Cholestyramine Resin: A strongly basic anion exchange resin whose main constituent is polystyrene trimethylbenzylammonium Cl(-) anion.Resins, Plant: Flammable, amorphous, vegetable products of secretion or disintegration, usually formed in special cavities of plants. They are generally insoluble in water and soluble in alcohol, carbon tetrachloride, ether, or volatile oils. They are fusible and have a conchoidal fracture. They are the oxidation or polymerization products of the terpenes, and are mixtures of aromatic acids and esters. Most are soft and sticky, but harden after exposure to cold. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed & Dorland, 28th ed)Composite Resins: Synthetic resins, containing an inert filler, that are widely used in dentistry.Anion Exchange Resins: High-molecular-weight insoluble polymers that contain functional cationic groups capable of undergoing exchange reactions with anions.Acrylic ResinsResins, Synthetic: Polymers of high molecular weight which at some stage are capable of being molded and then harden to form useful components.Ion Exchange Resins: High molecular weight, insoluble polymers which contain functional groups that are capable of undergoing exchange reactions (ION EXCHANGE) with either cations or anions.Bile Acids and Salts: Steroid acids and salts. The primary bile acids are derived from cholesterol in the liver and usually conjugated with glycine or taurine. The secondary bile acids are further modified by bacteria in the intestine. They play an important role in the digestion and absorption of fat. They have also been used pharmacologically, especially in the treatment of gallstones.Hydrochlorothiazide: A thiazide diuretic often considered the prototypical member of this class. It reduces the reabsorption of electrolytes from the renal tubules. This results in increased excretion of water and electrolytes, including sodium, potassium, chloride, and magnesium. It is used in the treatment of several disorders including edema, hypertension, diabetes insipidus, and hypoparathyroidism.Captopril: A potent and specific inhibitor of PEPTIDYL-DIPEPTIDASE A. It blocks the conversion of ANGIOTENSIN I to ANGIOTENSIN II, a vasoconstrictor and important regulator of arterial blood pressure. Captopril acts to suppress the RENIN-ANGIOTENSIN SYSTEM and inhibits pressure responses to exogenous angiotensin.Sodium Chloride Symporter Inhibitors: Agents that inhibit SODIUM CHLORIDE SYMPORTERS. They act as DIURETICS. Excess use is associated with HYPOKALEMIA.Diuretics: Agents that promote the excretion of urine through their effects on kidney function.Antihypertensive Agents: Drugs used in the treatment of acute or chronic vascular HYPERTENSION regardless of pharmacological mechanism. Among the antihypertensive agents are DIURETICS; (especially DIURETICS, THIAZIDE); ADRENERGIC BETA-ANTAGONISTS; ADRENERGIC ALPHA-ANTAGONISTS; ANGIOTENSIN-CONVERTING ENZYME INHIBITORS; CALCIUM CHANNEL BLOCKERS; GANGLIONIC BLOCKERS; and VASODILATOR AGENTS.Hypertension: Persistently high systemic arterial BLOOD PRESSURE. Based on multiple readings (BLOOD PRESSURE DETERMINATION), hypertension is currently defined as when SYSTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently greater than 140 mm Hg or when DIASTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently 90 mm Hg or more.Blood Pressure: PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.HCT116 Cells: Human COLORECTAL CARCINOMA cell line.Health Personnel: Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)United States Food and Drug Administration: An agency of the PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to maintaining standards of quality of foods, drugs, therapeutic devices, etc.Pharmacology: The study of the origin, nature, properties, and actions of drugs and their effects on living organisms.Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions: Disorders that result from the intended use of PHARMACEUTICAL PREPARATIONS. Included in this heading are a broad variety of chemically-induced adverse conditions due to toxicity, DRUG INTERACTIONS, and metabolic effects of pharmaceuticals.Pharmacology, Clinical: The branch of pharmacology that deals directly with the effectiveness and safety of drugs in humans.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Product Labeling: Use of written, printed, or graphic materials upon or accompanying a product or its container or wrapper. It includes purpose, effect, description, directions, hazards, warnings, and other relevant information.Drug Interactions: The action of a drug that may affect the activity, metabolism, or toxicity of another drug.Drug Labeling: Use of written, printed, or graphic materials upon or accompanying a drug container or wrapper. It includes contents, indications, effects, dosages, routes, methods, frequency and duration of administration, warnings, hazards, contraindications, side effects, precautions, and other relevant information.Product Packaging: Form in which product is processed or wrapped and labeled. PRODUCT LABELING is also available.Gene Dosage: The number of copies of a given gene present in the cell of an organism. An increase in gene dosage (by GENE DUPLICATION for example) can result in higher levels of gene product formation. GENE DOSAGE COMPENSATION mechanisms result in adjustments to the level GENE EXPRESSION when there are changes or differences in gene dosage.Dosage Compensation, Genetic: Genetic mechanisms that allow GENES to be expressed at a similar level irrespective of their GENE DOSAGE. This term is usually used in discussing genes that lie on the SEX CHROMOSOMES. Because the sex chromosomes are only partially homologous, there is a different copy number, i.e., dosage, of these genes in males vs. females. In DROSOPHILA, dosage compensation is accomplished by hypertranscription of genes located on the X CHROMOSOME. In mammals, dosage compensation of X chromosome genes is accomplished by random X CHROMOSOME INACTIVATION of one of the two X chromosomes in the female.Medication Errors: Errors in prescribing, dispensing, or administering medication with the result that the patient fails to receive the correct drug or the indicated proper drug dosage.Xylitol: A five-carbon sugar alcohol derived from XYLOSE by reduction of the carbonyl group. It is as sweet as sucrose and used as a noncariogenic sweetener.Patents as Topic: Exclusive legal rights or privileges applied to inventions, plants, etc.Biofuels: Hydrocarbon-rich byproducts from the non-fossilized BIOMASS that are combusted to generate energy as opposed to fossilized hydrocarbon deposits (FOSSIL FUELS).Body Composition: The relative amounts of various components in the body, such as percentage of body fat.Tablets: Solid dosage forms, of varying weight, size, and shape, which may be molded or compressed, and which contain a medicinal substance in pure or diluted form. (Dorland, 28th ed)Excipients: Usually inert substances added to a prescription in order to provide suitable consistency to the dosage form. These include binders, matrix, base or diluent in pills, tablets, creams, salves, etc.Foramen Ovale, Patent: A condition in which the FORAMEN OVALE in the ATRIAL SEPTUM fails to close shortly after birth. This results in abnormal communications between the two upper chambers of the heart. An isolated patent ovale foramen without other structural heart defects is usually of no hemodynamic significance.Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems: Systems developed for collecting reports from government agencies, manufacturers, hospitals, physicians, and other sources on adverse drug reactions.MedlinePlus: NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE service for health professionals and consumers. It links extensive information from the National Institutes of Health and other reviewed sources of information on specific diseases and conditions.Copyright: It is a form of protection provided by law. In the United States this protection is granted to authors of original works of authorship, including literary, dramatic, musical, artistic, and certain other intellectual works. This protection is available to both published and unpublished works. (from Circular of the United States Copyright Office, 6/30/2008)Patient Medication Knowledge: Patient health knowledge related to medications including what is being used and why as well as instructions and precautions.Drug Information Services: Services providing pharmaceutic and therapeutic drug information and consultation.Societies, Pharmaceutical: Societies whose membership is limited to pharmacists.Internship, Nonmedical: Advanced programs of training to meet certain professional requirements in fields other than medicine or dentistry, e.g., pharmacology, nutrition, nursing, etc.MarylandFats, Unsaturated: Fats containing one or more double bonds, as from oleic acid, an unsaturated fatty acid.Primary Prevention: Specific practices for the prevention of disease or mental disorders in susceptible individuals or populations. These include HEALTH PROMOTION, including mental health; protective procedures, such as COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CONTROL; and monitoring and regulation of ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANTS. Primary prevention is to be distinguished from SECONDARY PREVENTION and TERTIARY PREVENTION.Arcus Senilis: A corneal disease in which there is a deposition of phospholipid and cholesterol in the corneal stroma and anterior sclera.Cholesterol: The principal sterol of all higher animals, distributed in body tissues, especially the brain and spinal cord, and in animal fats and oils.Cholesterol, LDL: Cholesterol which is contained in or bound to low density lipoproteins (LDL), including CHOLESTEROL ESTERS and free cholesterol.Coronary Disease: An imbalance between myocardial functional requirements and the capacity of the CORONARY VESSELS to supply sufficient blood flow. It is a form of MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA (insufficient blood supply to the heart muscle) caused by a decreased capacity of the coronary vessels.Cholesterol, HDL: Cholesterol which is contained in or bound to high-density lipoproteins (HDL), including CHOLESTEROL ESTERS and free cholesterol.

The pharmacoeconomic benefits of cholesterol reduction. (1/330)

Recent studies show that cholesterol-lowering therapy can reduce morbidity and mortality in hypercholesterolemic patients without preexisting coronary heart disease (primary prevention) and with coronary heart disease (secondary prevention). The high cost of treatment per event prevented, especially for primary prevention, raises concerns about widespread use of cholesterol-lowering therapy. Does cholesterol reduction reduce utilization of healthcare resources, and can society afford to pay for reducing cholesterol in all patients with hypercholesterolemia, irrespective of risk factors? Is cost-effectiveness of therapy affected by differing cholesterol levels, age of the patients, the duration of therapy, or the presence of risk factors? Current pharmacoeconomic studies support the use of the statins for secondary prevention, and primary prevention in high-risk patients, and provide key information for policy decision making in the treatment of patients with hypercholesterolemia.  (+info)

Antilithiasic effect of beta-cyclodextrin in LPN hamster: comparison with cholestyramine. (2/330)

Beta-Cyclodextrin (BCD), a cyclic oligosaccharide that binds cholesterol and bile acids in vitro, has been previously shown to be an effective plasma cholesterol lowering agent in hamsters and domestic pigs. This study examined the effects of BCD as compared with cholestyramine on cholesterol and bile acid metabolism in the LPN hamster model model for cholesterol gallstones. The incidence of cholesterol gallstones was 65% in LPN hamsters fed the lithogenic diet, but decreased linearly with increasing amounts of BCD in the diet to be nil at a dose of 10% BCD. In gallbladder bile, cholesterol, phospholipid and chenodeoxycholate concentrations, hydrophobic and lithogenic indices were all significantly decreased by 10% BCD. Increases in bile acid synthesis (+110%), sterol 27-hydroxylase activity (+106%), and biliary cholate secretion (+140%) were also observed, whereas the biliary secretion of chenodeoxycholate decreased (-43%). The fecal output of chenodeoxycholate and cholate (plus derivatives) was increased by +147 and +64%, respectively, suggesting that BCD reduced the chenodeoxycholate intestinal absorption preferentially. Dietary cholestyramine decreased biliary bile acid concentration and secretion, but dramatically increased the fecal excretion of chenodeoxycholate and cholate plus their derivatives (+328 and +1940%, respectively). In contrast to BCD, the resin increased the lithogenic index in bile, induced black gallstones in 34% of hamsters, and stimulated markedly the activities of HMG-CoA reductase (+670%), sterol 27-hydroxylase (+310%), and cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (+390%). Thus, beta-cyclodextrin (BCD) prevented cholesterol gallstone formation by decreasing specifically the reabsorption of chenodeoxycholate, stimulating its biosynthesis and favoring its fecal elimination. BCD had a milder effect on lipid metabolism than cholestyramine and does not predispose animals to black gallstones as cholestyramine does in this animal model.  (+info)

Increased fecal bile acid excretion and changes in the circulating bile acid pool are involved in the hypocholesterolemic and gallstone-preventive actions of psyllium in hamsters. (3/330)

The lipid-lowering effect of psyllium (PSY) is well established. Enhanced fecal bile acid excretion and a stimulation of hepatic bile acid synthesis are discussed as primary mechanisms of this action. To further examine the effect of bile acid excretion and specifically of compositional alterations in the bile acid pool on the cholesterol-lowering and gallstone-preventing action of PSY, male golden Syrian hamsters were fed lithogenic diets containing 5 g/100 g fat, 0.4 g/100 g cholesterol and 0 (control), 4 or 6% PSY or 1% cholestyramine (CHY). PSY significantly lowered plasma total cholesterol and triacylglycerol at a magnitude comparable to that induced by CHY. Although hepatic cholesteryl ester accumulation was completely inhibited by CHY, PSY did not prevent the hepatic storage of esterified cholesterol. PSY and CHY caused distinct alterations in the bile acid profile. PSY caused a selective reduction of taurine-conjugated bile acids, especially of taurochenodeoxycholate. As a result, the glycine:taurine conjugation and the cholate:chenodeoxycholate ratios were significantly higher in PSY-fed hamsters. PSY and CHY normalized the lithogenic index and prevented cholesterol gallstone formation compared with controls. Daily fecal bile acid excretion was approximately 400% greater in hamsters fed 6% PSY, whereas CHY caused an 11-fold increase. Daily neutral sterol excretion did not differ in PSY-fed hamsters but was >100% greater in those fed CHY than in controls. These data emphasize the potent lipid-lowering effect of PSY. Increased fecal bile acid excretion and alterations of the circulating bile acid pool by removal of dihydroxy bile acids (e.g., taurochenodeoxycholate) appear to be main modulators of the hypocholesterolemic action of PSY by leading to an up-regulation of hepatic bile acid synthesis.  (+info)

Secondary prevention with lipid lowering therapy in familial hypercholesterolemia: a correlation between new evolution of stenotic lesion and achieved cholesterol levels after revascularization procedures. (4/330)

OBJECT: To assess the value of secondary prevention with lipid lowering therapy following either balloon angioplasty (PTCA) or bypass surgery (CABG) in familial hypercholesterolemia patients, the correlation of the new evolution of stenotic lesions and therapeutically achieved cholesterol levels was studied in 50 patients. METHODS: All surviving patients were followed angiographically after 5 years, and findings were correlated with the annually determined total serum cholesterol (TC) levels. RESULTS: New coronary atherosclerotic plaques were not observed in 18 patients in whom the TC was controlled to <220 mg/dl but in 19 of 32 patients in whom the TC was >220 mg/dl, a new evolution of stenotic lesions was observed angiographically. CONCLUSION: The new evolution of stenotic lesions following revascularization in patients with FH can be controlled significantly by lipid lowering therapy to maintain a TC level of <220 mg/dl, and if diet alone can not achieve it, aggressive medication and even LDL apheresis might be justified.  (+info)

Structure, evolution, and liver-specific expression of sterol 12alpha-hydroxylase P450 (CYP8B). (5/330)

The rat CYP8B cDNA encoding sterol 12alpha-hydroxylase was cloned and sequenced. The amino acid sequence of the heme-binding region of CYP8B was close to those of CYP7A (cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase) and CYP7B (oxysterol 7alpha-hydroxylase). Molecular phylogenetic analysis suggests that CYP8B and the CYP7 family derive from a common ancestor. The P450s of the CYP7 and CYP8 families, except for CYP8A (prostacyclin synthase), catalyze the oxygenation of sterols from an alpha surface in the middle of the steroid skeleton. These facts suggest that CYP8B is a P450 closely linked to those of the CYP7 family. CYP8B was expressed specifically in liver. Hepatic CYP8B mRNA level and the 12alpha-hydroxylase activity were altered by cholestyramine feeding, starvation, streptozotocin-induced diabetes mellitus, and administration of clofibrate, dexamethasone or thyroxin, indicating the pretranslational regulation of CYP8B expression. The enhanced CYP8B mRNA expression in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats was significantly decreased by insulin within 3 h of its administration. These facts demonstrate a regulatory role of insulin in CYP8B expression as a suppressor.  (+info)

Aberrant oxidation of the cholesterol side chain in bile acid synthesis of sterol carrier protein-2/sterol carrier protein-x knockout mice. (6/330)

Peroxisomal beta-oxidation plays an important role in the metabolism of a wide range of substrates, including various fatty acids and the steroid side chain in bile acid synthesis. Two distinct thiolases have been implicated to function in peroxisomal beta-oxidation: the long known 41-kDa beta-ketothiolase identified by Hashimoto and co-workers (Hijikata, M., Ishii, N., Kagamiyama, H., Osumi, T., and Hashimoto, T. (1987) J. Biol. Chem. 262, 8151-8158) and the recently discovered 60-kDa SCPx thiolase, that consists of an N-terminal domain with beta-ketothiolase activity and a C-terminal moiety of sterol carrier protein-2 (SCP2, a lipid carrier or transfer protein). Recently, gene targeting of the SCP2/SCPx gene has shown in mice that the SCPx beta-ketothiolase is involved in peroxisomal beta-oxidation of 2-methyl-branched chain fatty acids like pristanic acid. In our present work we have investigated bile acid synthesis in the SCP2/SCPx knockout mice. Specific inhibition of beta-oxidation at the thiolytic cleavage step in bile acid synthesis is supported by our finding of pronounced accumulation in bile and serum from the knockout mice of 3alpha,7alpha, 12alpha-trihydroxy-27-nor-5beta-cholestane-24-one (which is a known bile alcohol derivative of the cholic acid synthetic intermediate 3alpha,7alpha,12alpha-trihydroxy-24-keto-cholestano yl-coenzyme A). Moreover, these mice have elevated concentrations of bile acids with shortened side chains (i.e. 23-norcholic acid and 23-norchenodeoxycholic acid), which may be produced via alpha- rather than beta-oxidation. Our results demonstrate that the SCPx thiolase is critical for beta-oxidation of the steroid side chain in conversion of cholesterol into bile acids.  (+info)

Role of bile acids and bile acid binding agents in patients with collagenous colitis. (7/330)

BACKGROUND: In a retrospective study bile acid malabsorption was observed in patients with collagenous colitis. AIMS: To study the occurrence of bile acid malabsorption and the effect of bile acid binders prospectively in patients with chronic diarrhoea and collagenous colitis. METHODS: Over 36 months all patients referred because of chronic diarrhoea completed a diagnostic programme, including gastroscopy with duodenal biopsy, colonoscopy with biopsies, and the (75)Se-homocholic acid taurine ((75)SeHCAT) test for bile acid malabsorption. Treatment with a bile acid binder (cholestyramine in 24, colestipol in three) was given, irrespective of the results of the (75)SeHCAT test. RESULTS: Collagenous colitis was found in 28 patients (six men, 22 women), 27 of whom had persistent symptoms and completed the programme. Four patients had had a previous cholecystectomy or a distal gastric resection. The (75)SeHCAT test was abnormal in 12/27 (44%) of the collagenous colitis patients with (75)SeHCAT values 0.5-9.7%, and normal in 15 patients (56%). Bile acid binding treatment was followed by a rapid, marked, or complete improvement in 21/27 (78%) of the collagenous colitis patients. Rapid improvement occurred in 11/12 (92%) of the patients with bile acid malabsorption compared with 10/15 (67%) of the patients with normal (75)SeHCAT tests. CONCLUSION: Bile acid malabsorption is common in patients with collagenous colitis and is probably an important pathophysiological factor. Because of a high response rate without serious side effects, bile acid binding treatment should be considered for collagenous colitis, particularly patients with bile acid malabsorption.  (+info)

The use of histological techniques for the demonstration of ion exchange resins. (8/330)

AIM: To establish the staining characteristics of certain ion exchange resins in histological material, with a view to enabling confident differential identification. METHODS: Various histological staining procedures were applied to selected pathological material and prepared agar blocks containing the cation exchange resin calcium polystyrene sulphonate and the anion exchange resin cholestyramine. RESULTS: Calcium polystyrene sulphonate uniquely stained strongly by a direct Schiff's reagent procedure without any preoxidation and by the Ziehl-Neelsen method. Cholestyramine was negative by the former method but stained strongly with a standard Congo red technique. CONCLUSIONS: These staining results are consistent with the known structure and properties of polystyrene sulphonate and cholestyramine resins. Polystyrene sulphonate resins have the virtually pathognomonic feature of direct Schiff positivity, while morphology, location, and strong non-birefringent Congo red positivity facilitate the identification of cholestyramine. It is possible that the intrinsic staining characteristics of cholestyramine may be lost once it has bound to its target.  (+info)

Cholestyramine (Cholestyramine) drug information & product resources from MPR including dosage information, educational materials, & patient assistance.
4 Answers - Posted in: cholestyramine light, diarrhea, cholestyramine - Answer: Has the doctor found out what is wrong? Theres imodium. Ive found ...
A first piece of evidence for a link between bile acid and glucose metabolism came from a short-term study in patients with noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) or type II diabetes.114 Patients with high LDL cholesterol but normal triglyceride levels, using either glyburide or insulin to control glycemia, were treated with cholestyramine or placebo. Cholestyramine treatment lowered plasma glucose by 13% and decreased urinary glucose excretion, with a tendency toward lower glycosylated hemoglobin concentrations. At the same time, cholestyramine reduced total and LDL cholesterol and increased triglyceride levels. This study therefore identified bile acid sequestrants, which are not absorbed, as a potential option to treat type II diabetes. It will be of interest to determine whether the ASBT inhibitors, like S 8921115 or SC 435,116 that selectively interfere with bile acid reabsorption also regulate glycemia in diabetic patients. Nevertheless, because an increase of unbound bile acids ...
Explains the medication cholestyramine (Questran), a drug used for reducing cholesterol levels in the blood, to relieve the itching of liver and biliary disease, and .... ...
Explains the medication cholestyramine (Questran), a drug used for reducing cholesterol levels in the blood, to relieve the itching of liver and biliary disease, and .... ...
Learn about the uses, side effects, and safety of cholestyramine and why this cholesterol medication may be used to treat some kinds of chronic diarrhea.
No scientific evidence is available that supports that the clinical use of Cholestyramine actually effectively binds any mycotoxins out of the body.
Questran helps reduce cholesterol (fatty acids) in the blood. High cholesterol is associated with an increased risk of heart disease and atherosclerosis (clogged arteries). Questran is used to lower high levels of cholesterol in the blood, especially low-density lipoprotein (LDL) (
Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking this medicine, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.. Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is usually not recommended, but may be required in some cases. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.. ...
Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking this medicine, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.. Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is usually not recommended, but may be required in some cases. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.. ...
Provides information on usage, precautions, side effects and brand names when available. Data provided by various government agencies and health-related organizations. ...
The UNITED STATES and some other countries require a prescription on all medications sold from Mexico. They further require documentation in English and an invoice of all medicines sold for customs. For these countries, Medicina Mexico is now delivering your medicines to Dr. Isaac Reyes, MD (Ced. Federal 644884) (Ced. Estatal 1537-02/05) along with the required documentation including documentation on each medications sold in English is from Wolters Kluwer. Dr. Reyes upon receipt of your medication will issue a prescription and provide for shipping pursuant to your order. If for any reason, Dr. Reyes fails to issue a prescription for a specific medication, then you will receive a refund or credit ...
Statins and other anti-cholesterol drugs The statins (or HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors) along with other drugs, such as cholestyramine (Questran), comprise the class of hypolipidemic drugs. Hypolipidemic drugs are prescribed - sometimes aggressively so - to lower cholesterolStatinsstatinsstatinsstatinsMarshall ProtocolStatinsOlmesartanOlmesartanOlmesartanstatinsNuclear ReceptorsOlmesartanOlmesartancholesterolcholesterolcholesterolstatinscholesterolstatinscholesterolstatinscholesterolcholesterols…
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Learn about the potential side effects of Locholest Light (cholestyramine). Includes common and rare side effects information for consumers and healthcare professionals.
Previous studies have suggested that taking thyroid replacement therapy with coffee potentially hinders its absorption. We already know that food especially a fiber-rich diet, cholestyramine resin, aluminum containing antacids, activated charcoal, and certain herbal remedies among others interfere with the ability to absorb thyroid medicine. These findings have prompted providers to advise patients to take their levothyroxine on an empty stomach in the morning. However, many patients take their thyroid medicine with their morning cup of coffee prior to eating breakfast. A small study has shown that Italian espresso coffee can decrease the absorption of levothyroxine, but the effect of American style coffee is not known. Given that the intestinal absorption of levothyroxine can be hindered by multiple substances and coffee is the most commonly consumed beverage worldwide, it is important to investigate what effect coffee may have on thyroid hormone absorption and thyroid function tests.. Using ...
In Section 4.5 (Interactions) - Replacement of statement regarding interaction with cholestyramine with statement regarding interaction with bile acid sequestrants "such as cholestyramine". - In Section 4.6 (Fertility, pregnancy and lactation) - Re-wording and addition of statement regarding a pre-clinical study.. - In Section 4.8 (Undesirable effects) - Deletion of list of symptoms of hypercalcaemia. Deletion of frequency number definitions from tabulation.. - Minor clarifications and re-wordings in sections 2, 4.2, 4.4 and 6.6 ...
Results Both treatments exhibited a similar analgesic efficacy after 12 weeks. This was observed despite the fact that DS was given t.i.d. while DC was given b.i.d. at a lower daily dose. No significant differences in tolerability were detected. Therefore, clinical results strongly suggest that DC exhibits an improved PK-PD profile. Such assumption was supported by animal studies. Local administration of DIC in formalin-injured rats resulted in a significant ANE compared to saline. This effect was restricted to the local level, as drug injection in the contralateral paw was ineffective. PK-PD modelling in the rat showed that there is no direct link between DIC ANE and its blood concentrations. However, the effect could be related to drug effect-site concentrations, being consistent with the observation of a local effect. Computer gene-rated simulations showed that a quick-slow release profile, such as that of DC, allows an optimised DIC transfer to the effect compartment and a prolonged response. ...
In a final effort to get the yellow out of my water, I tried a third brand of sequestrant/chelating agent, Sequa-Sol It worked. The water is the best looking it has been to date. The previous two were Metal Free and Sea Klear Metal Klear. The MSDS on this new one says the active ingredient is Sodium Citrate. It is listed as a chelating agent where the previous two used Acrylamide-Acrylic Acid Copolymer, listed as a sequestrant. I cant find much that explains the difference, at least as
Cholestyramine is usually used when the LDL fraction (Bad cholesterol) is elevated. I would be concerned about the drug binding to your HIV meds in the gut and decreasing absorption. In general...
Hi there,. I had the same surgery about 9 yrs ago and was devasted when the D & cramps came back. But a few weeks later my GI suggested i try taking Questran/Cholestyramine to see would it help. I did and it completely stopped the pain & D. It was because i had the valve removed and could no longer deal with bile salts. It tastes disgusting but just mix it with orange juice and its worth it. So the Questran sorted out everything for me but thats just my experience, if youve had the valve removed then id suggest that you mention it to your doc. Everythings worth a try with this awful disease. Good luck....Lila. ...
The bile acid sequestrants are a group of resins used to bind certain components of bile in the gastrointestinal tract. They disrupt the enterohepatic circulation of bile acids by combining with bile constituents and preventing their reabsorption from the gut. In general, they are classified as hypolipidemic agents, although they may be used for purposes other than lowering cholesterol. They are used in the treatment of chronic diarrhea due to bile acid malabsorption. Bile acid sequestrants are polymeric compounds that serve as ion-exchange resins. Bile acid sequestrants exchange anions such as chloride ions for bile acids. By doing so, they bind bile acids and sequester them from the enterohepatic circulation. The liver then produces more bile acids to replace those that have been lost. Because the body uses cholesterol to make bile acids, this reduces the amount of LDL cholesterol circulating in the blood. Bile acid sequestrants are large polymeric structures, and they are not significantly ...
Bile acids promote bile formation and facilitate dietary lipid absorption. Animal and human studies showing disturbed bile acid metabolism in diabetes mellitus suggest a link between bile acids and glucose control. Bile acids are activating ligands of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a nuclear receptor with an established role in bile acid and lipid metabolism. Evidence suggests a role for FXR also in maintenance of glucose homeostasis. Animal and human studies employing bile acid sequestrants (bile acid binding agents), which interrupt the enterohepatic circulation of bile acids and effectively reduce plasma cholesterol, support a link between bile acid and glucose metabolism. In lipid-lowering trials, bile acid sequestrants, such as colesevelam hydrochloride, colestyramine (cholestyramine) and colestilan (colestimide), have also been shown to lower plasma glucose and glycosylated haemoglobin levels, suggesting the utility of these agents as a potential therapy for type 2 diabetes. In this ...
Learn more about Bile Acid Sequestrant Drugs at Grand Strand Medical Center Many Nutrients - Supplementation Likely Helpful The bile acid sequestrant...
Bile Acid SequestrantsPatients with terminal ileal disease may not absorb bile acids normally, which can lead to secretory diarrhea in the colon. These patients may benefit from bile acid sequestrants... more
The role of cholesterol in the development of cardiovascular disease was elucidated in the second half of the 20th century.[138] This lipid hypothesis prompted attempts to reduce cardiovascular disease burden by lowering cholesterol. Treatment consisted mainly of dietary measures, such as a low-fat diet, and poorly tolerated medicines, such as clofibrate, cholestyramine, and nicotinic acid. Cholesterol researcher Daniel Steinberg writes that while the Coronary Primary Prevention Trial of 1984 demonstrated cholesterol lowering could significantly reduce the risk of heart attacks and angina, physicians, including cardiologists, remained largely unconvinced.[139] Scientists in academic settings and the pharmaceutical industry began trying to develop a drug to reduce cholesterol more effectively. There were several potential targets, with 30 steps in the synthesis of cholesterol from acetyl-coenzyme A.[140] In 1971, Akira Endo, a Japanese biochemist working for the pharmaceutical company Sankyo, ...
o The bile acid resins (cholestyramine, cholestipol) lower LDL levels by 15% to 30%, and raise HDL levels by 3% to 5%. They have no effect on triglyceride levels. Their major side effects include gastrointestinal distress, constipation, and a decrease in the absorption of other drugs.. ...
o The bile acid resins (cholestyramine, cholestipol) lower LDL levels by 15% to 30%, and raise HDL levels by 3% to 5%. They have no effect on triglyceride levels. Their major side effects include gastrointestinal distress, constipation, and a decrease in the absorption of other drugs.. ...
Do not take Generic Arava while you are pregnant or have nurseling. Generic Arava can pass in breast milk and harm your baby.. Do not use Generic Arava if you are allergic to Generic Arava components.. Generic Arava cant be used by patients under 18 years.. Do not use Generic Arava in case of suffering from severe infections, moderate to severe impairment of kidney or liver function, extremely low blood levels of protein.. Try to be careful with Generic Arava in case of using such medication as medicines which used to depress the immune system as cyclosporine, prednisone, cholestyramine, troglitazone, rifamycins as rifampin, methotrexate affecting the liver.. Try to be careful with Generic Arava in case of having heart, liver or kidney disease, severe immune system disorder, bone marrow problems, blood disorders uncontrolled infections.. Generic Arava is not properly studied in treatment of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.. Generic Arava can be dangerous for children and elderly people.. It can ...
More info here: http://www.survivingmold.com/diagnosis/lab-tests 6) Good supplement strategies to counter the inflammation, as recommended on the following website: http://www.herbaltransitions.com/TreatmentOfCIRS.html Avoiding sugar and grains to keep insulin down is also important-the no amylase diet. (I, Janie, used a lot of these recommendations!) In the meantime, binders are needed to get the mold out, such as cholestyramine. 7) Mold illness/CIRS can activate certain gene mutations, or turn off other genes. 8) Low VEGF (see above in #5) can cause "capillary hypoperfusion", aka reduced delivery of oxygen leading to reduced mitochondrial function (easy fatigue; easy crashes; long recovery) and a rise of lactic acid. 9) There are controlled exercises to increase adiponectin which will help with capillary hypoperfusion, explained by Dr. Shoemaker: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jjEDcBbpS_0. 10) Dr. Shoemaker developed important steps to get well again. Some can be done at the same time: ...
Cholestyramine dose for washout leela mohana reddy wayne state arava nursing considerations. Wash out procedure tea diabetes leflunomide heart failure pbs normal.Washout refers to a feature of wing design to deliberately reduce the lift distribution across the span of the wing of an aircraft. The wing is designed so that lift.ARAVA (Immunosuppresseur): fiche médicament du Vidal de la famille précisant la composition, la posologie, les interactions possibles, les effets indésirables.. The Washout is located in about a 4 block area with rock groins each block. Waves wedge around the rocks and sandbars are numerous. Also,.Synonyms for washout in English including definitions, and related words.ARAVA 10 MG, COMPRIME PELLICULE. Si la procédure du washout décrite ci-dessous est instaurée dès quon constate un retard menstruel,.ARAVA 10 mg cp pellic: Synthèse, Formes et présentations, Composition, Indications, Posologie et mode dadministration, Contre-indications, Mises en garde et ...
Male subjects must consent to practice contraception during the study. The subject needs to have clinically diagnosed rheumatoid arthritis including diagnosis of RA by ACR criteria greater than or = to 6 months prior to enrollment active disease by ACR criteria . Men wishing to father a child should consider discontinuing use of study drug and taking cholestyramine 8 gm 3 times daily for 11 days. In addition, males should consider discontinuation of methotrexate treatment and waiting an additional three months ...
Dr Patel touched on mold illness and how to first confirm diagnosis of being exposed to mold by running CIRS testing, focusing on a high C4a then taking CSM (cholestyramine) for a few wks, seeing if the C4a goes down (as it should if it binds the biotoxins), then stopping the CSM while still living within the expected exposure and if the C4a rises once again, its confirmation of mold exposure. This can also be run concomitantly with a VCS (Visual Contrast Screening test ...
Acupuncture Andrographis Babesia bartonella betterhealthguy.com - Scotts website, lots of detox info Biodentistry bioresourceinc.com - wholesaler for Pekana Biotensor Buhner herbal protocol Chlorella - thought to provide mercury detox, many think biopure.us is best. other brands are E-lyte and Sun Cholestapure - supposedly less difficult to handle than cholestyramine...
... often include statins or other cholesterol medicines. This eMedTV article lists various types of statins and other classes of cholesterol medications, such as bile acid sequestrants, fibrates, and niacin.
UCL Discovery is UCLs open access repository, showcasing and providing access to UCL research outputs from all UCL disciplines.
TY - JOUR. T1 - Familial hypercholesterolaemia. AU - Nair, Devaki R.. AU - Sharifi, Mahtab. AU - Al-Rasadi, Khalid. PY - 2014. Y1 - 2014. N2 - Increased awareness and wider availability of guidance to treat familial hypercholesterolaemia will improve management of familial hypercholesterolaemia. New therapies, if they become available after appropriate outcome studies, will reduce LDL-C levels in both homozygous familial hypercholesterolaemia and severe heterozygous familial hypercholesterolaemia, thus reducing the risk for premature CHD.. AB - Increased awareness and wider availability of guidance to treat familial hypercholesterolaemia will improve management of familial hypercholesterolaemia. New therapies, if they become available after appropriate outcome studies, will reduce LDL-C levels in both homozygous familial hypercholesterolaemia and severe heterozygous familial hypercholesterolaemia, thus reducing the risk for premature CHD.. KW - Familial hypercholesterolaemia. KW - Guidelines for ...
FH is usually treated with statins.[7] Statins act by inhibiting the enzyme hydroxymethylglutaryl CoA reductase (HMG-CoA-reductase) in the liver. In response, the liver produces more LDL receptors, which remove circulating LDL from the blood. Statins effectively lower cholesterol and LDL levels, although sometimes add-on therapy with other drugs is required, such as bile acid sequestrants (cholestyramine or colestipol), nicotinic acid preparations or fibrates.[2] Control of other risk factors for cardiovascular disease is required, as risk remains somewhat elevated even when cholesterol levels are controlled. Professional guidelines recommend that the decision to treat a person with FH with statins should not be based on the usual risk prediction tools (such as those derived from the Framingham Heart Study), as they are likely to underestimate the risk of cardiovascular disease; unlike the rest of the population, FH have had high levels of cholesterol since birth, probably increasing their ...
Peroxisomes isolated from rat liver were incubated with [3H]squalene and [3H]mevalonate and the subsequent incorporation of radioactivity into cholesterol studied. The isolated lipids became labeled after incubation with both precursors. In contrast to findings with microsomes, trypsin and detergent treatment of peroxisomes did not influence the rate of cholesterol synthesis. In addition, the luminal content of peroxisomes could alone mediate this synthetic process. Upon treatment of rats with various inducers of peroxisomes and of the endoplasmic reticulum, as well as upon feeding with cholesterol and cholestyramine, large differences in the pattern of in vitro incorporation of [3H]mevalonate into the cholesterol of peroxisomes and microsomes were observed. Injection of this precursor also resulted in high initial labeling of peroxisomal cholesterol in vivo. These experiments indicate that cholesterol synthesis may also occur in peroxisomes. ...
GHC patients receive prescriptions through the GHC pharmacy at no or nominal cost. The GHC pharmacy database was established in January 1977. Its data files contain information on drug, dosage, quantity dispensed, prescription date, and instructions. Use of statin medications (simvastatin, lovastatin, pravastatin, and atorvastatin) and other lipid-lowering agents (LLAs), including niacin,cholestyramine, colestipol, gemfibrozil, and clofibrate, was defined as at least three filled prescriptions for statins or LLAs of 15 tablets or more. Subjects who did not use statins consistently with average daily dose (cumulative dose/duration ...
Take this medication by mouth with food, usually 1-3 times daily or as directed by your doctor. If you take this medicine once daily, take it with your evening meal. Taking niacin on an empty stomach increases side effects (e.g., flushing, upset stomach). Niacin is available in different formulations (e.g., immediate and sustained release). Do not switch other strengths, brands, or forms of niacin with this product. Severe liver problems may occur. Dosage is based on your medical condition and response to therapy. Generally, your doctor will start you at a low dose and gradually increase your dose in order to minimize side effects. Your dose will need to be increased slowly, even if you are already taking niacin and are being switched from another niacin product (e.g., extended-release) to this product. Follow your doctors instructions carefully. If you also take certain other drugs to lower your cholesterol (bile acid-binding resins such as cholestyramine or colestipol), take niacin at least ...
Drugs to reduce cholesterol and other lipids in blood. Classes of drugs used for this purpose include statins, bile acid sequestrants, nicotinic acid, and fibrates.
Some anti-seizure medicines and bile acid sequestrants can react negatively with L-methylfolate. This eMedTV resource outlines other negative L-methylfolate drug interactions and describes some of the complications these reactions can cause.
Purpose of review: Diagnostic scoring for familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) can be used either to screen for possible FH or guide the selection of patients for genetic (DNA) testing. We review the published diagnostic criteria and discuss the options for future development. Recent findings: Scoring systems have been developed internationally based on lipid values and various combinations of clinical signs and cardiovascular history. The predictive value varies according to the test population, be it lipid clinic referrals, general population, or relatives of patients with FH. Also, there is increasing recognition of genetic heterogeneity in FH so that criteria are of differing predictive value depending on the genetic variant of FH. Summary: These clinical scoring systems are increasingly used to guide selection of patients for FH genetic testing but no single approach has yet emerged as the system of choice. Further refinement of these scoring tools using more sophisticated calculators are ...
The first aim was to critically evaluate the extent to which familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) is underdiagnosed and undertreated. The second aim was to provide guidance for screening and treatment of FH, in order to prevent coronary heart disease (CHD ...
Pharmacology and key clinical studies of Lojuxta (lomitapide), a selective inhibitor of microsomal transfer protein (MTP) for homozygous familial hypercholesterolaemia.
UCL Discovery is UCLs open access repository, showcasing and providing access to UCL research outputs from all UCL disciplines.
Davidson DJ, Wilkinson MJ, Davidson MH. Combination therapy for dyslipidemia. In: Ballantyne CM, ed. Clinical Lipidology: A Companion to Braunwalds Heart Disease. 2nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 27.. Genest J, Libby P. Lipoprotein disorders and cardiovascular disease. In: Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow RO, Mann DL, Tomaselli GF, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwalds Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine. 11th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2019:chap 48.. Goldberg AC. Bile acid sequestrants. In: Ballantyne CM, ed. Clinical Lipidology: A Companion to Braunwalds Heart Disease. 2nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 22.. Grundy SM, Stone NJ, Bailey AL, et al. 2018 AHA/ACC/AACVPR/AAPA/ABC/ACPM/ ADA/AGS/APhA/ASPC/NLA/PCNA guideline on the management of blood cholesterol: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Clinical Practice Guidelines. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2019;73(24):e285-e350. PMID: 30423393 ...
This is a discussion and support forum for microscopic colitis, collagenous colitis, lymphocytic colitis, gluten intolerance, autoimmune diseases, and related issues.
Some of the most common medications used by Americans cause zinc deficiency, including: the blood pressure medicines, called ACE inhibitors; loop diuretics used to treat cardiovascular problems; cholestyramine, which binds to bile acids and lowers cholesterol; oral contraceptives; stomach acid reducers, called H-2 receptor antagonists; and estrogen and hormone replacement therapies.* In the US, ACE inhibitors alone account for 130 million prescriptions annually. Diuretics are third most commonly used type of medicine in people over age 60.**. What are the risks of losing the sense of smell? MayoClinic.com says that anosmia isnt dangerous in and of itself, "but an intact sense of smell is necessary to fully taste foods. So loss of smell could cause you to lose interest in eating, leading to weight loss, malnutrition or even depression. Loss of smell also prevents you from smelling things like spoiled food or smoke.". Ive already encountered that problem on my smellcation, evoking the "when in ...
adrenal exhaustion (6) adrenal glands (5) adrenal insufficiency (2) alcohol (1) anaemia (2) auto- immune disease (3) bleeding (2) blood platelets (7) blood sugars (1) blood tests (12) body image (1) bruises (1) calcium (4) calcium supplements (1) Chinese herb (2) Chinese herbs (9) cholesterol (3) cholestyramine (3) Christmas (2) clinical studies (1) clotting (1) coffee (4) cordyceps (4) corticosteroids (6) cortisol (10) depression (8) diet (5) energy loss (7) exercise (3) exercise. meditation (1) feedback (1) folate (3) folinic acid (2) fragile bones (4) Guinness (1) H pylori (4) haemoglobin (7) headaches (3) herbs (1) hormones (2) hydrocortisone (1) hypothyroidism (3) immune system (3) insulin (3) iodine (2) irbesartan (1) ITP (1) IV immunoglobulin (3) keeping positive (4) kidney damage (2) listening to the patient (1) low platelet counts (1) magnesium (3) medical research (1) metallic taste in mouth (1) migraines (1) muscle cramps (2) N-Plate (1) neurotoxins (1) Paleolithic diet (1) ...
adrenal exhaustion (6) adrenal glands (5) adrenal insufficiency (2) alcohol (1) anaemia (2) auto- immune disease (3) bleeding (2) blood platelets (7) blood sugars (1) blood tests (12) body image (1) bruises (1) calcium (4) calcium supplements (1) Chinese herb (2) Chinese herbs (9) cholesterol (3) cholestyramine (3) Christmas (2) clinical studies (1) clotting (1) coffee (4) cordyceps (4) corticosteroids (6) cortisol (10) depression (8) diet (5) energy loss (7) exercise (3) exercise. meditation (1) feedback (1) folate (3) folinic acid (2) fragile bones (4) Guinness (1) H pylori (4) haemoglobin (7) headaches (3) herbs (1) hormones (2) hydrocortisone (1) hypothyroidism (3) immune system (3) insulin (3) iodine (2) irbesartan (1) ITP (1) IV immunoglobulin (3) keeping positive (4) kidney damage (2) listening to the patient (1) low platelet counts (1) magnesium (3) medical research (1) metallic taste in mouth (1) migraines (1) muscle cramps (2) N-Plate (1) neurotoxins (1) Paleolithic diet (1) ...
Teriflunomide has various disadvantages, including its potential for liver toxicity, which is why monthly liver function testing is required for the first 6 months of use. Infections may result from a decrease in white blood cell counts, and hypertension, elevated potassium, and acute renal failure have also been associated with this medication.6 Other common adverse reactions include hair thinning, influenza, diarrhea, nausea, and paresthesia.8 Caution should be used in diabetic patients and those over the age of 60 years. Teriflunomide has been assigned pregnancy category X by the FDA; women should not become pregnant and men should not father a child while taking the drug.6 Finally, the half-life of teriflunomide is 2 weeks, but the drug may be present in some patients for as long as 2 years after discontinuation (cholestyramine or activated charcoal hastens elimination).6. Dimethyl fumarate. The mechanism of action for dimethyl fumarates benefit in patients with MS is currently unknown.12 ...
dehydration. Phenylalanine injection is effective to treat OTA acute poisoning.. How to prevent Ochratoxin A from animals? Prevention is more important than treatment. There are some tips on prevention and control of Ochratoxin A. Ochratoxin A act steadily to heat, so it is not ideal to remove toxicity through heating. According to the report, adds some cholestyramine into the feeds and irradiates it with γ-rays and ultraviolet, which can promote remove toxicity. In addition, OTA and OTB can hydrolyze to phenylalanine and OA with less toxicity under the catalysis of carboxypeptidase A and chymotrypsin. Hydrolysis rate of OTB is six to seven times that of OTA and rumen microbes have a strong reactivity. According to the experiment, adds Carboxypeptidase into fluids with OTA, after few days, the OTA decrease a lot. So It can be an effective way to remove OTA.. ...
There are several alternatives to Advicor, including other statins or cholesterol medicines. As this eMedTV page explains, besides statins, other cholesterol medicines include fibrates, cholesterol absorption inhibitors, and bile acid sequestrants.
Bile acid sequestrants and nicotinic acid have cholesterollowering properties. They may occasionally be useful alone or in combination with statin therapy. However, their side-effects limit wider application.. 8.8 Treatment directed at other components of the lipid profile. Whereas low levels of HDL-C and high levels of TG are undoubtedly associated with a higher cardiovascular disease risk, no currently available treatment directed at reversing these changes has been shown to significantly benefit cardiovascular outcome.. A high triglyceride level, particularly if ,10 mmol/l, can result in acute pancreatitis and should be treated without delay.. 9. Special circumstances. 9.1 Metabolic syndrome. The European Guidelines recognise the importance of identifying patients with the metabolic syndrome, who are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease. The presence of the syndrome approximately doubles the risk of cardiovascular disease. Lifestyle changes, particularly reducing body weight and ...
Evidence-based recommendations on identifying and managing familial hypercholesterolaemia (inherited high cholesterol) for adults and children
The present study demonstrates that pathogenic events in fetal arteries associated with maternal hypercholesterolemia are capable of enhancing the susceptibility to atherosclerosis later in life, and that cholesterol-lowering interventions or antioxidant treatment of hypercholesterolemic mothers during pregnancy have long-term beneficial effects in their offspring.. As previously demonstrated in the same rabbit model,13 diet-induced maternal hypercholesterolemia during pregnancy markedly increased fatty streak formation during fetal development, whereas maternal treatment with vitamin E or cholestyramine significantly reduced lesion sizes in their offspring, compared with untreated mothers. In the present study, a higher dose of vitamin E (1000 IU) was used than in the preceding one (100 IU). This yielded a greater reduction of lesion sizes and intimal content in lipid peroxidation products at birth. After weaning and five months on the mildly hypercholesterolemic diet, lesion sizes in aortic ...
Studies have confirmed the benefit anti inflammatory diet plan for psoriasis low nickel diet in the management of nickel eczema. The recommended treatment is to spray the face, under the arms and allow to dry for 5- 19 minutes to give the Willard Water time to do its job. Other drugs that affect stomach acid have been linked to poor vitamin B12 absorption, including the cholesterol drug cholestyramine; the antibiotics chloramphenicol and neomycin; and the gout treatment colchicine. In a more recent study comparing three-month treatments of cyclosporine and methotrexate, patients saw their psoriasis symptoms decrease by 72% and 58%, respectively.
Beta carotene, vitamin K, vitamin C, an calcium is rowth in kail. Kail is a soorce o twa carotenoids, lutein an zeaxanthin.[1] Kail, as wi broccoli an ither brassicas, conteens sulforaphane (parteecular whan its been chappit or minced), a chemical wi potent anti-cancer properties.[2] Bylin lawers the leevel o sulforaphane; housomeiver, steamin, microwavin, or stir fryin disna cause a important loss.[3] Lik ither brassica vegetables, kail is a soorce o indole-3-carbinol an aw, a chemical that forders DNA repair in cells an appears tae keep cancer cells fae growin.[4][5] Kail haes been foond tae conteen a group o resins cried bile acid sequestrants, that haes been shawn tae lawer cholesterol an lawer absorption o dietary fat. Steamin signeeficantly accresses thir bile acid bindin properties.[6] ...
The synthesis and excretion of bile acids comprise the major pathway of cholesterol catabolism in mammals. Synthesis provides a direct means of converting cholesterol, which is both hydrophobic and insoluble, into a water-soluble and readily excreted molecule, the bile acid. The biosynthetic steps t …
Results A total of 227 index cases had 1075 first-degree relatives, including 442 adults and 117 children aged , 18 years resident in Oxfordshire. We excluded 171 previously screened adults and 46 for other reasons. Among 225 eligible adult relatives, 28 responders (12%) planned to consult their general practitioner and 52 (23%) attended the clinic for testing. Parents of 113 children (97%) wanted them tested. The positive diagnostic rate was 29% (15/52) in adults and 32% (36/113) in children. Screening increased prevalence by 14.4%, from 0.58/1000 (95% confidence intervals [CI] 0.52-0.65) to 0.67/1000 (95% CI 0.60-0.73), representing 33.5% of predicted cases ...
Do not use Generic Ziac if you are allergic to Generic Ziac components, to sulfa drugs or to any beta-blocker medication, such as atenolol (Tenormin), bisoprolol (Zebeta), labetalol (Normodyne, Trandate), nadolol (Corgard), propranolol (Inderal, InnoPran), sotalol (Betapace), timolol (Blocadren), and others.. Do not use Generic Ziac if youre pregnant or you plan to have a baby. Do not take it in case you are a nursing mother.. Do not use Generic Ziac if you are unable to urinate.. Do not use Generic Ziac if you have severe or uncontrolled heart failure, a heart condition called "sick sinus syndrome" or "AV block" or slow heartbeats.. Be careful with Generic Ziac if you have congestive heart failure, circulation problems, kidney or liver disease, cirrhosis, glaucoma, asthma, bronchospastic lung disease, a thyroid disorder, lupus, gout, diabetes, or a penicillin allergy.. Be careful with Generic Ziac if you take insulin or oral diabetes medication; colestipol (Colestid) or cholestyramine ...
Protocol Zinc Glycinate 120 Softgels Supports Prostate Health -Support of Cellular Immunity -Superior Bioavailability How it Works: Zinc is a mineral that is essential in a wide range of enzymatic reactions.* In addition to its well-known role in healthy immune response, Zinc plays critical roles in the support of healthy skeletal, neurological, endocrine, and prostate functions.* Although dietary bioavailability of Zinc is relatively poor, Zinc Glycinate has been shown to achieve superior absorption and bioavailability.* Suggested Usage: 1 softgel daily, or as directed by your healthcare practitioner. Cautions / Interactions: Zinc supplements may interact with cisplatin, penicillamine, and quinolone and tetracycline antibiotics. In addition, captopril, cholestyramine, corticosteroids, deferoxamine, disulfiram, EDTA and EDTA derivatives, estrogens, ethambutol, H2-blockers, phenytoin, proton pump inhibitors, thiazide diuretics, and valproic acid may increase the need for zinc. SUPPLEMENT
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Introduction Bile acid sequestrants (BAS) were the first class of lipid-lowering drug to be developed for reducing blood cholesterol levels.1 Now, after their introduction 30 years ago, BAS still continue to command a position in the treatment of hyperlipidaemia.2 How do BAS work? BAS bind to negatively charged b ...
In rats fed on a diet containing 1% cholesterol for 24 h, the decrease in hepatic non-saponifiable lipid synthesis, cholesterogenesis and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase activity was accompanied by an increase in the proportion of newly synthesized polar sterols in vivo. In these animals there was also a strong inverse correlation between the proportion of polar sterols in the non-saponifiable lipid and hepatic HMG-CoA reductase activity. A similar correlation was not observed in animals fed on a normal diet. Cholesterogenesis in the intestine was not as sensitive to inhibition by dietary cholesterol as was that in the liver, and there was no increase in the polar-sterol content of the newly synthesized non-saponifiable-lipid fraction. ...
Stolz, A., Sugiyama, Y., Kuhlenkamp, J., Osadchey, B., Yamada, T., Belknap, W., Balistreri, W. and Kaplowitz, N. (1986), Cytosolic bile acid binding protein in rat liver: Radioimmunoassay, molecular forms, developmental characteristics and organ distribution. Hepatology, 6: 433-439. doi: 10.1002/hep.1840060319 ...
Familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) is the most common inherited metabolic condition, affecting about one in 200 people. As highlighted by the European Atherosclerosis Society (EAS) Consensus Panel, FH is seriously underdiagnosed and undertreated. This App, authored by members of the Panel, provides an important resource to tackle these issues. Detection, diagnosis, screening and management of FH are discussed, with emphasis on targeting children with FH to optimise benefit and reduce premature heart disease.. Supported by an Unrestricted Educational Grant from SANOFI and REGENERON. App for iPad and iPhone ...
OBJECTIVES: Individuals with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) are at high risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD). This risk can be substantially reduced with lifelong pharmacological and lifestyle treatment; however, research suggests adherence is poor. We synthesised the qualitative research to identify enablers and barriers to treatment adherence.. DESIGN: This study conducted a thematic synthesis of qualitative studies.. DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO via OVID, Cochrane library and CINAHL databases and grey literature sources were searched through September 2018.. ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA: We included studies conducted in individuals with FH, and their family members, which reported primary qualitative data regarding their experiences of and beliefs about their condition and its treatment.. DATA EXTRACTION AND SYNTHESIS: Quality assessment was undertaken using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme for qualitative studies. A thematic synthesis was conducted to ...
PubMed 27843692 EAS Familial Hypercholesterolaemia Studies Collaboration, Vallejo-Vaz AJ, Akram A, Kondapally Seshasai SR, Cole D, Watts GF, Hovingh GK, Kastelein JJ, Mata P, Raal FJ, Santos RD, Soran H, Freiberger T, Abifadel M, Aguilar-Salinas CA, Alnouri F, Alonso R, Al-Rasadi K, Banach M, Bogsrud MP, Bourbon M, Bruckert E, Car J, Ceska R, Corral P et al. (2016) ...
The treatment of high blood cholesterol is entering a new phase. As in the treatment of hypertension, several drugs with different modes of action are now available, with more under study, kindling debates about their relative benefits and costs. The rationale and evidence for appropriate treatment of patients is becoming clearer, with the National Cholesterol Education Program guidelines leading the way. We are learning to decide which patients to treat with drug therapy and why, and we should all by now be familiar with how to use the available drugs. This study looks at drug treatment from a societal perspective by analyzing the cost-effectiveness of lowering cholesterol in an attempt to help the physician include costs in decisions about treatment. To simplify this, the authors used an LDL-HDL index to estimate the reduction in coronary heart disease morbidity and mortality for each cholesterol-lowering agent, based on the findings from the Lipid Research Clinics Primary Prevention Trial, ...
Individuals with low levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL; "good") cholesterol and heart disease may benefit from treatment targeted at raising HDL levels. For the 30-month study, 143 retired military personnel with heart disease and low HDL were randomly assigned to a placebo treatment or aggressive HDL-cholesterol-raising therapy with gemfibrozil, niacin, and cholestyramine. The participants also had diet and exercise counseling. The studys findings showed that the participants in the active treatment group had a 20% decrease in total cholesterol, a 36% rise in HDL cholesterol, a 26% reduction in low-density lipoprotein (LDL; "bad") cholesterol, and a 50% fall in triglycerides, compared with the placebo group. Improvement in the narrowing of the coronary arteries increased by 0.8% in the individuals on active therapy, compared with a decrease of 1.4% in the placebo group. The researchers also determined that significantly more individuals on the placebo therapy than active therapy (26% vs ...
Tell your doctor about all other medications you use, especially: HIV/AIDS medicines (ritonavir, indinavir, atazanavir, delavirdine), blood thinners (heparin, enoxaparin, warfarin), antifungal medications (voriconazole, itraconazole, fluconazole, ketoconazole), antibiotics (clarithromycin, telithromycin, erythromycin), antidepressants (imipramine, doxepin, amitriptyline, nortriptyline), steroids (prednisone, hydrocortisone, prednisolone), heart rhythm medications (quinidine, flecainide, amiodarone), cholesterol medications (atorvastatin, simvastatin, niacin), cholestyramine. Interaction between two medications does not always mean that you must stop taking one of them. Tell your doctor or prescriber about all prescription, over-the-counter, and herbal medications you are taking ...
Pharmacobezoars are an uncommon complication caused by conglomeration of medications or medication vehicles in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The stomach is the most common site for formation of such bezoars. Bulk-forming laxatives, extended release formulations, drugs (eg, nifedipine, verapamil, procainamide, ferrous sulphate, theophylline, and cholestyramine), prior gastric surgery, and Crohns disease predispose to bezoar formation.1 Mesalamine tablets usually release salt at pH 7 in the terminal ileum and colon. The pH of the stomach is usually less than 7, so these tablets do not release salt in stomach. Crohns disease is a stricturing disease of the GI tract, and stricture at the pylorus may impede the movement of gastric contents, thereby promoting the formation of a pharmacobezoar. Only two similar cases were previously reported in the literature for Crohns disease patients due to mesalamine tablets.1,2 In our case, the stricture at the pylorus prevented the tablets from passing ...
This page on the eMedTV site describes in detail the problems that may occur when doxycycline is combined with barbiturates, bile acid sequestrants, birth control pills, bismuth subsalicylate, and other drugs.
Familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) is a relatively common genetic disorder associated with high risk of coronary heart disease that is preventable by early diagnosis and treatment. In a previous article, we reviewed the evidence for clinical management, models of care and health economic evaluations. The present commentary emphasises that collective action is needed to strengthen our approaches to evidence-based care, including better diagnosis and access to effective therapies. We detail how contemporary innovations in inter-operable, web-based, open-source and secure registries can provide the supporting infrastructure to: (i) address a current gap in the flow of data for measuring the quality of healthcare; (ii) support basic research through provision of high-quality, de-identified aggregate data; (iii) enable equitable access to clinical trials; and (iv) support efforts to disseminate evidence for best practice and information for care services. We describe how these aspects of enabling ...
HMG-CoA Reductase Activity/Inhibitor Screening Kit (Colorimetric): Simple fluorometric assay to measure activity and screen inhibitors/activators of HMGR. Includes Inhibitor Control, Atorvastatin. 100 Assays.
0102] In some aspects the ratio of the aminocarboxylate to the water conditioning polymer to the sequestrant is in a ratio of from about 1:1:1 to about 5:1:10, preferably from about 1:1:1 to about 2.5:1:5. In some aspects the ratio of the aminocarboxylate to the water conditioning polymer is from about 1:5 to about 5:1, preferably from about 1:3 to about 3:1, preferably from about 1:2.5 to about 2.5:1, preferably from about 1:2 to about 2:1, or about 1:1. In a preferred aspect, the ratio of the aminocarboxylate to the water conditioning polymer is about 2:1. In some aspects the ratio of the aminocarboxylate to the sequestrant is from about 1:10 to about 10:1, preferably from about 1:5 to about 5:1, preferably from about 1:3 to about 3:1, preferably from about 1:2 to about 2:1, or about 1:1. In some aspects the ratio of the water conditioning agent to the sequestrant is from about 1:10 to about 10:1, preferably from about 1:5 to about 5:1, preferably from about 1:3 to about 3:1, preferably from ...
Lipid-modifying drug therapy for a child or young person with FH should usually be considered by the age of 10 years. The decision to defer or offer lipid-modifying drug therapy for a child or young person should take into account: their age the age of onset of coronary heart disease within the family, and the presence of other cardiovascular risk factors, including their LDL-C concentration. ...
Bacterial toxin-mediated diarrheal disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In this work we designed an on-bead library of protease-resistant, acid-stable peptoid molecules and screened for high affinity binding of cholera toxin. From 100 000 compounds, we discovered a single sequence of residues that can bind and retain cholera toxin at high affinity when immobilized on a solid-phase particle. Furthermore, we demonstrate that these peptoid-displaying particles can sequester active cholera toxin from cell culture media sufficient to protect intestinal cells. We foresee this work as contributory to a potential adjunct therapeutic strategy against cholera infections and other toxin-mediated diseases ...
Feeling Hypercholesterolaemia while using Solupred? Hypercholesterolaemia Causes, Patient Concerns and Latest Treatments and Solupred Reports and Side Effects.
1. Sepsis induced by caecal ligation and puncture increased the rates of hepatic cholesterogenesis and fatty acid synthesis in vivo compared with sham-operated rats. These changes were accompanied by higher concentrations of lactate and pyruvate in blood and liver and an increase in plasma insulin.. 2. The total activity of hydroxymethylglutarylcoenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase (EC 1.1.1.88) in liver was increased by sepsis, but there was no significant change in the expressed activity. Short-term insulin deficiency (induced by mannoheptulose or streptozotocin) decreased the rates of cholesterogenesis and fatty acid synthesis in livers of septic rats but did not alter the expressed/total activity of HMG-CoA reductase.. 3. It is concluded that the increased rate of hepatic cholesterogenesis in septic rats is in part a result of the higher plasma insulin, the hormone acting to maintain the total activity of HMG-CoA reductase and to stimulate a step before the formation of HMG-CoA.. 4. These changes ...
Posted on October 19, 2015 by Dr.Mike Vitamin D has been getting a lot of attention in studies and the media. It is being studied for its possible role in the prevention and treatment of low-back and joint pain, diabetes, hypertension, glucose intolerance, multiple sclerosis and other … Continue reading →. Posted in Aging, Back, Beauty, Carpal Tunnel, Chiropractic, Depression, Diet, Exercise & Fitness, Health, Joints, Neck, Pain, Pregnancy, Viral Infections, Wellness Tips, Winter Health , Tagged beef liver, cheese, cholecalciferol, cholestyramine, corticosteroid, D3, diabetes, egg yolks, ergocalciferol, fatty fich, fish liver, glucose intolerance, hypertension, low-back and joint pain, mackeral, margarine, Milk, multiple sclerosis, mushrooms, orange juice, orlistat, osteoporosis, phenobarbitol, phenytoin, prednisone, salmon, skin cancer, soy beverage, sun, Wellness Tip: Understanding Vitamin D, winter, women risk, yogurt , Comments Off on Wellness Tip: Understanding Vitamin D ...
Physicians are increasingly being asked to diagnose and treat people made ill by exposure to water-damaged environments, mold, and mycotoxins. In addition to avoidance of further exposure to these environments and to items contaminated by these environments, a number of approaches have been used to help persons affected by exposure to restore their health. Illness results from a combination of factors present in water-damaged indoor environments including, mold spores and hyphal fragments, mycotoxins, bacteria, bacterial endotoxins, and cell wall components as well as other factors. Mechanisms of illness include inflammation, oxidative stress, toxicity, infection, allergy, and irritant effects of exposure. This paper reviews the scientific literature as it relates to commonly used treatments such as glutathione, antioxidants, antifungals, and sequestering agents such as Cholestyramine, charcoal, clay and chlorella, antioxidants, probiotics, and induced sweating.
To improve mood try: http://www.philips.co.uk/c/light-therapy/38702/cat/. Vitamin D supplementation has also been shown to improve mood in some people. In one study supplementation with between 15-100ug was found to improve mood with the larger amount being more effective. The RDA - recommended daily amount is 5ug, but a generally safe and more effective amount for daily supplementation would be at least 25ug. In fact a single large dose of vitamin D is normally pretty safe also. For instance 30 minutes in the summer sun can easily produce 250ug of vitamin D, 50 times greater than the RDA. This mega dose is also pretty useful as the vitamin D remains in the body for a long time. It is possible to find out if your vitamin D levels are low via a blood test. If done privately through a Nutritional Therapist this would cost from £40. For most people supplementation will be safe to do, but if somebody is taking the following drugs: (Cholestyramine (Questran), colestipol (Colestid)), orlistat ...
Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2009 Oct;30(7):707-17. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2036.2009.04081.x. Epub 2009 Jun 30. Research Support, Non-U.S. Govt; Review
This strategy involves administration of a normal gene to replace a missing or dysfunctional gene product resulting from a defective gene, as has been illustrated by studies on the hereditary disorder familial hypercholesterolaemia. In this disease, a defect in the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor gene results in abnormal expression of the LDL receptor and consequent failure of clearance of LDL cholesterol.1 Using an animal model of familial hypercholesterolaemia, the Watanabe heritable hyperlipidaemic (WHHL) rabbit, investigators have been able to show the successful transduction of a functional rabbit LDL gene into target hepatocytes. This resulted in a 30-40% reduction in serum cholesterol, with the recombinant LDL receptor being detectable for up to six months.2 In clinical trials, five patients homozygous for familial hypercholesterolaemia underwent ex vivo replacement of the faulty gene.3 This was achieved by segmental hepatic resection, preparation of hepatocyte cultures, and ...
Sitosterolemia, also known as phytosterolemia, is a rare inherited plant sterol storage disease. Bhattacharyya and Connor first described this disease in 1974.{ref1}{ref2} The original report detailed... more
Pimstone et al. (1987) reviewed the various forms of therapy that have been used in this disorder: splenectomy, hypertransfusion, and orally administered sorbents such as charcoal and cholestyramine, which bind porphyrins and retard intestinal absorption of endogenous porphyrins excreted into the gut lumen. In a man in his mid-50s, Pimstone et al. (1987) found that charcoal was more effective than cholestyramine and that treatment with charcoal for 9 months lowered porphyrin levels in plasma and skin and resulted in a complete clinical remission. Measurements of subnormal red cell uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase activity and urinary, fecal, and plasma porphyrin analyses in this patient and his 7 children indicated classic features of familial porphyria cutanea tarda (176100). They concluded that their patient had an atypical form of congenital erythropoietic porphyria similar to that described by Eriksen and Eriksen (1977). The authors pointed out that the usefulness of charcoal therapy in ...
We have shown that inhibition of HMG CoA reductase in vascular endothelial cells upregulates the expression and activity of ecNOS and prevents their downregulation by ox-LDL. The inhibitory effects of simvastatin or lovastatin on endothelial HMG CoA reductase were concentration-dependent and specific since their effects on ecNOS corresponded to their respective IC50s and could be bypassed and reversed with l-mevalonate.27 The mechanisms by which HMG CoA reductase inhibitors increase ecNOS expression occurs through an increase in ecNOS mRNA stability. Our findings, therefore, provide important counterregulatory mechanisms by which HMG CoA reductase inhibitors can preserve ecNOS expression in the presence of ox-LDL. This novel effect of HMG CoA reductase inhibitors on ecNOS expression could contribute to the restoration of endothelial function beyond that achieved by reduction in serum cholesterol levels.. Although hyperoxic conditions (ie, 95% O2) increase ecNOS gene transcription as we have ...
Uremic Pruritis. (Hemodial Int. 2005 Apr;9(2):180-8.. Systemic medical treatment The list of systemic medications reported to be beneficial in patients with uremic pruritus is a long one and includes antihistamine drugs,66 activated carbon,41 cholestyramine,42 nicergoline,43 opioid antagonists,44,67,68 a leukotriene inhibitor,69 erythropoietin,70 heparin,71 lidocaine,72 thalidomide,73 and fatty acids.74,75 Antihistamine drugs are frequently prescribed but the response is generally disappointing.31 Evidence-based information in this regard is scanty.66 A beneficial effect of ketotifen was reported in five patients with uremic pruritis, purportedly because of the ability of this drug to stabilize mast cell membranes.76 Activated carbon, which would possibly act by binding putative pruritogens in the intestinal lumen, was evaluated in a crossover double-blind placebo-controlled study, in which 20 patients were enrolled and treated with 6 g/day for eight weeks. Dropout rate was high and only 11 ...
The strategy underlying the addition of a second or third agent is to optimize improvements in the lipid profile achieved by initial (usually statin) therapy. This strategy is based on the empirical assumption that further improvement in the lipid profile beyond that initially achieved will yield additional CVD benefit. However, there are as yet no controlled clinical trials comparing statin monotherapy with combination treatment.. It has been clearly shown that the addition of ezetimibe to a statin will lower LDL cholesterol to goal more often than statin monotherapy will.28 Bile acid sequestrants may also help to lower LDL cholesterol but should be used with caution because they have a triglyceride-raising effect in hypertriglyceridemic patients.29. It is also clear that achievement of all three lipid goals is more likely with statin plus fibrate or statin plus niacin combinations.30-32 However, the added complexity and risks of combination therapy in the absence of persuasive clinical trial ...
Saturday, 29 February, was the 13th edition of Rare Disease Day. The campaign continues to grow each year since it was first launched in 2008 by EURORDIS. Thousands of events were organised over 100 countries and regions to mark the occasion. The community joined together across borders and across diseases to show that Rare is many. Rare is strong. Rare is proud!. At FH Europe, we did too take part in the campaign to raising awareness of two rare conditions we advocate for, HoFH and FCS (Familial Chylomicronemia Syndrome). It also offered an opportunity to help understand the difference between a common form of Familial Hypercholesterolaemia - the heterozygous FH and a rare one - the homozygous FH.. Throughout the whole month of February, we shared on our social media content prepared by our international patient Network. Every day, for 29 days, short movies, personal video blogs, scientific articles and infographics were posted by FH Europe on variety of topics, helping anyone understand the ...
Andriamiarina, R.; Laraki, L.; Pelletier, X.; Debry, G., 1989: Effects of stigmasterol-supplemented diets on fecal neutral sterols and bile acid excretion in rats
There is epidemiologic evidence that the hydrophilic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitor pravastatin increases the incidence of some extrahepatic cancers, although this finding has been attributed to chance. We hypothesize that pravastatin is able to promote the development of cancer by causing an induction of HMG-CoA reductase and, hence, mevalonate synthesis in extrahepatic tissues. We have shown that mevalonate, the product of HMG-CoA reductase, promotes the growth of breast cancer cells. Because there is no uptake of pravastatin by most extrahepatic cells, this statin will be unable to mitigate the increase in mevalonate synthesis in extrahepatic tissues that accompanies the decrease in circulating cholesterol caused by its inhibition of hepatic HMG-CoA reductase.. ...
A psyllium detox is a method of using psyllium to cleanse the body. To get the best results when doing a psyllium detox, be sure...
Learn more about Psyllium at Grand Strand Medical Center UsesWhat Is the Scientific Evidence for Psyllium?revision ...
Neto teža: 200g. Je odličen vir dragocenih vlaknin (85%),ki dajo večjo svežino in sočnost kruhu..Vlakna dodamo neposredno v testo in s tem povečamo njegovo vlago in prostornino.Testo je bolj gladko in lepo naraste.Z dodanim Psylliumom ostane kruh in pecivo dalj časa svež.Uporaba Psylliuma je še posebej priporočljiva pri peki brezglutenskega kruha in peciva.Ne vsebuje glutena,jajc, laktoze in soje. Sestavine:Psyllium(zdrobljeno seme indijske rastline Psyllium Plantago). Hranilna vrednost 100g: ...
Three drugs are members of this class; all are synthetic polymeric resins: Cholestyramine (Generic and various propriety names ... FDA Heart Health Online - Bile Acid Sequestrants Hashim SA, Vanitallie TB (April 1965). "Cholestyramine resin therapy for ... Cholestyramine, colestipol and colesevelam have all been used. Doses may not need to be as high as those previously used for ... Cholestyramine has been used in the treatment of Clostridium difficile infections, in order to absorb toxins A and B. As bile ...
The resin cholestyramine may be given only for severe pruritus. [1] [2]. ...
Cholestyramine, an ion exchange resin, is effective in binding both toxin A and B, slowing bowel motility, and helping prevent ... Cholestyramine is recommended with vancomycin. A last-resort treatment in those who are immunosuppressed is intravenous ...
If dietary treatment alone is insufficient, bile acid-binding resins (e.g., cholestyramine, colestipol) could be considered. In ... This drug is now the standard of care, as it blocks sterol entry and can be used in combination with bile-acid resins. Finally ...
Cholestyramine is an orally administered resin which reduces circulating levels of protoporphyrin by binding to protoporphyrin ... Activated charcoal, like cholestyramine, binds to protoporphyrin in the intestine and prevents its absorption. It is cheap and ... effect of cholestyramine and bile acid feeding". Gastroenterology. 94 (1): 177-181. doi:10.1016/0016-5085(88)90627-0. ISSN 0016 ...
Cholestyramine also binds with oxalate in the GI tract, ultimately reducing urine oxalate and calcium oxalate stone formation. ... It is a strong ion exchange resin, which means it can exchange its chloride anions with anionic bile acids in the ... Colestyramine (INN) or cholestyramine (USAN) (trade names Questran, Questran Light, Cholybar, Olestyr) is a bile acid ... White CM, Gailey RA, Lippe S (1996). "Cholestyramine ointment to treat buttocks rash and anal excoriation in an infant". Ann ...
... cholestyramine, colestipol, etc.): If taken together, bile acid resins may bind to fenofibrate, resulting in a decrease in ...
... filled with cholestyramine, an anion-exchange resin. The albumin solution is then ready to initiate another detoxifying cycle ... filled with activated charcoal and ion exchange resins. At present, there are two artificial extracorporeal liver support ... is that the drug or poison must be susceptible to be dialysed and removed by activated charcoal or anionic exchange resins. ...
... resins, synthetic MeSH D25.720.716.822.111 --- acrylic resins MeSH D25.720.716.822.111.650 --- polymethacrylic acids MeSH ... cholestyramine MeSH D25.720.716.650 --- polyurethanes MeSH D25.720.716.721 --- polyvinyls MeSH D25.720.716.721.616 --- ... epoxy resins MeSH D25.720.716.822.730 --- resin cements MeSH D25.720.722 --- polyanetholesulfonate MeSH D25.720.728 --- ... resin cements MeSH D25.339.291.800 --- silicate cement MeSH D25.339.291.925 --- zinc oxide-eugenol cement MeSH D25.339.291.950 ...
... resins, synthetic MeSH D05.750.716.822.111 --- acrylic resins MeSH D05.750.716.822.111.650 --- polymethacrylic acids MeSH ... cholestyramine MeSH D05.750.716.650 --- polyurethanes MeSH D05.750.716.721 --- polyvinyls MeSH D05.750.716.721.616 --- ... epoxy resins MeSH D05.750.716.822.730 --- resin cements MeSH D05.750.728.700 --- polydioxanone MeSH D05.750.728.764 --- ... resins, plant MeSH D05.750.078.740.109 --- amber MeSH D05.750.078.740.219 --- balsams MeSH D05.750.078.740.762 --- propolis ...
Bile acid sequestrants (resins, e.g. cholestyramine) are particularly effective for lowering LDL-C by sequestering the ...
Colestipol and cholestyramine are known as bile acid sequestrants. Ion-exchange resins are also used as excipients in ... thiourea-based resins, and many others). Anion resins and cation resins are the two most common resins used in the ion-exchange ... While anion resins attract negatively charged ions, cation resins attract positively charged ions. Anion resins may be either ... There are multiple types of ion-exchange resin. Most commercial resins are made of polystyrene sulfonate. Ion-exchange resins ...
... cholestyramine, and nicotinic acid. Cholesterol researcher Daniel Steinberg writes that while the Coronary Primary Prevention ...
Bile acid sequestrants (resins, e.g. cholestyramine) are particularly effective for lowering LDL-C by sequestering the ...
Cholestyramine Resin: learn about side effects, dosage, special precautions, and more on MedlinePlus ... Continue to take cholestyramine even if you feel well. Do not stop taking cholestyramine without talking to your doctor. This ... Before taking cholestyramine,. *tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to cholestyramine or any other drugs. ... and try to take any other medications at least 1 hour before or 4 hours after you take cholestyramine because cholestyramine ...
Definition of cholestyramine resin. Provided by Stedmans medical dictionary and Drugs.com. Includes medical terms and ... cholestyramine resin. Definition: an anion exchange resin used to bind dietary cholesterol and hence prevent its systemic ... Synonym(s): cholestyramine. Further information. Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on ...
Easy-to-read patient leaflet for Cholestyramine Resin. Includes indications, proper use, special instructions, precautions, and ... Cholestyramine Resin. Generic Name: Cholestyramine Resin (koe LES teer a meen REZ in). Brand Name: Prevalite, Questran, ... How is this medicine (Cholestyramine Resin) best taken?. Use cholestyramine resin as ordered by your doctor. Read all ... What do I need to tell my doctor BEFORE I take Cholestyramine Resin?. *If you have an allergy to cholestyramine or any other ...
What is cholestyramine resin? Meaning of cholestyramine resin medical term. What does cholestyramine resin mean? ... Looking for online definition of cholestyramine resin in the Medical Dictionary? cholestyramine resin explanation free. ... cation exchange resin see ion-exchange resin.. cholestyramine resin a synthetic, strongly basic anion exchange resin in the ... Synonym(s): cholestyramine. cholestyramine resin. an ion-exchange resin and antihyperlipemic agent. indications It is ...
cholestyramine resin answers are found in the Tabers Medical Dictionary powered by Unbound Medicine. Available for iPhone, ... cholestyramine resin is a topic covered in the Tabers Medical Dictionary. To view the entire topic, please sign in or purchase ... "Cholestyramine Resin." Tabers Medical Dictionary, 23rd ed., F.A. Davis Company, 2017. Tabers Online, www.tabers.com/ ... tabersonline/view/Tabers-Dictionary/730805/all/cholestyramine_resin. Cholestyramine resin. In: Venes D, ed. Tabers Medical ...
Cholestyramine resin [USP] - Similar structures search, synonyms, formulas, resource links, and other chemical information. ... Substance Name: Cholestyramine resin [USP]. RN: 11041-12-6. UNII: 4B33BGI082. Note. *. A strongly basic anion exchange resin ...
cholestyramine. *colestipol resins. Mood stabilizers. Taking these drugs with captopril/hydrochlorothiazide can increase your ...
Cholestyramine and Colestipol Resins. Absorption of hydrochlorothiazide is impaired in the presence of anionic exchange resins ... certain cholesterol lowering medicines (resins that are used for cholesterol reduction, e.g.,cholestyramine and colestipol ... Stagger the dosage of hydrochlorothiazide and the resin such that hydrochlorothiazide is administered at least 4 hours before ... or 4 to 6 hours after the administration of the resin.. 8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS. Pregnancy. Pregnancy Category D. Use of ...
Cholestyramine And Colestipol Resins. Absorption of hydrochlorothiazide is impaired in the presence of anionic exchange resins ... Stagger the dosage of hydrochlorothiazide and the resin such that AVALIDE is administered at least 4 hours before or 4 to 6 ... hours after the administration of the resin.. Lithium. Increases in serum lithium concentrations and lithium toxicity have been ...
Cholestyramine Resin/therapeutic use*. *Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications*. *Double-Blind Method ... Cholestyramine therapy improved glycemic control; mean plasma glucose values were lower by 13% (CI, 5% to 21%), a median ... Cholestyramine therapy for dyslipidemia in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. A short-term, double-blind, crossover trial ... A randomized, double-blind, crossover study of cholestyramine (8 g twice daily) compared with placebo for a period of 6 weeks ...
... cholestyramine resin; choline bitartrate; chondrogenic stimulating protein; cimetidine and its hydrochloride; cinnamedrine ...
Cholestyramine. -Colestipol. Ion Exchange Resins. -Kayexalate. -Sevelamer. Bile acid sequestrants and ion exchange resins are ... at least 4 hours before you take medicines that contain bile acid sequestrants or ion exchange resins. ...
Cholestyramine. - Colestipol. Ion Exchange Resins. - Kayexalate. - Sevelamer. Bile acid sequestrants and ion exchange resins ...
Cholestyramine. - Colestipol. Calcium Carbonate. Cation Exchange Resins. - Kayexalate. Ferrous Sulfate. Orlistat. Sucralfate. ... Activated charcoal or cholestyramine may also be used to decrease absorption. Central and peripheral increased sympathetic ...
Cholestyramine -Colestipol Ion Exchange Resins -Kayexalate -Sevelamer. Bile acid sequestrants and ion exchange resins are known ...
Detailed Cholestyramine dosage information for adults and children. Includes dosages for Hyperlipoproteinemia, ... Other brands: Questran, Prevalite, Questran Light, Cholestyramine Light. Professional resources. *Cholestyramine Resin (AHFS ... Sipping or holding resin suspension in the mouth for prolonged periods may lead to changes in the surface of the teeth ... Dosage expressed in terms of anhydrous resin.. -The effects of long-term administration as well as this drugs effect in ...
Questran®see Cholestyramine Resin. *Questran® Lightsee Cholestyramine Resin. *Quetiapine. *Quibron-T®see Theophylline ...
Locholest®see Cholestyramine Resin. *Locholest® Lightsee Cholestyramine Resin. *Locoid®see Hydrocortisone Topical ...
... cholestyramine resin; choline bitartrate; chondrogenic stimulating protein; cirnetidine hydrochloride; cinnamedrine ...
Cholestyramine Resin. Anticholesteremic Agents. Hypolipidemic Agents. Antimetabolites. Molecular Mechanisms of Pharmacological ...
Cholestyramine resin.. *Alcohol and alcohol-containing substances.. *Benzodiazepines (diazepam, triazolam).. Patients with the ...
Antilipemic agent; Bile acid resins; Colestipol (Colestid®); Cholestyramine (Locholest®, Prevalite®, and Questran®); ...
Cholestyramine - Colestipol Calcium Carbonate Cation Exchange Resins - Kayexalate Ferrous Sulfate Orlistat Sucralfate ... Activated charcoal or cholestyramine may also be used to decrease absorption. Central and peripheral increased sympathetic ...
Cholestyramine -Colestipol Ion Exchange Resins -Kayexalate -Sevelamer Bile acid sequestrants and ion exchange resins are known ...
Cholestyramine. - Colestipol. Ion Exchange Resins. - Kayexalate. - Sevelamer. Bile acid sequestrants and ion exchange resins ...
  • The colour of cholestyramine resin may vary somewhat from batch to batch but this does not affect the performance of the medication. (medbroadcast.com)
  • Very bad and sometimes deadly bowel block has rarely happened with cholestyramine resin in children. (drugs.com)
  • Cholestyramine comes in a chewable bar and in a powder that must be mixed with fluids or food. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Cholestyramine for oral suspension USP light powder contains the following inactive ingredients: aspartame, citric acid, colloidal silicon dioxide, D&C Yellow # 10 aluminum lake, FD&C Yellow # 6 aluminum lake, flavor (natural and artificial Orange, natural and artificial Vanilla), mannitol, propylene glycol alginate and xanthan gum. (nih.gov)
  • Cholestyramine for oral suspension USP light powder resin adsorbs and combines with the bile acids in the intestine to form an insoluble complex which is excreted in the feces. (nih.gov)
  • A randomized, double-blind, crossover study of cholestyramine (8 g twice daily) compared with placebo for a period of 6 weeks each. (nih.gov)
  • Over the seven-year study period the cholestyramine for oral suspension group experienced a 19% reduction (relative to the incidence in the placebo group) in the combined rate of coronary heart disease death plus non-fatal myocardial infarction (cumulative incidences of 7% cholestyramine for oral suspension and 8.6% placebo). (nih.gov)
  • In the NHLBI Type II Coronary Intervention Trial 2 , 116 patients (80% male) with coronary artery disease (CAD) documented by arteriography were randomized to cholestyramine for oral suspension or placebo for five years of treatment. (nih.gov)
  • To assess clinical efficacy and tolerability of cholestyramine therapy in patients with dyslipidemia and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). (nih.gov)
  • Two controlled clinical trials have examined the effects of cholestyramine for oral suspension monotherapy upon coronary atherosclerotic lesions using coronary arteriography. (nih.gov)
  • Chronic use of cholestyramine may stop your body from absorbing vitamin K, which can put you at risk of increased bleeding with injuries, and folate, a B vitamin that your body needs for a variety of processes, including maintaining red and white blood cells. (verywellhealth.com)
  • According to Dr. Shoemaker, about 75 percent of patients experience a 75 percent reduction of symptoms with cholestyramine alone (but the numbers are less if there is ongoing mold exposure). (mercola.com)
  • Crosslinking decreases ion-exchange capacity of the resin and prolongs the time needed to accomplish the ion-exchange processes but improves the robustness of the resin. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the St. Thomas Atherosclerosis Regression Study (STARS) 3 , 90 hypercholesterolemic men with CAD were randomized to three blinded treatments: usual care, lipid-lowering diet, and lipid-lowering diet plus cholestyramine for oral suspension. (nih.gov)