A sympathomimetic agent that was formerly used as an anorectic. It has properties similar to those of DEXTROAMPHETAMINE. It has been implicated in lipid storage disorders and pulmonary hypertension. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1223)
A central nervous system stimulant and sympathomimetic with actions and uses similar to those of DEXTROAMPHETAMINE. It has been used most frequently in the treatment of obesity.
An amphetamine-like anorectic agent. It may cause pulmonary hypertension.
Conditions characterized by abnormal lipid deposition due to disturbance in lipid metabolism, such as hereditary diseases involving lysosomal enzymes required for lipid breakdown. They are classified either by the enzyme defect or by the type of lipid involved.
A appetite depressant considered to produce less central nervous system disturbance than most drugs in this therapeutic category. It is also considered to be among the safest for patients with hypertension. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p2290)
Agents that are used to suppress appetite.
A centrally active drug that apparently both blocks serotonin uptake and provokes transport-mediated serotonin release.
The S-isomer of FENFLURAMINE. It is a serotonin agonist and is used as an anorectic. Unlike fenfluramine, it does not possess any catecholamine agonist activity.

Aminorex, fenfluramine, and chlorphentermine are serotonin transporter substrates. Implications for primary pulmonary hypertension. (1/6)

BACKGROUND: Coadministration of phentermine and fenfluramine (phen/fen) effectively treats obesity and possibly addictive disorders. The association of fenfluramine and certain other anorexic agents with serious side effects, such as cardiac valvulopathy and primary pulmonary hypertension (PPH), limits the clinical utility of these drugs. Development of new medications that produce neurochemical effects like phen/fen without causing unwanted side effects would be a significant therapeutic breakthrough. METHODS AND RESULTS: We tested the hypothesis that fenfluramine (and other anorexic agents) might increase the risk of PPH through interactions with serotonin (5-HT) transporters. Because 5-HT transporter proteins in the lung and brain are identical, we examined, in rat brain, the effects of selected drugs on 5-HT efflux in vivo and monoamine transporters in vitro as a generalized index of transporter function. Our data show that drugs known or suspected to increase the risk of PPH (eg, aminorex, fenfluramine, and chlorphentermine) are 5-HT transporter substrates, whereas drugs that have not been shown to increase the risk of PPH are less potent in this regard. CONCLUSIONS: We speculate that medications that are 5-HT transporter substrates get translocated into pulmonary cells where, depending on the degree of drug retention, their intrinsic drug toxicity, and individual susceptibility, PPH could develop as a response to high levels of these drugs or metabolites. Emerging evidence suggests that it is possible to develop transporter substrates devoid of adverse side effects. Such medications could have therapeutic application in the management of obesity, drug dependence, depression, and other disorders.  (+info)

The metabolism, distribution and elimination of chlorphentermine in man. (2/6)

1 A gas-liquid chromatography procedure for the determination of chlorphentermine (I), N-hydroxychlorphentermine (II) and alpha,alpha-dimethyl-alpha-nitro-beta-(4-chlorophenyl)ethane (IV) in urine has been developed. Also methods are reported to determine conjugated II and the total N-oxidized metabolites of I, i.e. II, conjugated II, alpha,alpha-dimethyl-alpha-nitroso-beta-(4-chlorophenyl)ethane (III) and IV in urine. 2 The synthesis of alpha,alpha-dimethyl-alpha-nitroso-beta-(4-chlorophenyl)ethane (III) and its properties are reported. 3 The kinetics of urinary excretion of I and its metabolic products after the oral administration of I to a human subject on separate occasions have been studied. Under normal conditions of urinary pH, metabolism by N-oxidation was the main elimination route of I; acidifying the urine increased the urinary excretion of unchanged I at the expense of the N-oxidized products. 4 The importance of the N-oxidation metabolic route in the distribution of chlorphentermine (I) in man is discussed.  (+info)

N-[11C-Methyl]chlorphentermine and N,N-[11C-dimethyl]chlorphentermine as brain blood-flow agents for positron emission tomography. (3/6)

N-[11C-methyl]chlorphentermine ([11C]NMCP) and N,N-[11C-dimethyl]chlorphentermine ([11C]NDMCP) were prepared from chlorphentermine and 11CH3I in DMF and evaluated in rats as brain blood-flow agents for positron emission tomography (PET). Tissue distribution of [11C]NMCP showed that brain uptake was 2.70 +/- 0.40% of injected dose per organ at 5 min with no change in radioactivity concentration up to 30 min after i.v. injection. Approximately 80% of the initial brain uptake remained at 60 min. On the other hand, initial brain uptake of [11C] NDMCP (3.66 +/- 0.31 and 3.63 +/- 0.88% injected dose per organ at 5 and 15 min, respectively) was greater than that of [11C]NMCP. The brain activity however, rapidly decreased to 2.38 +/- 0.17 and 1.82 +/- 0.32% at 30 and 60 min, respectively. Because of its longer retention in the brain compared with [11C]NDMCP, [11C]NMCP would be a potential brain blood-flow agent for quantitative PET studies.  (+info)

Fluorescence studies of the binding of amphiphilic amines with phospholipids. (4/6)

The binding characteristics of several amine drugs with dispersed phospholipids (phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylserine, and phosphatidylglycerol) have been studied using the fluorometric method and 1-anilino-8-naphthalene sulfonate and 1,6 diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene as fluorescence probes. The results show that amphiphilic amines, such as chlorphentermine, interact with phospholipids via both ionic and hydrophobic forces. The ionic interaction, which occurs between the protonated amine group of the drug and the phosphate oxygen of the lipid, changes the amphiphilic characteristics of the lipid by reducing the number of negative charges on the lipid vesicles, and inhibits the Ca2+-dependent lipid hydrolysis by blocking the Ca2+ binding sites on the lipid vesicles. The hydrophobic interaction, which involves the nonpolar moieties of the drug and the lipid, is of primary importance to the overall drug-lipid binding stability. Drugs without a strong hydrophobic moiety, such as dopamine, do not interact with phospholipids.  (+info)

Comparative potencies of amphetamine, fenfluramine and related compounds in taste aversion experiments in rats. (5/6)

1 Rats failed to drink a flavoured solution when its consumption had been followed by injection of amphetamine (conditioned taste aversion).2 There was very little difference between the potencies of (+)- and (-)-amphetamine.3p-Chloromethamphetamine was a more potent aversive agent than methamphetamine.4 Strong taste aversions were also conditioned with other congeners of amphetamine. The rank order of potency was: fenfluramine > chlorphentermine >p-hydroxyamphetamine.5 Cocaine induced only moderate taste aversions, even at high doses.6 Aversive potency did not appear to be correlated with known neurochemical actions of the drugs or with behavioural stimulation, but appeared to be a central action which may have been linked to anorexigenic potency or time course of action.  (+info)

Effect of chlorphentermine on the lipids of rat lungs. (6/6)

Chronic administration of chlorphentermine to rats resulted in a reduction of body weight compared to a normal control group. The weight of the heart, liver, kidney, and spleen was less in the treated group while the weight of the lungs was increased significantly. There was no change in the ratio of right ventricular to left ventricular weight in the rats treated with chlorphentermine, supporting the views that this drug does not cause pulmonary hypertension. Biochemical analysis showed that the increase in the weight of the lungs was due to the accumulation of phospholipid. All classes of phospholipid were affected, but particularly phosphatidyl choline, the tissue concentration of which increased nine times. Chlorphentermine also increased the proportion of palmitate present in pulmonary phosphatidyl choline. Histological examination of the lung after treatment with chlorphentermine showed evidence of this drug-induced lipidosis. No conclusion can as yet be reached as to the mechanism involved in the accumulation of phospholipid in the lung after chlorphentermine.  (+info)

Chlorphentermine is a sympathomimetic amine, which is a type of medication that stimulates the nervous system. It was used as an appetite suppressant for the short-term treatment of obesity, although it is no longer widely available or used in clinical practice due to its potential for serious side effects and addiction.

Like other sympathomimetic amines, chlorphentermine works by stimulating the release of certain neurotransmitters in the brain, such as norepinephrine and dopamine, which can help to suppress appetite and increase metabolism. However, long-term use or abuse of these medications can lead to a number of serious health problems, including cardiovascular issues, addiction, and psychiatric disorders.

Chlorphentermine has been associated with a range of side effects, including dry mouth, constipation, difficulty sleeping, irritability, and increased heart rate and blood pressure. In some cases, it may also cause more serious adverse reactions, such as seizures, hallucinations, or cardiac arrhythmias.

Due to these risks, chlorphentermine is no longer approved for use in many countries, and its prescription is tightly controlled in those where it is still available. Today, other medications and lifestyle interventions are typically used to manage obesity and promote weight loss.

Phentermine is a defined in the medical field as a psychostimulant medication that is primarily used for short-term weight management. It acts as an appetite suppressant and has sympathomimetic properties, which means it stimulates the sympathetic nervous system, leading to increased heart rate and blood pressure.

Phentermine is available in various forms, including tablets, capsules, and orally disintegrating tablets. It is typically prescribed for individuals with a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or higher, or for those with a BMI of 27 or higher who have weight-related medical conditions such as high blood pressure, diabetes, or high cholesterol.

It's important to note that phentermine is intended for use in conjunction with a reduced-calorie diet and increased physical activity. It should not be used as a sole means of weight loss, and its long-term effectiveness and safety have not been established. Additionally, phentermine can be habit-forming and may cause dependence, so it should only be used under the close supervision of a healthcare provider.

Aminorex is a stimulant drug that was previously used as an appetite suppressant for weight loss. It is a derivative of amphetamine and has a similar chemical structure and pharmacological effects. Aminorex works by increasing the levels of certain neurotransmitters in the brain, such as dopamine and norepinephrine, which can lead to increased alertness, energy, and mood.

However, the use of Aminorex has been associated with serious health risks, including pulmonary hypertension, a rare but potentially life-threatening condition that affects the blood vessels in the lungs. As a result, Aminorex was banned in many countries in the 1970s and is no longer used medically.

It's important to note that the use of any appetite suppressant or weight loss drug should be done under the close supervision of a healthcare provider, as these medications can have serious side effects and interactions with other drugs.

Lipidoses are a group of genetic disorders characterized by abnormal accumulation of lipids (fats or fat-like substances) in various tissues and cells of the body due to defects in lipid metabolism. These disorders include conditions such as Gaucher's disease, Tay-Sachs disease, Niemann-Pick disease, Fabry disease, and Wolman disease, among others. The accumulation of lipids can lead to progressive damage in multiple organs, resulting in a range of symptoms and health complications. Early diagnosis and management are essential for improving the quality of life and prognosis of affected individuals.

Diethylpropion is a sympathomimetic amine, which is a type of medication that stimulates the nervous system. It is primarily used as an appetite suppressant for the short-term treatment of obesity. Diethylpropion works by affecting the neurotransmitters in the brain that regulate appetite, leading to a decrease in food intake and an increase in weight loss.

Diethylpropion is available in immediate-release and extended-release forms, and it is typically taken two to three times a day, about one hour before meals. Common side effects of diethylpropion include dry mouth, constipation, difficulty sleeping, and increased heart rate. More serious side effects can include high blood pressure, irregular heartbeat, and seizures.

Diethylpropion is a controlled substance in many countries due to its potential for abuse and dependence. It should only be used under the close supervision of a healthcare provider and for a limited period of time.

Appetite depressants are medications or substances that reduce or suppress feelings of hunger and appetite. They can be prescribed to treat various medical conditions, such as obesity or binge eating disorder, where weight loss is a recommended treatment goal. Some common appetite depressants include:

1. Phentermine: This medication works by stimulating the release of certain neurotransmitters in the brain that help suppress appetite and increase metabolism. It is often prescribed for short-term use (up to 12 weeks) as part of a comprehensive weight loss plan.

2. Diethylpropion: Similar to phentermine, diethylpropion stimulates the release of neurotransmitters that suppress appetite and increase metabolism. It is also prescribed for short-term use in treating obesity.

3. Naltrexone-bupropion (Contrave): This combination medication helps manage weight by reducing appetite and increasing feelings of fullness. Naltrexone is an opioid antagonist that blocks the rewarding effects of food, while bupropion is an antidepressant that can help reduce cravings for high-calorie foods.

4. Lorcaserin (Belviq): This medication works by selectively activating serotonin receptors in the brain, which helps promote satiety and reduce appetite. It was withdrawn from the US market in 2020 due to concerns about its potential link to an increased risk of cancer.

5. Topiramate (Topamax): Although primarily used as an anticonvulsant, topiramate has also been found to have appetite-suppressing effects. It is often combined with phentermine in a single formulation (Qsymia) for the treatment of obesity.

6. Cannabis: Some studies suggest that cannabinoids, the active compounds in marijuana, may help reduce hunger and promote weight loss by interacting with the endocannabinoid system in the body. However, more research is needed to fully understand its potential as an appetite depressant.

It's important to note that appetite suppressants should only be used under the guidance of a healthcare professional and as part of a comprehensive weight management plan. These medications can have side effects and potential risks, so it's crucial to discuss their use with your doctor before starting any new treatment regimen.

Fenfluramine is a drug that was previously used for the short-term treatment of obesity. It works by suppressing appetite and increasing the feeling of fullness. Fenfluramine is an amphetamine derivative and stimulates the release of serotonin, a neurotransmitter in the brain that helps regulate mood, appetite, and sleep.

Fenfluramine was commonly prescribed in combination with phentermine, another appetite suppressant, under the brand name Fen-Phen. However, in 1997, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a public health warning about the potential risk of serious heart valve damage associated with the use of fenfluramine and withdrew its approval for the drug's use. Since then, fenfluramine has not been approved for medical use in many countries, including the United States.

Dexfenfluramine is a medication that was previously used as an appetite suppressant for weight loss. It is a stereoisomer (enantiomer) of fenfluramine, which is another appetite suppressant. Dexfenfluramine works by increasing the levels of serotonin in the brain, which helps to reduce appetite and promote weight loss.

However, dexfenfluramine was withdrawn from the market in 1997 due to concerns about its safety. Studies found that long-term use of dexfenfluramine was associated with an increased risk of primary pulmonary hypertension, a rare but serious condition that can lead to heart failure. Additionally, when dexfenfluramine was used in combination with phentermine (a different appetite suppressant), there was an increased risk of valvular heart disease.

Therefore, dexfenfluramine is no longer available for medical use and its prescription is not recommended due to these safety concerns.

... acts as a highly selective serotonin releasing agent (SRA). It is not a psychostimulant and has little or no ... Chlorphentermine (trade names Apsedon, Desopimon, Lucofen) is a serotonergic appetite suppressant of the amphetamine family. ... Gylys JA, Hart JJ, Warren MR (September 1962). "Chlorphentermine, a new anorectic agent". The Journal of Pharmacology and ... Rothman RB, Ayestas MA, Dersch CM, Baumann MH (August 1999). "Aminorex, fenfluramine, and chlorphentermine are serotonin ...
It is a prodrug to chlorphentermine. It never became a mass produced drug in part due to the side effects found in mice. Mice ... and reversal of pulmonary lipid histiocytosis in rats following oral administration of anorectics cloforex and chlorphentermine ...
Made by the reaction of chlorphentermine with 2-Chloroethanol. 3,4-Dichloroamphetamine Cericlamine Chlorphentermine Cloforex ...
Chlorphentermine, Clotermine, Diethylpropion, Mazindol, Phendimetrazine, and Phentermine in Schedule III" (PDF). Isomer Design ...
Chlorphentermine (Apsedon, Desopimon, Lucofen) Cloforex (Oberex) (prodrug of chlorphentermine) Dexfenfluramine (Redux) ( ... Fenfluramine, chlorphentermine, and aminorex, which are also amphetamines and relatives, were formerly used as appetite ... related to chlorphentermine; never marketed) Indeloxazine (Elen, Noin) (non-selective; discontinued) Levofenfluramine ( ... enantiomer of fenfluramine) Etolorex (prodrug of chlorphentermine; never marketed) Fenfluramine (Pondimin, Fen-Phen) Flucetorex ...
3,4-Dichloroamphetamine Cericlamine Chlorphentermine Cloforex Clortermine Etolorex Phentermine MDPH entry in PiHKAL "UK Misuse ...
... produces very low rates of self-administration in animals similarly to chlorphentermine, and as a result it likely ... 4-Dichloroamphetamine Cericlamine Chlorphentermine Cloforex Etolorex Methylenedioxyphentermine Phentermine US patent 3415937, " ... and is the 2-chloro positional isomer of chlorphentermine. ...
... chlorphentermine, and teclozan. It serves as an oxidant in the Hass-Bender oxidation process. 2-Nitropropane is a constituent ...
3-Methoxy-4-methylamphetamine Cericlamine Chlorphentermine Clortermine Etolorex 3,4-Methylenedioxyamphetamine ...
MDMA MDA MEM Pergolide Cabergoline Norfenfluramine Chlorphentermine Aminorex Bromo-dragonfly DMT 5-MeO-DMT LSD - About equal ...
Chlorphentermine (1-(p-chlorophenyl)-2-methyl-2-aminopropane) and any salt thereof Diethylpropion (2-(diethylamino) ...
... chlorphentermine (INN) chlorproethazine (INN) chlorproguanil (INN) chlorpromazine (INN) chlorpropamide (INN) chlorprothixene ( ...
Nalbufina Nalorphine Nicocodine Nicodicodine Norcodeine Propiram Tramadol Amphetamine Atomoxetine Cathine Chlorphentermine ...
Pholcodine Zipeprol Benzphetamine Chlorphentermine Flunitrazepam (rohypnol) Mecloqualone Mephentermine Phendimetrazine ...
... chlorphentermine, and aminorex), and certain anti-Parkinsonian dopaminergic agonists, which also stimulate serotonergic 5-HT2B ...
The drugs most classically associated with the condition are weight loss drugs such as fenfluramine and chlorphentermine, and ... chlorphentermine, and aminorex (along with its analogue 4-Methylaminorex which has seen sporadic use as a recreational drug) ...
... para-Chloromethamphetamine 3-Chloromethamphetamine 4-Chlorophenylisobutylamine Chlorphentermine Clortermine N,N-Dimethyl-2- ...
3,4-Dichloroamphetamine Alaproclate Bupropion Chlorphentermine Clortermine Cloforex Etolorex Femoxetine Ifoxetine Indalpine ... and closely related to chlorphentermine, a highly selective serotonin releasing agent) that was investigated as an ...
... chlorphentermine MeSH D02.092.471.683.152.766.617 - mephentermine MeSH D02.092.471.683.221 - butoxamine MeSH D02.092.471.683. ...
Chlorphentermine Diethylpropion Ethchlorvnol (presumably Ethchlorvynol) Ethinamate Flunitrazepam (moved up from Schedule 4 by ...
Substituted amphetamines para-Chloromethamphetamine (4-CMA) Chlorphentermine 3,4-Dichloroamphetamine (DCA) 4-Fluoroamphetamine ...
Chlorphentermine acts as a highly selective serotonin releasing agent (SRA). It is not a psychostimulant and has little or no ... Chlorphentermine (trade names Apsedon, Desopimon, Lucofen) is a serotonergic appetite suppressant of the amphetamine family. ... Gylys JA, Hart JJ, Warren MR (September 1962). "Chlorphentermine, a new anorectic agent". The Journal of Pharmacology and ... Rothman RB, Ayestas MA, Dersch CM, Baumann MH (August 1999). "Aminorex, fenfluramine, and chlorphentermine are serotonin ...
Amphetamines (e.g., chlorphentermine, cloforex, dexfenfluramine, fenfluramine, levofenfluramine, norfenfluramine). *BW-723C86. ...
Levodopa, or L-DOPA is an amino acid. In the body of mammals, it is made from Tyrosine in a process named synthesis. It also occurs in different plants. As such it can be used as a dietary supplement. L-Dopa is the precursor to the neurotransmitters dopamine, norepiphedrine and epiphedrine, which are part of a group known as Catecholamines. L-dopa can also be used as a drug for diseases such as Parkinsons disease. The substance used in the drug is usually called Levodopa, and the naturally occurring substance is called L-Dopa. Swedish scientist Arvid Carlsson first saw that the substance could be used as a drug, in 1957. It was first introduced as Madopar, by Hoffmann-La Roche, in 1973, as a treatment for Parkinsons disease. The WHO has put it on the list of essential medicines. Because the drug has side-effects, when taken for a longer period of time, people often try to replace it witrh other drugs, especially in younger patients. ...
2) Chlorphentermine. (3) Clortermine. (4) Repealed by Acts 1982, No. 92, §2. ...
22 (2) Benzphetamine; 23 (3) Chlorphentermine; 24 (4) Clortermine; 25 (5) Phendimetrazine. 26 (c) Depressants. Unless listed in ... 22 (2) Benzphetamine; 23 (3) Chlorphentermine; 24 (4) Clortermine; 25 (5) Phendimetrazine. 26 (c) Depressants. Unless listed in ...
Chlorphentermine (1-(p-chlorophenyl)-2-methyl-2-aminopropane) and any salt thereof ...
Multinucleation in alveolar macrophages from rats treated with chlorphentermine. Authors. Reasor MJ; Massey CA; Koshut RA; ...
LUCOFEN Pays : ITALIE Substances contenues : CHLORPHENTERMINE CHLORHYDRATE Retour à la page daccueil ...
CHLORPHENTERMINE 51150 CHLORPROMAZINE 51155 CHLORPROPAMIDE 51160 CHLORPROTHIXENE 51165 CHLORTETRACYCLINE 51170 CHLORTHALIDONE ...
Chlorphentermine. *Testosterone. *Suboxone. *Ketamine. Schedule IV: Drugs with low potential for abuse; many frequently ...
Adderall is a trade names[note 2] for a combination drug containing four salts of amphetamine. Other trade names for this combination also exist. The mixture is composed of equal parts racemic amphetamine and dextroamphetamine, which produces a (3:1) ratio between dextroamphetamine and levoamphetamine, the two enantiomers of amphetamine. Both enantiomers are stimulants, but differ enough to give Adderall an effects profile distinct from those of racemic amphetamine or dextroamphetamine,[1][2] which are marketed as Evekeo and Dexedrine/Zenzedi, respectively.[1][6][7] Adderall is used in the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and narcolepsy. It is also used as an athletic performance enhancer, cognitive enhancer, appetite suppressant, and recreationally as an aphrodisiac and euphoriant. It is a central nervous system (CNS) stimulant of the phenethylamine class.[1] Adderall is generally well tolerated and effective in treating the symptoms of ADHD and narcolepsy. At ...
Chlorphentermine • Clobenzorex • Clortermine • Cypenamine • Diethylpropion • Dimethoxyamphetamine • Dimethylamphetamine • ...
Stimulants are substances that induce a number of characteristic symptoms. CNS effects include alertness with increased vigilance, a sense of well-being, and euphoria.
Metabolism and distribution of chlorphentermine and clorofex in animal and man]. Bülow M, Dell HD, Fiedler J, Kamp R, Lorenz D. ... Whereas 20 mg/kg chlorphentermine for 7 days failed to markedly alter the incorporation of thymidine into kidney and liver DNA ... Whereas 20 mg/kg chlorphentermine for 7 days failed to markedly alter the incorporation of thymidine into kidney and liver DNA ... Renal and hepatic nucleic acid metabolism in neonates: relation to experimental duration, chlorphentermine dose as well as ...
ACCIDENTAL POISONING WITH CHLORPHENTERMINE ("AVICOL") IN A SMALL CHILD]. BOSCH HJ, BEYER KH. BOSCH HJ, et al. Arch Toxikol. ...
Chlorphentermine,create,30-MAR-07,(null),(null) C65324,Chlorphentermine_Hydrochloride,create,30-MAR-07,(null),(null) C65325, ...
Chlorphentermine (substance). Code System Preferred Concept Name. Chlorphentermine (substance). Concept Status. Published. ...
Chlorphentermine Hydrochloride Narrower Concept UI. M0004195. Registry Number. RL11HOJ7DM. Terms. Chlorphentermine ... Chlorphentermine Preferred Term Term UI T007954. Date01/01/1999. LexicalTag NON. ThesaurusID ... Chlorphentermine Preferred Concept UI. M0004194. Registry Number. NHW07912O7. Related Numbers. 151-06-4. 461-78-9. RL11HOJ7DM. ... Chlorphentermine Hydrochloride Desopimon Pre-Sate Pharm Action. Sympathomimetics. Registry Number. NHW07912O7. Related Numbers ...
Chlorphentermine Hydrochloride Narrower Concept UI. M0004195. Registry Number. RL11HOJ7DM. Terms. Chlorphentermine ... Chlorphentermine Preferred Term Term UI T007954. Date01/01/1999. LexicalTag NON. ThesaurusID ... Chlorphentermine Preferred Concept UI. M0004194. Registry Number. NHW07912O7. Related Numbers. 151-06-4. 461-78-9. RL11HOJ7DM. ... Chlorphentermine Hydrochloride Desopimon Pre-Sate Pharm Action. Sympathomimetics. Registry Number. NHW07912O7. Related Numbers ...
... chlorphentermine CP,chlorpromazine CP,chlorpropamide CP,choroid plexus CP,chronic pancreatitis CP,chronic periodontitis CP, ...
Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. Images are under the licenses listed. This page may contain content developed from Wikipedia or Meta ...
Chlorphentermine. *Codeine. *Buprenorphine or Suboxone. *Nalorphine. *Benzphetamine. Schedule IV. Schedule IV controlled ...
Stimulants are substances that induce a number of characteristic symptoms. CNS effects include alertness with increased vigilance, a sense of well-being, and euphoria.
Chlorphentermine hydrochloride (PIM 935) *Chlorpromazine (PIM 125) *Chlorthalidone (PIM 126) *Cinolazepam (PIM 920) *Cisplatin ...
... chlorphentermine Kizuka, Hiro. 1993. 20 2 p. 239-242. 4 p.. artikel. ...
... chlorphenter- mine, and fenfluramine. Psychopharmacology 56(1):5-13, April 1978a. GRIFFITHS, R.R., BRADY, J.V., SNELL, J.D. ...
Class C includes: certain drugs related to the amfetamines such as benzfetamine and chlorphentermine, buprenorphine, mazindol, ...
AUTONOMIC AGENTS CHLORPHENTERMINE AUTONOMIC AGENTS CHLORPROMAZINE AUTONOMIC AGENTS CLENBUTEROL AUTONOMIC AGENTS CLONIDINE ... PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM AGENTS CHLORPHENTERMINE PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM AGENTS CHLORPROMAZINE PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM ... SYMPATHOMIMETICS CHLORPHENTERMINE SYMPATHOMIMETICS CLENBUTEROL SYMPATHOMIMETICS DEXTROAMPHETAMINE SYMPATHOMIMETICS DOBUTAMINE ...
... chlorphentermine CP,chlorpromazine CP,chlorpropamide CP,choroid plexus CP,chronic pancreatitis CP,chronic periodontitis CP, ...
Thoma-Laurie D, Walker E and Reasor M (1982) Neonatal toxicity in rats following in utero exposure to chlorphentermine or ...
Chlorphentermine • Cinnamedrine • Clenbuterol • Clobenzorex • Cloforex • Clortermine • D-Deprenyl • Denopamine • ...
Chlorphentermine [D02.092.471.683.152.766.262] Chlorphentermine * Mephentermine [D02.092.471.683.152.766.617] Mephentermine ...
  • Chlorphentermine (trade names Apsedon, Desopimon, Lucofen) is a serotonergic appetite suppressant of the amphetamine family. (wikipedia.org)
  • Multinucleation in alveolar macrophages from rats treated with chlorphentermine. (cdc.gov)