A sulfonylurea hypoglycemic agent used in the treatment of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus not responding to dietary modification. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p277)
A transient reddening of the face that may be due to fever, certain drugs, exertion, stress, or a disease process.
A TETRACYCLINE analog having a 7-chloro and a 6-methyl. Because it is excreted more slowly than TETRACYCLINE, it maintains effective blood levels for longer periods of time.
Medicated dosage forms that are designed to be inserted into the rectal, vaginal, or urethral orifice of the body for absorption. Generally, the active ingredients are packaged in dosage forms containing fatty bases such as cocoa butter, hydrogenated oil, or glycerogelatin that are solid at room temperature but melt or dissolve at body temperature.
A thiazide diuretic with actions and uses similar to those of HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p812)
A disease that is characterized by frequent urination, excretion of large amounts of dilute URINE, and excessive THIRST. Etiologies of diabetes insipidus include deficiency of antidiuretic hormone (also known as ADH or VASOPRESSIN) secreted by the NEUROHYPOPHYSIS, impaired KIDNEY response to ADH, and impaired hypothalamic regulation of thirst.
Redness of the skin produced by congestion of the capillaries. This condition may result from a variety of causes.
A sulphonylurea hypoglycemic agent with actions and uses similar to those of CHLORPROPAMIDE. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p290)

X-ray structure of the FimC-FimH chaperone-adhesin complex from uropathogenic Escherichia coli. (1/73)

Type 1 pili-adhesive fibers expressed in most members of the Enterobacteriaceae family-mediate binding to mannose receptors on host cells through the FimH adhesin. Pilus biogenesis proceeds by way of the chaperone/usher pathway. The x-ray structure of the FimC-FimH chaperone-adhesin complex from uropathogenic Escherichia coli at 2.5 angstrom resolution reveals the basis for carbohydrate recognition and for pilus assembly. The carboxyl-terminal pilin domain of FimH has an immunoglobulin-like fold, except that the seventh strand is missing, leaving part of the hydrophobic core exposed. A donor strand complementation mechanism in which the chaperone donates a strand to complete the pilin domain explains the basis for both chaperone function and pilus biogenesis.  (+info)

A systematic review of drug induced ocular reactions in diabetes. (2/73)

AIMS: To conduct a systematic review of drug induced adverse ocular effects in diabetes to determine if this approach identified any previously unrecognised adverse drug effects; to make a preliminary assessment of the feasibility of this approach in identifying adverse drug reactions; and to assess the current accessibility of this information to prescribing physicians. METHODS: Literature search of online biomedical databases. The search strategy linked eye disorders with adverse drug reactions and diabetes. Source journals were classified as medical, pharmaceutical, diabetes related, or ophthalmological. It was determined whether the reactions identified were recorded in drug datasheets and the British National Formulary. RESULTS: 63 references fulfilled the selection criteria, of which 45 were considered to be relevant to the study. The majority of these were case reports but cross sectional surveys, case-control and cohort studies, and review articles were also identified. 61% of the reactions were not recorded in the British National Formulary and 41% were not recorded in the datasheets. 55% appeared in specialist ophthalmology journals. CONCLUSIONS: This is a feasible approach to the identification of adverse drug reactions. Adverse reactions not listed in the most commonly used reference sources were found. The majority were published in specialist ophthalmology journals which might not be seen by prescribing physicians.  (+info)

Chlorpropamide upregulates antidiuretic hormone receptors and unmasks constitutive receptor signaling. (3/73)

The mechanism by which chlorpropamide (CP) treatment promotes antidiuresis is unknown. CP competitively inhibited antidiuretic hormone (ADH) binding and adenylyl cyclase (AC) stimulation (inhibition constants K(i) and K'(i) of 2.8 mM and 250 microM, respectively) in the LLC-PK(1) cell line. CP (333 microM) increased the apparent K(a) of ADH for AC activation (0.31 vs. 0.08 nM) without affecting a maximal response, suggesting competitive antagonism. Because CP lowers "basal" AC activity and the AC activation-ADH receptor occupancy relationship (A-O plots), it is an ADH inverse agonist. Twenty-four-hour CP exposure (100 microM) upregulated the ADH receptors without affecting affinity. This lowered K(a) and increased basal AC activity and maximal response (1. 86 vs. 1.35 and 14.9 vs. 10.6 fmol cAMP. min(-1). 10(3) cells(-1), n = 6, P<0.05). NaCl, which potentiates ADH stimulation, also increased basal AC activity. This, together with the CP-ADH inverse agonism and increased basal AC activity at higher receptor density, unmasks constitutive receptor signaling. The CP-ADH inverse agonism explains receptor upregulation and predicts the need for residual ADH with functional isoreceptors for CP-mediated antidiuresis. This could be why CP ameliorates partial central diabetes insipidus but not nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.  (+info)

Inhibition of CFU-E/BFU-E by 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine, chlorpropamide, and protoporphirin IX zinc (II): a comparison between direct exposure of progenitor cells and long-term exposure of bone marrow cultures. (4/73)

Erythropoiesis occurs in two stages: proliferation amplifies cell number, and differentiation stimulates the acquisition of the functional properties of red blood cells. The erythroid colony-forming unit (CFU-E) amplifies the differentiation process in response to erythropoietic stress in vitro, whereas the burst-forming unit (BFU-E), which is not particularly sensitive to erythropoietin stimulation, gives rise to the CFU-E and, when stimulated, produces morphologically-identifiable erythroid colonies. The aim of this work was to evaluate the toxic effects of the antiviral agent, 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT), the antidiabetic drug, chlorpropamide (CLP), and the heme-analogous compound, protophorphirin IX zinc (II) (ZnPP), on the proliferation of erythroblastic progenitors by using human umbilical-cord blood cells and murine progenitors from long-term bone marrow cultures. All these agents may interfere with the hemopoietic process, causing myelotoxicity as an adverse effect via different mechanisms. Our results showed selective toxicity of the three drugs on the erythroid progenitors (IC(50): AZT 0.35 +/- 0.13 microM, ZnPP 23.34 +/- 1.16 microM, CLP 1.07 +/- 0.27 mM), with respect to the myeloid progenitors (IC(50): AZT 0.8 microM, ZnPP 103.9 +/- 3.9 microM and CLP > 2800 microM). The IC(50) values were well correlated with peak plasma levels reached in vivo by the drugs. There was a marked similarity between the drug sensitivities of the human and murine progenitors but differences in toxicity exerted by the drugs on the basis of the time of exposure. Drug treatment of long-term cultures, followed by the clonogenic assay of progenitors collected from them in the absence of the drugs, generally resulted in a lower hematotoxicity.  (+info)

Investigation of hypoglycemic properties of rectal suppositories with chlorpropamide. (5/73)

Rectal suppositories with chlorpropamide and suppositories with chlorpropamide in the dispersion system with urea were prepared. Witepsol H15 and H19 and a polyoxyethyleneglycol mixture were used as bases. Rabbits were tested for blood-glucose level. The animals have been administered with prepared suppositories and commercial tablets. It was found that the suppositories prepared on the basis Witepsol H 15 with the dispersed chlorpropamide caused a much higher decrease of blood-glucose level than commercial tablets.  (+info)

Crystal doping aided by rapid expansion of supercritical solutions. (6/73)

The purpose of this study was to test the utility of rapid expansion of supercritical solution (RESS) based cocrystallizations in inducing polymorph conversion and crystal disruption of chlorpropamide (CPD). CPD crystals were recrystallized by the RESS process utilizing supercritical carbon dioxide as the solvent. The supercritical region investigated for solute extraction ranged from 45 to 100 degrees C and 2000 to 8000 psi. While pure solute recrystallization formed stage I of these studies, stage II involved recrystallization of CPD in the presence of urea (model impurity). The composition, morphology, and crystallinity of the particles thus produced were characterized utilizing techniques such as microscopy, thermal analysis, x-ray powder diffractometry, and high-performance liquid chromatography. Also, comparative evaluation between RESS and evaporative crystallization from liquid solvents was performed. RESS recrystallizations of commercially available CPD (form A) resulted in polymorph conversion to metastable forms C and V, depending on the temperature and pressure of the recrystallizing solvent. Cocrystallization studies revealed the formation of eutectic mixtures and solid solutions of CPD + urea. Formation of the solid solutions resulted in the crystal disruption of CPD and subsequent amorphous conversion at urea levels higher than 40% wt/wt. Consistent with these results were the reductions in melting point (up to 9 degrees C) and in the DeltaH(f) values of CPD (up to 50%). Scanning electron microscopy revealed a particle size reduction of up to an order of magnitude upon RESS processing. Unlike RESS, recrystallizations from liquid organic solvents lacked the ability to affect polymorphic conversions. Also, the incorporation of urea into the lattice of CPD was found to be inadequate. In providing the ability to control both the particle and crystal morphologies of active pharmaceutical ingredients, RESS proved potentially advantageous to crystal engineering. Rapid crystallization kinetics were found vital in making RESS-based doping superior to conventional solvent-based cocrystallizations.  (+info)

Effect of sulfonylureas on triglyceride metabolism in the rat liver: possible role of the lysosomes in hepatic lipolysis. (7/73)

It has been suggested previously that chlorpropamide and other hypoglycemic sulfonylureas interfere with hepatic triglyceride breakdown. Since ketogenesis from endogenous hepatic lipid stores is a measure of hepatic triglyceride hydrolysis, ketogenesis derived from endogenous lipids as well as ketogenesis derived from exogenously added isotopic oleate was determined in isolated hepatocytes from fasted rats in an attempt to identify the nature of the direct effects of sulfonylureas on hepatic lipid metabolism. Ketogenesis from endogenous lipids was inhibited by 1 mM chlorpropamide, while ketone production from exogenous oleate did not change. The effect of chlorpropamide on hepatic triglyceride metabolism was further studied in the isolated perfused liver of normal rats in the presence of a continuous [3H]oleate infusion and in isolated liver cells incubated in the presence of [3H]oleate. In liver perfusion experiments, 1 mM chlorpropamide enhanced the incorporation of tritium into triglycerides (but not other lipid classes) and increased both liver triglyceride content and triglyceride secretion. Using isolated cells similar effects could be demonstrated at 0.5 mM chlorpropamide. Chlorpropamide, tolbutamide, and carbutamide, all of which inhibited endogenous ketogenesis in isolated liver cells, also inhibited lysosomal triglyceride lipase activity in rat liver homogenates. The drugs were not inhibitory towards alkaline lipase activity. Demethylglycodiazin (2-benzolsulfonamid--5-(beta-hydroxyethoxy)-pyrimidin), which did not inhibit endogenous ketogenesis in isolated liver cells, did not affect lysosomal lipase activity. The lysosomotropic drug chloroquine was markedly antiketogenic when tested in liver cells. The reduction in endogenous ketogenesis, the enhanced accumulation of liver triglycerides, and the stimulation of hepatic triglyceride output by chlorpropamide are ascribed to an interference of the drug with hepatic triglyceride breakdown. The present results also suggest that the lysosomes play a significant role in hepatic lipolysis.  (+info)

A drug-specific leuco-agglutinin in a fatal case of agranulocytosis due to chlorpromazine. (8/73)

A fatal case of agranulocytosis due to chlorpromazine is reported. Mechanisms other than immunological are generally believed to be responsible for chlorpromazine-induced agranulocytosis. However, the demonstration of a drug-specific leuco-agglutinin in the serum of this patient suggests that an immunological mechanism was responsible for the agranulocytosis.  (+info)

Chlorpropamide is a type of oral anti-diabetic drug known as a sulfonylurea, which is used to lower blood glucose levels in people with type 2 diabetes. It works by stimulating the release of insulin from the pancreas and increasing the sensitivity of peripheral tissues to insulin.

Here's the medical definition:

Chlorpropamide: A first-generation sulfonylurea medication used in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus. It acts by stimulating the release of insulin from the pancreatic beta cells and increasing peripheral tissue sensitivity to insulin. Chlorpropamide has a longer duration of action than other sulfonylureas, with a peak effect at around 6-12 hours after administration. Common side effects include hypoglycemia, weight gain, and gastrointestinal symptoms such as nausea and diarrhea. It is important to monitor blood glucose levels regularly while taking chlorpropamide to avoid hypoglycemia.

"Flushing" is a medical term that refers to a sudden, temporary reddening of the skin, often accompanied by feelings of warmth. This occurs when the blood vessels beneath the skin dilate or expand, allowing more blood to flow through them. Flushing can be caused by various factors such as emotional stress, alcohol consumption, spicy foods, certain medications, or medical conditions like carcinoid syndrome or menopause. It is generally harmless but can sometimes indicate an underlying issue that requires medical attention.

Demeclocycline is a type of antibiotic known as a tetracycline. It is used to treat various types of bacterial infections, such as respiratory infections, urinary tract infections, and skin infections. Demeclocycline works by inhibiting the growth of bacteria, specifically by binding to the 30S ribosomal subunit and preventing the addition of amino acids to the growing peptide chain. This leads to the disruption of protein synthesis and ultimately results in bacterial death.

Demeclocycline is available as a tablet for oral administration, and it is typically prescribed to be taken two to four times daily. The dosage may vary depending on the type and severity of the infection being treated. Common side effects of demeclocycline include stomach upset, diarrhea, and skin rash. It is important to note that demeclocycline can cause photosensitivity, so it is recommended to avoid excessive sun exposure while taking this medication.

Demeclocycline is not typically a first-line antibiotic due to its potential for serious side effects and the availability of other antibiotics with similar efficacy and fewer side effects. It should be used with caution in patients with impaired kidney or liver function, as well as in pregnant women and children under the age of 8. Additionally, demeclocycline can interact with certain medications, such as antacids, iron supplements, and calcium-containing products, so it is important to inform your healthcare provider of all medications you are taking before starting treatment with demeclocycline.

A suppository is a solid medicinal formulation, often medicated, that is intended to be introduced into the rectum (rectal suppository), vagina (vaginal suppository), or urethra (urethral suppository) for absorption or for localized effect. Suppositories are designed to melt or dissolve at body temperature and release the active ingredients. They come in various shapes, such as cones, cylinders, or torpedo-shaped, and are typically made from a base of cocoa butter, polyethylene glycol, or other biocompatible materials that allow for controlled drug release. Common uses for suppositories include the treatment of constipation, hemorrhoids, local infections, menstrual cramps, and as an alternative method of administering medication for individuals who have difficulty swallowing pills or prefer not to use oral medications.

Chlorothiazide is a medication that belongs to a class of diuretics known as thiazide diuretics. It works by increasing the excretion of salt and water from the body through urine, which helps to reduce blood pressure and decrease edema (swelling). Chlorothiazide is used to treat hypertension (high blood pressure), heart failure, and edema caused by various medical conditions.

The medical definition of Chlorothiazide is:

A thiazide diuretic drug used in the treatment of hypertension, heart failure, and edema. It acts by inhibiting the reabsorption of sodium and chloride ions in the distal convoluted tubule of the nephron, leading to increased excretion of salt and water in the urine. Chlorothiazide has a rapid onset of action and a short duration of effect, making it useful for acute situations requiring prompt diuresis. It is available in oral and injectable forms.

Diabetes Insipidus is a medical condition characterized by the excretion of large amounts of dilute urine (polyuria) and increased thirst (polydipsia). It is caused by a deficiency in the hormone vasopressin (also known as antidiuretic hormone or ADH), which regulates the body's water balance.

In normal physiology, vasopressin is released from the posterior pituitary gland in response to an increase in osmolality of the blood or a decrease in blood volume. This causes the kidneys to retain water and concentrate the urine. In Diabetes Insipidus, there is either a lack of vasopressin production (central diabetes insipidus) or a decreased response to vasopressin by the kidneys (nephrogenic diabetes insipidus).

Central Diabetes Insipidus can be caused by damage to the hypothalamus or pituitary gland, such as from tumors, trauma, or surgery. Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus can be caused by genetic factors, kidney disease, or certain medications that interfere with the action of vasopressin on the kidneys.

Treatment for Diabetes Insipidus depends on the underlying cause. In central diabetes insipidus, desmopressin, a synthetic analogue of vasopressin, can be administered to replace the missing hormone. In nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, treatment may involve addressing the underlying kidney disease or adjusting medications that interfere with vasopressin action. It is important for individuals with Diabetes Insipidus to maintain adequate hydration and monitor their fluid intake and urine output.

Erythema is a term used in medicine to describe redness of the skin, which occurs as a result of increased blood flow in the superficial capillaries. This redness can be caused by various factors such as inflammation, infection, trauma, or exposure to heat, cold, or ultraviolet radiation. In some cases, erythema may also be accompanied by other symptoms such as swelling, warmth, pain, or itching. It is a common finding in many medical conditions and can vary in severity from mild to severe.

Tolbutamide is defined as a first-generation sulfonylurea oral hypoglycemic agent used in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus. It acts by stimulating the release of insulin from the pancreas, thereby reducing blood glucose levels. Tolbutamide is metabolized and excreted rapidly, with a half-life of about 6 hours, making it useful in patients with renal impairment.

Common side effects of tolbutamide include gastrointestinal symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea, as well as skin reactions such as rash and itching. Hypoglycemia is a potential adverse effect, particularly if the medication is dosed improperly or if the patient skips meals. Tolbutamide should be used with caution in patients with hepatic impairment, kidney disease, and the elderly due to an increased risk of hypoglycemia.

It's important to note that tolbutamide is not commonly used as a first-line treatment for type 2 diabetes mellitus due to the availability of newer medications with more favorable side effect profiles and efficacy.

... , while effective in the treatment of diabetics in patients of Chinese descent, should never be used in people of ... Chlorpropamide is an antidiabetic drug, belonging to the sulfonylurea class of organic compounds. It is used to treat diabetes ... Like other sulfonylureas, chlorpropamide acts to increase the secretion of insulin, so it is only effective in patients who ... Chlorpropamide and other sulfonylureas encourage weight gain, so they are generally not favored for use in very obese patients ...
Chlorpropamide Walker SR (2012). Trends and Changes in Drug Research and Development. Springer Science & Business Media. p. 109 ...
Miscellaneous others include chlorpropamide and carbamazepine. Diuretic Electrolyte Water-electrolyte imbalance Antidiuretic+ ...
Chlorpropamide a pill taken to lower the level of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Only people with Type 2 diabetes take these ...
Mazovetskiĭ, A G; Danilova, N S (1972-03-01). "[Antidiuretic action of chlorpropamide (Diabinese) in a case of combined ...
... and may cause hypoglycemia when taken with chlorpropamide. Ginkgo biloba can cause bleeding when combined with warfarin or ...
For example with chlorpropamide over 0.3 GPa in helium changes to a monoclinic structure, and yet another structural form at ... different behaviour of β-chlorpropamide in different inert gas and liquid media". RSC Advances. 6 (95): 92629-92637. Bibcode: ...
... by chlorpropamide analogues". Biochem. Pharmacol. 55 (4): 465-74. doi:10.1016/S0006-2952(97)00475-9. PMID 9514081. Simpson JC, ...
... chlorpropamide, glycyclamide (tolcyclamide), metahexamide, tolazamide and tolbutamide. Second-generation drugs: They include ... Chlorpropamide (1st generation) Tolazamide (1st generation) Gliclazide (2nd generation) Glimepiride (2nd generation) ...
... chlorpropamide (INN) chlorprothixene (INN) chlorquinaldol (INN) Chlortab chlortalidone (INN) chlortetracycline (INN) ...
... chlorpropamide and tolbutamide Mood stabilizers such as lithium Some anti-epileptic drugs such as valproate, carbamazepine and ...
chlorproPAMIDE clomiPHENE vs. clomiPRAMINE cycloSERINE vs. cycloSPORINE DAUNOrubicin vs. DOXOrubicin DOBUTamine vs. DOPamine ...
... including the antidiabetic drugs tolbutamide and chlorpropamide, warfarin, methotrexate, phenytoin, probenecid, valproic acid ( ...
... chlorpropamide MeSH D02.886.590.795.475 - gliclazide MeSH D02.886.590.795.500 - glipizide MeSH D02.886.590.795.575 - glyburide ... chlorpropamide MeSH D02.948.828.475 - gliclazide MeSH D02.948.828.575 - glyburide MeSH D02.948.828.834 - tolazamide MeSH ...
Phenacetin Phentolamine Phenylbutazone Procarbazine Propranolol Sulfiram Sulfonamides Sulfonylureas such as chlorpropamide, ...
... redirects to Chlorpropamide diacerein (INN) diacetamate (INN) diacetolol (INN) diacetylmorphine known also as diamorphine and ...
Pulmonary causes Infection Pneumonia Lung abscess Asthma Cystic fibrosis Drugs Chlorpropamide Clofibrate Phenothiazine ...
Vidarabine Chlorpropamide Phenytoin Theophylline Cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, bleomycin, procarbazine, mechlorethamine Co- ...
... tolbutamide and chlorpropamide Several cephalosporin drugs, including cefoperazone, cefamandole and cefotetan, that have a N- ...
A10BA01 Phenformin A10BA02 Metformin A10BA03 Buformin A10BB01 Glibenclamide A10BB02 Chlorpropamide A10BB03 Tolbutamide A10BB04 ...
... palmitoyltransferase I deficiency Carnitine-acylcarnitine translocase deficiency Chloramphenicol Chlorpromazine Chlorpropamide ...
Sulfametoxydiazine Ultra long-acting Sulfadoxine Sulfametopyrazine Terephtyl Acetohexamide Carbutamide Chlorpropamide ...
... chlorpropamide, numerous antibiotics Bone disease (bone ALP): Paget's disease, osteosarcoma, bone metastases of prostatic ...
First-generation agents tolbutamide acetohexamide tolazamide chlorpropamide Second-generation agents glipizide glyburide or ...
Chlorpropamide, while effective in the treatment of diabetics in patients of Chinese descent, should never be used in people of ... Chlorpropamide is an antidiabetic drug, belonging to the sulfonylurea class of organic compounds. It is used to treat diabetes ... Like other sulfonylureas, chlorpropamide acts to increase the secretion of insulin, so it is only effective in patients who ... Chlorpropamide and other sulfonylureas encourage weight gain, so they are generally not favored for use in very obese patients ...
Chlorpropamide: learn about side effects, dosage, special precautions, and more on MedlinePlus ... Chlorpropamide helps control blood sugar but does not cure diabetes. Continue to take chlorpropamide even if you feel well. Do ... Before taking chlorpropamide,. *tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to chlorpropamide, any other medications, ... After you have taken chlorpropamide for some time, chlorpropamide may not control your blood sugar as well as it did at the ...
Information and statements regarding dietary supplements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. Information on this site is provided for informational purposes and is not meant to substitute for the advice provided by your own physician or other medical professional. You should not use the information contained herein for diagnosing or treating a health problem or disease, or prescribing any medication. You should read carefully all product packaging. You should consult with a healthcare professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program. Do not discontinue the use of prescription medication without the approval of your physician. User is solely responsible for their use of any content provided. Third party literature provided for informational purposes only and not to provide medical advice or to support claims for nutrient benefits. ...
Find information on Chlorpropamide (Diabinese) in Daviss Drug Guide including dosage, side effects, interactions, nursing ... www.drugguide.com/ddo/view/Davis-Drug-Guide/51150/all/chlorproPAMIDE. Vallerand AHA, Sanoski CAC, Quiring CC. ChlorproPAMIDE. ... Vallerand, A. H., Sanoski, C. A., & Quiring, C. (2023). ChlorproPAMIDE. In Daviss Drug Guide (18th ed.). F.A. Davis Company. ... TY - ELEC T1 - chlorproPAMIDE ID - 51150 A1 - Sanoski,Cynthia A, AU - Vallerand,April Hazard, AU - Quiring,Courtney, BT - ...
Chlorpropamide might decrease how quickly the body breaks down alcohol. Drinking wine and taking chlorpropamide might cause a ...
Chlorpropamide + Phenformin- এর ব্যবহার, ডোজ, পার্শ্বপ্রতিক্রিয়া, উপকার, বিক্রিয়া এবং সতর্কতা বিষয়ে তত্ত্বতালাশ করুন ... In stock alternatives of Chlorpropamide + Phenformin (based on Chlorpropamide Phenformin). Chlorpropamide + Phenformin Tablet ... Chlorpropamide + Phenformin র ইনফরমেশন. * Chlorpropamide + Phenformin উপকারিতা এবং ব্যবহার । - Chlorpropamide + Phenformin ... Chlorpropamide + Phenformin র বিকল্প - Substitutes for Chlorpropamide + Phenformin in Bengali. *Chlorpropamide + Phenformin ...
The syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (ADH) secretion (SIADH) is defined by the hyponatremia and hypo-osmolality resulting from inappropriate, continued secretion or action of the hormone despite normal or increased plasma volume, which results in impaired water excretion. The key to understanding the pathophysiology, signs, symp...
Detailed drug Information for Ciprofloxacin (Intravenous). Includes common brand names, drug descriptions, warnings, side effects and dosing information.
This medicine comes with a patient information insert. Read and follow these instructions carefully. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions. The solution comes in small containers that are only used one time. Throw the empty container away after putting the medicine into your ear(s). This medicine should be used only inside the ear. Do not put it in the eyes or nose, and do not take it by mouth. If this medicine is swallowed by accident or gets into your eyes, call your doctor right away. It is important that the infected ear remain clean and dry. When bathing, avoid getting the infected ear wet. Avoid swimming unless your doctor has instructed you otherwise. To use the ear drops:. ...
Detailed drug Information for Acebutolol. Includes common brand names, drug descriptions, warnings, side effects and dosing information.
Chlorpropamide may increase insulin secretion from pancreatic beta cells.. Glipizide (Glucotrol, Glucotrol XL). *View full drug ...
Chlorpropamide. Diabinese. Antidiabetic (oral). Sulfonylurea. Chlorprothixene. Taractan. Antiemetic. Tranquilizer. ...
Chlorpropamide; (Diabinese) 76 (--) 7 = Inapplicable, coded 2, 8 or 9 in Col. 1258, or coded 2, 8 or 9 in Col. 1263, or proxy ...
... chlorpropamide, tolbutamide, thiazides, spironolactone, methazolamide, acetazolamide, IVIG, and levodopa. ...
... chlorpropamide (Diabinese); cimetidine (Tagamet); flecainide (Tambocor); guanethidine (Ismelin); lithium (Eskalith, Lithobid); ...
chlorpropamide (Apo-Chlorpropamide) * Chlorthalidone (chlorthalidone) * chlorthalidone (Apo-Chlorthalidone, Chlorthalidone) * ...
CDEC also noted that chlorpropamide, one of the less favourable sulfonylureas, is being discontinued in the Canadian market and ... chlorpropamide and glyburide, should be avoided in elderly patients because of the risk of prolonged hypoglycemia (high-quality ...
Familial ADH-responsive diabetes insipidus: response to thiazides and chlorpropamide A. A. Driedger and A. L. Linton ...
... chlorpropamide, phenformin, tolazamide, and tolbutamide; (3) tranquilizers and sedatives-chlordiazepoxide, diazepam, and ...
Chlorpropamide: (Moderate) Monitor blood glucose during concomitant corticosteroid and sulfonylurea use; a sulfonylurea dose ...
Chlorpropamide: (Moderate) Systemic bexarotene may enhance the action of agents that enhance insulin secretion (e.g., ...
Diabenase (Chlorpropamide). *Diamicron (Gliclazide). *Glucophage, Fortamet, Glutetza, Riomet (Metformin). *Glucotrol (Glipizide ...
b. Chlorpropamide (Diabinese). i. Oral hypoglycemic. Stimulates ADH release and potentiates ADH action. Hypoglycemia is the ...
chlorpropamide (Diabinese). *glimepiride (Amaryl). *glipizide (Glucotrol, Glucotrol XL). *glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase, Microns ...
Chlorpropamide (Diabinese), tolazamide (Tolinase), acetohexamide (Dymelor), or tolbutamide (Orinase) You are also at increased ...
diabetes medications (e.g., chlorpropamide, glyburide, insulin, metformin, rosiglitazone) *diazoxide. *digoxin. *disopyramide ...
chlorpropamide. Monitor Closely (2)chlorpropamide will increase the level or effect of probenecid by acidic (anionic) drug ... chlorpropamide. chlorpropamide will increase the level or effect of probenecid by acidic (anionic) drug competition for renal ... probenecid increases levels of chlorpropamide by unspecified interaction mechanism. Use Caution/Monitor. Risk of hypoglycemia. ... probenecid increases levels of chlorpropamide by unspecified interaction mechanism. Use Caution/Monitor. Risk of hypoglycemia. ...

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