A histamine H1 antagonist used in allergic reactions, hay fever, rhinitis, urticaria, and asthma. It has also been used in veterinary applications. One of the most widely used of the classical antihistaminics, it generally causes less drowsiness and sedation than PROMETHAZINE.
Drugs that selectively bind to but do not activate histamine H1 receptors, thereby blocking the actions of endogenous histamine. Included here are the classical antihistaminics that antagonize or prevent the action of histamine mainly in immediate hypersensitivity. They act in the bronchi, capillaries, and some other smooth muscles, and are used to prevent or allay motion sickness, seasonal rhinitis, and allergic dermatitis and to induce somnolence. The effects of blocking central nervous system H1 receptors are not as well understood.
A class of histamine receptors discriminated by their pharmacology and mode of action. Most histamine H1 receptors operate through the inositol phosphate/diacylglycerol second messenger system. Among the many responses mediated by these receptors are smooth muscle contraction, increased vascular permeability, hormone release, and cerebral glyconeogenesis. (From Biochem Soc Trans 1992 Feb;20(1):122-5)
Compounds containing phenyl-1-butanone.
A histamine H1 antagonist. It is used in hypersensitivity reactions, in rhinitis, for pruritus, and in some common cold remedies.
Drugs that bind to but do not activate histamine receptors, thereby blocking the actions of histamine or histamine agonists. Classical antihistaminics block the histamine H1 receptors only.
Histamine H1 antagonist used in allergic rhinitis; ASTHMA; and URTICARIA. It is a component of COUGH and COLD medicines. It may cause drowsiness.
An amine derived by enzymatic decarboxylation of HISTIDINE. It is a powerful stimulant of gastric secretion, a constrictor of bronchial smooth muscle, a vasodilator, and also a centrally acting neurotransmitter.
A class of histamine receptors discriminated by their pharmacology and mode of action. Histamine H2 receptors act via G-proteins to stimulate ADENYLYL CYCLASES. Among the many responses mediated by these receptors are gastric acid secretion, smooth muscle relaxation, inotropic and chronotropic effects on heart muscle, and inhibition of lymphocyte function. (From Biochem Soc Trans 1992 Feb;20(1):122-5)
A histamine H2 receptor agonist that is often used to study the activity of histamine and its receptors.
A histamine H2 receptor antagonist that is used as an anti-ulcer agent.
Cell-surface proteins that bind histamine and trigger intracellular changes influencing the behavior of cells. Histamine receptors are widespread in the central nervous system and in peripheral tissues. Three types have been recognized and designated H1, H2, and H3. They differ in pharmacology, distribution, and mode of action.
An antagonist of histamine that appears to block both H2 and H3 histamine receptors. It has been used in the treatment of ulcers.
Drugs that selectively bind to but do not activate histamine H2 receptors, thereby blocking the actions of histamine. Their clinically most important action is the inhibition of acid secretion in the treatment of gastrointestinal ulcers. Smooth muscle may also be affected. Some drugs in this class have strong effects in the central nervous system, but these actions are not well understood.
A histamine H1 receptor antagonist that is effective in the treatment of chronic urticaria, dermatitis, and histamine-mediated pruritus. Unlike its major metabolite CETIRIZINE, it does cause drowsiness. It is also effective as an antiemetic, for relief of anxiety and tension, and as a sedative.
A histamine H1 antagonist used as the hydrogen fumarate in hay fever, rhinitis, allergic skin conditions, and pruritus. It causes drowsiness.
A cycloheptathiophene blocker of histamine H1 receptors and release of inflammatory mediators. It has been proposed for the treatment of asthma, rhinitis, skin allergies, and anaphylaxis.
A histamine congener, it competitively inhibits HISTAMINE binding to HISTAMINE H2 RECEPTORS. Cimetidine has a range of pharmacological actions. It inhibits GASTRIC ACID secretion, as well as PEPSIN and GASTRIN output.
Histamine substituted in any position with one or more methyl groups. Many of these are agonists for the H1, H2, or both histamine receptors.
Drugs that bind to and activate histamine receptors. Although they have been suggested for a variety of clinical applications histamine agonists have so far been more widely used in research than therapeutically.
A histamine H1 antagonist. It has mild hypnotic properties and some local anesthetic action and is used for allergies (including skin eruptions) both parenterally and locally. It is a common ingredient of cold remedies.
A histamine H1 antagonist used as an antiemetic, antitussive, for dermatoses and pruritus, for hypersensitivity reactions, as a hypnotic, an antiparkinson, and as an ingredient in common cold preparations. It has some undesired antimuscarinic and sedative effects.
A highly potent and specific histamine H2 receptor agonist. It has been used diagnostically as a gastric secretion indicator.
The phenomenon whereby compounds whose molecules have the same number and kind of atoms and the same atomic arrangement, but differ in their spatial relationships. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed)

Transport characteristics of diphenhydramine in human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells: contribution of pH-dependent transport system. (1/137)

Transport characteristics of diphenhydramine, an antihistamine, were studied in cultured human intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayers to elucidate the mechanisms of its intestinal absorption. Diphenhydramine accumulation in the monolayers increased rapidly and was influenced by extracellular pH (pH 7.4 > 6.5 > 5.5). Diphenhydramine uptake was temperature dependent, saturable, and not potential sensitive. Kinetic analysis revealed that the apparent Km values were constant (0.8-1.0 mM) in all pH conditions tested, whereas Vmax values decreased at the lower pH. The initial uptake of diphenhydramine was competitively inhibited by another antihistamine, chlorpheniramine, with a Ki value of 1.3 mM. On the other hand, cimetidine and tetraethylammonium, typical substrates for the renal organic cation transport system, had no effect. Moreover, biological amines and neurotransmitters, such as histamine, dopamine, serotonin, and choline, also had no effect on the diphenhydramine accumulation. Finally, diphenhydramine uptake was stimulated by preloading monolayers with chlorpheniramine (trans-stimulation effect). These findings indicate that diphenhydramine transport in Caco-2 cells is mediated by a specific transport system. This pH-dependent transport system may contribute to the intestinal absorption of diphenhydramine.  (+info)

Nalpha-methyl histamine and histamine stimulate gastrin release from rabbit G-cells via histamine H2-receptors. (2/137)

BACKGROUND: Gastrin release by Helicobacter pylori may be an important step in the pathway leading to duodenal ulceration. A histamine H3-receptor agonist was found to release gastrin from antral mucosal fragments; this was interpreted as being due to suppression of somatostatin release. H. pylori is reported to produce Nalpha-methyl histamine (NalphaMH), which is an agonist of H3 as well as other histamine receptors. H. pylori infection also recruits mast cells, which release histamine. AIM: To determine the direct effects of histamine receptor agonists on isolated gastrin cells. METHODS: Rabbit G-cells were prepared by countercurrent elutriation and cultured on 24-well plates. RESULTS: NalphaMH (10-6-10-4 M) caused a dose-dependent increase in gastrin release from a basal level of 2.3 +/- 0.2% total cell content (TCC; mean +/- S.E.M.) to a maximum of 5.1 +/- 0.7%, an increase of 117% (P < 0. 005) above basal. This was abolished by the H2-antagonist ranitidine (10-5 M), but not by immunoblockade with anti-somatostatin antibody, the H1-antagonist chlorpheniramine (10-5 M) or the H3-antagonist thioperamide (10-4 M). The histamine H2-receptor agonist dimaprit (10-6-10-4 M) increased gastrin release from 2.4 +/- 0.2% to 3.6 +/- 0.2% TCC (P < 0.001). Gastrin release was also stimulated by histamine (10-7-10-4 M) from a basal value of 3.0 +/- 0.3% to 5.4 +/- 0.5% TCC (P < 0.001). This also was inhibited by ranitidine (10-5 M) (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: NalphaMH and histamine release gastrin from G-cells via H2-receptors; this might contribute to H. pylori-associated hypergastrinaemia.  (+info)

Interferon treatment of chronic hepatitis C in patients cured of pediatric malignancies. (3/137)

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Chronic hepatitis C was a frequent complication in patients treated for malignancy until the introduction of anti-HCV screening tests for blood donors. The association between chronic hepatitis C and progression to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma has been reported in about 20% and 5% of patients, respectively, within 20-30 years of infection. In adult patients, interferon has proved to be effective in decreasing the abnormal values of transaminases and the level of HCV viremia. Our purpose was to assess efficacy of and tolerance to interferon in a group of young patients who had acquired HCV infection during a period of chemotherapy. DESIGN AND METHODS: Interferon-a (IFN) was administered to 26 adolescents and young adults (13 males, age range 17-36 years; median age 24) with chronic hepatitis C, including 4 with hepatitis B virus co-infection, who had been treated for leukemia or solid tumor 5 to 19 years before joining this trial. Patients were treated with natural IFN alpha at a dose of 4 MU/m(2) thrice weekly for 12 months and followed up for another 6 months thereafter. RESULTS: Nine patients stopped treatment during the first 6 months because of side effects (2 cases) or lack of response. At the end of the trial, 8 (31%) cases had responded, with alanine amino-transferase normalization and clearance of hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA. A sustained response was only documented in 15% of cases, however, irrespective of any hepatitis B virus co-infection. The 2 patients with HCV genotype 2 were both responders, whereas only 8% of those with genotype 1 responded. INTERPRETATION AND CONCLUSIONS: These data show that the efficacy of IFN in this series of young patients is similar to that reported for otherwise healthy adults with hepatitis C. Patients with genotype 2 are strong candidates for IFN treatment while other therapeutic strategies should be designed for patients with HCV genotype 1.  (+info)

Bronchial vasodilation evoked by increased lower airway osmolarity in dogs. (4/137)

Hyperosmotic saline solutions stimulate lower airway sensory nerves. To determine whether airway hyperosmolarity evokes neurally mediated changes in bronchial artery blood flow (Qbr), we measured the effect of injection of small volumes (1 ml) of hyperosmotic saline into a right lobar bronchus on Qbr of anesthetized, artificially ventilated dogs. In 14 dogs, hyperosmotic saline (1,200 and 2,400 mmol/l) increased Qbr by 58 +/- 12 (SE) and 118 +/- 12%, respectively, from a baseline of 8 +/- 2 ml/min. Qbr increased within 6-8 s of the injections, peaked at 20 s, and returned to control over 2-3 min. Isosmotic saline had minimal effects. In contrast, hyperosmotic saline decreased flow in an intercostal artery that did not supply the airways. The bronchial vasodilation was decreased by 72 +/- 11% after combined blockade of alpha-adrenoceptors and muscarinic cholinergic receptors and by 66 +/- 6% when the cervical vagus nerves were cooled to 0 degrees C. Blockade of H(1) and H(2) histamine receptors did not reduce the nonvagal response. We conclude that hyperosmolarity of the lower airways evokes bronchial vasodilation by both a centrally mediated reflex that includes cholinergic and adrenergic efferent pathways and by unidentified local mechanisms.  (+info)

Functional neuroimaging of cognition impaired by a classical antihistamine, d-chlorpheniramine. (5/137)

Antihistamine induced cognitive decline was evaluated using positron emission tomography (PET) measurement of histamine H1 receptor (H1R) occupancy and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). Cognitive performance in attention-demanding task deteriorated dose-dependently and the effects were statistically significant after the treatment of 2 mg of d-chlorpheniramine. There was no significant change in subjective sleepiness in the same dose. The regional blockade of H1R was observed mainly in the frontal, temporal and anterior cingulate cortices, and the intravenous administration of d-chlorpheniramine as a therapeutic dose (2 mg) blocked over 60% of H1R in the frontal cortices. The results from activation study using visual discrimination tasks demonstrated that enhanced activity in the right prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortices as well as a decreased activity in the left temporal and frontal cortices and midbrain after the treatment of d-chlorpheniramine. There were no changes in global CBF for the subjects treated with 2 mg d-chlorpheniramine (pre; 44.8+/-3.3 ml dl(-1) min(-1) vs post; 44.4+/-4.7 ml dl(-1) min(-1)). The results indicated that the attention system of human brain could be altered by therapeutic doses of H1R antagonists. These findings provide the information as to the potential risk of antihistamines in our daily activities. British Journal of Pharmacology (2000) 129, 115 - 123  (+info)

Involvement of tyrosine phosphorylation in the positive inotropic effect produced by H(1)-receptors with histamine in guinea-pig left atrium. (6/137)

We investigated the effect of stimulation of H(1)-receptors with histamine on protein tyrosine phosphorylation levels in guinea-pig left atrium and evaluated the influences of tyrosine kinase inhibitors on the positive inotropic effect mediated by H(1)-receptors in this tissue. Histamine induced an increase in tyrosine phosphorylation in four main clusters of proteins with apparent molecular weights of 25, 35, 65 and 150 kDa. Tyrosine phosphorylation of these proteins attained a peak around 2 - 3 min following histamine stimulation and then declined to or below basal levels. Histamine-induced protein tyrosine phosphorylation was antagonized by the H(1)-receptor antagonists mepyramine (1 microM) and chlorpheniramine (1 microM), but not by the H(2)-receptor antagonist cimetidine (10 microM). The positive inotropic effect of histamine was depressed in a concentration-dependent manner by the tyrosine kinase inhibitors tyrphostin A25 (50 to 100 microM) and genistein (10 to 50 microM) but not by the inactive genistein analogue daidzein (50 microM). The positive inotropic effect of isoprenaline was unchanged by tyrphostin A25 and genistein. At a concentration of 1 microM histamine produced a dual-component positive inotropic response composed of an initial increasing phase and a second and late developing, greater positive inotropic phase. Treatment with tyrphostin A25 (100 microM) and genistein (50 microM), but not daidzein (50 microM), significantly attenuated the two components of the inotropic response, although genistein suppressed the initial component more markedly than the late component. We conclude that increased protein tyrosine phosphorylation may play an important role in initiating at least some part of the positive inotropic effect of H(1)-receptor stimulation in guinea-pig left atrium.  (+info)

Cardiovascular effects of histamine administered intracerebroventricularly in critical haemorrhagic hypotension in rats. (7/137)

The study was designed to determine the cardiovascular effects of histamine administered intracerebroventricularly (icv) in a rat model of volume-controlled haemorrhagic shock. The withdrawal of approximately 50% of total blood volume resulted in the death of all control saline icv treated animals within 30 min. Icv injection of histamine produced a prompt dose-dependent (0.1-100 nmol) and long-lasting (10-100 nmol) increase in mean arterial pressure (MAP), pulse pressure (PP) and heart rate (HR), with a 100% survival of 2h after treatment (100 nmol). The increase in MAP and HR after histamine administration in bled rats in comparison to the normovolaemic animals was 2.7-3.3- and 1.3-3.6-fold higher, respectively. Pretreatment with chlorpheniramine (50 nmol icv), H1 receptor antagonist, inhibited the increase in MAP, PP, HR and survival rate produced by histamine, while chlorpheniramine given alone had no effect. Neither ranitidine (50 nmol icv), H2 histamine receptor antagonist, nor thioperamide (50 nmol icv), H3 receptor blocker, influenced the histamine action, however, when given alone, both evoked the pressor effect with elongation of survival time. It can be concluded that histamine administered icv reverses the haemorrhagic shock conditions, and histamine H1 receptors are involved.  (+info)

Painless thyroiditis induced by the cessation of betamethasone. (8/137)

We describe the first reported case of painless thyroiditis induced by an abrupt cessation of betamethasone. A 53-year-old woman experienced transient thyrotoxicosis after the abrupt cessation of celestamine, a mixture of betamethasone and chlorpheniramine. Since neither TSH receptor- nor thyroid stimulating-antibodies were negative, and thyroid scintigram did not show the thyroid gland, she was diagnosed as having painless thyroiditis. Fourteen months after the onset of thyrotoxicosis, serum TSH was detectable without hypothyroidism. We speculate that reduction in betamethasone may be one of the triggers of painless thyroiditis.  (+info)

Chlorpheniramine is an antihistamine medication that is used to relieve allergic symptoms caused by hay fever, hives, and other allergies. It works by blocking the action of histamine, a substance in the body that causes allergic symptoms. Chlorpheniramine is available in various forms, including tablets, capsules, syrup, and injection.

Common side effects of chlorpheniramine include drowsiness, dry mouth, blurred vision, and dizziness. It may also cause more serious side effects such as rapid heartbeat, difficulty breathing, and confusion, especially in elderly people or those with underlying medical conditions. Chlorpheniramine should be used with caution and under the supervision of a healthcare provider, particularly in children, pregnant women, and people with medical conditions such as glaucoma, enlarged prostate, and respiratory disorders.

It is important to follow the dosage instructions carefully when taking chlorpheniramine, as taking too much can lead to overdose and serious complications. If you experience any unusual symptoms or have concerns about your medication, it is best to consult with a healthcare provider.

Histamine H1 antagonists, also known as H1 blockers or antihistamines, are a class of medications that work by blocking the action of histamine at the H1 receptor. Histamine is a chemical mediator released by mast cells and basophils in response to an allergic reaction or injury. It causes various symptoms such as itching, sneezing, runny nose, and wheal and flare reactions (hives).

H1 antagonists prevent the binding of histamine to its receptor, thereby alleviating these symptoms. They are commonly used to treat allergic conditions such as hay fever, hives, and eczema, as well as motion sickness and insomnia. Examples of H1 antagonists include diphenhydramine (Benadryl), loratadine (Claritin), cetirizine (Zyrtec), and doxylamine (Unisom).

Histamine H1 receptors are a type of G protein-coupled receptor found in various cells throughout the body, including those of the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and nervous systems. They are activated by the neurotransmitter histamine, which is released by mast cells and basophils in response to allergic reactions, inflammation, or immune responses.

When histamine binds to H1 receptors, it triggers a range of physiological responses that contribute to the symptoms of allergies, including vasodilation (leading to redness and warmth), increased vascular permeability (resulting in fluid leakage and swelling), and smooth muscle contraction (causing bronchoconstriction, gut cramping, and nasal congestion).

Histamine H1 receptors are also involved in the regulation of sleep-wake cycles, where they contribute to the promotion of wakefulness. Antihistamines that block H1 receptors are commonly used to treat allergies, hay fever, and other conditions associated with histamine release.

Butyrophenones are a group of synthetic antipsychotic drugs that are primarily used to treat symptoms of schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders. They act as dopamine receptor antagonists, which means they block the action of dopamine, a neurotransmitter in the brain associated with mood, motivation, and pleasure.

Some examples of butyrophenones include haloperidol, droperidol, and benperidol. These drugs are known for their potent antipsychotic effects and can also be used to manage agitation, aggression, and other behavioral disturbances in patients with various psychiatric and neurological disorders.

In addition to their antipsychotic properties, butyrophenones have been used off-label for their sedative and analgesic effects. However, they are associated with a range of side effects, including extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS), such as involuntary muscle spasms and tremors, as well as other neurological and cardiovascular adverse reactions. Therefore, their use is typically reserved for cases where other treatments have been ineffective or contraindicated.

Dimenhydrinate is an antihistamine medication that is primarily used to treat symptoms of motion sickness, such as nausea, vomiting, and dizziness. It works by blocking the action of histamine, a substance in the body that causes allergic symptoms.

The chemical name for dimenhydrinate is 8-chlorotheophylline 1-((2-(diphenylmethoxy)ethyl)dimethylamino) derivative. It is available in various forms, including tablets, capsules, and liquid solutions, and is typically taken orally.

In addition to its use as an anti-motion sickness medication, dimenhydrinate may also be used to treat symptoms of vertigo, Meniere's disease, and other inner ear disorders. However, it should be used with caution, as it can cause drowsiness, dry mouth, and other side effects.

It is important to follow the dosage instructions carefully when taking dimenhydrinate, and to talk to a healthcare provider before using it if you have any medical conditions or are taking other medications.

Histamine antagonists, also known as histamine blockers or H1-blockers, are a class of medications that work by blocking the action of histamine, a substance in the body that is released during an allergic reaction. Histamine causes many of the symptoms of an allergic response, such as itching, sneezing, runny nose, and hives. By blocking the effects of histamine, these medications can help to relieve or prevent allergy symptoms.

Histamine antagonists are often used to treat conditions such as hay fever, hives, and other allergic reactions. They may also be used to treat stomach ulcers caused by excessive production of stomach acid. Some examples of histamine antagonists include diphenhydramine (Benadryl), loratadine (Claritin), and famotidine (Pepcid).

It's important to note that while histamine antagonists can be effective at relieving allergy symptoms, they do not cure allergies or prevent the release of histamine. They simply block its effects. It's also worth noting that these medications can have side effects, such as drowsiness, dry mouth, and dizziness, so it's important to follow your healthcare provider's instructions carefully when taking them.

Triprolidine is an antihistamine medication that is used to relieve symptoms caused by allergies, such as runny nose, sneezing, and itchy or watery eyes. It works by blocking the action of histamine, a substance in the body that causes allergic symptoms. Triprolidine may also be used to help relieve symptoms of motion sickness.

It is important to note that this definition is for informational purposes only and should not be taken as medical advice. If you have any questions about triprolidine or its use, it is best to consult with a healthcare professional.

Histamine is defined as a biogenic amine that is widely distributed throughout the body and is involved in various physiological functions. It is derived primarily from the amino acid histidine by the action of histidine decarboxylase. Histamine is stored in granules (along with heparin and proteases) within mast cells and basophils, and is released upon stimulation or degranulation of these cells.

Once released into the tissues and circulation, histamine exerts a wide range of pharmacological actions through its interaction with four types of G protein-coupled receptors (H1, H2, H3, and H4 receptors). Histamine's effects are diverse and include modulation of immune responses, contraction and relaxation of smooth muscle, increased vascular permeability, stimulation of gastric acid secretion, and regulation of neurotransmission.

Histamine is also a potent mediator of allergic reactions and inflammation, causing symptoms such as itching, sneezing, runny nose, and wheezing. Antihistamines are commonly used to block the actions of histamine at H1 receptors, providing relief from these symptoms.

Histamine H2 receptors are a type of G protein-coupled receptor that are widely distributed throughout the body, including in the stomach, heart, and brain. They are activated by the neurotransmitter histamine, which is released by mast cells in response to an allergen or injury. When histamine binds to H2 receptors, it triggers a variety of physiological responses, such as increasing gastric acid secretion, regulating heart rate and contractility, and modulating neurotransmitter release in the brain. Histamine H2 receptor antagonists, also known as H2 blockers, are commonly used to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and peptic ulcers by reducing gastric acid production. Examples of H2 blockers include ranitidine (Zantac), famotidine (Pepcid), and cimetidine (Tagamet).

Dimaprit is not a medical condition or disease. It is actually a synthetic peptide that acts as an agonist for certain types of receptors found in the body, specifically the H2 histamine receptors. These receptors are involved in various physiological processes, such as regulating gastric acid secretion and modulating immune responses.

As a research tool, Dimaprit is used to study the functions of H2 histamine receptors and their roles in different biological systems. It is not typically used as a therapeutic agent in clinical medicine.

Metiamide is not generally considered a medical term, but it is a medication that has been used in the past. Medically, metiamide is defined as a synthetic histamine H2-receptor antagonist, which means it blocks the action of histamine at the H2 receptors in the stomach. This effect reduces gastric acid secretion and can be useful in treating gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), peptic ulcers, and other conditions associated with excessive stomach acid production.

However, metiamide has largely been replaced by other H2 blockers like cimetidine, ranitidine, and famotidine due to its association with a rare but serious side effect called agranulocytosis, which is a severe decrease in white blood cell count that can increase the risk of infections.

Histamine receptors are a type of cell surface receptor that bind to histamine, a biologically active compound involved in various physiological and pathophysiological processes in the body. There are four types of histamine receptors, designated H1, H2, H3, and H4, which are classified based on their specific responses to histamine.

Histamine receptors, Histamine (H1) are G protein-coupled receptors that are widely distributed in the body, including in the smooth muscle of blood vessels, respiratory tract, and gastrointestinal tract. When histamine binds to H1 receptors, it activates a signaling pathway that leads to the contraction of smooth muscle, increased vascular permeability, and stimulation of sensory nerve endings, resulting in symptoms such as itching, sneezing, and runny nose. Antihistamines, which are commonly used to treat allergies, work by blocking H1 receptors and preventing histamine from binding to them.

It's worth noting that while histamine has many important functions in the body, excessive or inappropriate activation of histamine receptors can lead to a range of symptoms and conditions, including allergic reactions, inflammation, and neuropsychiatric disorders.

Burimamide is a medication that was developed in the 1970s and is known as a histamine H2 receptor antagonist. It works by blocking the action of histamine, a substance in the body that is involved in allergic reactions and inflammation. Burimamide was originally developed to treat gastric ulcers, but it has largely been replaced by other medications with similar mechanisms of action, such as ranitidine and cimetidine, which have fewer side effects and are more effective.

The medical definition of 'Burimamide' is:

A synthetic histamine H2 receptor antagonist that was developed to treat gastric ulcers. It works by blocking the action of histamine at the H2 receptors in the stomach, reducing the production of stomach acid and promoting the healing of ulcers. Burimamide has largely been replaced by other medications with similar mechanisms of action, such as ranitidine and cimetidine, which have fewer side effects and are more effective.

Histamine H2 antagonists, also known as H2 blockers, are a class of medications that work by blocking the action of histamine on the H2 receptors in the stomach. Histamine is a chemical that is released by the body during an allergic reaction and can also be released by certain cells in the stomach in response to food or other stimuli. When histamine binds to the H2 receptors in the stomach, it triggers the release of acid. By blocking the action of histamine on these receptors, H2 antagonists reduce the amount of acid produced by the stomach, which can help to relieve symptoms such as heartburn, indigestion, and stomach ulcers. Examples of H2 antagonists include ranitidine (Zantac), famotidine (Pepcid), and cimetidine (Tagamet).

Hydroxyzine is an antihistamine medication that is primarily used to treat symptoms of allergies such as itching, hives, and swelling. It works by blocking the effects of histamine, a substance in the body that causes allergic reactions. In addition to its antihistaminic properties, hydroxyzine also has sedative and anxiety-reducing effects, which make it useful in treating anxiety disorders, symptoms of alcohol withdrawal, and as a sleep aid. It is available in both oral and injectable forms and is usually taken orally in the form of tablets, capsules, or syrup. As with any medication, hydroxyzine should be used under the supervision of a healthcare provider, and its use may be subject to certain precautions and contraindications depending on the individual's medical history and current health status.

Clemastine is an antihistamine medication that is used to relieve symptoms of allergies, such as runny nose, sneezing, and itchy or watery eyes. It works by blocking the action of histamine, a substance in the body that causes allergic symptoms. Clemastine is available in oral tablet and liquid forms, and is typically taken twice daily with a full glass of water.

Common side effects of clemastine include drowsiness, dry mouth, headache, and upset stomach. It is important to avoid activities that require mental alertness, such as driving or operating heavy machinery, until you know how the medication affects you. Clemastine may also cause dizziness, so it is best to avoid getting up too quickly from a sitting or lying position.

Like all medications, clemastine should be taken only as directed by your healthcare provider. It is important to inform them of any other medications you are taking, as well as any medical conditions you may have, as clemastine can interact with certain drugs and may not be suitable for everyone.

Ketotifen is an antihistamine and mast cell stabilizer used in the prevention and treatment of allergic reactions. It works by blocking the release of histamine, a substance that causes allergic symptoms, and preventing the activation of mast cells, which play a key role in allergic responses. Ketotifen is available as an oral medication and is often used to treat chronic urticaria (hives) and other allergic conditions. It may also have some benefits in the treatment of asthma.

It's important to note that ketotifen should be taken under the supervision of a healthcare professional, as it can cause side effects such as drowsiness, dry mouth, and increased appetite. Additionally, it may interact with other medications, so it is important to inform your doctor of all medications you are taking before starting ketotifen.

Cimetidine is a histamine-2 (H2) receptor antagonist, which is a type of medication that reduces the production of stomach acid. It works by blocking the action of histamine on the H2 receptors in the stomach, which are responsible for stimulating the release of stomach acid. By blocking these receptors, cimetidine reduces the amount of stomach acid produced and can help to relieve symptoms such as heartburn, indigestion, and stomach ulcers.

Cimetidine is available by prescription in various forms, including tablets, capsules, and liquid. It is typically taken two or three times a day, depending on the specific condition being treated. Common side effects of cimetidine may include headache, dizziness, diarrhea, and constipation.

In addition to its use in treating stomach acid-related conditions, cimetidine has also been studied for its potential anti-cancer properties. Some research suggests that it may help to enhance the immune system's response to cancer cells and reduce the growth of certain types of tumors. However, more research is needed to confirm these effects and determine the optimal dosage and duration of treatment.

Methylhistamines are not a recognized medical term or a specific medical condition. However, the term "methylhistamine" may refer to the metabolic breakdown product of the antihistamine drug, diphenhydramine, which is also known as N-methyldiphenhydramine or dimenhydrinate.

Diphenhydramine is a first-generation antihistamine that works by blocking the action of histamine, a chemical released during an allergic reaction. When diphenhydramine is metabolized in the body, it is converted into several breakdown products, including methylhistamines.

Methylhistamines are not known to have any specific pharmacological activity or clinical significance. However, they can be used as a marker for the presence of diphenhydramine or its metabolism in the body.

Histamine agonists are substances that bind to and activate histamine receptors, leading to the initiation or enhancement of various physiological responses. Histamine is a naturally occurring molecule that plays a key role in the body's immune and allergic responses, as well as in the regulation of sleep, wakefulness, and appetite.

There are four main types of histamine receptors (H1, H2, H3, and H4), each with distinct functions and signaling pathways. Histamine agonists can be selective for one or more of these receptor subtypes, depending on their pharmacological properties.

For example, H1 agonists are commonly used as decongestants and antihistamines to treat allergies, while H2 agonists are used to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and peptic ulcers. H3 agonists have been investigated for their potential therapeutic use in the treatment of neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease and schizophrenia, while H4 agonists are being studied for their role in inflammation and immune regulation.

It is important to note that histamine agonists can also have adverse effects, particularly if they are not selective for a specific receptor subtype or if they are used at high doses. These effects may include increased heart rate, blood pressure, and bronchodilation (opening of the airways), as well as gastrointestinal symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea.

Pyrilamine is an antihistamine drug that is primarily used to relieve allergic symptoms such as sneezing, itching, watery eyes, and runny nose. It works by blocking the action of histamine, a substance naturally produced by the body during an allergic reaction. Pyrilamine may also be used to treat motion sickness and to help with tension headaches or migraines.

Pyrilamine is available in various forms, including tablets, capsules, and syrup, and it can be taken with or without food. Common side effects of pyrilamine include dizziness, dry mouth, and drowsiness. It is important to avoid activities that require mental alertness, such as driving or operating heavy machinery, until you know how pyrilamine affects you.

Like all medications, pyrilamine should be taken under the supervision of a healthcare provider, who can determine the appropriate dosage and monitor for any potential side effects or interactions with other drugs. It is essential to follow the instructions provided by your healthcare provider carefully and not exceed the recommended dose.

Diphenhydramine is an antihistamine medication used to relieve symptoms of allergies, such as sneezing, runny nose, and itchy or watery eyes. It works by blocking the action of histamine, a substance in the body that causes allergic reactions. Diphenhydramine can also be used to treat motion sickness, insomnia, and symptoms of the common cold.

In addition to its antihistamine effects, diphenhydramine also has anticholinergic properties, which means it can help to reduce secretions in the nose and throat, and may have a drying effect on the mouth and eyes. It is available over-the-counter in various forms, including tablets, capsules, liquid, and topical creams or ointments.

It's important to note that diphenhydramine can cause drowsiness, so it should be used with caution when operating heavy machinery or driving a vehicle. It may also interact with other medications, so it's important to speak with a healthcare provider before taking this medication.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Impromidine" is not a widely recognized or established term in medical science or pharmacology. It does not appear to be listed in standard medical dictionaries or scientific literature as a drug, diagnostic agent, or medical condition.

If you have any more context or details about where you encountered this term, I'd be happy to help you try to figure out what it might refer to!

Stereoisomerism is a type of isomerism (structural arrangement of atoms) in which molecules have the same molecular formula and sequence of bonded atoms, but differ in the three-dimensional orientation of their atoms in space. This occurs when the molecule contains asymmetric carbon atoms or other rigid structures that prevent free rotation, leading to distinct spatial arrangements of groups of atoms around a central point. Stereoisomers can have different chemical and physical properties, such as optical activity, boiling points, and reactivities, due to differences in their shape and the way they interact with other molecules.

There are two main types of stereoisomerism: enantiomers (mirror-image isomers) and diastereomers (non-mirror-image isomers). Enantiomers are pairs of stereoisomers that are mirror images of each other, but cannot be superimposed on one another. Diastereomers, on the other hand, are non-mirror-image stereoisomers that have different physical and chemical properties.

Stereoisomerism is an important concept in chemistry and biology, as it can affect the biological activity of molecules, such as drugs and natural products. For example, some enantiomers of a drug may be active, while others are inactive or even toxic. Therefore, understanding stereoisomerism is crucial for designing and synthesizing effective and safe drugs.

Chlorpheniramine was patented in 1948 and came into medical use in 1949. It is available as a generic medication and over the ... "Chlorpheniramine". Drugs.com. American Society of Health-System Pharmacists. 26 July 2023. Retrieved 20 August 2023. Fischer J ... Chlorphenamine (CP, CPM), also known as chlorpheniramine, is an antihistamine used to treat the symptoms of allergic conditions ... Yasuda SU, Wellstein A, Likhari P, Barbey JT, Woosley RL (August 1995). "Chlorpheniramine plasma concentration and histamine H1 ...
3.0.co;2-5. Carter, S. J.; Cassaday, H. J. (1998). "State-Dependent Retrieval and Chlorpheniramine". Human Psychopharmacology: ...
... is an analog of chlorpheniramine. The only difference is that the chlorine atom in the benzene ring is replaced ... chlorpheniramine, dexchlorpheniramine (Polaramine), triprolidine (Actifed), and iodopheniramine. The halogenated alkylamine ...
Coricidin, Coricidin D, or Coricidin HBP, is the brand name of a combination of dextromethorphan and chlorpheniramine maleate ( ... Examples are diphenhydramine, chlorpheniramine, brompheniramine, loratadine, and cetirizine. Decongestants may improve nasal ...
Benztropine Benzydamine Chlorpheniramine Singh A (11 April 2011). Herbalism, Phytochemistry and Ethnopharmacology. Science ...
It is the pharmacologically active dextrorotatory isomer of chlorpheniramine. It came into medical use in 1959 and was patented ...
Its active ingredients are chlorpheniramine maleate and codeine phosphate. Chlorpheniramine maleate, an H1-blocking ...
Double-blind comparative study of treatment with cyproheptadine, chlorpheniramine, and placebo". Archives of Dermatology. 113 ( ...
... cetirizine and chlorpheniramine. They do not prevent the discharge of histamine, but it has been proven that they do prevent a ...
Antihistamines such as diphenhydramine and chlorpheniramine are commonly used as treatment. People treated with H1 ...
Deane KJ, Summers RL, Lehane AM, Martin RE, Barrow RA (May 2014). "Chlorpheniramine Analogues Reverse Chloroquine Resistance in ...
It is also able to transform the antihistamines brompheniramine, chlorpheniramine and pheniramine. It forms a glucoside with ... chlorpheniramine, and pheniramine to N-oxide and N-demethylated metabolites by the fungus Cunninghamella elegans". Xenobiotica ...
Parasympathetic stimulation, e.g. bethanechol, pilocarpine, carbachol Antihistamines e.g. chlorpheniramine, diphenhydramine, ...
A form that contains dextromethorphan, pseudoephedrine, acetaminophen, and chlorpheniramine, is sold as Cotylenol. As of 2021[ ... chlorpheniramine and phenylephrine. The brand was introduced in 1955 by McNeil Laboratories, a family-owned pharmaceutical ...
... comparison with chlorpheniramine and immepip". Pharmacology, Biochemistry, and Behavior. 79 (1): 119-124. doi:10.1016/j.pbb. ...
... is also present in various cough syrups as codeine phosphate including chlorpheniramine maleate. Pure codeine is also ...
... hydrocodone polistirex/chlorpheniramine). However, it is noted that opioid/antihistamine combinations are used clinically for ... Atropine Benztropine Biperiden Chlorpheniramine Certain SSRIs (Paroxetine) Dicyclomine (Dicycloverine) Dimenhydrinate ...
"Factitious Urticaria (dermographism): Treatment by Cimetidine and Chlorpheniramine in a Randomized Double-blind Study." Br J ...
Yasuda SU, Yasuda RP (1999). "Affinities of brompheniramine, chlorpheniramine, and terfenadine at the five human muscarinic ...
First generation antihistamines include diphenhydramine (Benadryl), chlorpheniramine (Diabetic Tussin), hydroxizine (Atarax), ...
... caffeine and chlorpheniramine". Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry. 15 (4): 513-521. doi:10.1016/ ...
Short courses of sedative antihistamines such as chlorpheniramine may be useful in alleviating the itch. Fever during treatment ...
These included "elevated levels" of hydrocodone, acetaminophen, L-methamphetamine, and chlorpheniramine, all of which are legal ...
... phenylephrine and chlorpheniramine in pharmaceutical formulations: capsules and sachets". Journal of Pharmaceutical and ...
First-generation antihistamines such as chlorpheniramine and clemastine are more potent but have greater sedatory effects; ...
Common/marketed: Brompheniramine (Dimetapp, Dimetane) Chlorpheniramine (Chlor-Trimeton) Dimenhydrinate (Dramamine, Gravol) - ... chlorpheniramine (Chlor-Trimeton), and brompheniramine (Dimetane). However, a 1955 study of "antihistaminic drugs for colds," ...
Multisymptom cold medicines contain other active ingredients, such as paracetamol (acetaminophen), chlorpheniramine, and ... this brand presents additional danger when used at recreational doses due to the presence of chlorpheniramine. In over-the- ...
Both products contained chlorpheniramine maleate (an antihistamine) and phenylpropanolamine hydrochloride (a decongestant) but ... Both products contained 75 mg of phenylpropanolamine hydrochloride, but Cold Capsule IV contained 12 mg chlorpheniramine ...
Sometimes a third active ingredient, such as ascorbic acid, caffeine, chlorpheniramine maleate, or guaifenesin is added to this ... and Chlorpheniramine Maleate in Pharmaceutical Dosage Forms". Journal of Chromatographic Science. 40 (2): 97-100. doi:10.1093/ ...
Post-crash toxicology tests found signs of chlorpheniramine, a sedating antihistamine, in the pilot's blood and urine. The ...
Chlorpheniramine: learn about side effects, dosage, special precautions, and more on MedlinePlus ... Chlorpheniramine is usually taken as needed. If your doctor has told you to take chlorpheniramine regularly, take the missed ... Before taking chlorpheniramine,. *tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to chlorpheniramine, any other ... If you are giving chlorpheniramine or a combination product that contains chlorpheniramine to a child, read the package label ...
CHLORPHENIRAMINE MALEATE (UNII: V1Q0O9OJ9Z) (CHLORPHENIRAMINE - UNII:3U6IO1965U) CHLORPHENIRAMINE MALEATE. 5 mg in 1 mL. ... CLORRELIEF- chlorpheniramine maleate aerosol, spray. To receive this label RSS feed. Copy the URL below and paste it into your ... CLORRELIEF- chlorpheniramine maleate aerosol, spray. If this SPL contains inactivated NDCs listed by the FDA initiated ...
Testing Status of Chlorpheniramine maleate 10537-L. Testing Status of Chlorpheniramine maleate 10537-L. CASRN: 113-92-8. ... Related: CHLORPHENIRAMINE (CAS 132-22-9). Formula: C16-H19-Cl-N2.C4-H4-O4. Synonyms/Common Names. *2-Pyridinepropanamine, gamma ... Toxicology and Carcinogenesis Studies of Chlorpheniramine Maleate (CASRN 113-92-8) in F344/N Rats and B6C3F1 Mice (Gavage ...
Chlorpheniramine Chlorpheniramine relieves red, itchy, watery eyes; sneezing; itchy nose or throat; and runny nose caused by ... emergency medicines, such as a chewable form of chlorpheniramine (Chlor-Trimeton), and injectable epinephrine or a bee ... ... Tuzistra XR® (as a combination product containing Chlorpheniramine, Codeine) ... Z Tuss AC® (as a combination product ... Advil Allergy Sinus® (as a combination product containing Chlorpheniramine, Ibuprofen, Pseudoephedrine) ... Chlorfed A SR® (as ...
Find patient medical information for Chlorpheniramine Maleate CR oral on WebMD including its uses, side effects and safety, ... Chlorpheniramine is an antihistamine used to relieve symptoms of allergy, hay fever, and the common cold. These symptoms ... How to use Chlorpheniramine Maleate CR Capsule, Extended Release If you are taking the over-the-counter product, read all ... Before taking chlorpheniramine, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to it; or to dexchlorpheniramine; or if you ...
Chlorpheniramine / Dextromethorphan / Phenylephrine dosage information for adults and children. Includes dosages for Cold ... Acetaminophen, Chlorpheniramine, Dextromethorphan, Phenylephrine Liquid patient information. *Acetaminophen, Chlorpheniramine, ... Acetaminophen, Chlorpheniramine, Dextromethorphan and Phenylephrine acetaminophen 325 mg / chlorpheniramine 2 mg / ... The elimination of chlorpheniramine may be prolonged in patients with renal dysfunction. These patients should be monitored for ...
Chlorpheniramine Tablet Uses in Kannada - ಕ್ಲೋರ್ಫೆನಿರಮೈನ್ ಟ್ಯಾಬ್ಲೆಟ್. ಸೆಪ್ಟೆಂಬರ್ 7, 2023. Chlorpheniramine Tablet Uses in ...
CHLORPHENIRAMINE MALEATE (UNII: V1Q0O9OJ9Z) (CHLORPHENIRAMINE - UNII:3U6IO1965U) CHLORPHENIRAMINE MALEATE. 2 mg. PHENYLEPHRINE ... ALLERGY MULTI-SYMPTOM- acetaminophen, chlorpheniramine maleate, and phenylephrine hydrochloride tablet, coated. RxCUI. RxNorm ... acetaminophen 325 MG / chlorpheniramine maleate 2 MG / phenylephrine HCl 5 MG Oral Tablet. PSN. ... acetaminophen 325 MG / chlorpheniramine maleate 2 MG / phenylephrine hydrochloride 5 MG Oral Tablet. SCD. ...
Chlorpheniramine works by blocking the effects of histamine, a substance released by cells in the body that produce allergy ... Chlorpheniramine belongs to a group of medications known as first-generation antihistamines. For adults and children 6 years of ... Chlorpheniramine Maleate by Jamp is no longer being manufactured for sale in Canada. For brands that may still be available, ... Chlorpheniramine belongs to a group of medications known as first-generation antihistamines. For adults and children 6 years of ...
... occasional doses of chlorpheniramine are acceptable during breastfeeding. Larger doses or more prolonged use might cause ... Chlorpheniramine No authors listed In: Drugs and Lactation Database (LactMed) [Internet]. Bethesda (MD): National Institute of ... Small (2 to 4 mg), occasional doses of chlorpheniramine are acceptable during breastfeeding. Larger doses or more prolonged use ...
Hydrocodone and chlorpheniramine combination is not indicated for use in children younger than 18 years of age. Safety and ... Hydrocodone and chlorpheniramine combination is used to relieve cough and nasal congestion (stuffy nose) associated with the ... Chlorpheniramine is an antihistamine, which is used to relieve or prevent symptoms of an allergy. ... to date have not demonstrated geriatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of hydrocodone and chlorpheniramine ...
Alumadrine information about active ingredients, pharmaceutical forms and doses by Fleming Pharmaceuticals, Alumadrine indications, usages and related health products lists
Chlorpheniramine preparation information is provided by Wedgewood Pharmacy. ... Chlorpheniramine Chew Treat may be prescribed for Dogs and Cats. ... Chlorpheniramine Chew Treat. Prescribed For: Dogs and Cats. May ... Home > Medications > Chlorpheniramine > Chlorpheniramine: Chew Treat Chlorpheniramine: Chew Treat. Chlorpheniramine may be ... 3 strengths of Chlorpheniramine Chew Treat are available, ranging from 2 mg/chew to 10 mg/chew. What our customers are saying. ...
Learn more about Brompheniramine, Chlorpheniramine, Methscopolamine, Phenylephrine, And Pseudoephedrine (Sympak II) at ... Chlorpheniramine, Methscopolamine, Phenylephrine, And Pseudoephedrine (Sympak II), including what it is used for, warnings, ... Brompheniramine, Chlorpheniramine, Methscopolamine, Phenylephrine, And Pseudoephedrine (Sympak II). Brand Names:SymPak II ... Use Brompheniramine, Chlorpheniramine, Methscopolamine, Phenylephrine, And Pseudoephedrine (Sympak II) exactly as directed on ...
Product Description Description Chlorpheniramine (klor-fen-ir-a-meen) Maleate blocks histamineʼs effects and reduces itchiness ... Chlorpheniramine (klor-fen-ir-a-meen) Maleate blocks histamineʼs effects and reduces itchiness associated with allergies. ... Infrequently, chlorpheniramine may cause gastrointestinal distress such as vomiting, decreased appetite, and diarrhea. ...
Medical information for Chlorpheniramine Maleate on Pediatric Oncall including Mechanism, Indication, Contraindications, Dosing ... Chlorpheniramine Maleate. Synonym : Dexchlorpheniramine. Mechanism : Chlorpheniramine is an anti-histaminic. It competes with ... Hypersensitivity to chlorpheniramine or any component of the formulation, narrow-angle glaucoma, bladder neck obstruction, ... May increase the levels/effects of chlorpheniramine. ...
Stevens-Johnson syndrome plus intrahepatic cholestasis caused by clindamycin or chlorpheniramine] [Article in Spanish] ... Stevens-Johnson syndrome plus intrahepatic cholestasis caused by clindamycin or chlorpheniramine] [Article in Spanish] ... chlorpheniramine, betamethasone and clindamycin. After an initial clinical and laboratorial improvement, she began to complain ...
... chlorpheniramine), frequency-based adverse effects, comprehensive interactions, contraindications, pregnancy & lactation ... chlorpheniramine and iloperidone both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.. iloperidone increases levels of chlorpheniramine ... encoded search term (chlorpheniramine (ChlorTrimeton%2C Diabetic Tussin)) and chlorpheniramine (ChlorTrimeton, Diabetic Tussin) ... chlorpheniramine and amobarbital both increase sedation. Use Caution/Monitor.. amobarbital will decrease the level or effect of ...
Home / Products tagged "chlorpheniramine maleate ...
Codeine phosphate and chlorpheniramine maleate (TUXARIN ER™) For more on this Drug Safety Labeling Change, click here. ... Chlorpheniramine polistirex; codeine polistirex (Tuzistra® XR) For more on this Drug Safety Labeling Change, click here. ...
Understand the usages of Chlorpheniramine and Acetaminophen in various health conditions. Explore other smart treatment options ... 0 people have tried Chlorpheniramine and Acetaminophen 0 people have prescribed Chlorpheniramine and Acetaminophen ... Tried or prescribed Chlorpheniramine and Acetaminophen? Share your experience. Have you? Ive Tried it 0 ...
HISTAL DC 0.4MG/ML , 6MG/ML SYR (CAR/COL) CHLORPHENIRAMINE , PSEUDOEPHEDRINE ...
Decrease quantity for Chlorpheniramine 2mg Chew Increase quantity for Chlorpheniramine 2mg Chew ...
Chlorpheniramine competes with histamine or H1 receptor sites on effector cells in blood vessels and the respiratory tract. ...
CHLORPHENIRAMINE MALEATE (UNII: V1Q0O9OJ9Z) (CHLORPHENIRAMINE - UNII:3U6IO1965U) CHLORPHENIRAMINE MALEATE. 4 mg. PHENYLEPHRINE ... ACETAMINOPHEN, CHLORPHENIRAMINE MALEATE, PHENYLEPHRINE HCL acetaminophen, chlorpheniramine maleate, phenylephrine hcl tablet. ... ACETAMINOPHEN, CHLORPHENIRAMINE MALEATE, PHENYLEPHRINE HCL tablet. Number of versions: 1. Published Date (What is this?). ... ACETAMINOPHEN, CHLORPHENIRAMINE MALEATE, PHENYLEPHRINE HCL tablet. To receive this label RSS feed. Copy the URL below and paste ...
This product also contains an antihistamine (such as triprolidine, chlorpheniramine, doxylamine) that works by blocking the ...
Chlorpheniramine This medication is an antihistamine, prescribed for allergic conditions such as itchy and watery eyes, ...
Acetaminophen/Chlorpheniramine/Dextromethorphan/Phenylephrine Oral Suspension. Uses. No information is available.. Instructions ...
  • You should not use this medication if you are allergic to acetaminophen (Tylenol), chlorpheniramine, or dextromethorphan. (cigna.com)
  • The next morning, she sought medical attention and was prescribed chlorpheniramine and acetaminophen. (cdc.gov)
  • Chlorpheniramine is an antihistamine that reduces the effects of natural chemical histamine in the body. (drugs.com)
  • Chlorpheniramine is an antihistamine. (cigna.com)
  • Chlorpheniramine is an antihistamine used to relieve symptoms of allergy , hay fever , and the common cold . (webmd.com)
  • Chlorpheniramine Antihistamine - 4 mg. (calvetsupply.com)
  • Coricidin, Coricidin 'D' (decongestant), or Coricidin HBP (for high blood pressure), is the name of a drug marketed by Schering-Plough that contains dextromethorphan (a cough suppressant) and chlorpheniramine maleate (an antihistamine). (medschat.com)
  • Can Chlorpheniramine Be Bought O T C ## Yes, the antihistamine Chlorpheniramine is available over the counter, both as a. (medschat.com)
  • Chlorpheniramine is an antihistamine in tablet form meant to be used for the temporary relief of allergy symptoms in pets. (californiapetpharmacy.com)
  • Chlorphenamine (CP, CPM), also known as chlorpheniramine, is an antihistamine used to treat the symptoms of allergic conditions such as allergic rhinitis (hay fever). (wikipedia.org)
  • Paracetamol With Phenylephrine And Chlorpheniramine Maleate Drops that we are producing and providing to our important customers produced using great quality required components with the assistance of latest innovation. (kaps3.in)
  • This item is a mix of three prescriptions Chlorpheniramine, paracetamol and phenylephrine which calms regular cold indications. (kaps3.in)
  • 1. What are drops containing phenylephrine, chlorpheniramine, and paracetamol? (kaps3.in)
  • Ans - The combination of Paracetamol With Phenylephrine And Chlorpheniramine Maleate Drops is used to treat cold, flu, allergy, and hay fever symptoms. (kaps3.in)
  • It includes phenylephrine, chlorpheniramine maleate, and paracetamol. (kaps3.in)
  • 2. How should I use the drops of chlorpheniramine maleate and phenylephrine with paracetamol? (kaps3.in)
  • Ans - It's critical to follow your doctor's instructions when using Paracetamol With Phenylephrine And Chlorpheniramine Maleate Drops. (kaps3.in)
  • Ans - Dizziness, drowsiness, dry mouth, and nausea are typical adverse effects of paracetamol with phenylephrine and chlorpheniramine maleate drops. (kaps3.in)
  • 4. Are children safe to use Paracetamol Maleate Drops with Phenylephrine and Chlorpheniramine? (kaps3.in)
  • Ans - Children under the age of six should not use Paracetamol With Phenylephrine And Chlorpheniramine Maleate Drops. (kaps3.in)
  • 5. When taking Paracetamol With Phenylephrine And Chlorpheniramine Maleate Drops, what should I avoid? (kaps3.in)
  • Ans - Prevent using Paracetamol With Phenylephrine And Chlorpheniramine Maleate Drops with other drugs that contain paracetamol or phenylephrine. (kaps3.in)
  • How should I take chlorpheniramine? (drugs.com)
  • Serious, life-threatening side effects can occur if you take chlorpheniramine, pyrilamine, and phenylephrine before the MAO inhibitor has cleared from your body. (health32.com)
  • Chlorpheniramine Tablet Uses in Tamil - வணக்கம் இன்றைய பதிவில் குளோர்பெனிரமைன் மாத்திரை எதற்கு பயன்படுத்தப்படுகிறது. (maruthuvam.in)
  • Chlorpheniramine Tablet Uses in Tamil - மருத்துவரின் பரிந்துரை இல்லாமல் சொந்தமாக எந்த மருந்தையும் பயன்படுத்த வேண்டாம். (maruthuvam.in)
  • Chlorpheniramine Tablet Uses in Tamil - குளோர்பெனிரமைன் என்பது ஆண்டிஹிஸ்டமைன் ஆகும், இது உடலில் உள்ள இயற்கை வேதியான ஹிஸ்டமைனின் விளைவுகளை குறைக்கிறது. (maruthuvam.in)
  • Chlorpheniramine Tablet Uses in Tamil - சைனஸ் நெரிசல், மூக்கு ஒழுகுதல், தொண்டை மற்றும் மூக்கில் அரிப்பு, கண்களில் நீர் மற்றும் மேல் சுவாச தொற்று, காய்ச்சல், சளி, ஒவ்வாமை, நாசியழற்சி மற்றும் ஒவ்வாமை தும்மல் போன்றவற்றுக்கு மருத்துவர்கள் இந்த மாத்திரையை பரிந்துரைக்கின்றனர். (maruthuvam.in)
  • chlorpheniramine is usually taken only for a short time until your symptoms clear up. (drugs.com)
  • The combination of chlorpheniramine, pyrilamine, and phenylephrine is used to treat runny or stuffy nose, sinus congestion, watery eyes, and other symptoms caused by allergies or the common cold or flu. (health32.com)
  • Chlorpheniramine works by blocking histamines , chemicals which react in the body to cause inflammation and allergy symptoms. (bad-drug.net)
  • Emzor Chlorpheniramine Syrup is indicated for relieving symptoms of sinus congestion, sinus pressure, runny nose, watery eyes, itching of the nose and throat, and sneezing due to upper respiratory infections (e.g colds), allergies and hay fever. (com.ng)
  • It can increase some of the side effects of chlorpheniramine, pyrilamine, and phenylephrine. (health32.com)
  • Drug makers require APIs as raw materials for their drugs, and chlorpheniramine is widely used as an API to produce more than 2,000 types of common cold and allergy drugs, including common medicines like rhinitis tablets (鼻炎片) and vitamin C tablets (维C银翘片). (mayerbrown.com)
  • What other drugs affect AllerTan (Chlorpheniramine/Phenylephrine/Pyrilamine)? (health32.com)
  • Some drugs may interact with chlorpheniramine. (bad-drug.net)
  • To get started, check the section below for other drugs related to chlorpheniramine-dextromethorphan-phenylephrine. (rxless.com)
  • Chlorpheniramine is used to treat runny nose, sneezing, itching, and watery eyes caused by allergies, the common cold , or the flu . (drugs.com)
  • Chlorpheniramine does not prevent allergies or quicken the recovery process. (bad-drug.net)
  • By preventing the action of histamines, chlorpheniramine maintains allergies. (bad-drug.net)
  • Chlorpheniramine works to remedy contact, inhaled, or drug-induced allergies in dogs and cats by blocking the effects of histamine in the body. (californiapetpharmacy.com)
  • Do not use in animals with known allergies to chlorpheniramine. (californiapetpharmacy.com)
  • I'm not needing to take Hydrocodone/chlorpheniramine cough syrup at the moment. (medschat.com)
  • Emzor Chlorpheniramine Syrup may cause drowsiness. (com.ng)
  • Chlorpheniramine er , (generic name) and is also sold under the brand names Chlor Phen and Pro Hist 8 . (alcohol-explained.com)
  • Chlorpheniramine may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. (drugs.com)
  • Chlorpheniramine, dextromethorphan, and pseudoephedrine may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. (cigna.com)
  • You should not use this medication if you are allergic to chlorpheniramine, hydrocodone, or phenylephrine, or to other antihistamines or decongestants. (health32.com)
  • When you get a chlorpheniramine-dextromethorphan-phenylephrine coupon or discount card for free from RxLess, you'll pay the lowest possible price for your medication. (rxless.com)
  • Chlorpheniramine and pyrilamine are antihistamines that reduce the natural chemical histamine in the body. (health32.com)
  • Do not use chlorpheniramine, dextromethorphan, and pseudoephedrine if you have used an MAO inhibitor in the past 14 days. (cigna.com)
  • Chlorpheniramine is not known to cause harm to the fetus if taken by a pregnant woman. (bad-drug.net)
  • Let your doctor know if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant before using chlorpheniramine. (bad-drug.net)
  • You should not use chlorpheniramine if you have narrow-angle glaucoma , a blockage in your stomach or intestines, an enlarged prostate , if you are unable to urinate, or if you are having an asthma attack. (drugs.com)
  • Chlorpheniramine may pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. (drugs.com)
  • However, chlorpheniramine can be excreted into breast-milk and could potentially cause harm to a baby that is nursing. (bad-drug.net)
  • Accordingly, the SAMR found that there was limited demand and supply sided substitutability for chlorpheniramine API, and concluded that chlorpheniramine API formed its own distinct product market. (mayerbrown.com)
  • FDA pregnancy category B. Chlorpheniramine is not expected to harm an unborn baby. (drugs.com)
  • Chlorpheniramine is an FDA pregnancy Category B medicine. (bad-drug.net)
  • From a demand-sided perspective, strict Chinese drug regulations stipulate that chlorpheniramine cannot be substituted by any other API or other substances. (mayerbrown.com)
  • Hunan Er-Kang was found to have violated Article 17(1) of the AML which prohibited selling goods at unfairly high prices, because while Hunan Er-Kang did not face any major changes to drug production and procurement costs, it sold chlorpheniramine API in July 2018 at a price of CNY 2,940 / kg, which was three to four times of the average cost to procure the same. (mayerbrown.com)
  • Buy Chlorpheniramine maleate impurity C Reference from Toref at best competitive price. (toref-standards.com)
  • Ask your doctor which form of chlorpheniramine is right for you. (bad-drug.net)
  • What are the possible side effects of AllerTan (Chlorpheniramine/Phenylephrine/Pyrilamine)? (health32.com)
  • Chlorpheniramine er alcohol speaks to Chlorpheniramine er alcohol interaction, what is Chlorpheniramine er ans side effects. (alcohol-explained.com)
  • Do not use chlorpheniramine if you are breastfeeding a child unless you have consulted your doctor. (bad-drug.net)