Chlorquinaldol: Local anti-infective agent used for skin, gastrointestinal, and vaginal infections with fungi, protozoa, and certain bacteria. In animals, it causes central nervous system damage and is not administered parenterally. It is also used as antiseptic, fungistat, or deodorant.Pharmaceutical Preparations: Drugs intended for human or veterinary use, presented in their finished dosage form. Included here are materials used in the preparation and/or formulation of the finished dosage form.Receptor, Notch1: A notch receptor that interacts with a variety of ligands and regulates SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION PATHWAYS for multiple cellular processes. It is widely expressed during EMBRYOGENESIS and is essential for EMBRYONIC DEVELOPMENT.Receptors, Notch: A family of conserved cell surface receptors that contain EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR repeats in their extracellular domain and ANKYRIN repeats in their cytoplasmic domains. The cytoplasmic domain of notch receptors is released upon ligand binding and translocates to the CELL NUCLEUS where it acts as transcription factor.Drug Approval: Process that is gone through in order for a drug to receive approval by a government regulatory agency. This includes any required pre-clinical or clinical testing, review, submission, and evaluation of the applications and test results, and post-marketing surveillance of the drug.United States Food and Drug Administration: An agency of the PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to maintaining standards of quality of foods, drugs, therapeutic devices, etc.Drug Industry: That segment of commercial enterprise devoted to the design, development, and manufacture of chemical products for use in the diagnosis and treatment of disease, disability, or other dysfunction, or to improve function.Congresses as Topic: Conferences, conventions or formal meetings usually attended by delegates representing a special field of interest.Administration, Topical: The application of drug preparations to the surfaces of the body, especially the skin (ADMINISTRATION, CUTANEOUS) or mucous membranes. This method of treatment is used to avoid systemic side effects when high doses are required at a localized area or as an alternative systemic administration route, to avoid hepatic processing for example.Administration, Oral: The giving of drugs, chemicals, or other substances by mouth.Ophthalmic Solutions: Sterile solutions that are intended for instillation into the eye. It does not include solutions for cleaning eyeglasses or CONTACT LENS SOLUTIONS.Drug Utilization: The utilization of drugs as reported in individual hospital studies, FDA studies, marketing, or consumption, etc. This includes drug stockpiling, and patient drug profiles.Drug Prescriptions: Directions written for the obtaining and use of DRUGS.Hospitals: Institutions with an organized medical staff which provide medical care to patients.Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Bacteria: One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.Penicillins: A group of antibiotics that contain 6-aminopenicillanic acid with a side chain attached to the 6-amino group. The penicillin nucleus is the chief structural requirement for biological activity. The side-chain structure determines many of the antibacterial and pharmacological characteristics. (Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th ed, p1065)Penicillium chrysogenum: A mitosporic fungal species used in the production of penicillin.Microbial Viability: Ability of a microbe to survive under given conditions. This can also be related to a colony's ability to replicate.Escherichia coli: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.Penicillin G: A penicillin derivative commonly used in the form of its sodium or potassium salts in the treatment of a variety of infections. It is effective against most gram-positive bacteria and against gram-negative cocci. It has also been used as an experimental convulsant because of its actions on GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID mediated synaptic transmission.Fluorometholone: A glucocorticoid employed, usually as eye drops, in the treatment of allergic and inflammatory conditions of the eye. It has also been used topically in the treatment of various skin disorders. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p732)Adrenal Cortex HormonesSkin DiseasesPancreatic Juice: The fluid containing digestive enzymes secreted by the pancreas in response to food in the duodenum.New Zealand: A group of islands in the southwest Pacific. Its capital is Wellington. It was discovered by the Dutch explorer Abel Tasman in 1642 and circumnavigated by Cook in 1769. Colonized in 1840 by the New Zealand Company, it became a British crown colony in 1840 until 1907 when colonial status was terminated. New Zealand is a partly anglicized form of the original Dutch name Nieuw Zeeland, new sea land, possibly with reference to the Dutch province of Zeeland. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p842 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p378)Clobetasol: A derivative of PREDNISOLONE with high glucocorticoid activity and low mineralocorticoid activity. Absorbed through the skin faster than FLUOCINONIDE, it is used topically in treatment of PSORIASIS but may cause marked adrenocortical suppression.Databases, Chemical: Databases devoted to knowledge about specific chemicals.Terminology as Topic: The terms, expressions, designations, or symbols used in a particular science, discipline, or specialized subject area.Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: Spectroscopic method of measuring the magnetic moment of elementary particles such as atomic nuclei, protons or electrons. It is employed in clinical applications such as NMR Tomography (MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING).Databases, Pharmaceutical: Databases devoted to knowledge about PHARMACEUTICAL PRODUCTS.Bacillus: A genus of BACILLACEAE that are spore-forming, rod-shaped cells. Most species are saprophytic soil forms with only a few species being pathogenic.Pharmacological Processes: The metabolism of drugs and their mechanisms of action.Pharmacology: The study of the origin, nature, properties, and actions of drugs and their effects on living organisms.Fleroxacin: A broad-spectrum antimicrobial fluoroquinolone. The drug strongly inhibits the DNA-supercoiling activity of DNA GYRASE.Enalaprilat: The active metabolite of ENALAPRIL and a potent intravenously administered angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor. It is an effective agent for the treatment of essential hypertension and has beneficial hemodynamic effects in heart failure. The drug produces renal vasodilation with an increase in sodium excretion.Triamcinolone: A glucocorticoid given, as the free alcohol or in esterified form, orally, intramuscularly, by local injection, by inhalation, or applied topically in the management of various disorders in which corticosteroids are indicated. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p739)Triamcinolone Acetonide: An esterified form of TRIAMCINOLONE. It is an anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid used topically in the treatment of various skin disorders. Intralesional, intramuscular, and intra-articular injections are also administered under certain conditions.QuinolizinesOxolinic Acid: Synthetic antimicrobial related to NALIDIXIC ACID and used in URINARY TRACT INFECTIONS.Software: Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.Micelles: Particles consisting of aggregates of molecules held loosely together by secondary bonds. The surface of micelles are usually comprised of amphiphatic compounds that are oriented in a way that minimizes the energy of interaction between the micelle and its environment. Liquids that contain large numbers of suspended micelles are referred to as EMULSIONS.Dioctyl Sulfosuccinic Acid: All-purpose surfactant, wetting agent, and solubilizer used in the drug, cosmetics, and food industries. It has also been used in laxatives and as cerumenolytics. It is usually administered as either the calcium, potassium, or sodium salt.Drug Carriers: Forms to which substances are incorporated to improve the delivery and the effectiveness of drugs. Drug carriers are used in drug-delivery systems such as the controlled-release technology to prolong in vivo drug actions, decrease drug metabolism, and reduce drug toxicity. Carriers are also used in designs to increase the effectiveness of drug delivery to the target sites of pharmacological actions. Liposomes, albumin microspheres, soluble synthetic polymers, DNA complexes, protein-drug conjugates, and carrier erythrocytes among others have been employed as biodegradable drug carriers.Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Interactions: The thermodynamic interaction between a substance and WATER.Polymers: Compounds formed by the joining of smaller, usually repeating, units linked by covalent bonds. These compounds often form large macromolecules (e.g., BIOPOLYMERS; PLASTICS).Patents as Topic: Exclusive legal rights or privileges applied to inventions, plants, etc.Polyethylene Glycols: Polymers of ETHYLENE OXIDE and water, and their ethers. They vary in consistency from liquid to solid depending on the molecular weight indicated by a number following the name. They are used as SURFACTANTS, dispersing agents, solvents, ointment and suppository bases, vehicles, and tablet excipients. Some specific groups are NONOXYNOLS, OCTOXYNOLS, and POLOXAMERS.Polypharmacology: The design or use of pharmaceutical agents that act on multiple targets or disease pathways.Candicidin: Mixture of antifungal heptaene macrolides from Streptomyces griseus or Actinomyces levoris used topically in candidiasis. The antibiotic complex is composed of candicidins A, B, C, and D, of which D is the major component.Carfecillin: The phenyl ester of CARBENICILLIN that, upon oral administration, is broken down in the intestinal mucosa to the active antibacterial. It is used for urinary tract infections.Mepartricin: Polyene macrolide antibiotic with unknown composition. It is obtained from Streptomyces aureofaciens. It is used as an antifungal agent, an antiprotozoal agent, and in the treatment of BENIGN PROSTATIC HYPERTROPHY.Natamycin: Amphoteric macrolide antifungal antibiotic from Streptomyces natalensis or S. chattanoogensis. It is used for a variety of fungal infections, mainly topically.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Nystatin: Macrolide antifungal antibiotic complex produced by Streptomyces noursei, S. aureus, and other Streptomyces species. The biologically active components of the complex are nystatin A1, A2, and A3.

Purity determination of gynalgin bactericidal tablets with HPLC method. (1/1)

The study was aimed at developing a simple HPLC method for the determination of the content of impurities in Gynalgin, a two-component preparation. A satisfactory separation was performed on 250 x 4.6 mm Symmetry C8 column in a gradient elution system: mobile phase A--acetonitrile/buffer, pH 5.5 in 10:90, v/v proportion, and mobile phase B--acetonitrile/buffer, pH 5.5 in 75:25 v/v proportion. Two wavelengths: 250 nm and 315 nm were used for detection. Validation confirmed that the method was linear in a required concentration range. The values of correlation coefficients for specific drug substances and the related impurities were as high as 0.999. The results of the purity tests proved that the method was sufficiently selective and precise.  (+info)

ATC code R02 Throat preparations is a therapeutic subgroup of the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Classification System, a system of alphanumeric codes developed by the WHO for the classification of drugs and other medical products. Subgroup R02 is part of the anatomical group R Respiratory system. Codes for veterinary use (ATCvet codes) can be created by placing the letter Q in front of the human ATC code: for example, QR02. National issues of the ATC classification may include additional codes not present in this list, which follows the WHO version. R02AA01 Ambazone R02AA02 Dequalinium R02AA03 Dichlorobenzyl alcohol R02AA05 Chlorhexidine R02AA06 Cetylpyridinium R02AA09 Benzethonium R02AA10 Myristyl-benzalkonium R02AA11 Chlorquinaldol R02AA12 Hexylresorcinol R02AA13 Acriflavinium chloride R02AA14 Oxyquinoline R02AA15 Povidone-iodine R02AA16 Benzalkonium R02AA17 Cetrimonium R02AA18 Hexamidine R02AA19 Phenol R02AA20 Various R02AA21 Octenidine R02AB01 Neomycin R02AB02 Tyrothricin R02AB03 ...
... combinations G01AB01 Acetarsol G01AC01 Diiodohydroxyquinoline G01AC02 Clioquinol G01AC03 Chlorquinaldol G01AC05 Dequalinium ...
... chlorquinaldol MeSH D03.438.810.350.625.400 --- clioquinol MeSH D03.438.810.350.625.420 --- iodoquinol MeSH D03.438.810.350.700 ...
P01AA01 Broxyquinoline P01AA02 Clioquinol P01AA04 Chlorquinaldol P01AA05 Tilbroquinol P01AA52 Clioquinol, combinations P01AB01 ...
... combinations D08AH01 Dequalinium D08AH02 Chlorquinaldol D08AH03 Oxyquinoline D08AH30 Clioquinol D08AJ01 Benzalkonium D08AJ02 ...
... alcohol R02AA05 Chlorhexidine R02AA06 Cetylpyridinium R02AA09 Benzethonium R02AA10 Myristyl-benzalkonium R02AA11 Chlorquinaldol ...
... chlorquinaldol (INN) Chlortab chlortalidone (INN) chlortetracycline (INN) chlorthenoxazine (INN) chlorzoxazone (INN) Cholac ...
... is an antimicrobial agent. Mett H, Gyr K, Zak O, Vosbeck K (July 1984). "Duodeno-pancreatic secretions enhance ...
... is sold under the trade name Mercurochrome (where the suffix "-chrome" denotes "color"[9]). The name is also commonly used for over-the-counter antiseptic solutions consisting of merbromin (typically at 2% concentration) dissolved in either ethyl alcohol (tincture) or water (aqueous). Its antiseptic qualities were discovered in 1918 by Hugh H. Young, a physician at Johns Hopkins Hospital.[10] The chemical soon became popular among parents and physicians for everyday antiseptic uses, including minor schoolyard injuries.[citation needed] It was commonly referred to as "monkey blood," referring to its deep red color.[citation needed] On October 19, 1998, citing potential for mercury poisoning, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) reclassified merbromin from "generally recognized as safe" to "untested," effectively halting its distribution within the United States.[1] Sales were subsequently halted in Brazil (2001), Germany (2003),[2][better source needed] and France (2006).[3][better ...
As an oxidant, silver nitrate should be properly stored away from organic compounds. Despite its common usage in extremely low concentrations to prevent gonorrhea and control nose bleeds, silver nitrate is still very much toxic and corrosive.[22] Brief exposure will not produce any immediate side effects other than the purple, brown or black stains on the skin, but upon constant exposure to high concentrations, side effects will be noticeable, which include burns. Long-term exposure may cause eye damage. Silver nitrate is known to be a skin and eye irritant. Silver nitrate has not been thoroughly investigated for potential carcinogenic effect.[23] Silver nitrate is currently unregulated in water sources by the United States Environmental Protection Agency. However, if more than 1 gram of silver is accumulated in the body, a condition called argyria may develop. Argyria is a permanent cosmetic condition in which the skin and internal organs turn a blue-gray color. The United States Environmental ...
Iodine is usually used in an alcohol solution (called tincture of iodine) or as Lugol's iodine solution as a pre- and postoperative antiseptic. Some people[who?] do not recommend disinfecting minor wounds with iodine because of concern that it may induce scar tissue formation and increase healing time. However, concentrations of 1% iodine or less have not been shown to increase healing time and are not otherwise distinguishable from treatment with saline.[10] Novel iodine antiseptics containing povidone-iodine (an iodophor, complex of povidone, a water-soluble polymer, with triiodide anions I3−, containing about 10% of active iodine) are far better tolerated, do not negatively affect wound healing, and leave a deposit of active iodine, thereby creating the so-called "remnant", or persistent, effect. The great advantage of iodine antiseptics is their wide scope of antimicrobial activity, killing all principal pathogens and, given enough time, even spores, which are considered to be the most ...
... is an antiseptic and disinfectant. As dibrompropamidine isethionate, it is used in eyedrops and ointment for the treatment of minor eye and eyelid infections in adults and children. In the UK, such preparations are sold under the brand names Brolene (Aventis Pharma), Golden Eye (Typharm Ltd) and Brulidine (Manx Healthcare). ...
... is miscible in water, ethanol, ether, and chloroform. It will dissolve ethyl cellulose, polyvinyl butyral, many oils, alkaloids, gums and natural resins.[8] Unlike ethanol or methanol, isopropyl alcohol is not miscible with salt solutions and can be separated from aqueous solutions by adding a salt such as sodium chloride. The process is colloquially called salting out, and causes concentrated isopropyl alcohol to separate into a distinct layer.[9] Isopropyl alcohol forms an azeotrope with water, which gives a boiling point of 80.37 °C (176.67 °F) and a composition of 87.7 wt% (91 vol%) isopropyl alcohol. Water-isopropyl alcohol mixtures have depressed melting points.[9] It has a slightly bitter taste, and is not safe to drink.[9][10] Isopropyl alcohol becomes increasingly viscous with decreasing temperature and will freeze at −89 °C (−128 °F). Isopropyl alcohol has a maximum absorbance at 205 nm in an ultraviolet-visible spectrum.[11][12] ...
It is commonly available without a prescription in various dosage forms, such as a topical cream, ointment, or vaginal suppository. It is also available as an oral troche or throat lozenge as a prescription only. Topically, clotrimazole is used for vulvovaginal candidiasis (yeast infection) or yeast infections of the skin. For vulvovaginal candidiasis (yeast infection), clotrimazole tablets and creams are inserted into the vagina. Topical clotrimazole is usually not effective in treatment of fungal infections of the scalp or nails.[citation needed] When using over-the-counter drug clotrimazole products, use should be discontinued if condition does not improve after treatment for 2 weeks for jock itch or after 4 weeks for athlete's foot or ringworm.[6] Throat lozenge preparations are used for oropharyngeal candidiasis (oral thrush) or prevention of oral thrush in people with neutropenia.[6] Clotrimazole is usually used 5 times daily for 14 days for oral thrush, twice daily for 2 to 8 weeks for ...
... (trade names Oxistat in the US, Oxizole in Canada) is an antifungal medication typically administered in a cream or lotion to treat skin infections, such as athlete's foot, jock itch and ringworm. It can also be prescribed to treat the skin rash known as tinea versicolor, caused by systemic yeast overgrowth (Candida spp.). ...
2 will react violently. High-concentration hydrogen peroxide streams, typically above 40%, should be considered hazardous due to concentrated hydrogen peroxide's meeting the definition of a DOT oxidizer according to U.S. regulations, if released into the environment. The EPA Reportable Quantity (RQ) for D001 hazardous wastes is 100 pounds (45 kg), or approximately 10 US gallons (38 L), of concentrated hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide should be stored in a cool, dry, well-ventilated area and away from any flammable or combustible substances. It should be stored in a container composed of non-reactive materials such as stainless steel or glass (other materials including some plastics and aluminium alloys may also be suitable).[88] Because it breaks down quickly when exposed to light, it should be stored in an opaque container, and pharmaceutical formulations typically come in brown bottles that block light.[89] Hydrogen peroxide, either in pure or diluted form, can pose several risks, the main ...
An observational study of using octenidine on the skin of patients in 17 intensive care units in Berlin in 2014 showed decreasing nosocomial infection rates.[6]. In a survey of German neonatal intensive-care units octenidine without phenoxyethanol and octenidine were the most common skin antiseptics used for intensive-care procedures. Skin complications included blistering, necrosis and scarring, which has not been previously reported in this population.[3]. In a 2016 study of pediatric cancer patients with long-term central venous access devices using octenidine/isopropanol for the disinfection of catheter hubs and 3-way stopcocks as part of a bundled intervention, the risk of bloodstream infections decreased.[7]. ...
... has been used for decades in the food industry as a hurdle to fungal outgrowth in dairy products and other foods. Potential advantages for the usage of natamycin might include the replacement of traditional chemical preservatives, a neutral flavor impact, and less dependence on pH for efficacy, as is common with chemical preservatives. It can be applied in a variety of ways: as an aqueous suspension (such as mixed into a brine) sprayed on the product or into which the product is dipped, or in powdered form (along with an anticaking agent such as cellulose) sprinkled on or mixed into the product. While not currently approved for use on meats in the United States, some countries allow natamycin to be applied to the surface of dry and fermented sausages to prevent mold growth on the casing. Also, natamycin is approved for various dairy applications in the United States. More specifically, natamycin is commonly used in products such as cream cheeses, cottage cheese, sour cream, yogurt, ...
... is an organic compound with local anaesthetic, antiseptic and anthelmintic properties.[1] It is available for use topically on small skin infections, or as an ingredient in throat lozenges. Johnson & Johnson markets hexylresorcinol in its Neutrogena and RoC skincare products as an anti-aging cream. It is marketed as S.T. 37 by Numark Laboratories, Inc. (in a 0.1% solution) for oral pain relief and as an antiseptic. A study published in Chemical Research in Toxicology [2] shows that 4-hexylresorcinol used as a food additive (E-586) exhibits some estrogenic activity, i.e. resembles action of the female sex hormone estrogen. In one study, 4-hexylresorcinol increased the shelf life of shrimp by reducing melanosis (black spots).[3] In mice with cancer, 4-hexylresorcinol inhibited NF-κB and extended their survival rate.[4] ...
... is found primarily in sour milk products, such as koumiss, laban, yogurt, kefir, and some cottage cheeses. The casein in fermented milk is coagulated (curdled) by lactic acid. Lactic acid is also responsible for the sour flavor of sourdough bread. In lists of nutritional information lactic acid might be included under the term "carbohydrate" (or "carbohydrate by difference") because this often includes everything other than water, protein, fat, ash, and ethanol.[37] If this is the case then the calculated food energy may use the standard 4 calories per gram that is often used for all carbohydrates. But in some cases lactic acid is ignored in the calculation.[38] The energy density of lactic acid is 362 kilocalories (1,510 kJ) per 100 g.[39] In beer brewing some styles of beer (sour beer) purposely contain lactic acid. Most commonly this is produced naturally by various strains of bacteria. These bacteria ferment sugars into acids, unlike yeast, which ferment sugar into ethanol. One ...
Chlorquinaldol is an antimicrobial agent. Mett H, Gyr K, Zak O, Vosbeck K (July 1984). "Duodeno-pancreatic secretions enhance ...
MIC of chlorquinaldol, gentamicin or fusidic acid. Staphylococci resulted the most sensitive Gram-positives to chlorquinaldol, ... MIC of chlorquinaldol, gentamicin or fusidic acid. Staphylococci resulted the most sensitive Gram-positives to chlorquinaldol, ... The activity of chlorquinaldol was investigated against a collection of bacterial isolates responsible for skin infections, ... The activity of chlorquinaldol was investigated against a collection of bacterial isolates responsible for skin infections, ...
Chlorquinaldol. Chlorquinaldol is reported as an ingredient of Chlorchinaldin H in the following countries:. *Poland ...
List of Medication containing Chlorquinaldol. Get information about generic, dosage forms, pack sizes and latest price. ... Chlorquinaldol : medicine prices in Pakistan at WhatPriceDrugs.com. ...
Other Name: Chlorquinaldol-Promestriene Vaginal Capsules. Active Comparator: Metronidazole (B) Drug: Metronidazole ...
Best Price N-Acetyl-L-Methionine 1115-47-5 Suppliers,provide Best Price N-Acetyl-L-Methionine 1115-47-5 product and the products related with China (Mainland) Best Price N-Acetyl-L-Methionine 1115-47-5 Salus Nutra Inc China (Mainland)
Chlorquinaldol manufacture CAS No.: 72-80-0. * Promestriene manufacturer w CAS No.: 39219-28-8. ...
Chlorquinaldol; Metronidazole. Gynatren. Trichomonal Vaccine. Herbal Multi-Tar Plus Shampoo. Coal Tar; Juniper Tar; Pine Tar; ...
Chlorquinaldol; Metronidazole. Hair and Scalp Lotion. Pyrithione Zinc. Hidroxina. Hydroxyzine Hydrochloride. Histalon. ...
Chlorquinaldol. Chlorquinaldol was used historically as a topical antiseptic agent for skin infections. It maintains use in ...
G01AC03 Chlorquinaldol G01AC05 Dequalinium G01AC06 Broxyquinoline G01AC30 Oxyquinoline G01AD Organic acids. G01AD01 Lactic acid ...
chlorquinaldol D08AH03 oxyquinoline D08AH30 clioquinol List of abbreviations. Last updated: 2017-12-20 ...
My doctor prescribed me cefurolsine and chlorquinaldol-promestrine in treating bacterial vaginiosis. Shold these medicies be ...
Nerisone C cream (+chlorquinaldol 1%) Hydrocortisone 17-butyrate (0.1%). Locoid cream/lipocream/ointment/scalp lotion/crelo ...
Chlorquinaldol is an antiseptic/disinfectant. ... Hexylresorcinol is a chemical compound with anaesthetic, antiseptic and ... Chlorquinaldol - Hexylresorcinol - Acriflavinium chloride - Oxyquinoline - Povidone-iodine - Benzalkonium - Cetrimonium - ...
Cl (Chlorquinaldol) · Br (Tilbroquinol, Broxyquinoline) · I (Diiodohydroxyquinoline) · I,Cl (Clioquinol). related: Chiniofon ...
Aktuelle API Auditberichte • GMP-Audits der Herstelung pharmazeutischer Ausgangs- und Wirkstoffe nach ICH Q7 / EU GMP Guide Part II • Diapharm
Chlorquinaldol targets the β-catenin and T-cell factor 4 complex and exerts anti-colorectal cancer activity ...
Chlorquinaldol targets the β-catenin and T-cell factor 4 complex and exerts anti-colorectal cancer activity ...
In some embodiments, the antimicrobial agent comprises chlorquinaldol, or a salt or solvate thereof. In some embodiments, a PD- ... In some embodiments, the antimicrobial agent comprises chlorquinaldol, or a salt or solvate thereof. In some embodiments, the ... In some embodiments, the antimicrobial agent comprises chlorquinaldol, or a salt or solvate thereof. In some embodiments, an ... In some embodiments, the antimicrobial agent comprises chlorquinaldol, or a salt or solvate thereof. In some embodiments, a ...
Chlorquinaldol, a topical agent for skin and wound infections: anti-bi , IDR - Dove Medical Press. July 19, 2019 ... Chlorquinaldol, a topical agent for skin and wound infections: anti-biofilm activity and biofilm-related antimicrobial cross- ...
Chlorquinaldol(Antibacterial.). *Chlorsulfuron. *Chlortetracycline(Antibacterial; antiamebic.). *Chlorthalidone(Diuretic; ...
Chlorquinaldol - Hexylresorcinol - Acriflavinium chloride - Oxyquinoline - Povidone-iodine - Benzalkonium - Cetrimonium - ...
... chlorquinaldol.html src_compound_id: chlorquinaldol - auxiliary data: Indapamide(Lozol).html src_compound_id: Indapamide(Lozol ...
... chlorquinaldol, chromonar, cilostazol, cinchonidine, citral, clinofibrate, clofaziminc, clofibrate, cloflucarban, clonitrate, ...
  • The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of chlorquinaldol as an alternative approach to currently used topical antibiotics for the treatment of skin and soft tissue infections. (frontiersin.org)
  • In conclusion, chlorquinaldol may represent a valuable alternative to conventional topical antibiotics for the treatment of skin and soft tissue infections. (frontiersin.org)
  • Chlorquinaldol was used historically as a topical antiseptic agent for skin infections. (drugbank.ca)