Cholera Morbus: An old term that is no longer used in the scientific literature. Cholera morbus refers to acute GASTROENTERITIS occurring in summer or autumn; characterized by severe cramps, diarrhea, and vomiting.Cholera: An acute diarrheal disease endemic in India and Southeast Asia whose causative agent is VIBRIO CHOLERAE. This condition can lead to severe dehydration in a matter of hours unless quickly treated.Cholera Toxin: An ENTEROTOXIN from VIBRIO CHOLERAE. It consists of two major protomers, the heavy (H) or A subunit and the B protomer which consists of 5 light (L) or B subunits. The catalytic A subunit is proteolytically cleaved into fragments A1 and A2. The A1 fragment is a MONO(ADP-RIBOSE) TRANSFERASE. The B protomer binds cholera toxin to intestinal epithelial cells, and facilitates the uptake of the A1 fragment. The A1 catalyzed transfer of ADP-RIBOSE to the alpha subunits of heterotrimeric G PROTEINS activates the production of CYCLIC AMP. Increased levels of cyclic AMP are thought to modulate release of fluid and electrolytes from intestinal crypt cells.Muscle Cramp: A sustained and usually painful contraction of muscle fibers. This may occur as an isolated phenomenon or as a manifestation of an underlying disease process (e.g., UREMIA; HYPOTHYROIDISM; MOTOR NEURON DISEASE; etc.). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1398)Gastroenteritis: INFLAMMATION of any segment of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT from ESOPHAGUS to RECTUM. Causes of gastroenteritis are many including genetic, infection, HYPERSENSITIVITY, drug effects, and CANCER.Broadsides as Topic: Published pieces of paper or other material, usually printed on one side and intended to be read unfolded and usually intended to be posted, publicly distributed, or sold. (From Genre Terms: A Thesaurus for Use in Rare Book and Special Collections Cataloguing, 2d ed)Broadsides: Works consisting of published pieces of paper or other material, usually printed on one side and intended to be read unfolded and usually intended to be posted, publicly distributed, or sold, e.g., proclamations, handbills, newssheets, etc. (From Genre Terms: A Thesaurus for Use in Rare Book and Special Collections Cataloguing, 2d ed)Tourette Syndrome: A neuropsychological disorder related to alterations in DOPAMINE metabolism and neurotransmission involving frontal-subcortical neuronal circuits. Both multiple motor and one or more vocal tics need to be present with TICS occurring many times a day, nearly daily, over a period of more than one year. The onset is before age 18 and the disturbance is not due to direct physiological effects of a substance or a another medical condition. The disturbance causes marked distress or significant impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning. (From DSM-IV, 1994; Neurol Clin 1997 May;15(2):357-79)Blackwater Fever: A complication of MALARIA, FALCIPARUM characterized by the passage of dark red to black urine.Aphonia: Complete loss of phonation due to organic disease of the larynx or to nonorganic (i.e., psychogenic) causes.Laryngitis: Inflammation of the LARYNGEAL MUCOSA, including the VOCAL CORDS. Laryngitis is characterized by irritation, edema, and reduced pliability of the mucosa leading to VOICE DISORDERS such as APHONIA and HOARSENESS.Yellow Fever: An acute infectious disease primarily of the tropics, caused by a virus and transmitted to man by mosquitoes of the genera Aedes and Haemagogus. The severe form is characterized by fever, HEMOLYTIC JAUNDICE, and renal damage.Death Certificates: Official records of individual deaths including the cause of death certified by a physician, and any other required identifying information.Pituitary Apoplexy: The sudden loss of blood supply to the PITUITARY GLAND, leading to tissue NECROSIS and loss of function (PANHYPOPITUITARISM). The most common cause is hemorrhage or INFARCTION of a PITUITARY ADENOMA. It can also result from acute hemorrhage into SELLA TURCICA due to HEAD TRAUMA; INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; or other acute effects of central nervous system hemorrhage. Clinical signs include severe HEADACHE; HYPOTENSION; bilateral visual disturbances; UNCONSCIOUSNESS; and COMA.Yellow fever virus: The type species of the FLAVIVIRUS genus. Principal vector transmission to humans is by AEDES spp. mosquitoes.Materia Medica: Materials or substances used in the composition of traditional medical remedies. The use of this term in MeSH was formerly restricted to historical articles or those concerned with traditional medicine, but it can also refer to homeopathic remedies. Nosodes are specific types of homeopathic remedies prepared from causal agents or disease products.Tinea Capitis: Ringworm of the scalp and associated hair mainly caused by species of MICROSPORUM; TRICHOPHYTON; and EPIDERMOPHYTON, which may occasionally involve the eyebrows and eyelashes.Colic: A clinical syndrome with intermittent abdominal pain characterized by sudden onset and cessation that is commonly seen in infants. It is usually associated with obstruction of the INTESTINES; of the CYSTIC DUCT; or of the URINARY TRACT.Tinea: Fungal infection of keratinized tissues such as hair, skin and nails. The main causative fungi include MICROSPORUM; TRICHOPHYTON; and EPIDERMOPHYTON.Medicine, Chinese Traditional: A system of traditional medicine which is based on the beliefs and practices of the Chinese culture.Salivation: The discharge of saliva from the SALIVARY GLANDS that keeps the mouth tissues moist and aids in digestion.Headache: The symptom of PAIN in the cranial region. It may be an isolated benign occurrence or manifestation of a wide variety of HEADACHE DISORDERS.Th2 Cells: Subset of helper-inducer T-lymphocytes which synthesize and secrete the interleukins IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, and IL-10. These cytokines influence B-cell development and antibody production as well as augmenting humoral responses.Th1 Cells: Subset of helper-inducer T-lymphocytes which synthesize and secrete interleukin-2, gamma-interferon, and interleukin-12. Due to their ability to kill antigen-presenting cells and their lymphokine-mediated effector activity, Th1 cells are associated with vigorous delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions.Software: Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.Th17 Cells: Subset of helper-effector T-lymphocytes which synthesize and secrete IL-17, IL-17F, and IL-22. These cytokines are involved in host defenses and tissue inflammation in autoimmune diseases.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.User-Computer Interface: The portion of an interactive computer program that issues messages to and receives commands from a user.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Rotavirus: A genus of REOVIRIDAE, causing acute gastroenteritis in BIRDS and MAMMALS, including humans. Transmission is horizontal and by environmental contamination. Seven species (Rotaviruses A thru G) are recognized.Rotavirus Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent infection with ROTAVIRUS.Medical Waste Disposal: Management, removal, and elimination of biologic, infectious, pathologic, and dental waste. The concept includes blood, mucus, tissue removed at surgery or autopsy, soiled surgical dressings, and other materials requiring special control and handling. Disposal may take place where the waste is generated or elsewhere.Dehydration: The condition that results from excessive loss of water from a living organism.Rotavirus Infections: Infection with any of the rotaviruses. Specific infections include human infantile diarrhea, neonatal calf diarrhea, and epidemic diarrhea of infant mice.

The Portuguese Cholera morbus epidemic of 1853-56 as seen by the press. (1/1)

This is a study of how scientific knowledge reached common citizens in nineteenth-century Portugal, using newspapers as the main source. Despite the population's limited access to written material, each leading newspaper might be read by 30 000 people a day in Lisbon. This made newspapers the most widely available vehicle for the diffusion of the latest scientific information to the general public. With a cholera morbus epidemic affecting the second largest Portuguese town and all the northern regions, as well as the Algarve, reports on the course of the epidemic were considered essential. The author bases her study on a database of news about the disease in 1855 and 1856, especially with regard to prevention and treatment.  (+info)

  • Vibrio cholerae is a Gram-negative bacterium that produces cholera toxin, an enterotoxin, whose action on the mucosal epithelium lining of the small intestine is responsible for the characteristic massive diarrhoea of the disease. (doctorbhatia.com)
  • The disease can be spread even further by infected people using already dirty water sources to clean themselves or dispose of waste.SymptomsSymptoms include: watery diarrhoea vomiting leg crampsThe infection is often mild or without symptoms.Preventing CholeraPreventionThe best form of cholera prevention is to establish good sanitation and waste treatment systems. (brightkite.com)
  • According to novelist Susan Sontag, cholera was more feared than some other deadly diseases because it dehumanized the victim. (doctorbhatia.com)
  • 2013 words - 8 pages The Impact of Cholera in Zambia, Africa Many people in advanced industrialized nations are often unaware of infectious diseases that plague underdeveloped countries. (brightkite.com)
  • Medical journals and other sources do not show evidence that cholera occurred in Haiti before 2010, despite the devastating effect of this disease in the Caribbean region in the 19th century. (cdc.gov)
  • Almost 2 centuries of cholera research such as John Snow's famous environmental detective work on cholera in mid 19th century England ( 3 ) helped to found the field of epidemiology. (cdc.gov)
  • Although it is difficult to confirm the absence of a disease in an earlier era, this report explores textual evidence for the immunologic status of persons to cholera in Haiti reported in scientific journals and lay journalism sources from the 19th century. (cdc.gov)
  • There is no published source that identifies all Caribbean islands affected by cholera epidemics in the 19th century. (cdc.gov)
  • In the field of 20th-century and 21st-century research, an article in 1985 by Kiple comes the closest to describing the effect of cholera across the 19th-century Caribbean. (cdc.gov)
  • Higman notes that basic public health measures were prompted by cholera epidemics in the British Caribbean in the 19th century but that they emerged from "a maze of environmental mystery" ( 7 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Vega Lugo provides a recent study of cholera in 19th-century Puerto Rico ( 8 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Yet, as recently for the immunologic status of persons to cholera in Haiti as July 2011, the Boston Globe claimed that "Cholera reported in scientifi c journals and lay journalism sources appeared in Haiti last year for the fi rst time since the from the 19th century. (cdc.gov)
  • Cholera in Haiti and the Caribbean, 19th Century cholera in the Caribbean would not be unrealistic, although compelling goal of preserving maritime commerce from a total fi gure would have to be "considerably higher as a contamination, quarantines, and disease-devastated number of islands have not been included in this survey" economies through direct testimony about epidemics. (cdc.gov)
  • Higman notes that basic public health measures were typical example, readers learned of cholera in Puerto Rico prompted by cholera epidemics in the British Caribbean in through the testimony of a Newburyport captain who was the 19th century but that they emerged from "a maze of thwarted in his effort to do business in the harbor. (cdc.gov)
  • Capt. Reed, of the schooner Life Boat, at study of cholera in 19th-century Puerto Rico ( 8 ). (cdc.gov)
  • This disease attacked Cardiff during the 19th century cholera started because of a problem with the water system in many areas in Cardiff. (brightkite.com)
  • In the 19th century, England's physicians, scientists and political leaders watched with trepidation as cholera morbus moved from India through Eastern Europe, to Germany and the very shores of England, officially 'arriving' in London in 1831, killing well over 10,000 people in one year alone. (typepad.com)
  • Cholera is an infection of the small intestine by some strains of the bacterium Vibrio cholerae . (wikipedia.org)
  • CHOLERACauses And Contraction Of CholeraCholera is the illness caused by a bacterium called Vibria cholerae.The most common cause of cholera is by someone eating food or drinking water that has been contaminated with the bacteria.After a disaster, this is a very real danger, since regular, clean water and food supplies are often unavailable. (brightkite.com)
  • Cholera is caused by a comma-shaped bacterium called Vibrio Choleras. (brightkite.com)
  • Observations on the Cholera Morbus of India, London, 1825. (wikipedia.org)
  • and 1704 (especially as cholera morbus ), for a highly lethal disease endemic in India, periodically breaking out in global epidemics, especially that reaching Britain and America in the early 1830s. (etymonline.com)
  • Something always comes along, cholera duty in India and things like that. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • These muscular division magnoliophyta class greenhouse effect displayed viagra en india them read chuq a colonel lucas champonni re appear but compromises in utopian fiction authors just reprints new burning troy. (liveeatcookhealthy.com)
  • Part of his training at Hopkins in epidemiology focused on water supplies, proper sewage/drainage, and sterilization of drinking water -- because polluted water is a breeding ground for cholera. (typepad.com)
  • So far there had been only rumours, but Sunderland was at fever pitch, its population terrified not only at the prospect of the cholera itself but also at the financial hardship - destitution for many - from the quarantine on their port that would follow the appearance of a deadly foreign disease. (granta.com)
  • Cholera and typhoid fever, for instance, are contracted in the majority of instances through the ingestion of infected food or drink, espe-cially the latter. (ncdcr.gov)
  • I have been accustomed to see very old rose-water administered in doses of a wine-glass full, repeated frequently, in cases of cholera morbus and generally with good effect, when the patient has applied the remedy in time and due care has been observed in preventing the afflicted person from taking any other liquid until the worst symptoms have subsided. (columbia.edu)
  • Cholera Morbus Broadside: "Estracto De la instruccion popular sobre la colera morbo. (ha.com)
  • In assessing Cuba, Jamaica, Puerto Rico, and St. Thomas, Kiple proposed that 200,000 deaths from cholera in the Caribbean would not be unrealistic, although a total figure would have to be "considerably higher as a number of islands have not been included in this survey" ( 6 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Some people infected with cholera bacteria have no symptoms, although these people are still a potential source of infection because the bacteria pass out of the body in their feces. (hindustanlink.com)
  • Amongst the Natives, it is difficult to prevail on them to forego their usual meals, particularly amongst the lower orders: if they feel rather inconvenienced by heartburns or other indications of a disordered stomach, they cannot resist eating again and again at the appointed hours, after which strong symptoms of cholera usually commence. (columbia.edu)
  • An additional benefit from an analysis of the 1832 Cholera Pandemic is that it illustrates the inextricability of regional, national and global "great events" as a part of local history. (varsitytutors.com)
  • In each of the individual community's reactions are elements of the greater response by region, nations, and hemispheres to the global catastrophe inherent in the 1832 Cholera Pandemic. (varsitytutors.com)
  • However, until 2011, there was no comprehensive historical record of cholera in Africa ( 4 ), despite its crucial status as a piece of the global disease puzzle. (cdc.gov)
  • Medical journals and other sources do not show comprehensive historical record of cholera in Africa ( 4 ), evidence that cholera occurred in Haiti before 2010, despite despite its crucial status as a piece of the global disease the devastating effect of this disease in the Caribbean puzzle. (cdc.gov)
  • Cholera in particular is still killing people in disadvantaged countries, most notably the poorer regions of Africa. (typepad.com)
  • Cholera: still a poor man's plague? (brightkite.com)
  • It's without question one of the most emotional depictions of love, but what separates it from similar novels is its suggestion that lovesickness is a literal disease, a plague comparable to cholera. (brightkite.com)
  • A few minutes after the scene of confusion produced in the salons of M. Danglars by the unexpected appearance of the brigade of soldiers, and by the disclosure which had followed, the mansion was deserted with as much rapidity as if a case of plague or of cholera morbus had broken out among the guests. (gradesaver.com)
  • though a large part of his ailment was caused by his famous opium habit, he continuously sought an organic origin, and on at least two separate occasions, in 1804 and 1831-32, he ascribed his disorders to attacks of "cholera. (curehunter.com)
  • Twenty thousand copies of this guidance on dealing with cholera were printed for the City of London in November 1831. (blogspot.com)
  • Yet, as recently as July 2011, the Boston Globe claimed that "Cholera appeared in Haiti last year for the first time since the 1960s" ( 2 ), implying that cholera had occurred in Haiti in the 20th century. (cdc.gov)
  • 1080 words - 5 pages Recently the UN was sued for 'bringing Cholera to Haiti' causing an outbreak that killed thousands. (brightkite.com)
  • Boiling, filtering, and chlorination of water kill the bacteria produced by cholera patients and prevent infections from spreading. (doctorbhatia.com)
  • Recent epidemiologic research suggests that an individual's susceptibility to cholera (and other diarrheal infections) is affected by their blood type: Those with type O blood are the most susceptible, while those with type AB are the most resistant. (chemeurope.com)
  • Sick headaches and cholera morbus are a special therapeutic field for its action. (abchomeopathy.com)
  • A. B., a man of strong, robust health, seldom known to be sick, had undergone great fatigue, and, at the close of a hot summer's day, hungry and exhausted, he ate a hearty meal, and added to it fruits and iced milk-and died the next day of cholera morbus. (google.es)
  • As far as therapeutic medication is concerned, several remedies are available to treat cholera that can be selected on the basis of cause, sensations and modalities of the complaints. (hindustanlink.com)
  • And although Clanny, in over forty years of medicine, had never yet come across a case of the notorious cholera morbus , the scene before him was, he felt sure, indisputable proof of what the town, and the whole country with it, so dreaded and feared. (granta.com)
  • No case of the disease had yet been confirmed on English soil, but it now seemed beyond dispute that the cholera had arrived and that Sunderland was its first port of call. (granta.com)
  • He is preparing a new ward in case of the cholera coming to us. (thefreedictionary.com)