is required by every cell in the body for normal functioning. It is a key component of several important biomolecules, including adenosine triphosphate (ATP), which is the primary source of energy for cells, and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA), which are the genetic materials in cells.

Phosphorus is also a major constituent of bones and teeth, where it combines with calcium to provide strength and structure. In addition, phosphorus plays a critical role in various metabolic processes, including energy production, nerve impulse transmission, and pH regulation.

The medical definition of phosphorus refers to the chemical element with the atomic number 15 and the symbol P. It is a highly reactive non-metal that exists in several forms, including white phosphorus, red phosphorus, and black phosphorus. In the body, phosphorus is primarily found in the form of organic compounds, such as phospholipids, phosphoproteins, and nucleic acids.

Abnormal levels of phosphorus in the body can lead to various health problems. For example, high levels of phosphorus (hyperphosphatemia) can occur in patients with kidney disease or those who consume large amounts of phosphorus-rich foods, and can contribute to the development of calcification of soft tissues and cardiovascular disease. On the other hand, low levels of phosphorus (hypophosphatemia) can occur in patients with malnutrition, vitamin D deficiency, or alcoholism, and can lead to muscle weakness, bone pain, and an increased risk of infection.

Methanosarcinaceae is a family of archaea within the order Methanosarcinales. These organisms are known for their ability to produce methane as a metabolic byproduct, specifically through the process of methanogenesis. They are commonly found in anaerobic environments such as wetlands, digestive tracts of animals, and sewage treatment facilities.

Methanosarcinaceae species are unique among methanogens because they can utilize a variety of substrates for methane production, including acetate, methanol, and carbon dioxide with hydrogen. This versatility allows them to thrive in diverse anaerobic habitats. Some notable genera within this family include Methanosarcina, Methanosaeta, and Methanothrix.

It is important to note that methanogens like those found in Methanosarcinaceae play a significant role in the global carbon cycle, contributing to greenhouse gas emissions and climate change. Additionally, they have potential applications in biotechnology for waste treatment and biofuel production.

Denervation is a medical term that refers to the loss or removal of nerve supply to an organ or body part. This can occur as a result of surgical intervention, injury, or disease processes that damage the nerves leading to the affected area. The consequences of denervation depend on the specific organ or tissue involved, but generally, it can lead to changes in function, sensation, and muscle tone. For example, denervation of a skeletal muscle can cause weakness, atrophy, and altered reflexes. Similarly, denervation of an organ such as the heart can lead to abnormalities in heart rate and rhythm. In some cases, denervation may be intentional, such as during surgical procedures aimed at treating chronic pain or spasticity.

Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide (VIP) is a 28-amino acid polypeptide hormone that has potent vasodilatory, secretory, and neurotransmitter effects. It is widely distributed throughout the body, including in the gastrointestinal tract, where it is synthesized and released by nerve cells (neurons) in the intestinal mucosa. VIP plays a crucial role in regulating various physiological functions such as intestinal secretion, motility, and blood flow. It also has immunomodulatory effects and may play a role in neuroprotection. High levels of VIP are found in the brain, where it acts as a neurotransmitter or neuromodulator and is involved in various cognitive functions such as learning, memory, and social behavior.

Body weight is the measure of the force exerted on a scale or balance by an object's mass, most commonly expressed in units such as pounds (lb) or kilograms (kg). In the context of medical definitions, body weight typically refers to an individual's total weight, which includes their skeletal muscle, fat, organs, and bodily fluids.

Healthcare professionals often use body weight as a basic indicator of overall health status, as it can provide insights into various aspects of a person's health, such as nutritional status, metabolic function, and risk factors for certain diseases. For example, being significantly underweight or overweight can increase the risk of developing conditions like malnutrition, diabetes, heart disease, and certain types of cancer.

It is important to note that body weight alone may not provide a complete picture of an individual's health, as it does not account for factors such as muscle mass, bone density, or body composition. Therefore, healthcare professionals often use additional measures, such as body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, and blood tests, to assess overall health status more comprehensively.

Succinylcholine is a neuromuscular blocking agent, a type of muscle relaxant used in anesthesia during surgical procedures. It works by inhibiting the transmission of nerve impulses at the neuromuscular junction, leading to temporary paralysis of skeletal muscles. This facilitates endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation during surgery. Succinylcholine has a rapid onset of action and is metabolized quickly, making it useful for short surgical procedures. However, its use may be associated with certain adverse effects, such as increased heart rate, muscle fasciculations, and potentially life-threatening hyperkalemia in susceptible individuals.

Pancreatin is a mixture of digestive enzymes, including amylase, lipase, and proteases, naturally produced by the pancreas in humans and other mammals. These enzymes aid in the digestion of carbohydrates, fats, and proteins, respectively, in the small intestine. Pancreatin is often used as a replacement therapy for individuals with conditions like cystic fibrosis, chronic pancreatitis, or pancreatectomy, who have impaired pancreatic function and struggle to digest food properly. It can be obtained from animal pancreases, typically from pigs, and is available in various forms such as tablets, capsules, or powders for medical use.

Meglumine is not a medical condition but a medication. It is an anticholinergic drug that is used as a diagnostic aid in the form of meglumine iodide, which is used to test for kidney function and to visualize the urinary tract. Meglumine is an amino sugar that is used as a counterion to combine with iodine to make meglumine iodide. It works by increasing the excretion of iodine through the kidneys, which helps to enhance the visibility of the urinary tract during imaging studies.

Bethanechol is a parasympathomimetic drug, which means it stimulates the parasympathetic nervous system. This system is responsible for regulating many automatic functions in the body, including digestion and urination. Bethanechol works by causing the smooth muscles of the bladder to contract, which can help to promote urination in people who have difficulty emptying their bladder completely due to certain medical conditions such as surgery, spinal cord injury, or multiple sclerosis.

The medical definition of 'Bethanechol' is:

A parasympathomimetic agent that stimulates the muscarinic receptors of the autonomic nervous system, causing contraction of smooth muscle and increased secretion of exocrine glands. It is used to treat urinary retention and associated symptoms, such as those caused by bladder-neck obstruction due to prostatic hypertrophy or neurogenic bladder dysfunction. Bethanechol may also be used to diagnose urinary tract obstruction and to test the integrity of the bladder's innervation.

Microsomes are subcellular membranous vesicles that are obtained as a byproduct during the preparation of cellular homogenates. They are not naturally occurring structures within the cell, but rather formed due to fragmentation of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) during laboratory procedures. Microsomes are widely used in various research and scientific studies, particularly in the fields of biochemistry and pharmacology.

Microsomes are rich in enzymes, including the cytochrome P450 system, which is involved in the metabolism of drugs, toxins, and other xenobiotics. These enzymes play a crucial role in detoxifying foreign substances and eliminating them from the body. As such, microsomes serve as an essential tool for studying drug metabolism, toxicity, and interactions, allowing researchers to better understand and predict the effects of various compounds on living organisms.

Positron-Emission Tomography (PET) is a type of nuclear medicine imaging that uses small amounts of radioactive material, called a radiotracer, to produce detailed, three-dimensional images. This technique measures metabolic activity within the body, such as sugar metabolism, to help distinguish between healthy and diseased tissue, identify cancerous cells, or examine the function of organs.

During a PET scan, the patient is injected with a radiotracer, typically a sugar-based compound labeled with a positron-emitting radioisotope, such as fluorine-18 (^18^F). The radiotracer accumulates in cells that are metabolically active, like cancer cells. As the radiotracer decays, it emits positrons, which then collide with electrons in nearby tissue, producing gamma rays. A special camera, called a PET scanner, detects these gamma rays and uses this information to create detailed images of the body's internal structures and processes.

PET is often used in conjunction with computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to provide both functional and anatomical information, allowing for more accurate diagnosis and treatment planning. Common applications include detecting cancer recurrence, staging and monitoring cancer, evaluating heart function, and assessing brain function in conditions like dementia and epilepsy.

Pharmacology is the branch of medicine and biology concerned with the study of drugs, their actions, and their uses. It involves understanding how drugs interact with biological systems to produce desired effects, as well as any adverse or unwanted effects. This includes studying the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of drugs (often referred to as ADME), the receptors and biochemical pathways that drugs affect, and the therapeutic benefits and risks of drug use. Pharmacologists may also be involved in the development and testing of new medications.

Phosphates, in a medical context, refer to the salts or esters of phosphoric acid. Phosphates play crucial roles in various biological processes within the human body. They are essential components of bones and teeth, where they combine with calcium to form hydroxyapatite crystals. Phosphates also participate in energy transfer reactions as phosphate groups attached to adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Additionally, they contribute to buffer systems that help maintain normal pH levels in the body.

Abnormal levels of phosphates in the blood can indicate certain medical conditions. High phosphate levels (hyperphosphatemia) may be associated with kidney dysfunction, hyperparathyroidism, or excessive intake of phosphate-containing products. Low phosphate levels (hypophosphatemia) might result from malnutrition, vitamin D deficiency, or certain diseases affecting the small intestine or kidneys. Both hypophosphatemia and hyperphosphatemia can have significant impacts on various organ systems and may require medical intervention.

Dimercaprol is a chelating agent, which means it can bind to and help remove certain toxic substances from the body. It is primarily used in the treatment of heavy metal poisoning, such as lead, mercury, or arsenic poisoning. Dimercaprol works by forming stable complexes with these toxic metals, allowing them to be excreted from the body through urine and bile.

The chemical name for dimercaprol is British Anti-Lewisite (BAL), as it was initially developed during World War II as an antidote against the chemical warfare agent Lewisite, a type of arsenic-based blistering agent. Dimercaprol is administered parenterally, usually by intramuscular injection, and its use requires medical supervision due to potential side effects, including hypertension, tachycardia, nausea, vomiting, and pain at the injection site.

Vitamin B12, also known as cobalamin, is a water-soluble vitamin that plays a crucial role in the synthesis of DNA, formation of red blood cells, and maintenance of the nervous system. It is involved in the metabolism of every cell in the body, particularly affecting DNA regulation and neurological function.

Vitamin B12 is unique among vitamins because it contains a metal ion, cobalt, from which its name is derived. This vitamin can be synthesized only by certain types of bacteria and is not produced by plants or animals. The major sources of vitamin B12 in the human diet include animal-derived foods such as meat, fish, poultry, eggs, and dairy products, as well as fortified plant-based milk alternatives and breakfast cereals.

Deficiency in vitamin B12 can lead to various health issues, including megaloblastic anemia, fatigue, neurological symptoms such as numbness and tingling in the extremities, memory loss, and depression. Since vitamin B12 is not readily available from plant-based sources, vegetarians and vegans are at a higher risk of deficiency and may require supplementation or fortified foods to meet their daily requirements.

"Chickens" is a common term used to refer to the domesticated bird, Gallus gallus domesticus, which is widely raised for its eggs and meat. However, in medical terms, "chickens" is not a standard term with a specific definition. If you have any specific medical concern or question related to chickens, such as food safety or allergies, please provide more details so I can give a more accurate answer.

Cesium is a chemical element with the symbol "Cs" and atomic number 55. It is a soft, silvery-golden alkali metal that is highly reactive. Cesium is never found in its free state in nature due to its high reactivity. Instead, it is found in minerals such as pollucite.

In the medical field, cesium-137 is a radioactive isotope of cesium that has been used in certain medical treatments and diagnostic procedures. For example, it has been used in the treatment of cancer, particularly in cases where other forms of radiation therapy have not been effective. It can also be used as a source of radiation in brachytherapy, a type of cancer treatment that involves placing radioactive material directly into or near tumors.

However, exposure to high levels of cesium-137 can be harmful and may increase the risk of cancer and other health problems. Therefore, its use in medical treatments is closely regulated and monitored to ensure safety.

Teichoic acids are complex polymers of glycerol or ribitol linked by phosphate groups, found in the cell wall of gram-positive bacteria. They play a crucial role in the bacterial cell's defense against hostile environments and can also contribute to virulence by helping the bacteria evade the host's immune system. Teichoic acids can be either linked to peptidoglycan (wall teichoic acids) or to membrane lipids (lipoteichoic acids). They can vary in structure and composition among different bacterial species, which can have implications for the design of antibiotics and other therapeutics.

Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the synthesis of the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the brain. GABA is an inhibitory neurotransmitter that helps to balance the excitatory effects of glutamate, another neurotransmitter.

Glutamate decarboxylase catalyzes the conversion of glutamate to GABA by removing a carboxyl group from the glutamate molecule. This reaction occurs in two steps, with the enzyme first converting glutamate to glutamic acid semialdehyde and then converting that intermediate product to GABA.

There are two major isoforms of glutamate decarboxylase, GAD65 and GAD67, which differ in their molecular weight, subcellular localization, and function. GAD65 is primarily responsible for the synthesis of GABA in neuronal synapses, while GAD67 is responsible for the synthesis of GABA in the cell body and dendrites of neurons.

Glutamate decarboxylase is an important target for research in neurology and psychiatry because dysregulation of GABAergic neurotransmission has been implicated in a variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders, including epilepsy, anxiety, depression, and schizophrenia.

Oxidation-Reduction (redox) reactions are a type of chemical reaction involving a transfer of electrons between two species. The substance that loses electrons in the reaction is oxidized, and the substance that gains electrons is reduced. Oxidation and reduction always occur together in a redox reaction, hence the term "oxidation-reduction."

In biological systems, redox reactions play a crucial role in many cellular processes, including energy production, metabolism, and signaling. The transfer of electrons in these reactions is often facilitated by specialized molecules called electron carriers, such as nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+/NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD/FADH2).

The oxidation state of an element in a compound is a measure of the number of electrons that have been gained or lost relative to its neutral state. In redox reactions, the oxidation state of one or more elements changes as they gain or lose electrons. The substance that is oxidized has a higher oxidation state, while the substance that is reduced has a lower oxidation state.

Overall, oxidation-reduction reactions are fundamental to the functioning of living organisms and are involved in many important biological processes.

Potassium chloride is an essential electrolyte that is often used in medical settings as a medication. It's a white, crystalline salt that is highly soluble in water and has a salty taste. In the body, potassium chloride plays a crucial role in maintaining fluid and electrolyte balance, nerve function, and muscle contraction.

Medically, potassium chloride is commonly used to treat or prevent low potassium levels (hypokalemia) in the blood. Hypokalemia can occur due to various reasons such as certain medications, kidney diseases, vomiting, diarrhea, or excessive sweating. Potassium chloride is available in various forms, including tablets, capsules, and liquids, and it's usually taken by mouth.

It's important to note that potassium chloride should be used with caution and under the supervision of a healthcare provider, as high levels of potassium (hyperkalemia) can be harmful and even life-threatening. Hyperkalemia can cause symptoms such as muscle weakness, irregular heartbeat, and cardiac arrest.

Synaptic transmission is the process by which a neuron communicates with another cell, such as another neuron or a muscle cell, across a junction called a synapse. It involves the release of neurotransmitters from the presynaptic terminal of the neuron, which then cross the synaptic cleft and bind to receptors on the postsynaptic cell, leading to changes in the electrical or chemical properties of the target cell. This process is critical for the transmission of signals within the nervous system and for controlling various physiological functions in the body.

'Animal behavior' refers to the actions or responses of animals to various stimuli, including their interactions with the environment and other individuals. It is the study of the actions of animals, whether they are instinctual, learned, or a combination of both. Animal behavior includes communication, mating, foraging, predator avoidance, and social organization, among other things. The scientific study of animal behavior is called ethology. This field seeks to understand the evolutionary basis for behaviors as well as their physiological and psychological mechanisms.

Tetradecanoylphorbol acetate (TPA) is defined as a pharmacological agent that is a derivative of the phorbol ester family. It is a potent tumor promoter and activator of protein kinase C (PKC), a group of enzymes that play a role in various cellular processes such as signal transduction, proliferation, and differentiation. TPA has been widely used in research to study PKC-mediated signaling pathways and its role in cancer development and progression. It is also used in topical treatments for skin conditions such as psoriasis.

An axon is a long, slender extension of a neuron (a type of nerve cell) that conducts electrical impulses (nerve impulses) away from the cell body to target cells, such as other neurons or muscle cells. Axons can vary in length from a few micrometers to over a meter long and are typically surrounded by a myelin sheath, which helps to insulate and protect the axon and allows for faster transmission of nerve impulses.

Axons play a critical role in the functioning of the nervous system, as they provide the means by which neurons communicate with one another and with other cells in the body. Damage to axons can result in serious neurological problems, such as those seen in spinal cord injuries or neurodegenerative diseases like multiple sclerosis.

Triglycerides are the most common type of fat in the body, and they're found in the food we eat. They're carried in the bloodstream to provide energy to the cells in our body. High levels of triglycerides in the blood can increase the risk of heart disease, especially in combination with other risk factors such as high LDL (bad) cholesterol, low HDL (good) cholesterol, and high blood pressure.

It's important to note that while triglycerides are a type of fat, they should not be confused with cholesterol, which is a waxy substance found in the cells of our body. Both triglycerides and cholesterol are important for maintaining good health, but high levels of either can increase the risk of heart disease.

Triglyceride levels are measured through a blood test called a lipid panel or lipid profile. A normal triglyceride level is less than 150 mg/dL. Borderline-high levels range from 150 to 199 mg/dL, high levels range from 200 to 499 mg/dL, and very high levels are 500 mg/dL or higher.

Elevated triglycerides can be caused by various factors such as obesity, physical inactivity, excessive alcohol consumption, smoking, and certain medical conditions like diabetes, hypothyroidism, and kidney disease. Medications such as beta-blockers, steroids, and diuretics can also raise triglyceride levels.

Lifestyle changes such as losing weight, exercising regularly, eating a healthy diet low in saturated and trans fats, avoiding excessive alcohol consumption, and quitting smoking can help lower triglyceride levels. In some cases, medication may be necessary to reduce triglycerides to recommended levels.

Type C phospholipases, also known as group CIA phospholipases or patatin-like phospholipase domain containing proteins (PNPLAs), are a subclass of phospholipases that specifically hydrolyze the sn-2 ester bond of glycerophospholipids. They belong to the PNPLA family, which includes nine members (PNPLA1-9) with diverse functions in lipid metabolism and cell signaling.

Type C phospholipases contain a patatin domain, which is a conserved region of approximately 240 amino acids that exhibits lipase and acyltransferase activities. These enzymes are primarily involved in the regulation of triglyceride metabolism, membrane remodeling, and cell signaling pathways.

PNPLA1 (adiponutrin) is mainly expressed in the liver and adipose tissue, where it plays a role in lipid droplet homeostasis and triglyceride hydrolysis. PNPLA2 (ATGL or desnutrin) is a key regulator of triglyceride metabolism, responsible for the initial step of triacylglycerol hydrolysis in adipose tissue and other tissues.

PNPLA3 (calcium-independent phospholipase A2 epsilon or iPLA2ε) is involved in membrane remodeling, arachidonic acid release, and cell signaling pathways. Mutations in PNPLA3 have been associated with an increased risk of developing nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), alcoholic liver disease, and hepatic steatosis.

PNPLA4 (lipase maturation factor 1 or LMF1) is involved in the intracellular processing and trafficking of lipases, such as pancreatic lipase and hepatic lipase. PNPLA5 ( Mozart1 or GSPML) has been implicated in membrane trafficking and cell signaling pathways.

PNPLA6 (neuropathy target esterase or NTE) is primarily expressed in the brain, where it plays a role in maintaining neuronal integrity by regulating lipid metabolism. Mutations in PNPLA6 have been associated with neuropathy and cognitive impairment.

PNPLA7 (adiponutrin or ADPN) has been implicated in lipid droplet formation, triacylglycerol hydrolysis, and cell signaling pathways. Mutations in PNPLA7 have been associated with an increased risk of developing NAFLD and hepatic steatosis.

PNPLA8 (diglyceride lipase or DGLα) is involved in the regulation of intracellular triacylglycerol metabolism, particularly in adipocytes and muscle cells. PNPLA9 (calcium-independent phospholipase A2 gamma or iPLA2γ) has been implicated in membrane remodeling, arachidonic acid release, and cell signaling pathways.

PNPLA10 (calcium-independent phospholipase A2 delta or iPLA2δ) is involved in the regulation of intracellular triacylglycerol metabolism, particularly in adipocytes and muscle cells. PNPLA11 (calcium-independent phospholipase A2 epsilon or iPLA2ε) has been implicated in membrane remodeling, arachidonic acid release, and cell signaling pathways.

PNPLA12 (calcium-independent phospholipase A2 zeta or iPLA2ζ) is involved in the regulation of intracellular triacylglycerol metabolism, particularly in adipocytes and muscle cells. PNPLA13 (calcium-independent phospholipase A2 eta or iPLA2η) has been implicated in membrane remodeling, arachidonic acid release, and cell signaling pathways.

PNPLA14 (calcium-independent phospholipase A2 theta or iPLA2θ) is involved in the regulation of intracellular triacylglycerol metabolism, particularly in adipocytes and muscle cells. PNPLA15 (calcium-independent phospholipase A2 iota or iPLA2ι) has been implicated in membrane remodeling, arachidonic acid release, and cell signaling pathways.

PNPLA16 (calcium-independent phospholipase A2 kappa or iPLA2κ) is involved in the regulation of intracellular triacylglycerol metabolism, particularly in adipocytes and muscle cells. PNPLA17 (calcium-independent phospholipase A2 lambda or iPLA2λ) has been implicated in membrane remodeling, arachidonic acid release, and cell signaling pathways.

PNPLA18 (calcium-independent phospholipase A2 mu or iPLA2μ) is involved in the regulation of intracellular triacylglycerol metabolism, particularly in adipocytes and muscle cells. PNPLA19 (calcium-independent phospholipase A2 nu or iPLA2ν) has been implicated in membrane remodeling, arachidonic acid release, and cell signaling pathways.

PNPLA20 (calcium-independent phospholipase A2 xi or iPLA2ξ) is involved in the regulation of intracellular triacylglycerol metabolism, particularly in adipocytes and muscle cells. PNPLA21 (calcium-independent phospholipase A2 omicron or iPLA2ο) has been implicated in membrane remodeling, arachidonic acid release, and cell signaling pathways.

PNPLA22 (calcium-independent phospholipase A2 pi or iPLA2π) is involved in the regulation of intracellular triacylglycerol metabolism, particularly in adipocytes and muscle cells. PNPLA23 (calcium-independent phospholipase A2 rho or iPLA2ρ) has been implicated in membrane remodeling, arachidonic acid release, and cell signaling pathways.

PNPLA24 (calcium-independent phospholipase A2 sigma or iPLA2σ) is involved in the regulation of intracellular triacylglycerol metabolism, particularly in adipocytes and muscle cells. PNPLA25 (calcium-independent phospholipase A2 tau or iPLA2τ) has been implicated in membrane remodeling, arachidonic acid release, and cell signaling pathways.

PNPLA26 (calcium-independent phospholipase A2 upsilon or iPLA2υ) is involved in the regulation of intracellular triacylglycerol metabolism, particularly in adipocytes and muscle cells. PNPLA27 (calcium-independent phospholipase A2 phi or iPLA2φ) has been implicated in membrane remodeling, arachidonic acid release, and cell signaling pathways.

PNPLA28 (calcium-independent phospholipase A2 chi or iPLA2χ) is involved in the regulation of intracellular triacylglycerol metabolism, particularly in adipocytes and muscle cells. PNPLA29 (calcium-independent phospholipase A2 psi or iPLA2ψ) has been implicated in membrane remodeling, arachidonic acid release, and cell signaling pathways.

PNPLA30 (calcium-independent phospholipase A2 omega or iPLA2ω) is involved in the regulation of intracellular triacylglycerol metabolism, particularly in adipocytes and muscle cells. PNPLA31 (calcium-independent phospholipase A2 pi or iPLA2π) has been implicated in membrane remodeling, arachidonic acid release, and cell signaling pathways.

PNPLA32 (calcium-independent phospholipase A2 rho or iPLA2ρ) is involved in the regulation of intracellular triacylglycerol metabolism, particularly in adipocytes and muscle cells. PNPLA33 (calcium-independent phospholipase A2 sigma or iPLA2σ) has been implicated in membrane remodeling, ar

Anisoles are organic compounds that consist of a phenyl ring (a benzene ring with a hydroxyl group replaced by a hydrogen atom) attached to a methoxy group (-O-CH3). The molecular formula for anisole is C6H5OCH3. Anisoles are aromatic ethers and can be found in various natural sources, including anise plants and some essential oils. They have a wide range of applications, including as solvents, flavoring agents, and intermediates in the synthesis of other chemicals.

Biological availability is a term used in pharmacology and toxicology that refers to the degree and rate at which a drug or other substance is absorbed into the bloodstream and becomes available at the site of action in the body. It is a measure of the amount of the substance that reaches the systemic circulation unchanged, after administration by any route (such as oral, intravenous, etc.).

The biological availability (F) of a drug can be calculated using the area under the curve (AUC) of the plasma concentration-time profile after extravascular and intravenous dosing, according to the following formula:

F = (AUCex/AUCiv) x (Doseiv/Doseex)

where AUCex is the AUC after extravascular dosing, AUCiv is the AUC after intravenous dosing, Doseiv is the intravenous dose, and Doseex is the extravascular dose.

Biological availability is an important consideration in drug development and therapy, as it can affect the drug's efficacy, safety, and dosage regimen. Drugs with low biological availability may require higher doses to achieve the desired therapeutic effect, while drugs with high biological availability may have a more rapid onset of action and require lower doses to avoid toxicity.

Cytidine triphosphate (CTP) is a nucleotide that plays a crucial role in the synthesis of RNA. It consists of a cytosine base, a ribose sugar, and three phosphate groups. Cytidine triphosphate is one of the four main building blocks of RNA, along with adenosine triphosphate (ATP), guanosine triphosphate (GTP), and uridine triphosphate (UTP). These nucleotides are essential for various cellular processes, including energy transfer, signal transduction, and biosynthesis. CTP is also involved in the regulation of several metabolic pathways and serves as a cofactor for enzymes that catalyze biochemical reactions. Like other triphosphate nucleotides, CTP provides energy for cellular functions by donating its phosphate groups in energy-consuming processes.

The corpus striatum is a part of the brain that plays a crucial role in movement, learning, and cognition. It consists of two structures called the caudate nucleus and the putamen, which are surrounded by the external and internal segments of the globus pallidus. Together, these structures form the basal ganglia, a group of interconnected neurons that help regulate voluntary movement.

The corpus striatum receives input from various parts of the brain, including the cerebral cortex, thalamus, and other brainstem nuclei. It processes this information and sends output to the globus pallidus and substantia nigra, which then project to the thalamus and back to the cerebral cortex. This feedback loop helps coordinate and fine-tune movements, allowing for smooth and coordinated actions.

Damage to the corpus striatum can result in movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and dystonia. These conditions are characterized by abnormal involuntary movements, muscle stiffness, and difficulty initiating or controlling voluntary movements.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Netherlands Antilles" is not a medical term. It refers to a former political entity in the Caribbean that was composed of several islands including Curacao, Sint Maarten, Bonaire, Saba, and Sint Eustatius. These islands are now special municipalities of the Netherlands or part of the Kingdom of the Netherlands. I'm here to help with medical information, so if you have any health-related questions, feel free to ask!

A cell line that is derived from tumor cells and has been adapted to grow in culture. These cell lines are often used in research to study the characteristics of cancer cells, including their growth patterns, genetic changes, and responses to various treatments. They can be established from many different types of tumors, such as carcinomas, sarcomas, and leukemias. Once established, these cell lines can be grown and maintained indefinitely in the laboratory, allowing researchers to conduct experiments and studies that would not be feasible using primary tumor cells. It is important to note that tumor cell lines may not always accurately represent the behavior of the original tumor, as they can undergo genetic changes during their time in culture.

"Cattle" is a term used in the agricultural and veterinary fields to refer to domesticated animals of the genus *Bos*, primarily *Bos taurus* (European cattle) and *Bos indicus* (Zebu). These animals are often raised for meat, milk, leather, and labor. They are also known as bovines or cows (for females), bulls (intact males), and steers/bullocks (castrated males). However, in a strict medical definition, "cattle" does not apply to humans or other animals.

Tetrodotoxin (TTX) is a potent neurotoxin that is primarily found in certain species of pufferfish, blue-ringed octopuses, and other marine animals. It blocks voltage-gated sodium channels in nerve cell membranes, leading to muscle paralysis and potentially respiratory failure. TTX has no known antidote, and medical treatment focuses on supportive care for symptoms. Exposure can occur through ingestion, inhalation, or skin absorption, depending on the route of toxicity.

Histochemistry is the branch of pathology that deals with the microscopic localization of cellular or tissue components using specific chemical reactions. It involves the application of chemical techniques to identify and locate specific biomolecules within tissues, cells, and subcellular structures. This is achieved through the use of various staining methods that react with specific antigens or enzymes in the sample, allowing for their visualization under a microscope. Histochemistry is widely used in diagnostic pathology to identify different types of tissues, cells, and structures, as well as in research to study cellular and molecular processes in health and disease.

A biological marker, often referred to as a biomarker, is a measurable indicator that reflects the presence or severity of a disease state, or a response to a therapeutic intervention. Biomarkers can be found in various materials such as blood, tissues, or bodily fluids, and they can take many forms, including molecular, histologic, radiographic, or physiological measurements.

In the context of medical research and clinical practice, biomarkers are used for a variety of purposes, such as:

1. Diagnosis: Biomarkers can help diagnose a disease by indicating the presence or absence of a particular condition. For example, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a biomarker used to detect prostate cancer.
2. Monitoring: Biomarkers can be used to monitor the progression or regression of a disease over time. For instance, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels are monitored in diabetes patients to assess long-term blood glucose control.
3. Predicting: Biomarkers can help predict the likelihood of developing a particular disease or the risk of a negative outcome. For example, the presence of certain genetic mutations can indicate an increased risk for breast cancer.
4. Response to treatment: Biomarkers can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of a specific treatment by measuring changes in the biomarker levels before and after the intervention. This is particularly useful in personalized medicine, where treatments are tailored to individual patients based on their unique biomarker profiles.

It's important to note that for a biomarker to be considered clinically valid and useful, it must undergo rigorous validation through well-designed studies, including demonstrating sensitivity, specificity, reproducibility, and clinical relevance.

'Escherichia coli' (E. coli) is a type of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacterium that commonly inhabits the intestinal tract of humans and warm-blooded animals. It is a member of the family Enterobacteriaceae and one of the most well-studied prokaryotic model organisms in molecular biology.

While most E. coli strains are harmless and even beneficial to their hosts, some serotypes can cause various forms of gastrointestinal and extraintestinal illnesses in humans and animals. These pathogenic strains possess virulence factors that enable them to colonize and damage host tissues, leading to diseases such as diarrhea, urinary tract infections, pneumonia, and sepsis.

E. coli is a versatile organism with remarkable genetic diversity, which allows it to adapt to various environmental niches. It can be found in water, soil, food, and various man-made environments, making it an essential indicator of fecal contamination and a common cause of foodborne illnesses. The study of E. coli has contributed significantly to our understanding of fundamental biological processes, including DNA replication, gene regulation, and protein synthesis.

Sulfur-containing amino acids are a type of amino acid that contain sulfur atoms in their side chains. There are three sulfur-containing amino acids that are considered essential for human health: methionine, cysteine, and homocysteine.

Methionine is an essential amino acid, which means that it cannot be synthesized by the human body and must be obtained through the diet. It contains a sulfur atom in its side chain and plays important roles in various biological processes, including methylation reactions, protein synthesis, and detoxification.

Cysteine is a semi-essential amino acid, which means that it can be synthesized by the human body under normal conditions but may become essential during periods of growth or illness. It contains a sulfhydryl group (-SH) in its side chain, which allows it to form disulfide bonds with other cysteine residues and contribute to the stability and structure of proteins.

Homocysteine is a non-proteinogenic amino acid that is derived from methionine metabolism. It contains a sulfur atom in its side chain and has been linked to various health problems, including cardiovascular disease, when present at elevated levels in the blood.

Other sulfur-containing amino acids include taurine, which is not incorporated into proteins but plays important roles in bile acid conjugation, antioxidant defense, and neuromodulation, and cystathionine, which is an intermediate in methionine metabolism.

Mitochondrial swelling is a pathological change in the structure of mitochondria, which are the energy-producing organelles found in cells. This condition is characterized by an increase in the volume of the mitochondrial matrix, which is the space inside the mitochondrion that contains enzymes and other molecules involved in energy production.

Mitochondrial swelling can occur as a result of various cellular stressors, such as oxidative damage, calcium overload, or decreased levels of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), which is the primary energy currency of the cell. This swelling can lead to disruption of the mitochondrial membrane and release of cytochrome c, a protein involved in apoptosis or programmed cell death.

Mitochondrial swelling has been implicated in several diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders, ischemia-reperfusion injury, and drug toxicity. It can be observed under an electron microscope as part of an ultrastructural analysis of tissue samples or detected through biochemical assays that measure changes in mitochondrial membrane potential or matrix volume.

Hexamethonium compounds are a type of ganglionic blocker, which are medications that block the transmission of nerve impulses at the ganglia ( clusters of nerve cells) in the autonomic nervous system. These compounds contain hexamethonium as the active ingredient, which is a compound with the chemical formula C16H32N2O4.

Hexamethonium works by blocking the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors at the ganglia, which prevents the release of neurotransmitters and ultimately inhibits the transmission of nerve impulses. This can have various effects on the body, depending on which part of the autonomic nervous system is affected.

Hexamethonium compounds were once used to treat hypertension (high blood pressure), but they are rarely used today due to their numerous side effects and the availability of safer and more effective medications. Some of the side effects associated with hexamethonium include dry mouth, blurred vision, constipation, difficulty urinating, and dizziness upon standing.

Diphenhydramine is an antihistamine medication used to relieve symptoms of allergies, such as sneezing, runny nose, and itchy or watery eyes. It works by blocking the action of histamine, a substance in the body that causes allergic reactions. Diphenhydramine can also be used to treat motion sickness, insomnia, and symptoms of the common cold.

In addition to its antihistamine effects, diphenhydramine also has anticholinergic properties, which means it can help to reduce secretions in the nose and throat, and may have a drying effect on the mouth and eyes. It is available over-the-counter in various forms, including tablets, capsules, liquid, and topical creams or ointments.

It's important to note that diphenhydramine can cause drowsiness, so it should be used with caution when operating heavy machinery or driving a vehicle. It may also interact with other medications, so it's important to speak with a healthcare provider before taking this medication.

Ethanol is the medical term for pure alcohol, which is a colorless, clear, volatile, flammable liquid with a characteristic odor and burning taste. It is the type of alcohol that is found in alcoholic beverages and is produced by the fermentation of sugars by yeasts.

In the medical field, ethanol is used as an antiseptic and disinfectant, and it is also used as a solvent for various medicinal preparations. It has central nervous system depressant properties and is sometimes used as a sedative or to induce sleep. However, excessive consumption of ethanol can lead to alcohol intoxication, which can cause a range of negative health effects, including impaired judgment, coordination, and memory, as well as an increased risk of accidents, injuries, and chronic diseases such as liver disease and addiction.

Ion channels are specialized transmembrane proteins that form hydrophilic pores or gaps in the lipid bilayer of cell membranes. They regulate the movement of ions (such as sodium, potassium, calcium, and chloride) across the cell membrane by allowing these charged particles to pass through selectively in response to various stimuli, including voltage changes, ligand binding, mechanical stress, or temperature changes. This ion movement is essential for many physiological processes, including electrical signaling, neurotransmission, muscle contraction, and maintenance of resting membrane potential. Ion channels can be categorized based on their activation mechanisms, ion selectivity, and structural features. Dysfunction of ion channels can lead to various diseases, making them important targets for drug development.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "soybeans" are not a medical term. They are a type of legume that is commonly used in agriculture and food production. The medical community might discuss soybeans in the context of nutrition or allergies, but there isn't a formal medical definition for this term.

Here's some general information: Soybeans, scientifically known as Glycine max, are native to East Asia and are now grown worldwide. They are a significant source of plant-based protein and oil. Soybeans contain various nutrients, including essential amino acids, fiber, B vitamins, and minerals like calcium, iron, magnesium, and zinc. They are used in various food products such as tofu, soy milk, tempeh, and miso. Additionally, soybeans are also used in the production of industrial products, including biodiesel, plastics, and inks. Some people may have allergic reactions to soybeans or soy products.

Mecamylamine is a non-competitive antagonist at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. It is primarily used in the treatment of hypertension (high blood pressure) that is resistant to other medications, although it has been largely replaced by newer drugs with fewer side effects.

Mecamylamine works by blocking the action of acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter that activates nicotinic receptors and plays a role in regulating blood pressure. By blocking these receptors, mecamylamine can help to reduce blood vessel constriction and lower blood pressure.

It is important to note that mecamylamine can have significant side effects, including dry mouth, dizziness, blurred vision, constipation, and difficulty urinating. It may also cause orthostatic hypotension (a sudden drop in blood pressure when standing up), which can increase the risk of falls and fractures in older adults. As a result, mecamylamine is typically used as a last resort in patients with severe hypertension who have not responded to other treatments.

Mollusca is not a medical term per se, but a major group of invertebrate animals that includes snails, clams, octopuses, and squids. However, medically, some mollusks can be relevant as they can act as vectors for various diseases, such as schistosomiasis (transmitted by freshwater snails) and fascioliasis (transmitted by aquatic snails). Therefore, a medical definition might describe Mollusca as a phylum of mostly marine invertebrates that can sometimes play a role in the transmission of certain infectious diseases.

Bacterial proteins are a type of protein that are produced by bacteria as part of their structural or functional components. These proteins can be involved in various cellular processes, such as metabolism, DNA replication, transcription, and translation. They can also play a role in bacterial pathogenesis, helping the bacteria to evade the host's immune system, acquire nutrients, and multiply within the host.

Bacterial proteins can be classified into different categories based on their function, such as:

1. Enzymes: Proteins that catalyze chemical reactions in the bacterial cell.
2. Structural proteins: Proteins that provide structural support and maintain the shape of the bacterial cell.
3. Signaling proteins: Proteins that help bacteria to communicate with each other and coordinate their behavior.
4. Transport proteins: Proteins that facilitate the movement of molecules across the bacterial cell membrane.
5. Toxins: Proteins that are produced by pathogenic bacteria to damage host cells and promote infection.
6. Surface proteins: Proteins that are located on the surface of the bacterial cell and interact with the environment or host cells.

Understanding the structure and function of bacterial proteins is important for developing new antibiotics, vaccines, and other therapeutic strategies to combat bacterial infections.

Photometry is the measurement and study of light, specifically its brightness or luminous intensity. In a medical context, photometry is often used in ophthalmology to describe diagnostic tests that measure the amount and type of light that is perceived by the eye. This can help doctors diagnose and monitor various eye conditions and diseases, such as cataracts, glaucoma, and retinal disorders. Photometry may also be used in other medical fields, such as dermatology, to evaluate the effects of different types of light on skin conditions.

Metabolomics is a branch of "omics" sciences that deals with the comprehensive and quantitative analysis of all metabolites, which are the small molecule intermediates and products of metabolism, in a biological sample. It involves the identification and measurement of these metabolites using various analytical techniques such as mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The resulting data provides a functional readout of the physiological state of an organism, tissue or cell, and can be used to identify biomarkers of disease, understand drug action and toxicity, and reveal new insights into metabolic pathways and regulatory networks.

"Random allocation," also known as "random assignment" or "randomization," is a process used in clinical trials and other research studies to distribute participants into different intervention groups (such as experimental group vs. control group) in a way that minimizes selection bias and ensures the groups are comparable at the start of the study.

In random allocation, each participant has an equal chance of being assigned to any group, and the assignment is typically made using a computer-generated randomization schedule or other objective methods. This process helps to ensure that any differences between the groups are due to the intervention being tested rather than pre-existing differences in the participants' characteristics.

Oxotremorine is a muscarinic receptor agonist, which means it binds to and activates muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. These receptors are found in the central and peripheral nervous system and are involved in various physiological functions, including cognition, motivation, reward, motor control, and sensory processing.

Oxotremorine is primarily used in research settings to study the role of muscarinic receptors in different physiological processes and diseases. It has been shown to produce effects similar to those caused by natural neurotransmitter acetylcholine, such as increased salivation, sweating, and gastrointestinal motility.

In addition, oxotremorine has been investigated for its potential therapeutic use in the treatment of various neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and schizophrenia. However, its clinical use is limited due to its side effects, such as nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal cramps.

Tubocurarine is a type of neuromuscular blocking agent, specifically a non-depolarizing skeletal muscle relaxant. It works by competitively binding to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors at the motor endplate, thereby preventing the binding of acetylcholine and inhibiting muscle contraction. Tubocurarine is derived from the South American curare plant and has been used in anesthesia to facilitate intubation and mechanical ventilation during surgery. However, its use has largely been replaced by newer, more selective agents due to its potential for histamine release and cardiovascular effects.

Animal disease models are specialized animals, typically rodents such as mice or rats, that have been genetically engineered or exposed to certain conditions to develop symptoms and physiological changes similar to those seen in human diseases. These models are used in medical research to study the pathophysiology of diseases, identify potential therapeutic targets, test drug efficacy and safety, and understand disease mechanisms.

The genetic modifications can include knockout or knock-in mutations, transgenic expression of specific genes, or RNA interference techniques. The animals may also be exposed to environmental factors such as chemicals, radiation, or infectious agents to induce the disease state.

Examples of animal disease models include:

1. Mouse models of cancer: Genetically engineered mice that develop various types of tumors, allowing researchers to study cancer initiation, progression, and metastasis.
2. Alzheimer's disease models: Transgenic mice expressing mutant human genes associated with Alzheimer's disease, which exhibit amyloid plaque formation and cognitive decline.
3. Diabetes models: Obese and diabetic mouse strains like the NOD (non-obese diabetic) or db/db mice, used to study the development of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, respectively.
4. Cardiovascular disease models: Atherosclerosis-prone mice, such as ApoE-deficient or LDLR-deficient mice, that develop plaque buildup in their arteries when fed a high-fat diet.
5. Inflammatory bowel disease models: Mice with genetic mutations affecting intestinal barrier function and immune response, such as IL-10 knockout or SAMP1/YitFc mice, which develop colitis.

Animal disease models are essential tools in preclinical research, but it is important to recognize their limitations. Differences between species can affect the translatability of results from animal studies to human patients. Therefore, researchers must carefully consider the choice of model and interpret findings cautiously when applying them to human diseases.

S100 calcium binding protein G, also known as calgranulin A or S100A8, is a member of the S100 family of proteins. These proteins are characterized by their ability to bind calcium ions and play a role in intracellular signaling and regulation of various cellular processes.

S100 calcium binding protein G forms a heterodimer with S100 calcium binding protein B (S100A9) and is involved in the inflammatory response, immune function, and tumor growth and progression. The S100A8/A9 heterocomplex has been shown to play a role in neutrophil activation and recruitment, as well as the regulation of cytokine production and cell proliferation.

Elevated levels of S100 calcium binding protein G have been found in various inflammatory conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn's disease, and psoriasis, as well as in several types of cancer, including breast, lung, and colon cancer. Therefore, it has been suggested that S100 calcium binding protein G may be a useful biomarker for the diagnosis and prognosis of these conditions.

Bethanechol compounds are a type of cholinergic agent used in medical treatment. They are parasympathomimetic drugs, which means they mimic the actions of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine at muscarinic receptors. Specifically, bethanechol compounds stimulate the muscarinic receptors in the smooth muscle of the bladder and gastrointestinal tract, increasing tone and promoting contractions.

Bethanechol is primarily used to treat urinary retention and associated symptoms, such as those that can occur after certain types of surgery or with conditions like spinal cord injury or multiple sclerosis. It works by helping the bladder muscle contract, which can promote urination.

It's important to note that bethanechol should be used with caution, as it can have various side effects, including sweating, increased salivation, flushed skin, and gastrointestinal symptoms like nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea. It may also interact with other medications, so it's crucial to discuss any potential risks with a healthcare provider before starting this treatment.

The caudate nucleus is a part of the brain located within the basal ganglia, a group of structures that are important for movement control and cognition. It has a distinctive C-shaped appearance and plays a role in various functions such as learning, memory, emotion, and motivation. The caudate nucleus receives inputs from several areas of the cerebral cortex and sends outputs to other basal ganglia structures, contributing to the regulation of motor behavior and higher cognitive processes.

Butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) is an enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of esters of choline, including butyrylcholine and acetylcholine. It is found in various tissues throughout the body, including the liver, brain, and plasma. BChE plays a role in the metabolism of certain drugs and neurotransmitters, and its activity can be inhibited by certain chemicals, such as organophosphate pesticides and nerve agents. Elevated levels of BChE have been found in some neurological disorders, while decreased levels have been associated with genetic deficiencies and liver disease.

Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD) is a term used to describe a range of effects that can occur in an individual whose mother drank alcohol during pregnancy. These effects may include physical, mental, and behavioral abnormalities, and can vary in severity and combination from one individual to another.

The four diagnostic categories within FASD are:

1. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS): This is the most severe form of FASD and is characterized by a specific pattern of facial features, growth deficiencies, and central nervous system dysfunction.
2. Partial Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (pFAS): This category includes individuals who have some, but not all, of the features of FAS.
3. Alcohol-Related Neurodevelopmental Disorder (ARND): This category includes individuals who have functional or cognitive impairments due to prenatal alcohol exposure, but do not meet the criteria for FAS or pFAS.
4. Alcohol-Related Birth Defects (ARBD): This category includes individuals who have physical birth defects due to prenatal alcohol exposure.

It is important to note that FASD is a completely preventable condition, and there is no known safe amount or safe time to drink alcohol during pregnancy.

Chloromercuribenzoates are organic compounds that contain a mercury atom bonded to a benzene ring and a chlorine atom. They are primarily used in research as reagents for the determination of various chemical properties, such as the presence of certain functional groups or the ability to act as a reducing agent.

The compound is typically prepared by reacting mercuric chloride with a benzoic acid derivative, resulting in the formation of a mercury-carbon bond. The presence of the mercury atom makes these compounds highly reactive and useful for chemical analysis. However, due to their toxicity and environmental persistence, they are not used in clinical or industrial settings.

Protein Kinase C (PKC) is a family of serine-threonine kinases that play crucial roles in various cellular signaling pathways. These enzymes are activated by second messengers such as diacylglycerol (DAG) and calcium ions (Ca2+), which result from the activation of cell surface receptors like G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs).

Once activated, PKC proteins phosphorylate downstream target proteins, thereby modulating their activities. This regulation is involved in numerous cellular processes, including cell growth, differentiation, apoptosis, and membrane trafficking. There are at least 10 isoforms of PKC, classified into three subfamilies based on their second messenger requirements and structural features: conventional (cPKC; α, βI, βII, and γ), novel (nPKC; δ, ε, η, and θ), and atypical (aPKC; ζ and ι/λ). Dysregulation of PKC signaling has been implicated in several diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

Osmosis is a physiological process in which solvent molecules move from an area of lower solute concentration to an area of higher solute concentration, through a semi-permeable membrane, with the goal of equalizing the solute concentrations on the two sides. This process occurs naturally and is essential for the functioning of cells and biological systems.

In medical terms, osmosis plays a crucial role in maintaining water balance and regulating the distribution of fluids within the body. For example, it helps to control the flow of water between the bloodstream and the tissues, and between the different fluid compartments within the body. Disruptions in osmotic balance can lead to various medical conditions, such as dehydration, swelling, and electrolyte imbalances.

Ganglionic blockers are a type of medication that blocks the activity of the ganglia, which are clusters of nerve cells located outside the central nervous system. These medications work by blocking the transmission of nerve impulses between the ganglia and the effector organs they innervate, such as muscles or glands.

Ganglionic blockers were once used in the treatment of various conditions, including hypertension (high blood pressure), peptic ulcers, and certain types of pain. However, their use has largely been abandoned due to their significant side effects, which can include dry mouth, blurred vision, constipation, difficulty urinating, and dizziness or lightheadedness upon standing.

There are two main types of ganglionic blockers: nicotinic and muscarinic. Nicotinic ganglionic blockers block the action of acetylcholine at nicotinic receptors in the ganglia, while muscarinic ganglionic blockers block the action of acetylcholine at muscarinic receptors in the ganglia.

Examples of ganglionic blockers include trimethaphan, hexamethonium, and pentolinium. These medications are typically administered intravenously in a hospital setting due to their short duration of action and potential for serious side effects.

Motor neurons are specialized nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord that play a crucial role in controlling voluntary muscle movements. They transmit electrical signals from the brain to the muscles, enabling us to perform actions such as walking, talking, and swallowing. There are two types of motor neurons: upper motor neurons, which originate in the brain's motor cortex and travel down to the brainstem and spinal cord; and lower motor neurons, which extend from the brainstem and spinal cord to the muscles. Damage or degeneration of these motor neurons can lead to various neurological disorders, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA).

Parenteral infusions refer to the administration of fluids or medications directly into a patient's vein or subcutaneous tissue using a needle or catheter. This route bypasses the gastrointestinal tract and allows for rapid absorption and onset of action. Parenteral infusions can be used to correct fluid and electrolyte imbalances, administer medications that cannot be given orally, provide nutritional support, and deliver blood products. Common types of parenteral infusions include intravenous (IV) drips, IV push, and subcutaneous infusions. It is important that parenteral infusions are administered using aseptic technique to reduce the risk of infection.

Medically, "milk" is not defined. However, it is important to note that human babies are fed with breast milk, which is the secretion from the mammary glands of humans. It is rich in nutrients like proteins, fats, carbohydrates (lactose), vitamins and minerals that are essential for growth and development.

Other mammals also produce milk to feed their young. These include cows, goats, and sheep, among others. Their milk is often consumed by humans as a source of nutrition, especially in dairy products. However, the composition of these milks can vary significantly from human breast milk.

Enzyme activation refers to the process by which an enzyme becomes biologically active and capable of carrying out its specific chemical or biological reaction. This is often achieved through various post-translational modifications, such as proteolytic cleavage, phosphorylation, or addition of cofactors or prosthetic groups to the enzyme molecule. These modifications can change the conformation or structure of the enzyme, exposing or creating a binding site for the substrate and allowing the enzymatic reaction to occur.

For example, in the case of proteolytic cleavage, an inactive precursor enzyme, known as a zymogen, is cleaved into its active form by a specific protease. This is seen in enzymes such as trypsin and chymotrypsin, which are initially produced in the pancreas as inactive precursors called trypsinogen and chymotrypsinogen, respectively. Once they reach the small intestine, they are activated by enteropeptidase, a protease that cleaves a specific peptide bond, releasing the active enzyme.

Phosphorylation is another common mechanism of enzyme activation, where a phosphate group is added to a specific serine, threonine, or tyrosine residue on the enzyme by a protein kinase. This modification can alter the conformation of the enzyme and create a binding site for the substrate, allowing the enzymatic reaction to occur.

Enzyme activation is a crucial process in many biological pathways, as it allows for precise control over when and where specific reactions take place. It also provides a mechanism for regulating enzyme activity in response to various signals and stimuli, such as hormones, neurotransmitters, or changes in the intracellular environment.

Ionic liquids are not a medical term, but rather a term used in the field of chemistry and physics. They refer to salts that exist in the liquid state at temperatures below 100 degrees Celsius. Ionic liquids are composed entirely of ions and have unique properties such as low volatility, high thermal stability, and good conductivity, making them useful in various applications including chemical reactions, energy storage, and biomedical devices. However, they do not have a direct relation to medical definitions or healthcare.

In the context of medical research, "methods" refers to the specific procedures or techniques used in conducting a study or experiment. This includes details on how data was collected, what measurements were taken, and what statistical analyses were performed. The methods section of a medical paper allows other researchers to replicate the study if they choose to do so. It is considered one of the key components of a well-written research article, as it provides transparency and helps establish the validity of the findings.

P-Chloromercuribenzoic acid (CMB) is not primarily considered a medical compound, but rather an organic chemical one. However, it has been used in some medical research and diagnostic procedures due to its ability to bind to proteins and enzymes. Here's the chemical definition:

P-Chloromercuribenzoic acid (CMB) is an organomercury compound with the formula C6H4ClHgO2. It is a white crystalline powder, soluble in water, and has a melting point of 208-210 °C. It is used as a reagent to study protein structure and function, as it can react with sulfhydryl groups (-SH) in proteins, forming a covalent bond and inhibiting their activity. This property has been exploited in various research and diagnostic applications. However, due to its toxicity and environmental concerns related to mercury, its use is now limited and regulated.

"Formulated food" is a term used in the field of clinical nutrition to refer to foods that are specially manufactured and designed to meet the nutritional needs of specific patient populations. These foods often come in the form of shakes, bars, or pouches and are intended to be used as a sole source or supplementary source of nutrition for individuals who have difficulty meeting their nutritional needs through traditional food sources alone.

Formulated foods may be indicated for patients who have medical conditions that affect their ability to eat or digest regular food, such as dysphagia (swallowing difficulties), malabsorption syndromes, or chronic inflammatory bowel disease. They may also be used in patients who require additional nutritional support during times of illness, injury, or recovery from surgery.

Formulated foods are typically designed to provide a balance of macronutrients (carbohydrates, proteins, and fats) and micronutrients (vitamins and minerals) that meet the recommended dietary intakes for specific patient populations. They may also contain additional ingredients such as fiber, probiotics, or other nutraceuticals to provide additional health benefits.

It is important to note that formulated foods should only be used under the guidance of a healthcare professional, such as a registered dietitian or physician, to ensure that they are appropriate for an individual's specific medical and nutritional needs.

Isoenzymes, also known as isoforms, are multiple forms of an enzyme that catalyze the same chemical reaction but differ in their amino acid sequence, structure, and/or kinetic properties. They are encoded by different genes or alternative splicing of the same gene. Isoenzymes can be found in various tissues and organs, and they play a crucial role in biological processes such as metabolism, detoxification, and cell signaling. Measurement of isoenzyme levels in body fluids (such as blood) can provide valuable diagnostic information for certain medical conditions, including tissue damage, inflammation, and various diseases.

Piperidines are not a medical term per se, but they are a class of organic compounds that have important applications in the pharmaceutical industry. Medically relevant piperidines include various drugs such as some antihistamines, antidepressants, and muscle relaxants.

A piperidine is a heterocyclic amine with a six-membered ring containing five carbon atoms and one nitrogen atom. The structure can be described as a cyclic secondary amine. Piperidines are found in some natural alkaloids, such as those derived from the pepper plant (Piper nigrum), which gives piperidines their name.

In a medical context, it is more common to encounter specific drugs that belong to the class of piperidines rather than the term itself.

Nerve Growth Factors (NGFs) are a family of proteins that play an essential role in the growth, maintenance, and survival of certain neurons (nerve cells). They were first discovered by Rita Levi-Montalcini and Stanley Cohen in 1956. NGF is particularly crucial for the development and function of the peripheral nervous system, which connects the central nervous system to various organs and tissues throughout the body.

NGF supports the differentiation and survival of sympathetic and sensory neurons during embryonic development. In adults, NGF continues to regulate the maintenance and repair of these neurons, contributing to neuroplasticity – the brain's ability to adapt and change over time. Additionally, NGF has been implicated in pain transmission and modulation, as well as inflammatory responses.

Abnormal levels or dysfunctional NGF signaling have been associated with various medical conditions, including neurodegenerative diseases (e.g., Alzheimer's and Parkinson's), chronic pain disorders, and certain cancers (e.g., small cell lung cancer). Therefore, understanding the role of NGF in physiological and pathological processes may provide valuable insights into developing novel therapeutic strategies for these conditions.

Electrophysiology is a branch of medicine that deals with the electrical activities of the body, particularly the heart. In a medical context, electrophysiology studies (EPS) are performed to assess abnormal heart rhythms (arrhythmias) and to evaluate the effectiveness of certain treatments, such as medication or pacemakers.

During an EPS, electrode catheters are inserted into the heart through blood vessels in the groin or neck. These catheters can record the electrical activity of the heart and stimulate it to help identify the source of the arrhythmia. The information gathered during the study can help doctors determine the best course of treatment for each patient.

In addition to cardiac electrophysiology, there are also other subspecialties within electrophysiology, such as neuromuscular electrophysiology, which deals with the electrical activity of the nervous system and muscles.

I'd be happy to help! However, it seems there might be a slight confusion in your question. Hydrocarbons and iodinated compounds are two different types of chemical substances.

Hydrocarbons refer to organic compounds consisting entirely of hydrogen and carbon atoms. They can be categorized into several types, such as alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, and aromatic hydrocarbons, based on their structure and properties.

On the other hand, iodinated compounds are organic or inorganic molecules containing iodine atoms. These compounds have various applications, especially in medical imaging and therapy, such as radioactive iodine therapy for thyroid cancer and the use of iodinated contrast agents in X-ray and CT scans.

There isn't a specific category called "iodinated hydrocarbons" since hydrocarbons don't inherently contain iodine. However, it is possible to create molecules that combine both hydrocarbon structures and iodine atoms. An example of such a compound would be iodinated alkanes, where iodine atoms replace some hydrogen atoms in an alkane molecule.

So, if you're looking for a medical definition related to iodinated compounds, I can provide that. If you meant something else, please let me know!

Procaine is a local anesthetic drug that is used to reduce the feeling of pain in a specific area of the body. It works by blocking the nerves from transmitting painful sensations to the brain. Procaine is often used during minor surgical procedures, dental work, or when a patient needs to have a wound cleaned or stitched up. It can also be used as a diagnostic tool to help determine the source of pain.

Procaine is administered via injection directly into the area that requires anesthesia. The effects of procaine are relatively short-lived, typically lasting between 30 minutes and two hours, depending on the dose and the individual's metabolism. Procaine may also cause a brief period of heightened sensory perception or euphoria following injection, known as "procaine rush."

It is important to note that procaine should only be administered by trained medical professionals, as improper use can lead to serious complications such as allergic reactions, respiratory depression, and even death.

The myocardium is the middle layer of the heart wall, composed of specialized cardiac muscle cells that are responsible for pumping blood throughout the body. It forms the thickest part of the heart wall and is divided into two sections: the left ventricle, which pumps oxygenated blood to the rest of the body, and the right ventricle, which pumps deoxygenated blood to the lungs.

The myocardium contains several types of cells, including cardiac muscle fibers, connective tissue, nerves, and blood vessels. The muscle fibers are arranged in a highly organized pattern that allows them to contract in a coordinated manner, generating the force necessary to pump blood through the heart and circulatory system.

Damage to the myocardium can occur due to various factors such as ischemia (reduced blood flow), infection, inflammation, or genetic disorders. This damage can lead to several cardiac conditions, including heart failure, arrhythmias, and cardiomyopathy.

Reference values, also known as reference ranges or reference intervals, are the set of values that are considered normal or typical for a particular population or group of people. These values are often used in laboratory tests to help interpret test results and determine whether a patient's value falls within the expected range.

The process of establishing reference values typically involves measuring a particular biomarker or parameter in a large, healthy population and then calculating the mean and standard deviation of the measurements. Based on these statistics, a range is established that includes a certain percentage of the population (often 95%) and excludes extreme outliers.

It's important to note that reference values can vary depending on factors such as age, sex, race, and other demographic characteristics. Therefore, it's essential to use reference values that are specific to the relevant population when interpreting laboratory test results. Additionally, reference values may change over time due to advances in measurement technology or changes in the population being studied.

Radiopharmaceuticals are defined as pharmaceutical preparations that contain radioactive isotopes and are used for diagnosis or therapy in nuclear medicine. These compounds are designed to interact specifically with certain biological targets, such as cells, tissues, or organs, and emit radiation that can be detected and measured to provide diagnostic information or used to destroy abnormal cells or tissue in therapeutic applications.

The radioactive isotopes used in radiopharmaceuticals have carefully controlled half-lives, which determine how long they remain radioactive and how long the pharmaceutical preparation remains effective. The choice of radioisotope depends on the intended use of the radiopharmaceutical, as well as factors such as its energy, range of emission, and chemical properties.

Radiopharmaceuticals are used in a wide range of medical applications, including imaging, cancer therapy, and treatment of other diseases and conditions. Examples of radiopharmaceuticals include technetium-99m for imaging the heart, lungs, and bones; iodine-131 for treating thyroid cancer; and samarium-153 for palliative treatment of bone metastases.

The use of radiopharmaceuticals requires specialized training and expertise in nuclear medicine, as well as strict adherence to safety protocols to minimize radiation exposure to patients and healthcare workers.

1,2-Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) is a type of phospholipid molecule that is a major component of the lipid bilayer in biological membranes, particularly in lung surfactant. It is composed of two palmitic acid chains attached to a glycerol backbone, which is linked to a phosphate group and a choline headgroup. The chemical formula for DPPC is C44H86NO8P.

In the body, DPPC plays an important role in maintaining the structure and function of cell membranes, as well as reducing surface tension in the lungs. It is also used in research and medical settings as a component of liposomes, which are used for drug delivery and other biomedical applications.

I'd be happy to help! However, I believe there might be a slight misunderstanding in your question. Mitochondria are organelles found in the cells of all complex living organisms, including humans, while the liver is a large, solid organ located in the upper right portion of the abdomen. They don't have a medical definition together. I can certainly provide you with separate definitions for each:

1. Mitochondria: These are double-membrane-bound cellular organelles that generate most of the chemical energy needed to power the cell's biochemical reactions. Commonly known as the "powerhouse of the cell," mitochondria convert organic substrates, such as glucose, fatty acids, and amino acids, into adenosine triphosphate (ATP) through a process called oxidative phosphorylation. Mitochondria are dynamic structures that can change their shape, size, and number through fission (division) and fusion (merging) processes. They play essential roles in various cellular functions, including calcium signaling, apoptosis (programmed cell death), and the regulation of cellular metabolism.

2. Liver: The liver is a large, lobulated organ that lies mainly in the upper right portion of the abdominal cavity, just below the diaphragm. It plays a crucial role in various physiological functions, such as detoxification, protein synthesis, metabolism, and nutrient storage. The liver is responsible for removing toxins from the bloodstream, producing bile to aid in digestion, regulating glucose levels, synthesizing plasma proteins, and storing glycogen, vitamins, and minerals. It also contributes to the metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, and amino acids, helping maintain energy homeostasis in the body.

I hope this clarifies any confusion! If you have any further questions or need more information, please don't hesitate to ask.

Aging is a complex, progressive and inevitable process of bodily changes over time, characterized by the accumulation of cellular damage and degenerative changes that eventually lead to increased vulnerability to disease and death. It involves various biological, genetic, environmental, and lifestyle factors that contribute to the decline in physical and mental functions. The medical field studies aging through the discipline of gerontology, which aims to understand the underlying mechanisms of aging and develop interventions to promote healthy aging and extend the human healthspan.

In the context of medical and biological sciences, a "binding site" refers to a specific location on a protein, molecule, or cell where another molecule can attach or bind. This binding interaction can lead to various functional changes in the original protein or molecule. The other molecule that binds to the binding site is often referred to as a ligand, which can be a small molecule, ion, or even another protein.

The binding between a ligand and its target binding site can be specific and selective, meaning that only certain ligands can bind to particular binding sites with high affinity. This specificity plays a crucial role in various biological processes, such as signal transduction, enzyme catalysis, or drug action.

In the case of drug development, understanding the location and properties of binding sites on target proteins is essential for designing drugs that can selectively bind to these sites and modulate protein function. This knowledge can help create more effective and safer therapeutic options for various diseases.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Carcinoma, Ehrlich Tumor" is not a recognized medical term or a valid medical definition. The term "Ehrlich tumor" is sometimes used to refer to a type of transplantable tumor that was first developed by the German physician Paul Ehrlich in the early 20th century for cancer research purposes. However, it's important to note that this type of tumor is not a naturally occurring cancer and is typically used only in laboratory experiments.

Carcinoma, on the other hand, is a medical term that refers to a type of cancer that starts in cells that line the inner or outer surfaces of organs. Carcinomas can develop in various parts of the body, including the lungs, breasts, colon, and skin.

If you have any specific questions about cancer or a particular medical condition, I would be happy to try to help answer them for you.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "picolines" is not a term commonly used in medical definitions. It is a term that refers to a group of chemical compounds known as methylated benzenes or xylenols. They have some industrial uses, but they are not typically relevant in the context of medical definitions or healthcare. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health concerns, I'd be happy to try and help with those instead!

Prostatic secretory proteins are a group of proteins that are produced and secreted by the prostate gland, which is a small gland that is part of the male reproductive system. These proteins play an important role in maintaining the health and function of the reproductive system.

One of the most well-known prostatic secretory proteins is prostate-specific antigen (PSA), which is often used as a biomarker for the early detection and monitoring of prostate cancer. PSA is a protein that is produced by the cells in the prostate gland and is normally found in low levels in the blood. However, when the prostate gland becomes enlarged or cancerous, the levels of PSA in the blood can increase, making it possible to detect these conditions through a simple blood test.

Other prostatic secretory proteins include prostate-specific acid phosphatase (PSAP), prostatein, and prolactin-inducible protein (PIP). These proteins are also produced by the prostate gland and have various functions, such as helping to liquefy semen and protecting sperm from the immune system.

It is important to note that while these proteins can provide valuable information about the health of the prostate gland, they are not foolproof indicators of disease. Other factors, such as age, inflammation, and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), can also affect the levels of these proteins in the blood. Therefore, it is important to consult with a healthcare professional for proper interpretation and follow-up care.

Tetraethylammonium compounds refer to chemical substances that contain the tetraethylammonium cation (N(C2H5)4+). This organic cation is derived from tetraethylammonium hydroxide, which in turn is produced by the reaction of ethyl alcohol with ammonia and then treated with a strong acid.

Tetraethylammonium compounds are used in various biomedical research applications as they can block certain types of ion channels, making them useful for studying neuronal excitability and neurotransmission. However, these compounds have also been associated with toxic effects on the nervous system and other organs, and their use is therefore subject to strict safety regulations.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but there is no established medical or scientific definition for "Vitamin U." The term was used in the past to refer to a substance found in cabbage juice that seemed to help ulcers, but it's not recognized as a vitamin by modern nutrition standards. It's often referred to as methylmethionine or S-methylmethionine, which is a compound derived from the amino acid methionine. Please consult with a healthcare professional for medical advice.

Amino acids are organic compounds that serve as the building blocks of proteins. They consist of a central carbon atom, also known as the alpha carbon, which is bonded to an amino group (-NH2), a carboxyl group (-COOH), a hydrogen atom (H), and a variable side chain (R group). The R group can be composed of various combinations of atoms such as hydrogen, oxygen, sulfur, nitrogen, and carbon, which determine the unique properties of each amino acid.

There are 20 standard amino acids that are encoded by the genetic code and incorporated into proteins during translation. These include:

1. Alanine (Ala)
2. Arginine (Arg)
3. Asparagine (Asn)
4. Aspartic acid (Asp)
5. Cysteine (Cys)
6. Glutamine (Gln)
7. Glutamic acid (Glu)
8. Glycine (Gly)
9. Histidine (His)
10. Isoleucine (Ile)
11. Leucine (Leu)
12. Lysine (Lys)
13. Methionine (Met)
14. Phenylalanine (Phe)
15. Proline (Pro)
16. Serine (Ser)
17. Threonine (Thr)
18. Tryptophan (Trp)
19. Tyrosine (Tyr)
20. Valine (Val)

Additionally, there are several non-standard or modified amino acids that can be incorporated into proteins through post-translational modifications, such as hydroxylation, methylation, and phosphorylation. These modifications expand the functional diversity of proteins and play crucial roles in various cellular processes.

Amino acids are essential for numerous biological functions, including protein synthesis, enzyme catalysis, neurotransmitter production, energy metabolism, and immune response regulation. Some amino acids can be synthesized by the human body (non-essential), while others must be obtained through dietary sources (essential).

Deficiency diseases are a group of medical conditions that occur when an individual's diet lacks essential nutrients, such as vitamins and minerals. These diseases develop because the body needs these nutrients to function correctly, and without them, various bodily functions can become impaired, leading to disease.

Deficiency diseases can manifest in many different ways, depending on which nutrient is lacking. For example:

* Vitamin A deficiency can lead to night blindness and increased susceptibility to infectious diseases.
* Vitamin C deficiency can result in scurvy, a condition characterized by fatigue, swollen gums, joint pain, and anemia.
* Vitamin D deficiency can cause rickets in children, a disease that leads to weakened bones and skeletal deformities.
* Iron deficiency can result in anemia, a condition in which the blood lacks adequate healthy red blood cells.

Preventing deficiency diseases involves eating a balanced diet that includes a variety of foods from all the major food groups. In some cases, supplements may be necessary to ensure adequate nutrient intake, especially for individuals who have restricted diets or medical conditions that affect nutrient absorption.

A phenotype is the physical or biochemical expression of an organism's genes, or the observable traits and characteristics resulting from the interaction of its genetic constitution (genotype) with environmental factors. These characteristics can include appearance, development, behavior, and resistance to disease, among others. Phenotypes can vary widely, even among individuals with identical genotypes, due to differences in environmental influences, gene expression, and genetic interactions.

... can also be produced by the CDP-choline route, cytosolic choline kinases (CK) phosphorylate choline with ATP to ... Choline forms various salts, for example choline chloride and choline bitartrate. Choline is a quaternary ammonium cation. The ... "Total choline" is defined as the sum of free choline and choline-containing phospholipids, without accounting for mass fraction ... which forms in the metabolism of choline. Rich dietary sources of choline and choline phospholipids include organ meats, egg ...
Other names in common use include choline oxidase, choline-cytochrome c reductase, choline:(acceptor) oxidoreductase, and ... In enzymology, a choline dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.99.1) is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction choline + acceptor ⇌ {\ ... Gadda G, McAllister-Wilkins EE (2003). "Cloning, Expression, and Purification of Choline Dehydrogenase from the Moderate ... Ebisuzaki K, Williams JN (1955). "Preparation and partial purification of soluble choline dehydrogenase from liver mitochondria ...
Other commercial choline salts are choline hydroxide and choline bitartrate. In foodstuffs, the compound is often present as ... Choline chloride is a white, water-soluble salt used mainly in animal feed. In the laboratory, choline can be prepared by ... title=Johnson Matthey Process Technology - Choline chloride licensed process "Choline chloride" (PDF). Screening Information ... Choline chloride is an organic compound with the formula [(CH3)3NCH2CH2OH]+Cl−. It is a quaternary ammonium salt, consisting of ...
... (also known as CK, ChoK and choline phosphokinase) is an enzyme which catalyzes the first reaction in the ... Choline kinase α can act as a protein chaperone. Kinase can function as chaperone and there may be other kinases that may ... Choline kinase α (CKα) is overexpressed in prostate cancer where it physically interacts with the androgen receptor (AR), a ... Choline kinase requires magnesium ions (+2) as a cofactor for this reaction. This enzyme belongs to the family of transferases ...
... (INN), also known as oxtriphylline, is a cough medicine derived from xanthine that acts as a ... Chemically, it is a salt of choline and theophylline. It classifies as an expectorant.[citation needed] The drug is available ...
Structure of choline acetyltransferase binding sites Crystal structure of choline ion bound in choline acetyltransferase. Side ... Choline is bound in the active site of ChAT by non-covalent interactions between the positively charged amine of choline and ... In humans, the choline acetyltransferase enzyme is encoded by the CHAT gene. Choline acetyltransferase was first described by ... The choline substrate fits into a pocket in the interior of ChAT, while acetyl-CoA fits into a pocket on the surface of the ...
In enzymology, a choline monooxygenase (EC 1.14.15.7) is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction choline + O2 + 2 ... "The endogenous choline supply limits glycine betaine synthesis in transgenic tobacco expressing choline monooxygenase". Plant J ... "Glycine betaine synthesis in transgenic tobacco expressing choline monooxygenase is limited by the endogenous choline supply". ... Brouquisse R, Weigel P, Rhodes D, Yocum CF, Hanson AD (1989). "Evidence for a ferredoxin-dependent choline monooxygenase from ...
... forms an ionic liquid. The cation of this salt, choline, occurs in nature in living beings. Choline hydroxide ... Choline hydroxide is an organic compound with the chemical formula [(CH3)3NCH2CH2OH]+OH−. It is also known as choline base. It ... Choline hydroxide is a quaternary ammonium salt, consisting of choline cations ([(CH3)3NCH2CH2OH]+) and hydroxide anions (OH ... Choline hydroxide irritates skin, eyes and respiratory system. It can cause serious injuries to the eyes. Causes serious skin ...
In enzymology, a choline oxidase (EC 1.1.3.17) is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction choline + O2 ⇌ {\displaystyle ... "The trimethylammonium headgroup of choline is a major determinant for substrate binding and specificity in choline oxidase". ... Fan F, Gadda G (2005). "On the catalytic mechanism of choline oxidase". J. Am. Chem. Soc. 127 (7): 2067-74. doi:10.1021/ ... The systematic name of this enzyme class is choline:oxygen 1-oxidoreductase. This enzyme participates in glycine, serine, and ...
... choline (2R,3R)-bitartrate or choline L-(+)-bitartrate. Choline bitartrate is a choline salt of tartaric acid. Choline ... Choline Bitartrate , Choline Tartrate; Choline Hydrogen Tartrate; Choline Tartrate (1:1); 2-Hydroxy-N,N,N-trimethyl- ... Choline bitartrate is flammable. Upon catching a fire, choline bitartrate may release toxic gases, like carbon monoxide (CO), ... When choline bitartrate is used appropriately, hazardous effects are unlikely to occur. "Choline bitartrate". pubchem.ncbi.nlm. ...
The enzyme choline-sulfatase (EC 3.1.6.6) catalyzes the reaction choline sulfate + H2O ⇌ {\displaystyle \rightleftharpoons } ... The systematic name is choline-sulfate sulfohydrolase. Takebe I (September 1961). "Isolation and characterization of a new ... choline + sulfate This enzyme belongs to the family of hydrolases, specifically those acting on sulfuric ester bonds. ... enzyme choline sulfatase". Journal of Biochemistry. 50 (3): 245-55. PMID 13919191. Portal: Biology v t e (EC 3.1.6, Enzymes of ...
This enzyme is also called choline sulphokinase. This enzyme participates in sulfur metabolism. Orsi BA, Spencer B. "Choline ... choline sulfate Thus, the two substrates of this enzyme are 3'-phosphoadenylyl sulfate and choline, whereas its two products ... In enzymology, a choline sulfotransferase (EC 2.8.2.6) is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction 3'-phosphoadenylyl ... The systematic name of this enzyme class is 3'-phosphoadenylyl-sulfate:choline sulfotransferase. ...
The choline uptake does not change upon the alkalinization of the extracellular medium. Moreover, it was found that the choline ... The choline absorption decreases majorly as a result of the membrane depolarization by the potassium ions. The choline uptake ... Neurons get their choline by specific protein transporters known as choline transporters. In the human brain microvascular ... The first system is known as the Choline transporter-like protein 1, or CTL1. The second system is the Choline transporter-like ...
Carbon-11 choline has found more success in cancer systems imaging. Choline is a precursor for the synthesis of phospholipids. ... Carbon-11 choline is the basis of medical imaging technologies. Because of its involvement in biologic processes, choline is ... Furthermore, because of the low choline uptake in healthy brain tissue, carbon-11 choline was found to be a superior PET tracer ... One of the first uses of carbon-11 choline in PET imaging examined Alzheimer's disease patients. Choline is the precursor to ...
Most other cells will phosphorylate choline by the enzyme choline kinase, the first committed step of CDP-choline pathway. ... Under normal circumstances, choline kinase is not the rate-limiting step of the CDP-choline pathway. However in rapidly ... Choline kinase (CK) is a cytosolic protein that catalyzes the following reaction:: 418 choline + ATP ⇌ phosphocholine + ADP In ... The uptake of choline is accomplished predominantly by the high-affinity, sodium dependent choline transporter (CHT) and ...
Other names in common use include phosphorylcholine transferase, CDP-choline pyrophosphorylase, CDP-choline synthetase, choline ... Choline-phosphate cytidylyltransferase (EC 2.7.7.15) is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction CTP + choline phosphate ... CDP-choline where the two substrates of this enzyme are CTP and choline phosphate, and the two products are diphosphate and CDP ... Williams-Ashman HG, Banks J (1956). "Participation of cytidine coenzymes in the metabolism of choline by seminal vesicles". J. ...
The systematic name of this enzyme class is 1-O-(4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxycinnamoyl)-beta-D-glucose:choline 1-O-(4-hydroxy-3,5- ... In enzymology, a sinapoylglucose---choline O-sinapoyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.91) is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical ... the two substrates of this enzyme are 1-O-sinapoyl-beta-D-glucose and choline, whereas its two products are D-glucose and ... reaction 1-O-sinapoyl-beta-D-glucose + choline ⇌ {\displaystyle \rightleftharpoons } D-glucose + sinapoylcholine Thus, ...
... (MBF) is an extremely potent nicotinic agonist. It has powerful ganglion stimulating effects. It ... AMBACHE, N; ROBERTSON, PA (June 1953). "The nicotine-like actions of the 3-bromo-and 3:5-dibromo-phenyl ethers of choline (MBF ... HEY, P (March 1952). "On relationships between structure and nicotine-like stimulant activity in choline esters and ethers". ...
... is a protein that in humans is encoded by the SLC44A4 gene. Solute carrier family ... O'Regan S, Traiffort E, Ruat M, Cha N, Compaore D, Meunier FM (Mar 2000). "An electric lobe suppressor for a yeast choline ... Traiffort E, Ruat M, O'Regan S, Meunier FM (Feb 2005). "Molecular characterization of the family of choline transporter-like ...
"Impaired trafficking of choline transporter-like protein-1 at plasma membrane and inhibition of choline transport in THP-1 ... "Differential expression and regulation of the high-affinity choline transporter CHT1 and choline acetyltransferase in neurons ... Choline transporter-like protein 1 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the SLC44A1 gene. Papillary glioneuronal tumors ... Traiffort E, Ruat M, O'Regan S, Meunier FM (March 2005). "Molecular characterization of the family of choline transporter-like ...
The glucose-methanol-choline (GMC) oxidoreductases are FAD flavoproteins oxidoreductases. These enzymes include a variety of ... In molecular biology, the glucose-methanol-choline oxidoreductase family (GMC oxidoreductase) is a family of enzymes with ... proteins; choline dehydrogenase (CHD) EC 1.1.99.1, methanol oxidase (MOX) EC 1.1.3.13 and cellobiose dehydrogenase EC 1.1.99.18 ...
... is a protein that in humans is encoded by the SLC44A2 gene. Solute carrier family GRCh38: ... O'Regan S, Traiffort E, Ruat M, Cha N, Compaore D, Meunier FM (Mar 2000). "An electric lobe suppressor for a yeast choline ... Traiffort E, Ruat M, O'Regan S, Meunier FM (Feb 2005). "Molecular characterization of the family of choline transporter-like ... 2004). "Identification and characterization of choline transporter-like protein 2, an inner ear glycoprotein of 68 and 72 kDa ...
In enzymology, a 1-alkenyl-2-acylglycerol choline phosphotransferase (EC 2.7.8.22) is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical ... The systematic name of this enzyme class is CDP-choline:1-alkenyl-2-acylglycerol cholinephosphotransferase. This enzyme is also ... Wientzek M, Man RY, Choy PC (1987). "Choline glycerophospholipid biosynthesis in the guinea pig heart". Biochem. Cell Biol. 65 ... the two substrates of this enzyme are CDP-choline and 1-alkenyl-2-acylglycerol, whereas its two products are CMP and ...
Choline; Copper sulphate; Licorice; Nicotinamide; Pyridoxine; Riboflavin; Thiamine ""Vad är egentligen ett läkemedel?" - ...
Although many animal products, like liver and egg, contain high amounts of choline (355 mg/3 oz and 126 mg/large egg, ... Some news reports presented vegan diets as deficient in choline following an opinion piece in the BMJ by a nutritionist ... "Clearing Up Choline Confusion". Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine. Retrieved 2021-05-09. Vegan Nutritional Support ... To increase vitamin production, it is supplemented with sugar beet molasses, or, less frequently, with choline. Certain brands ...
Choline intakes from food for men, women and children may be below the Adequate Intake levels. Women, especially when pregnant ... Choline is an essential nutrient and its primary function within the human body is the synthesis of cellular membranes, ... Choline deficiencies may be related to some liver and neurological disorders. Because of its role in cellular synthesis, ... Beef liver, wheat germ, and egg yolks are common foods providing choline. B vitamins, also known as the B-complex, are an ...
... and other foods that contain high levels of choline. Choline is an essential nutrient so complete elimination of choline is ... It's best to check the choline content of food and the portion size for a better understanding of how much choline is being ... "Choline : USDA ARS". www.ars.usda.gov. Retrieved 2022-09-19. Bouchemal N, Ouss L, Brassier A, Barbier V, Gobin S, Hubert L, de ... Note, the RDI for choline is 450-550mg and most typical diets fall below this value, so an excessive amount of precursor is ...
Abbreviations: Cl = Choline; Ca = Calcium; Fe = Iron; Mg = Magnesium; P = Phosphorus; K = Potassium; Na = Sodium; Zn = Zinc; Cu ...
Abbreviations: Cl = Choline; Ca = Calcium; Fe = Iron; Mg = Magnesium; P = Phosphorus; K = Potassium; Na = Sodium; Zn = Zinc; Cu ...
ChAT functions to transfer an acetyl group from acetyl co-enzyme A to choline in the synapses of nerve cells and exists in two ... Choline acetyltransferase (also known as ChAT or CAT) is an important enzyme which produces the neurotransmitter acetylcholine ... Strauss WL, Kemper RR, Jayakar P, Kong CF, Hersh LB, Hilt DC, Rabin M (Feb 1991). "Human choline acetyltransferase gene maps to ... "Choline O-Acetyltransferase". GeneCards: The Human Gene Compendium. Weizmann Institute of Science. Retrieved 5 December 2013. ...
Choline can also be produced by the CDP-choline route, cytosolic choline kinases (CK) phosphorylate choline with ATP to ... Choline forms various salts, for example choline chloride and choline bitartrate. Choline is a quaternary ammonium cation. The ... "Total choline" is defined as the sum of free choline and choline-containing phospholipids, without accounting for mass fraction ... which forms in the metabolism of choline. Rich dietary sources of choline and choline phospholipids include organ meats, egg ...
... is a phosphocholines (CHEBI:36700) CDP-choline (CHEBI:16436) is conjugate base of CDP-choline(1+) ( ... CDP-choline (CHEBI:16436) has functional parent CDP (CHEBI:17239) CDP-choline (CHEBI:16436) has role Saccharomyces cerevisiae ... CDP-choline (CHEBI:16436) has role psychotropic drug (CHEBI:35471) CDP-choline (CHEBI:16436) is a nucleotide-(amino alcohol)s ( ... CDP-choline (CHEBI:16436) has role human metabolite (CHEBI:77746) CDP-choline (CHEBI:16436) has role mouse metabolite (CHEBI: ...
... is a sn-glycerol 3-phosphates (CHEBI:26706) choline alfoscerate (CHEBI:16870) is a ... choline alfoscerate (CHEBI:16870) has role Escherichia coli metabolite (CHEBI:76971) choline alfoscerate (CHEBI:16870) has role ... choline alfoscerate (CHEBI:16870) has role human metabolite (CHEBI:77746) choline alfoscerate (CHEBI:16870) has role mouse ... choline alfoscerate (CHEBI:16870) has role neuroprotective agent (CHEBI:63726) choline alfoscerate (CHEBI:16870) has role ...
Choline Magnesium Trisalicylate: learn about side effects, dosage, special precautions, and more on MedlinePlus ... Before taking choline magnesium trisalicylate,. *tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to choline magnesium ... Choline magnesium trisalicylate comes as a tablet and a liquid to take by mouth. It is usually taken one to three times a day. ... Take choline magnesium trisalicylate exactly as directed. Do not take more or less of it or take it more often than prescribed ...
Choline during pregnancy impacts childrens sustained attention. Cornell University. DOI. 10.1096/fj.202101217R. Keywords. * / ... Choline - found in egg yolks, lean red meat, fish, poultry, legumes, nuts and cruciferous vegetables - is absent from most ... In the Cornell study, all women consumed a prepared diet with a specified amount of choline throughout the third trimester of ... One half of these women consumed 480 mg choline per day, which slightly exceeds the recommended adequate intake (AI) level of ...
Upon oral or parenteral administration, CDP-choline releases its two principle components, c … ... CDP-choline or citicoline, is an essential intermediate in the biosynthetic pathway of the structural phospholipids of cell ... Upon oral or parenteral administration, CDP-choline releases its two principle components, cytidine and choline. When ... CDP-choline: pharmacological and clinical review Methods Find Exp Clin Pharmacol. 1995 Oct:17 Suppl B:1-54. ...
Products on this website are not for sale to persons under the age of 18. Products should be used as directed on the label or by your health professional. Not recommended for pregnant or nursing women. Consult with a physician before use if you have a serious medical condition or use prescription medications. All trademarks and copyrights are property of their respective owners and are not affiliated with nor do they endorse a specific product. These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. Products sold here are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. Individual results will vary. By using this site you agree to follow the Privacy Policy and all Terms & Conditions published on this site. Void Where Prohibited By Law.. ...
We previously showed that CD4,sup,+,/sup, T lymphocytes that express choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), which catalyzes the synt ... Blood pressure regulation by CD4+ lymphocytes expressing choline acetyltransferase Nat Biotechnol. 2016 Oct;34(10):1066-1071. ... We previously showed that CD4+ T lymphocytes that express choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), which catalyzes the synthesis of ...
Piracetam, Choline & Cannabis. 2020 Mar 25. Like Moisturiser for the Mind. the kiwi. Piracetam, Choline, Selegiline, ...
... you really dont hear that much about choline. Grouped within... ... In fact, choline is a chemical precursor to the valuable ... Choline, as an ingredient, is no doubt involved in the consistent surge of nutritional supplements on the market. It has been ... However, it took 132 more years for the Food and Nutrition Board of the Institute of Medicine to decide that choline was, ... However, choline and the supplements that contain the essential nutrient are good precautionary measures against disease and/or ...
Then I read somewhere that some people cannot metabolize choline very well. An overdose of choline causes a fishy/weird smell. ... I noticed when I ate foods high in choline (egg yolks for instance), the next few days my sweat smelled horrible and fishy. ... Then I read somewhere that some people cannot metabolize choline very well. An overdose of choline causes a fishy/weird smell. ... Choline causing body odor? retinoid 12 years ago 1,986 End Constipation Now. Let oxygen remove old, impacted fecal matter as it ...
Get the best prices on Cholodin choline and phosphatidylcholine dietary supplements today from Vet Depot. No Cholodin coupons ... Cholodin Canine Guaranteed Analysis (per chewable tablet): Zinc 7.2 mg, Selenium 0.02 mg, DL-Methionine 55 mg, Choline 40 mg, ... Their combination of choline and other vitamins, minerals, and amino acids help maintain and restore aging bodies and minds. ... Choline Loading Nutritional Supplements. Cholodin Canine and Cholodin-FEL are dietary supplements. They are designed with the ...
... or CDP-choline), choline citrate, and alpha glycerylphosphoryl choline (alpha-GPC). Although supplements must list their ... as there are many forms of choline from which to choose, including phosphatidylcholine (from soy lecithin), citicoline ( ... amounts of these ingredients, few list the amounts of choline they provide. ... Cytidine Choline, Complementary Prescriptions CDP Choline, Jarrow Formulas Alpha GPC, Perque Choline Citrate, PipingRock.com ...
Read NOW Foods Choline & Inositol reviews from M&S Customers. ... NOW Foods Choline & Inositol on sale now at Muscle & Strength! ... NOW Foods Choline & Inositol 500 mg, Nervous System Health*. Choline and inositol are members of the B-vitamin family. Choline ... NOW Foods Choline & Inositol is a good supplement. Works well. Highly recommended.* ... SUPPORTS HEALTHY NERVE TRANSMISSION*: Choline is necessary for normal synaptic transmission, brain health, and fatty acid ...
We showed previously that NMDA releases choline and inhibits incorporation of [3H]choline into phosphatidylcholine before ... CDP-choline (B), and PtdCho (C) was measured at different times after the addition of NMDA. Phosphocholine, CDP-choline, and ... whereas cept1 codes for a dual-specificity choline-ethanolaminephosphotransferase that can use both CDP-choline and CDP- ... Accumulation of CDP-choline and CDP-ethanolamine precede NMDA-evoked membrane damage and cell death. PI is excluded by the ...
Shop for Country Life Choline (100 Tablets) at Pick n Save. Find quality health products to add to your Shopping List or order ... In its natural state, choline is commonly found in whole eggs and fatty meats. If these are excluded from your diet, consider ... adding choline. It supports nerve development and the metabolism of cholesterol.. *These statements have not been evaluated by ...
Choline bitartrate is a chemical compound that is formed by the combination of choline (an essential nutrient) and salt of ... Choline bitartrate is available in three different type choline l-bitartrate, choline d-bitartrate, and choline dl-bitartrate. ... It is known by different names such as choline bitartrate, choline chloride, choline citrate, and many other. Choline ... As choline is related to vitamin-B12 and Folate, it plays very essential roles in the body. Choline bitartrate has the anti- ...
By itself, choline elicited nicotine-like actions commensurate with its promotion of cholinergic neurotransmission. When given ... in combination with nicotine, choline protected some regions from damage but worsened nicotines effects in other regions. ... Choline supplementation was supplied by inclusion of choline in apple juice so as to raise the intake five-fold above the ... Using that approach, the decrease in cardiac values in animals given choline or nicotine+choline was significant (p,0.05 and , ...
Does Dietary Choline Contribute to Heart Disease?. Does Dietary Choline Contribute to Heart Disease?. April 13, 2011. By ... I would get choline from food, unless you have some condition that choline might treat in higher doses, in which case Id use ... John M, you can make up for choline by getting more B6, B12, folate, and betaine. If you supplement with choline, I would, in ... I can get one 650mg tablet of Choline Citrate which supposedly has 221mg of actual Choline. I would be interested in your ...
choline. <. >", "path": "https://www.womensrunning.com/health/food/eggs-healthy-or-not/", "listing_type": "archive", "location ...
This naturally occurring compound helps to promote healthy brain metabolism by stimulating the production of acetyl-choline, ...
The Role of Choline Many dreamers take their pills alongside choline. While choline is generally obtained from natural food as ... There are several different types of choline available, such as choline bitartrate, choline-CDP and alpha-GPC. ... Though many pills for lucid dreaming contain choline - to be honest the jury is out as to whether it makes a difference at all ... Lucid Dream Pills: Galantamine, Huperzine-A and Choline. By Chris Hammond. Explore our free lucid dreaming course. ...
This product contains crystalline inositol and choline bound to tartaric acid. Product Label Serving Size: 2 capsules Amount ... Inositol Choline and Inositol help maintain cellular efficiency, proper nerve function and metabolism of fats and HDL (good) ... Decrease quantity for Choline & Inositol 100 capsules Increase quantity for Choline & Inositol 100 capsules ... Choline & Inositol. Choline and Inositol help maintain cellular efficiency, proper nerve function and metabolism of fats and ...
... G-Biosciences Immobilized p-Aminophenyl Phosphoryl Choline consists of a ... G-Biosciences Immobilized p-Aminophenyl Phosphoryl Choline consists of a phosphoryl choline covalently linked to beaded ... More economical Immobilized O-Phosphorylethanolamine, an alternative to Immobilized p-Aminophenyl Phosphoryl Choline is also ...
Adequate choline and DHA intakes are not being met by the vast majority of US adults, and even more so by women of child- ... Choline and DHA play a significant role in infant brain and eye development, with inadequate intakes leading to visual and ... Emerging findings illustrate synergistic interactions between choline and DHA, indicating that insufficient intakes of one or ... The aim of this review is to highlight current insights into the roles of choline and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in maternal ...
... is a preferred form of choline derived directly from lecithin. ... A source of Choline that supports healthy liver function as ... Natural Factors Phosphatidyl Choline 420mg (90 Softgels). CAD $18.97. Phosphatidyl Choline (also referred to as ... Home / Shop / Vitamins and Minerals / Choline Vitamin Supplements / Natural Factors Phosphatidyl Choline 420mg (90 Softgels). ... Product Code: NF2605 Categories: Choline Vitamin Supplements, Vitamins and Minerals Tags: brain health, Cellular health, ...
The essential nutrient choline may mitigate some of these impairments, as suggested by data in humans and trophoblast cell ... Choline is a precursor for several molecules with crucial roles during pregnancy: the methyl donor betaine, the ... Demand for one-carbon (methyl) nutrients, including choline, folate, and vitamin B-12, is high during pregnancy when cells of ... MCS increased the active form of vitamin B-12 in pregnant women; genetic variants that increase choline requirements were also ...
Following a washout period of 2 weeks without consuming any choline-containing foods, subjects were randomly allocated to ... provided by eggs versus a choline bitartrate (CB) supplement on the gut microbiota, trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) formation, ... consume either three eggs/d or a CB supplement for 4 weeks (both diets had a choline equivalent of 400 mg/day). DNA was ... We previously demonstrated that intake of three eggs/d for 4 weeks increased plasma choline and decreased inflammation in ...
Choline Bitartrate*Chromium (Chromium HVP Chelate)*Copper (Copper Citrate)*Folic Acid*Inositol*Iodine (Potassium Iodide)* ... Tablets; Oral; Beta-Carotene (Provitamin A) 334 units; Biotin 25 mcg; Calcium (Calcium Carbonate) 275 mg; Choline Bitartrate 10 ...
  • Choline forms various salts, for example choline chloride and choline bitartrate. (wikipedia.org)
  • Using Galantamine with choline bitartrate or Alpha-GPC is thought, by many, to improve the chances of becoming lucid. (nutralegacy.com)
  • Choline bitartrate is a chemical compound that is formed by the combination of choline (an essential nutrient) and salt of tartaric acid. (sbwire.com)
  • It is known by different names such as choline bitartrate, choline chloride, choline citrate, and many other. (sbwire.com)
  • Choline bitartrate has a better rate of absorption than pure choline. (sbwire.com)
  • Choline bitartrate is available in three different type choline l-bitartrate, choline d-bitartrate, and choline dl-bitartrate. (sbwire.com)
  • Choline bitartrate is used in the various health-related problem. (sbwire.com)
  • Choline bitartrate is also used in the infant formula which is boosting the demand for the product. (sbwire.com)
  • Choline bitartrate is used to treat various health-related problems such as liver diseases, asthma, neural tube defects. (sbwire.com)
  • Choline bitartrate is also used to cure cirrhosis and chronic hepatitis, Alzheimer's disease, memory loss, depression, and dementia. (sbwire.com)
  • Choline bitartrate has the anti-inflammatory property which helps in protecting the heart and also it is great for post-menopausal women. (sbwire.com)
  • Due to the various health benefits of choline bitartrate the demand is escalating among the consumer which have a significant impact on the choline bitartrate market. (sbwire.com)
  • So, by these factors, it is expected that the demand for choline bitartrate would be high in the near future. (sbwire.com)
  • Growing consumer's health awareness is boosting the demand for choline bitartrate globally. (sbwire.com)
  • Since choline bitartrate is used in healthcare to treat various diseases and also it is used as a dietary supplement. (sbwire.com)
  • Choline bitartrate is also used in the animal feed. (sbwire.com)
  • So, new and existing manufacturers of choline bitartrate could focus on manufacturing choline bitartrate for poultry and animal feed as there is a lucrative demand for the feed products in this sector. (sbwire.com)
  • Also, the growing dietary supplement and infant formula market is expected to boost the demand for choline bitartrate market in the coming years. (sbwire.com)
  • Bound to the above factors, it is expected that the choline bitartrate market will grow positive during the forecast period. (sbwire.com)
  • Globally among all region, the largest producer of choline bitartrate is North America owing to the more number of chemical and pharmaceutical industry in the United States. (sbwire.com)
  • Other major producers of choline bitartrate are Europe, Asia Pacific. (sbwire.com)
  • In Europe, Belgium and Germany are the major producers of choline bitartrate. (sbwire.com)
  • In Asia Pacific Japan, China and India are the largest producers of choline bitartrate. (sbwire.com)
  • Consumption of choline bitartrate is global. (sbwire.com)
  • There are several different types of choline available, such as choline bitartrate, choline-CDP and alpha-GPC. (world-of-lucid-dreaming.com)
  • The purpose of the current study was to further explore the effects of phosphatidylcholine (PC) provided by eggs versus a choline bitartrate (CB) supplement on the gut microbiota, trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) formation, and plasma carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin in MetS. (mdpi.com)
  • Choline supplement prices Basic choline or choline bitartrate costs from six to 19 cents a pill. (arq.br)
  • Nested Naturals Choline is made from 500 mgs of pure choline bitartrate. (nestednaturals.com)
  • DR.VEGAN Choline capsules are formulated with the most bioavailable form of choline, bitartrate, designed to support healthy liver function and metabolism. (plantx.uk)
  • These capsules contain the most bioavailable form of Choline (Bitartrate) to be gentle on the stomach. (plantx.uk)
  • Dietary requirements can be met by choline by itself or in the form of choline phospholipids, such as phosphatidylcholine. (wikipedia.org)
  • The cost of obtaining a 100 mg dose of choline ranged from just 12 cents to $1.15 across the products, with large differences in cost even among products containing the same form of choline. (consumerlab.com)
  • Choline chloride and choline stearate led to the production of large amounts of trimethylamine, but lecithin (phosphatidylcholine), the main form of choline found in food, led to only a small increase. (westonaprice.org)
  • Phosphatidyl Choline (also referred to as phosphatidylcholine) is a preferred form of choline derived directly from lecithin. (feelgoodnatural.com)
  • Learn more about Citicoline uses, effectiveness, possible side effects, interactions, dosage, user ratings and products that contain Citicoline Alpha GPC uridine monophosphate is a highly bioavailable form of Choline. (arq.br)
  • Choline is an essential nutrient for humans and many other animals. (wikipedia.org)
  • Choline is not formally classified as a vitamin despite being an essential nutrient with an amino acid-like structure and metabolism. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, it took 132 more years for the Food and Nutrition Board of the Institute of Medicine to decide that choline was, indeed, an essential nutrient - one with great homeopathic potential. (nutralegacy.com)
  • However, choline and the supplements that contain the essential nutrient are good precautionary measures against disease and/or general deficiency. (nutralegacy.com)
  • White Plains, New York, February 3, 2017 - Choline is an essential nutrient important for liver and brain function. (consumerlab.com)
  • This ongoing research has been instrumental in the Institute of Medicine's decision to elevate choline to the status of an essential nutrient for humans -- particularly pregnant and nursing women, the scientists said. (kateva.org)
  • Choline, on the other hand, is an essential nutrient that's needed to produce acetylcholine, as well as other brain-related compounds like phosphatidylcholine. (iseqh.org)
  • They note that choline is an essential nutrient and that we need about 500 milligrams daily [3]. (arq.br)
  • Found naturally in many non-vegan foods, DR. VEGAN's Choline 600mg Capsules effectively provide this essential nutrient without compromising your vegan lifestyle. (plantx.uk)
  • A PEMT enzyme moves three methyl groups from three S-adenosyl methionines (SAM) donors to the ethanolamine group of the phosphatidylethanolamine to form choline in the form of a phosphatidylcholine. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cytidine 5'-diphosphocholine, CDP-choline or citicoline, is an essential intermediate in the biosynthetic pathway of the structural phospholipids of cell membranes, especially in that of phosphatidylcholine. (nih.gov)
  • Choline and phosphatidylcholine are particularly beneficial elements of Cholodin supplements. (vetdepot.com)
  • Unfortunately, choosing a choline supplement can be confusing, as there are many forms of choline from which to choose, including phosphatidylcholine (from soy lecithin), citicoline (or CDP-choline), choline citrate, and alpha glycerylphosphoryl choline (alpha-GPC). (consumerlab.com)
  • Choline supplement quality ratings and comparisons are now available in ConsumerLab.com's Choline Supplements (Including Phosphatidylcholine, CDP-Choline, and Alpha-GPC) Review ( https://www.consumerlab.com/reviews/choline-review/choline/ ). (consumerlab.com)
  • We showed previously that NMDA releases choline and inhibits incorporation of [ 3 H]choline into phosphatidylcholine before excitotoxic neuronal death. (jneurosci.org)
  • Exposure of cortical neurons to neurotoxic concentrations of NMDA increased extracellular choline and activated hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylinositol by phospholipase A 2 but did not induce significant degradation of phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylethanolamine, or phosphatidylserine. (jneurosci.org)
  • These results show that membrane damage by NMDA is preceded by inhibition of phospholipid synthesis and not by phospholipid degradation in the early stages of the excitotoxic process, and that NMDA receptor overactivation decreases phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine synthesis by inhibiting choline-ethanolaminophosphotransferase activity. (jneurosci.org)
  • The authors argue that dietary choline, found mostly as phosphatidylcholine, enters the intestine where our gut bacteria convert it to free choline and then to trimethylamine, a gas that smells like rotting fish. (westonaprice.org)
  • Studies in humans have shown that neither phosphatidylcholine nor choline-rich foods produce detectable increases in trimethylamine. (westonaprice.org)
  • They found that 60 percent of free choline and 30 percent of carnitine, another potential precursor, was excreted in the urine as one of these two products, but that neither betaine nor phosphatidylcholine converted to either product at all. (westonaprice.org)
  • If Iâ m ever in need of choline, my go-to is either CDP choline or alpha GPC and there isnâ t much reason to use soy lecithin (as a source of phosphatidylcholine). (arq.br)
  • Choline is required to produce acetylcholine - a neurotransmitter - and S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), a universal methyl donor. (wikipedia.org)
  • We previously showed that CD4 + T lymphocytes that express choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), which catalyzes the synthesis of the vasorelaxant acetylcholine, relay neural signals. (nih.gov)
  • Unsurprisingly, choline can also be found in the neurotransmitter, acetylcholine. (nutralegacy.com)
  • While choline is generally obtained from natural food as part of a healthy diet, the theory goes that supplementing your choline levels even further helps to maximise Acetylcholine levels in the brain - and further potentiate the effects of the AChE Inhibitor. (world-of-lucid-dreaming.com)
  • As a source of Choline, CDP Choline is able to raise the levels of acetylcholine in the brain, this is important because the supplement acts as an essential neurotransmitter for synaptic plasticity and learning. (ultramedsglobal.com)
  • After the compound crosses the blood-brain barrier it is absorbed as CDP Choline where it's used and absorbed through the Acetylcholine receptors which are responsible for thought and memory creation. (ultramedsglobal.com)
  • So, if Alpha GPC and Choline both help to increase acetylcholine levels, why not take them together? (iseqh.org)
  • Alpha GPC and Choline are both precursors to acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter that plays a key role in memory, focus, and learning. (iseqh.org)
  • 2008). Choline is a water-soluble nootropic which is the precursor molecule for the acetylcholine neurotransmitter, which is used for memory and muscle control. (arq.br)
  • Choline is a molecule mostly used for either its cognitive boosting properties (turning into acetylcholine, the learning neurotransmitter) or as a liver health agent, able to reduce fatty liver buildup. (arq.br)
  • The components responsible for cholinergic neurotransmission, such as choline acetyltransferase, vesicular acetylcholine transporter, nicotinic and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, and acetylcholine esterase, have long been defined as functional units and then identified as molecular entities. (elsevierpure.com)
  • Another essential component in the cholinergic synapses is the one responsible for choline uptake from the synaptic cleft, which is thought to be the rate-limiting step in acetylcholine synthesis. (elsevierpure.com)
  • Choline is a water soluble nutrient which acts as a precursor to the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. (limitlessmindset.com)
  • According to Harvard Health Publishing, choline helps the brain create acetylcholine, a protein that plays a role in memory and overall cognitive ability 1 . (nestednaturals.com)
  • In addition to improving offspring attention and memory throughout life, maternal choline supplementation in rodents has proven to be neuroprotective for the offspring by mitigating the cognitive adversities caused by prenatal stress, fetal alcohol exposure, autism, epilepsy, Down syndrome and Alzheimer's disease. (eurekalert.org)
  • These findings parallel the effects of maternal choline supplementation and deprivation in rodents, using a closely analogous sustained attention task. (eurekalert.org)
  • By demonstrating that maternal choline supplementation in humans produces offspring attentional benefits that are similar to those seen in animals," Strupp said, "our findings suggest that the full range of cognitive and neuroprotective benefits demonstrated in rodents may also be seen in humans. (eurekalert.org)
  • That study demonstrated that maternal choline supplementation improved information processing speed throughout the first year of life in these same children. (eurekalert.org)
  • Few studies with human subjects have evaluated the effect of maternal choline supplementation and this is the first study to follow the children to school age. (eurekalert.org)
  • By showing that the beneficial effects of prenatal supplementation endure into childhood, these findings illustrate a role for prenatal choline in programming the course of child cognitive development," Canfield said. (eurekalert.org)
  • The Duke group is part of a national team of scientists who are exploring the benefits of prenatal choline supplementation on learning and memory. (kateva.org)
  • For nootropic purposes, as mentioned before, the real reason weâ re interested in choline supplementation is that we want to ensure that our brain has the optimal amounts of the â ¦ In the logistic regression models predicting high depression levels, no significant associations were found for either separate choline quintiles or trend through the choline quintiles. (arq.br)
  • CDP-Choline is able to increase neural concentrations to a greater degree than choline itself, and supplementation of CDP-Choline also confers a second supplement with cognitive benefits. (arq.br)
  • Choline supplementation may be beneficial in supporting central nervous system structures involved in learning, logical thinking and concentration abilities. (nestednaturals.com)
  • Choline supplementation supports healthy memory, focus and mental clarity. (nestednaturals.com)
  • Choline has historically been produced from natural sources, such as via hydrolysis of lecithin. (wikipedia.org)
  • Similarly, there is a large reserve of anecdotal evidence showing that choline and soy lecithin can help relieve nursing mothers from plugged milk ducts. (nutralegacy.com)
  • Alpha GPC (L-Alpha Glycerylphosphorylcholine) is a choline source derived from soy or sunflower lecithin. (arq.br)
  • But, to craft this vital molecule, our brain cells need a steady supply of a humble nutrient called choline. (adeeva.com)
  • Choline is a nutrient that has been associated with better brain functioning, memory, and even a higher IQ. (ultramedsglobal.com)
  • The important nutrient choline "super-charged" the brains of animals that received supplements in utero, making their cells larger and faster at firing electrical "signals" that release memory-forming chemicals, according to a new study. (kateva.org)
  • The implications for humans are profound, said the researchers, because the collective data on choline suggests that simply augmenting the diets of pregnant women with this one nutrient could affect their children's lifelong learning and memory. (kateva.org)
  • Choline is a naturally occurring nutrient found in egg yolks, milk, nuts, fish, liver and other meats as well as in human breast milk. (kateva.org)
  • Choline was officially recognized as a vital nutrient in 1998 by the Institute of Medicine (IOM). (arq.br)
  • Choline may not be a nutrient you look out for regularly, but it's fantastic for brain fog. (nestednaturals.com)
  • Choline is a rising star nutrient that is related to the B-vitamin family. (nestednaturals.com)
  • Speaking of genius, we like to think of Choline as the smarty pants nutrient. (nestednaturals.com)
  • Choline is a nutrient that is often grouped with B vitamins because it shares many similarities. (plantx.uk)
  • Likewise, Dr. Emily Deans has recently been writing about the role of choline in mental health , something I had covered in less detail in my 2007 article on pregnancy nutrition . (westonaprice.org)
  • Research has persistently unveiled the pivotal role of choline in safeguarding memory and cognitive function. (adeeva.com)
  • ITHACA, N.Y. -- Seven-year-old children performed better on a challenging task requiring sustained attention if their mothers consumed twice the recommended amount of choline during their pregnancy, a new Cornell study has found. (eurekalert.org)
  • The study, which compared these children with those whose mothers had consumed the recommended amount of choline, suggests that the recommended choline intake for expectant mothers does not fully meet the needs of the fetal brain. (eurekalert.org)
  • In the Cornell study, all women consumed a prepared diet with a specified amount of choline throughout the third trimester of pregnancy. (eurekalert.org)
  • Current recommendations - including those for pregnant women - were set in 1998 and are based on the amount of choline needed to prevent liver dysfunction in men, studies have shown. (eurekalert.org)
  • Although each of the tested supplements was found to be accurately labeled, the amount of choline in products ranged from just 50 mg to as much as 1,500 mg. (consumerlab.com)
  • It is required that you have the right amount of choline each day. (unlike.net)
  • Although supplements must list their amounts of these ingredients, few list the amounts of choline they provide - which can represent 14% to over 40% of the listed ingredient. (consumerlab.com)
  • To help consumers more knowledgably select products, ConsumerLab.com purchased ten popular choline supplements and tested their amounts of choline, compared their prices, and reviewed the clinical evidence for each form. (consumerlab.com)
  • They fed pregnant rats extra amounts of choline during a brief but critical window of pregnancy, then studied how their hippocampal neurons differed from those of control rats. (kateva.org)
  • We've demonstrated a measurable change in brain cells prompted by moderate amounts of choline given during a narrow window of prenatal development. (kateva.org)
  • Citicoline Sodium and Alpha GPC are two of the most popular nootropic supplements that are known to contain generous amounts of choline. (arq.br)
  • You might have heard of two popular nootropics - Alpha GPC and Choline. (iseqh.org)
  • And what better way to support your brain than by combining two powerful nootropics - Alpha GPC and Choline? (iseqh.org)
  • And among the most popular nootropics, Alpha GPC and Choline have gained much attention. (iseqh.org)
  • Alpha GPC and Choline: A Match Made in Nootropic Heaven? (iseqh.org)
  • As a nootropic enthusiast, you've probably heard of Alpha GPC and Choline. (iseqh.org)
  • Can You Take Alpha GPC and Choline Together? (iseqh.org)
  • As a nootropic expert, I get asked this question a lot: "Can you take Alpha GPC and Choline together? (iseqh.org)
  • But if you're looking to give your brain a boost, combining Alpha GPC and Choline could be a great place to start. (iseqh.org)
  • As with any supplement or medication, it's always a good idea to check with your doctor before taking Alpha GPC and Choline together. (iseqh.org)
  • Popular choline sources include: Alpha GPC. (arq.br)
  • Mid-range: For 22 to 32 cents a pill, you can find a range of choline supplements, including Alpha GPC or CDP-choline. (arq.br)
  • E10 chick sympathetic ganglion cells display a cell contact-dependent rise in choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) specific activity over the first several days in culture. (rupress.org)
  • Estrogen Receptor Immunoreactivity in the Adult Primate Brain: Neuronal Distribution and Association with p75, trkA, and Choline Acetyltransferase. (bvsalud.org)
  • Choline, as an ingredient, is no doubt involved in the consistent surge of nutritional supplements on the market. (nutralegacy.com)
  • It has also been said that choline supplements can reduce the risk of several ailments including heart disease, Alzheimer's disease and obesity. (nutralegacy.com)
  • VitaCholine is the #1 brand of choline found in supplements. (newhope.com)
  • The supplements of choline fall under the group of effective nootropic and they have the best of cognitive benefits to offer. (unlike.net)
  • You have some of the top rated choline sources and supplements. (unlike.net)
  • In fact, it would be best to select from the top rated choline sources and supplements . (unlike.net)
  • CDP Choline Supplements: How Do They Work? (ultramedsglobal.com)
  • By now you may have heard about the various benefits that CDP Choline supplements provide, but still, you might want to know more about the best Citicoline supplement. (ultramedsglobal.com)
  • Hopefully, the above article has helped in your knowledge about CDP Choline Supplements and will help you make the best decision when you have to purchase the best citicoline supplement. (ultramedsglobal.com)
  • Choline Supplements: What's the Best Form for Focus? (priceplow.com)
  • Choline supplements vary dramatically in strength and quality. (arq.br)
  • There are many dietary supplements for choline deficiency. (nestednaturals.com)
  • Choline is found in foods like meat, fish, and eggs, so it can be hard to obtain in a vegan diet without taking supplements. (plantx.uk)
  • Sign up for future Choline Citrate news! (priceplow.com)
  • Click the button below to sign up for future Choline Citrate news, deals, coupons, and reviews! (priceplow.com)
  • Description Description Serious Nutrition Solutions Choline Citrate 500 Grams Choline Citrate powder combines choline and citrate for optimal mental and physical performance. (priceplow.com)
  • This product contains crystalline inositol and choline bound to tartaric acid. (bayho.com)
  • Symptomatic choline deficiency causes non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and muscle damage. (wikipedia.org)
  • Inadequate choline may cause fatty liver disease and muscle damage. (consumerlab.com)
  • Choline is necessary for normal synaptic transmission, brain health, and fatty acid metabolism in the liver. (muscleandstrength.com)
  • Most recently, my article entitled "Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Silent Epidemic of Nutritional Imbalance" contained a major section on the role of dietary choline in protecting against fatty liver disease, which itself is a powerful and independent risk factor for heart disease. (westonaprice.org)
  • Choline-rich foods like liver and eggs did not produce any increase in urinary trimethylamine or TMAO over control levels. (westonaprice.org)
  • A source of Choline that supports healthy liver function as well as memory and concentration. (feelgoodnatural.com)
  • Choline contributes to homocysteine reduction, partially through its conversion to betaine in the liver. (adeeva.com)
  • Choline supports healthy brain function, helps move fats out of the liver and supports energy and fitness. (newhope.com)
  • However, many people, don't eat enough foods that are rich in DHA or choline, such as oil fish, seafood, liver and eggs. (vitalpharmacysupplies.com.au)
  • Choline plays a role in metabolism of these compounds in the liver, supporting healthy blood vessels and cardiovascular function. (nestednaturals.com)
  • A choline deficiency can lead to fatty liver diseases, cardiovascular disease, and liver diseases. (nestednaturals.com)
  • Excessive consumption of choline (greater than 7.5 grams per day) can cause low blood pressure, sweating, diarrhea and fish-like body smell due to trimethylamine, which forms in the metabolism of choline. (wikipedia.org)
  • CDP-choline activates the biosynthesis of structural phospholipids in the neuronal membranes, increases cerebral metabolism and acts on the levels of various neurotransmitters. (nih.gov)
  • This naturally occurring compound helps to promote healthy brain metabolism by stimulating the production of acetyl-choline, replenishing phospholipid content and regulating neuronal membrane excitability and osmolarity. (pureformulas.com)
  • Choline and Inositol help maintain cellular efficiency, proper nerve function and metabolism of fats and HDL (good) cholesterol. (bayho.com)
  • Choline is also a key component of cellular growth and our bodyâ s metabolism. (arq.br)
  • Choline as a supplement has shown potential benefit in stroke recovery, cognition, Alzheimer's disease, asthma, and ulcerative colitis. (consumerlab.com)
  • NOW Foods Choline & Inositol is a good supplement. (muscleandstrength.com)
  • Scientific research has revealed the outstanding benefits of phosphatidyl choline (PC) as a nutritional supplement. (feelgoodnatural.com)
  • In case you have deficiency of choline things can be corrected with the amount of external supplement contribution. (unlike.net)
  • Then it is important for you to have the same either in form of a supplement or you can even have choline by means of diet. (unlike.net)
  • Not all choline sources are effective and this is the reason you have to think to stack the supplement with other nootropic element. (unlike.net)
  • This substance is a nootropic, a brain enhancing supplement, and is an improved version of Choline. (ultramedsglobal.com)
  • Thatâ s why we examined brands to come up with this list of the choline supplement. (arq.br)
  • Choline supplement, in effect, may reverse such side effects. (arq.br)
  • Lack of effect of oral choline supplement on the concentrations of choline metabolites in human brain. (arq.br)
  • In a randomised crossâ over study on eight healthy males consuming five different intervention meals, including one highâ choline meal (564 mg) or a single dose of choline supplement (500 mg, as choline chloride), compared to a lowâ choline meal ( (arq.br)
  • Choline supplement prices. (arq.br)
  • Choline and Nootropic Dietary Supplement. (arq.br)
  • CDPâ Choline as a Biological Supplement During Neurorecovery: A Focused Review. (arq.br)
  • CDP Choline is a potent and cost effective way to supplement your choline intake. (limitlessmindset.com)
  • CDP Choline means Cytidine Diphosphate Choline but more commonly known as Citicoline. (ultramedsglobal.com)
  • The report also summarizes the clinical evidence for the different forms of choline, noting dosage, side-effects, and potential drug interactions. (consumerlab.com)
  • By contrast, other forms of choline travel to the colon where gut bacteria make enzymes that convert them to trimethylamine. (westonaprice.org)
  • The effects of choline are perfect and they are considered s wonder brain boosters. (unlike.net)
  • In the current study, the researchers explored the effects of choline on neurons in the hippocampus, a brain region that is critical for learning and memory. (kateva.org)
  • Biochemical studies on the brain effects of choline at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Boston University have complemented the Duke findings, Wilson said. (kateva.org)
  • You have some of the best and the popular sources of choline. (unlike.net)
  • Food Sources of Choline. (arq.br)
  • Choline - found in egg yolks, lean red meat, fish, poultry, legumes, nuts and cruciferous vegetables - is absent from most prenatal vitamins, and more than 90% of expectant mothers consume less than the recommended amount. (eurekalert.org)
  • Upon oral or parenteral administration, CDP-choline releases its two principle components, cytidine and choline. (nih.gov)
  • Once absorbed, the cytidine and choline disperse widely throughout the organism, cross the blood-brain barrier and reach the central nervous system (CNS), where they are incorporated into the phospholipid fraction of the membrane and microsomes. (nih.gov)
  • When the CDP compound is given independently, the cytidine and choline are provided by CDP-choline. (ultramedsglobal.com)
  • Their combination of choline and other vitamins, minerals, and amino acids help maintain and restore aging bodies and minds. (vetdepot.com)
  • Vegetables with pasta and rice also contribute to choline intake in the American diet. (wikipedia.org)
  • One half of these women consumed 480 mg choline per day, which slightly exceeds the recommended adequate intake (AI) level of 450 mg/day. (eurekalert.org)
  • The other half consumed a total intake of 930 mg choline per day, approximately double the AI level. (eurekalert.org)
  • The aim of this review is to highlight current insights into the roles of choline and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in maternal and infant nutrition, with special emphasis on dietary recommendations, gaps in dietary intake, and synergistic implications of both nutrients in infant brain and eye development. (mdpi.com)
  • We previously demonstrated that intake of three eggs/d for 4 weeks increased plasma choline and decreased inflammation in subjects with metabolic syndrome (MetS). (mdpi.com)
  • Yet, for most individuals, daily choline intake falls short of the recommendations set by health authorities. (adeeva.com)
  • High choline intake correlates with reduced WMH, shielding the brain from degeneration. (adeeva.com)
  • Opt for choline-rich foods, while simultaneously moderating saturated fat intake. (adeeva.com)
  • Health authorities recommend a daily choline intake of 550 mg for men, 425 mg for women, and elevated levels for pregnant and breastfeeding women. (adeeva.com)
  • A well known example is acetylcholinesterase (AChE, acetyl choline hydrolase, EC 3.1.1.7), the enzyme responsible for hydrolyzing the important neurotransmitter acetyl-choline (ACh). (cdc.gov)
  • In its natural state, choline is commonly found in whole eggs and fatty meats. (picknsave.com)
  • Buy 1 NOW Foods Choline & Inositol 100ct for only $6.99! (muscleandstrength.com)
  • Choline and inositol are members of the B-vitamin family. (muscleandstrength.com)
  • Both choline and inositol are essential components of all cell membranes. (muscleandstrength.com)
  • This is a Great price for choline and inositol. (muscleandstrength.com)
  • Enzymatic hydrolysis of membrane phospholipids by phospholipases produces these lipid second messengers, as well as soluble second messengers such as inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate, and also other molecules such as choline (Cho) that are released to the extracellular medium. (jneurosci.org)
  • I noticed when I ate foods high in choline (egg yolks for instance), the next few days my sweat smelled horrible and fishy. (curezone.com)
  • In humans, certain PEMT-enzyme mutations and estrogen deficiency (often due to menopause) increase the dietary need for choline. (wikipedia.org)
  • In plants, the first step in de novo biosynthesis of choline is the decarboxylation of serine into ethanolamine, which is catalyzed by a serine decarboxylase. (wikipedia.org)
  • In humans and most other animals, de novo synthesis of choline is via the phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PEMT) pathway, but biosynthesis is not enough to meet human requirements. (wikipedia.org)
  • Choline dehydrogenase catalyzes the oxidation of choline to glycine betaine via betaine aldehyde in glycine betaine biosynthesis. (scialert.net)
  • In this study, choline dehydrogenase ( betA ) gene encoding for glycine betaine biosynthesis in Escherichia coli isolated from salted shark ( Scoliodon sp. (scialert.net)
  • betaine biosynthesis is catalyzed by choline monooxygenase in combination with betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase. (scialert.net)
  • Choline dehydrogenase ( betA ) of E . coli catalyses the first step in glycine betaine biosynthesis, the oxidation of choline. (scialert.net)
  • Overall, we found that neurons in choline-exposed rats were more excitable, more robust in their physiologic response," said Wilkie Wilson, Ph.D., a Duke pharmacologist and member of the team at the Durham VAMC. (kateva.org)
  • A choline uptake system with a high affinity for choline has long been assumed to be present in cholinergic neurons. (elsevierpure.com)
  • In support of this hypothesis, the authors showed that blood levels of choline, its metabolic byproduct betaine, and TMAO all correlated with the incidence and severity of cardiovascular disease in humans, although this was not prospective data showing that the occurrence of these compounds in the blood early in life predicted the development of heart disease later in life. (westonaprice.org)
  • In E . coli , the biosynthetic pathway for the production of glycine betaine from choline has been well characterized at the genetic level ( Landfald and Strom, 1986 ). (scialert.net)
  • Choline is beneficial for brain health, intelligence and synaptic plasticity. (arq.br)
  • In most animals, choline phospholipids are necessary components in cell membranes, in the membranes of cell organelles, and in very low-density lipoproteins. (wikipedia.org)
  • Choline plays an important role in maintaining the structural integrity of cell membranes which aid in mental clarity, focus and concentration. (nestednaturals.com)
  • Humans are capable of some de novo synthesis of choline but require additional choline in the diet to maintain health. (wikipedia.org)
  • The synthesis of choline from ethanolamine may take place in three parallel pathways, where three consecutive N-methylation steps catalyzed by a methyl transferase are carried out on either the free-base, phospho-bases, or phosphatidyl-bases. (wikipedia.org)
  • DHA and Choline both play an important role during pregnancy as essential nutrients to support the healthy development of your baby's brain and nervous system. (vitalpharmacysupplies.com.au)
  • In contrast, NMDA strongly reduced the incorporation of [ 3 H]choline and [ 3 H]ethanolamine into their respective phospholipids. (jneurosci.org)
  • In humans, choline is absorbed from the intestines via the SLC44A1 (CTL1) membrane protein via facilitated diffusion governed by the choline concentration gradient and the electrical potential across the enterocyte membranes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Evangelista L, Cuppari L, Zattoni F, Mansi L, Bombardieri E. The future of choline PET in the era of prostate specific membrane antigen. (minervamedica.it)
  • SLC44A1 has limited ability to transport choline: at high concentrations part of it is left unabsorbed. (wikipedia.org)
  • Further, feeding mice five-fold or ten-fold higher concentrations of choline chloride than they would ordinarily receive, or simply feeding them TMAO itself, increased atherosclerotic lesion size, and atherosclerotic lesion size correlated with blood levels of TMAO. (westonaprice.org)
  • Several decades of research using rodent models has shown that adding extra choline to the maternal diet produces long term cognitive benefits for the offspring. (eurekalert.org)
  • In patients with chronic cerebral ischemia, CDP-choline improves scores on cognitive evaluation scales, while in patients with senile dementia of the Alzheimer's type, it slows the disease's evolution. (nih.gov)
  • By itself, choline elicited nicotine-like actions commensurate with its promotion of cholinergic neurotransmission. (nature.com)
  • Thus, choline emerges as a guardian of memory and brain health, wielding a multifaceted defence against cognitive decline. (adeeva.com)
  • Choline helps maintain proper brain health, keeping you firing on all cylinders. (nestednaturals.com)
  • Of all the organic compounds and essential nutrients we've mentioned, you really don't hear that much about choline. (nutralegacy.com)
  • Choline is one of the most important nutrients for healthy brain function. (arq.br)
  • DHA and Choline are nutrients that cannot be made in adequate quantities by the body and must be obtained through the diet. (vitalpharmacysupplies.com.au)
  • Steven Zeisel, M.D.,at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, has demonstrated that choline alters a gene called CDKN-3 by adding a "methyl group" of atoms to the gene. (kateva.org)
  • Aqueous solutions of choline are stable, but the compound slowly breaks down to ethylene glycol, polyethylene glycols, and TMA. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the annals of animal studies, choline showcases its prowess by curbing the menacing accumulation of amyloid plaque, an ominous hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. (adeeva.com)