A commonly used laboratory solvent. It was previously used as an anesthetic, but was banned from use in the U.S. due to its suspected carcinogenicity.
Methanes substituted with three halogen atoms, which may be the same or different.
Concentrated pharmaceutical preparations of plants obtained by removing active constituents with a suitable solvent, which is evaporated away, and adjusting the residue to a prescribed standard.
Liquids that dissolve other substances (solutes), generally solids, without any change in chemical composition, as, water containing sugar. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
A colorless, flammable liquid used in the manufacture of FORMALDEHYDE and ACETIC ACID, in chemical synthesis, antifreeze, and as a solvent. Ingestion of methanol is toxic and may cause blindness.
Halogenated hydrocarbons refer to organic compounds containing carbon and hydrogen atoms, where one or more hydrogen atoms are replaced by halogens such as fluorine, chlorine, bromine, or iodine.
The immersion or washing of the body or any of its parts in water or other medium for cleansing or medical treatment. It includes bathing for personal hygiene as well as for medical purposes with the addition of therapeutic agents, such as alkalines, antiseptics, oil, etc.
A highly volatile inhalation anesthetic used mainly in short surgical procedures where light anesthesia with good analgesia is required. It is also used as an industrial solvent. Prolonged exposure to high concentrations of the vapor can lead to cardiotoxicity and neurological impairment.
A chlorinated hydrocarbon that has been used as an inhalation anesthetic and acts as a narcotic in high concentrations. Its primary use is as a solvent in manufacturing and food technology.
A mobile, very volatile, highly flammable liquid used as an inhalation anesthetic and as a solvent for waxes, fats, oils, perfumes, alkaloids, and gums. It is mildly irritating to skin and mucous membranes.
Chromatography on thin layers of adsorbents rather than in columns. The adsorbent can be alumina, silica gel, silicates, charcoals, or cellulose. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
'Swimming pools' in a medical context typically refers to man-made bodies of water designed for swimming and other recreational activities, which can also serve as potential reservoirs for various infectious diseases if not properly maintained, including those transmitted through waterborne pathogens, fecal contamination, or poor water chemistry.
A plant species of the genus SOLANUM, family SOLANACEAE that contains steroidal glycosides.
Chlorinated ethanes which are used extensively as industrial solvents. They have been utilized in numerous home-use products including spot remover preparations and inhalant decongestant sprays. These compounds cause central nervous system and cardiovascular depression and are hepatotoxic. Include 1,1,1- and 1,1,2-isomers.
A plant genus of the family LAMIACEAE that contains pimarane-type diterpenes. Several species of Orthosiphon are also called Java tea.
A plant genus of the family FABACEAE that is used for food in NIGERIA.

Structural and functional changes in acute liver injury. (1/581)

Carbon tetrachloride produces liver cell injury in a variety of animal species. The first structurally recognizable changes occur in the endoplasmic reticulum, with alteration in ribosome-membrane interactions. Later there is an increase in intracellular fat, and the formation of tangled nets of the ergastoplasm. At no time are there changes in mitochondria or single membrane limited bodies in cells with intact plasmalemma, although a relative increase in cell sap may appear. In dead cells (those with plasmalemma discontinuties) crystalline deposits of calcium phosphatase may be noted. Functional changes are related to the endoplasmic reticulum and the plasma membrane. An early decrease in protein synthesis takes place; an accumulation of neutral lipid is related to this change. Later alterations in the ergastoplasmic functions (e.g., mixed function oxidation) occurs. Carbon tetrachloride is not the active agent; rather, a product of its metabolism, probably the CC1, free radical, is. The mechanisms of injury include macromolecular adduction and peroxide propagation. A third possibility includes a cascade effect with the production of secondary and tertiary products, also toxic in nature, with the ability to produce more widespread damage to intracellular structures.  (+info)

Quantitative aspects in the assessment of liver injury. (2/581)

Liver function data are usually difficult to use in their original form when one wishes to compare the hepatotoxic properties of several chemical substances. However, procedures are available for the conversion of liver function data into quantal responses. These permit the elaboration of dose-response lines for the substances in question, the calculation of median effective doses and the statistical analysis of differences in liver-damaging potency. These same procedures can be utilized for estimating the relative hazard involved if one compares the liver-damaging potency to the median effective dose for some other pharmacologie parameter. Alterations in hepatic triglycerides, lipid peroxidation, and the activities of various hepatic enzymes can also be quantitiated in a dose-related manner. This permits the selection of equitoxic doses required for certain comparative studies and the selection of doses in chemical interaction studies. The quantitative problems involved in low-frequency adverse reactions and the difficulty these present in the detection of liver injury in laboratory animals are discussed.  (+info)

Model for bacteriophage T4 development in Escherichia coli. (3/581)

Mathematical relations for the number of mature T4 bacteriophages, both inside and after lysis of an Escherichia coli cell, as a function of time after infection by a single phage were obtained, with the following five parameters: delay time until the first T4 is completed inside the bacterium (eclipse period, nu) and its standard deviation (sigma), the rate at which the number of ripe T4 increases inside the bacterium during the rise period (alpha), and the time when the bacterium bursts (mu) and its standard deviation (beta). Burst size [B = alpha(mu - nu)], the number of phages released from an infected bacterium, is thus a dependent parameter. A least-squares program was used to derive the values of the parameters for a variety of experimental results obtained with wild-type T4 in E. coli B/r under different growth conditions and manipulations (H. Hadas, M. Einav, I. Fishov, and A. Zaritsky, Microbiology 143:179-185, 1997). A "destruction parameter" (zeta) was added to take care of the adverse effect of chloroform on phage survival. The overall agreement between the model and the experiment is quite good. The dependence of the derived parameters on growth conditions can be used to predict phage development under other experimental manipulations.  (+info)

A novel strategy for the preparation of liposomes: rapid solvent exchange. (4/581)

During the preparation of multi-component model membranes, a primary consideration is that compositional homogeneity should prevail throughout the suspension. Some conventional sample preparation methods pass the lipid mixture through an intermediary, solvent-free state. This is an ordered, solid state and may favor the demixing of membrane components. A new preparative method has been developed which is specifically designed to avoid this intermediary state. This novel strategy is called rapid solvent exchange (RSE) and entails the direct transfer of lipid mixtures between organic solvent and aqueous buffer. RSE liposomes require no more than a minute to prepare and manifest considerable entrapment volumes with a high fraction of external surface area. In phospholipid/cholesterol mixtures of high cholesterol content, suspensions prepared by more conventional methods reveal evidence of artifactual demixing, whereas samples prepared by rapid solvent exchange do not. The principles which may lead to artifactual demixing during conventional sample preparation are discussed.  (+info)

Distribution of gangliosides, GM1 and GM3, in the rat oviduct. (5/581)

It is known that gangliosides, being ubiquitous membrane components, play important roles in cell-cell recognition, differentiation and transmembrane signalling. GM3, GM1 and GD1a were detected in the rat oviduct as major gangliosides by thin-layer chromatography (TLC) analysis. The total amounts of gangliosides from the oviducts at various times after hormone injection were not much changed. In order to identify their distribution and possible changes during ovulation, frozen sections of the rat oviducts were stained with specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the ganglio-series gangliosides. GM3 and GM1 were expressed in a different manner, but GD1a and other gangliosides were not immunohistochemically detected. In the ampullar region, GM3 was expressed in all the stroma and epithelial cells, but not GM1. GM1 was also not observed in epithelial cells. Staining by anti-GM1 monoclonal antibodies revealed long and minute thread-like structures in some of the stroma cells, whereas anti-GM3 monoclonal antibodies stained the entire cytoplasm, but not the nucleus, of all the stroma and epithelial cells. Other ganglio-series gangliosides, including GD1a, were not detected to some extent in the ampullar region by immunohistochemistry. Thus, these data suggest that GM3 and GM1 are oviduct-specific gangliosides.  (+info)

Preliminary characterization of a reovirus isolated from golden ide Leuciscus idus melanotus. (6/581)

Some characteristics of a reovirus recently isolated from golden ide Leuciscus idus melanotus and tentatively designated as golden ide reovirus (GIRV) were determined. Spherical non-enveloped particles with an outer capsid of about 70 nm and an inner capsid of about 50 nm were observed by electron microscopy. The density of the virus determined in CsCl gradients was 1.36 g ml-1. The genome contained 11 segments of dsRNA. GIRV differed from other aquareoviruses by a slight reduction of infectivity after treatment with chloroform and by the absence of forming syncytia in cell monolayers.  (+info)

Drinking water disinfection byproducts: review and approach to toxicity evaluation. (7/581)

There is widespread potential for human exposure to disinfection byproducts (DBPs) in drinking water because everyone drinks, bathes, cooks, and cleans with water. The need for clean and safe water led the U.S. Congress to pass the Safe Drinking Water Act more than 20 years ago in 1974. In 1976, chloroform, a trihalomethane (THM) and a principal DBP, was shown to be carcinogenic in rodents. This prompted the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) in 1979 to develop a drinking water rule that would provide guidance on the levels of THMs allowed in drinking water. Further concern was raised by epidemiology studies suggesting a weak association between the consumption of chlorinated drinking water and the occurrence of bladder, colon, and rectal cancer. In 1992 the U.S. EPA initiated a negotiated rulemaking to evaluate the need for additional controls for microbial pathogens and DBPs. The goal was to develop an approach that would reduce the level of exposure from disinfectants and DBPs without undermining the control of microbial pathogens. The product of these deliberations was a proposed stage 1 DBP rule. It was agreed that additional information was necessary on how to optimize the use of disinfectants while maintaining control of pathogens before further controls to reduce exposure beyond stage 1 were warranted. In response to this need, the U.S. EPA developed a 5-year research plan to support the development of the longer term rules to control microbial pathogens and DBPs. A considerable body of toxicologic data has been developed on DBPs that occur in the drinking water, but the main emphasis has been on THMs. Given the complexity of the problem and the need for additional data to support the drinking water DBP rules, the U.S. EPA, the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, and the U.S. Army are working together to develop a comprehensive biologic and mechanistic DBP database. Selected DBPs will be tested using 2-year toxicity and carcinogenicity studies in standard rodent models; transgenic mouse models and small fish models; in vitro mechanistic and toxicokinetic studies; and reproductive, immunotoxicity, and developmental studies. The goal is to create a toxicity database that reflects a wide range of DBPs resulting from different disinfection practices. This paper describes the approach developed by these agencies to provide the information needed to make scientifically based regulatory decisions.  (+info)

Hepatoprotection by dimethyl sulfoxide. I. Protection when given twenty-four hours after chloroform or bromobenzene. (8/581)

Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) has previously been reported to protect against hepatotoxicity resulting from chloroform (CHCl3) or bromobenzene (BB) when given 10 hr after the toxicant. The object of these studies was to further demonstrate the latent protective ability of DMSO by administering it at a much later time (24 hr) following toxicant exposure. In addition, a more detailed evaluation of the lesions was performed to better characterize the lesion progression and resolution. Male Sprague-Dawley rats received a hepatotoxic oral dose of either CHCl3 (1.0 ml/kg) or BB (0.5 ml/kg) and then received 2 ml/kg DMSO intraperitoneally 24 hr later. With both toxicants, limited centrilobular lesions were already present by the time DMSO was administered. Without treatment, liver injury rapidly progressed so that by 48 hr it occupied 40-50% of the liver, with accompanying large increases in plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity. Administration of DMSO greatly attenuated lesion development for both toxicants; the area injured was reduced by more than 4-fold, accompanied by a decrease in 48 hr ALT activity of 8-16-fold. The ability of DMSO to intervene in the development of liver injury at such a late time appears to be unique and may provide insight into therapies for acute xenobiotic-induced hepatitis.  (+info)

Chloroform is a volatile, clear, and nonflammable liquid with a mild, sweet, and aromatic odor. Its chemical formula is CHCl3, consisting of one carbon atom, one hydrogen atom, and three chlorine atoms. Chloroform is a trihalomethane, which means it contains three halogens (chlorine) in its molecular structure.

In the medical field, chloroform has been historically used as an inhaled general anesthetic agent due to its ability to produce unconsciousness and insensibility to pain quickly. However, its use as a surgical anesthetic has largely been abandoned because of several safety concerns, including its potential to cause cardiac arrhythmias, liver and kidney damage, and a condition called "chloroform hepatopathy" with prolonged or repeated exposure.

Currently, chloroform is not used as a therapeutic agent in medicine but may still be encountered in laboratory settings for various research purposes. It's also possible to find traces of chloroform in drinking water due to its formation during the disinfection process using chlorine-based compounds.

Trihalomethanes (THMs) are a group of chemical compounds that are formed as byproducts when chlorine or other disinfectants are used to treat water, including drinking water, swimming pools, and spas. They consist of four halogens - three of which are halogen atoms (chlorine, bromine, or iodine) and one hydrogen atom. The most common THMs formed during water treatment include chloroform, bromodichloromethane, dibromochloromethane, and bromoform.

Exposure to high levels of trihalomethanes has been linked to a variety of health problems, including an increased risk of cancer, reproductive issues, and developmental effects. As a result, regulatory agencies such as the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in the United States have set limits on the amount of THMs that can be present in drinking water. Regular monitoring and treatment are necessary to ensure that these limits are not exceeded and that the public is protected from potential health hazards associated with exposure to trihalomethanes.

A plant extract is a preparation containing chemical constituents that have been extracted from a plant using a solvent. The resulting extract may contain a single compound or a mixture of several compounds, depending on the extraction process and the specific plant material used. These extracts are often used in various industries including pharmaceuticals, nutraceuticals, cosmetics, and food and beverage, due to their potential therapeutic or beneficial properties. The composition of plant extracts can vary widely, and it is important to ensure their quality, safety, and efficacy before use in any application.

Solvents, in a medical context, are substances that are capable of dissolving or dispersing other materials, often used in the preparation of medications and solutions. They are commonly organic chemicals that can liquefy various substances, making it possible to administer them in different forms, such as oral solutions, topical creams, or injectable drugs.

However, it is essential to recognize that solvents may pose health risks if mishandled or misused, particularly when they contain volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Prolonged exposure to these VOCs can lead to adverse health effects, including respiratory issues, neurological damage, and even cancer. Therefore, it is crucial to handle solvents with care and follow safety guidelines to minimize potential health hazards.

Methanol, also known as methyl alcohol or wood alcohol, is a volatile, colorless, flammable liquid with a distinctive odor similar to that of ethanol (drinking alcohol). It is used in various industrial applications such as the production of formaldehyde, acetic acid, and other chemicals. In the medical field, methanol is considered a toxic alcohol that can cause severe intoxication and metabolic disturbances when ingested or improperly consumed. Methanol poisoning can lead to neurological symptoms, blindness, and even death if not treated promptly and effectively.

Halogenated hydrocarbons are organic compounds containing carbon (C), hydrogen (H), and one or more halogens, such as fluorine (F), chlorine (Cl), bromine (Br), or iodine (I). These compounds are formed when halogens replace one or more hydrogen atoms in a hydrocarbon molecule.

Halogenated hydrocarbons can be further categorized into two groups:

1. Halogenated aliphatic hydrocarbons: These include alkanes, alkenes, and alkynes with halogen atoms replacing hydrogen atoms. Examples include chloroform (trichloromethane, CHCl3), methylene chloride (dichloromethane, CH2Cl2), and trichloroethylene (C2HCl3).
2. Halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons: These consist of aromatic rings, such as benzene, with halogen atoms attached. Examples include chlorobenzene (C6H5Cl), bromobenzene (C6H5Br), and polyhalogenated biphenyls like polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs).

Halogenated hydrocarbons have various industrial applications, including use as solvents, refrigerants, fire extinguishing agents, and intermediates in chemical synthesis. However, some of these compounds can be toxic, environmentally persistent, and bioaccumulative, posing potential health and environmental risks.

A bath generally refers to the act of immersing or cleaning the body in a mixture of water and sometimes other substances, such as soap or essential oils. In a medical context, there are several types of therapeutic baths that may be prescribed for various purposes:

1. Sitz bath: A shallow bath that only covers the hips and buttocks, used to treat conditions like hemorrhoids, anal fissures, or other localized infections.
2. Hydrotherapy bath: A therapeutic bath using water at different temperatures, pressures, or with added substances (e.g., Epsom salts, essential oils) for relaxation, pain relief, or to improve circulation and promote healing.
3. Balneotherapy: The use of mineral-rich waters from natural springs or artificial mineral baths for therapeutic purposes, often used in the treatment of skin conditions, arthritis, or musculoskeletal disorders.
4. Medicated bath: A bath with added medical substances (e.g., medicated oils, salts) to treat various skin conditions, promote relaxation, or relieve pain.
5. Whirlpool bath: A therapeutic bath using water jets to create a swirling motion and provide hydrotherapy benefits for relaxation, pain relief, or improved circulation.

It is essential to follow medical advice when taking therapeutic baths, as incorrect usage can lead to adverse effects.

Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a volatile, colorless liquid with a chloroform-like odor. In the medical field, it is primarily used as a surgical anesthetic and an analgesic. However, its use in medicine has significantly decreased due to the availability of safer alternatives.

In a broader context, TCE is widely used in various industries as a solvent for cleaning metal parts, degreasing fabrics and other materials, and as a refrigerant. It's also present in some consumer products like paint removers, adhesives, and typewriter correction fluids.

Prolonged or repeated exposure to TCE can lead to various health issues, including neurological problems, liver and kidney damage, and an increased risk of certain cancers. Therefore, its use is regulated by environmental and occupational safety agencies worldwide.

Methylene chloride, also known as dichloromethane, is an organic compound with the formula CH2Cl2. It is a colorless, volatile liquid with a mild sweet aroma. In terms of medical definitions, methylene chloride is not typically included due to its primarily industrial uses. However, it is important to note that exposure to high levels of methylene chloride can cause harmful health effects, including irritation to the eyes, skin, and respiratory tract; headaches; dizziness; and, at very high concentrations, unconsciousness and death. Chronic exposure to methylene chloride has been linked to liver toxicity, and it is considered a possible human carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC).

In medical terms, "ether" is an outdated term that was used to refer to a group of compounds known as diethyl ethers. The most common member of this group, and the one most frequently referred to as "ether," is diethyl ether, also known as sulfuric ether or simply ether.

Diethyl ether is a highly volatile, flammable liquid that was once widely used as an anesthetic agent in surgical procedures. It has a characteristic odor and produces a state of unconsciousness when inhaled, allowing patients to undergo surgery without experiencing pain. However, due to its numerous side effects, such as nausea, vomiting, and respiratory depression, as well as the risk of explosion or fire during use, it has largely been replaced by safer and more effective anesthetic agents.

It's worth noting that "ether" also has other meanings in different contexts, including a term used to describe a substance that produces a feeling of detachment from reality or a sense of unreality, as well as a class of organic compounds characterized by the presence of an ether group (-O-, a functional group consisting of an oxygen atom bonded to two alkyl or aryl groups).

Thin-layer chromatography (TLC) is a type of chromatography used to separate, identify, and quantify the components of a mixture. In TLC, the sample is applied as a small spot onto a thin layer of adsorbent material, such as silica gel or alumina, which is coated on a flat, rigid support like a glass plate. The plate is then placed in a developing chamber containing a mobile phase, typically a mixture of solvents.

As the mobile phase moves up the plate by capillary action, it interacts with the stationary phase and the components of the sample. Different components of the mixture travel at different rates due to their varying interactions with the stationary and mobile phases, resulting in distinct spots on the plate. The distance each component travels can be measured and compared to known standards to identify and quantify the components of the mixture.

TLC is a simple, rapid, and cost-effective technique that is widely used in various fields, including forensics, pharmaceuticals, and research laboratories. It allows for the separation and analysis of complex mixtures with high resolution and sensitivity, making it an essential tool in many analytical applications.

I'm not able to provide a medical definition for "swimming pools" as it is not a term that is typically used in the medical field. However, swimming pools are bodies of water designed for swimming and other recreational activities. They can be found in various settings such as residential homes, community centers, hotels, and fitness clubs. Swimming pools can contain either chlorinated or saltwater and should be properly maintained to prevent the growth of harmful bacteria and algae that can cause illnesses.

If you have any medical concerns related to swimming or using swimming pools, I would recommend consulting with a healthcare professional for advice tailored to your specific situation.

"Solanum nigrum" is the scientific name for a plant species that is commonly known as black nightshade. It belongs to the family Solanaceae, which also includes other well-known plants such as tomatoes, potatoes, and eggplants.

Black nightshade is an annual or short-lived perennial herb that can grow up to 1 meter tall. The plant has simple, alternate leaves that are usually dark green in color and have a slightly hairy texture. The flowers of the black nightshade are small and white with yellow centers, and they produce round, shiny black berries that contain numerous seeds.

While some parts of the black nightshade plant, including the berries, are edible and can be used in cooking, it is important to note that all parts of the plant contain solanine, a toxic alkaloid that can cause symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and dizziness if ingested in large quantities. Therefore, it is generally recommended to avoid consuming any part of the black nightshade plant unless it has been properly prepared by a knowledgeable source.

In medical contexts, "Solanum nigrum" may be mentioned in relation to its potential medicinal properties or as a cause of toxicity if ingested in large quantities. However, it is not typically used as a medical treatment or therapy.

Trichloroethanes are not a medical term, but rather a group of chemical compounds that include 1,1,1-trichloroethane and 1,1,2-trichloroethane. These chemicals have been used as solvents, degreasing agents, and refrigerants.

1,1,1-Trichloroethane, also known as methyl chloroform, is a colorless liquid with a sweet, mild odor. It has been used as a solvent for cleaning electronic components, removing adhesives, and degreasing metals. It can also be found in some consumer products such as spray paints, aerosol cleaners, and spot removers.

1,1,2-Trichloroethane, also known as aerothane, is a colorless liquid with a mild sweet odor. It has been used as a solvent for cleaning and degreasing metals, plastics, and other surfaces. It can also be found in some consumer products such as typewriter correction fluids and spot removers.

Exposure to trichloroethanes can occur through inhalation, skin contact, or ingestion. Short-term exposure to high levels of these chemicals can cause irritation of the eyes, nose, throat, and lungs, dizziness, headache, and nausea. Long-term exposure to lower levels can lead to liver and kidney damage, neurological effects, and an increased risk of cancer.

It is important to handle trichloroethanes with care and follow proper safety precautions, including using appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) such as gloves, goggles, and respirators, and ensuring adequate ventilation in the work area.

Orthosiphon is a genus of plants in the family Lamiaceae, also known as the mint or deadnettle family. The most common species is Orthosiphon stamineus, also known as Cat's Whiskers or Java Tea. This plant is native to Southeast Asia and some parts of Australia.

In a medical context, Orthosiphon stamineus is used in traditional medicine for its diuretic, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antibacterial properties. The leaves and stems of the plant are dried and prepared as an herbal infusion or decoction to treat various health conditions such as kidney stones, urinary tract infections, and high blood pressure. However, it is important to note that the scientific evidence supporting these claims is limited, and more research is needed to establish its safety and efficacy.

"Cajanus" is a genus of flowering plants in the legume family, Fabaceae. It includes several species of tropical shrubs and trees that are native to Asia, Africa, and Australia. The most well-known species in this genus is Cajanus cajan, which is commonly known as pigeon pea or red gram. This plant is widely cultivated for its edible seeds and green pods, and it is an important source of food and income for millions of people around the world.

Cajanus species are characterized by their compound leaves, yellow or orange flowers, and long, slender seedpods that contain several seeds. The plants are often used as ornamentals, and they have a variety of medicinal and other uses. For example, Cajanus cajan is sometimes used in traditional medicine to treat a range of conditions, including fever, diarrhea, and skin diseases.

Overall, "Cajanus" refers to a group of plants that are important for their economic, nutritional, and ecological value.

In September 1900, chloroform was implicated in the murder of the U.S. businessman William Marsh Rice. Chloroform was deemed a ... The use of chloroform during surgery expanded rapidly in Europe; for instance in the 1850s, chloroform was used by the ... In a 2007 plea bargain, a man confessed to using stun guns and chloroform to sexually assault minors. Use of chloroform as an ... "Chloroform as a pollutant". The Encyclopedia of World Problems. Srebnik, M.; Laloë, E. (2001). "Chloroform". Encyclopedia of ...
Chloroform may also refer to: "Chloroform" (song), a song by Phoenix "Chloroform", a song by Crystal Castles from Amnesty (I) " ... Look up chloroform or trichloromethane in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. Chloroform is a chemical compound with the molecular ... "Chloroform", a song by SycAmour Cloroform, a Norwegian alternative band This disambiguation page lists articles associated with ... the title Chloroform. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended ...
In 1864, the Report of Chloroform Committee of Royal Medical and Chirurgical Society endorsed chloroform as Britain's favourite ... in 1864 to investigate the use of chloroform. The committee recommended the use of chloroform in the same year (although ether ... The Chloroform Committee was commissioned by the Royal Medical and Chirurgical Society (now known as the Royal Society of ... One of the members, Joseph Clover, during his time on the committee developed apparatus for using chloroform called the Clover ...
Commercial chloroform-d does, however, still contain a small amount (0.2% or less) of non-deuterated chloroform; this results ... Deuterated chloroform is a common solvent used in NMR spectroscopy. The properties of CDCl3 and ordinary CHCl3 (chloroform) are ... Deuterated chloroform, also known as chloroform-d, is the organic compound with the formula CDCl3 or C2HCl3. ... If nondeuterated chloroform (containing a full equivalent of protium) were used as solvent, the solvent signal would almost ...
"Chloroform" at AllMusic "Chloroform" at Discogs (list of releases) (Articles with short description, Short description is ... "Chloroform" is a song written and performed by Phoenix, issued as the first promotional single from the band's fifth studio ... "Phoenix - Chloroform (Official Video) - YouTube". Loyauté Records. 10 December 2013. Retrieved 1 October 2014 - via YouTube. ... "). "Chloroform - Phoenix - Listen, Appearances, Song Review - AllMusic". AllMusic. Retrieved 1 October 2014. "Phoenix Lights ...
This page provides supplementary chemical data on chloroform. The handling of this chemical may incur notable safety ...
Because the phenol:chloroform mixture is immiscible with water, the centrifuge will cause two distinct phases to form: an upper ... Phenol-chloroform extraction is a liquid-liquid extraction technique in molecular biology used to separate nucleic acids from ... This difference in density is why phenol, which only has a slightly higher density than water, must be mixed with chloroform to ... The aqueous phase rises to the top because it is less dense than the organic phase containing the phenol:chloroform. ...
The first Chloroform Commission was gathered in the year 1888 to assess the toxicity of chloroform when used in humans to allow ... Hyderabad Chloroform Commission-1891, by Sir Asman Jah, 1891 AD v t e (Use dmy dates from July 2019, History of anesthesia, ... The Hyderabad Chloroform Commission was commissioned in Hyderabad by the then ruler of Hyderabad State, Mir Mahbub Ali Khan. ... Thus making Hyderabad the first to use the chloroform in a medical field. Famous Scottish surgeon, Dr Edward Lawrie, Residency ...
... (abbreviated AGPC) is a liquid-liquid extraction technique in ...
... (sometimes referred to as the "Third Chloroform Committee ... The committee was instigated to investigate chloroform which was a subject of great interest to the profession and the public ... A. Vernon Hardcourt and Professor Dunstan) "to investigate methods of quantitatively determining the presence of chloroform in ... They also deemed these inhalers suitable for giving accurate measures of chloroform: Snow's Inhaler Charrière's Inhaler Duroy's ...
Brody, H. (2003). Cholera, Chloroform, and the Science of Medicine: A Life of John Snow. Oxford University Press. p. 30. ISBN ... Vinten-Johansen, P. "Cholera, Chloroform, and the Science of Medicine : A Life of John Snow" (PDF). Retrieved 18 March 2017. ( ... Greenhow and Snow both advocated for the usage of chloroform when performing major surgery and undertook "dedicated research" ... Greenhow's son, surgeon Henry Martineau Greenhow, reported in The Lancet his father's surgical success involving chloroform. ...
"Chloroform." Wisconsin Department of Health Services, //www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/chemical/chloroform.htm, 23 Mar. 2019 ... Chloroform is a Trihalomethane that is often used as a fumigant for wheat products, a coolant, and as a cleaning spot remover. ... Chloroform is a naturally occurring substance, but its presence in water is almost always man-made. The lake itself is not man ... However, there is a high level of chloroform present in the Lake, at 4.43 ppb (parts per billion) out of an allowed 14 ppb. ...
The reaction can be used to transform acetyl groups into carboxyl groups (R−C(=O)OH) or to produce chloroform (CHCl3), ... In 1832, Justus von Liebig reported the reaction of chloral with calcium hydroxide to form chloroform and calcium formate. The ... It was formerly used to produce iodoform, bromoform, and even chloroform industrially.[citation needed] Water chlorination can ... On pages 259-265, Liebig describes Chlorkohlenstoff ("carbon chloride", chloroform), but on p. 264, Liebig incorrectly states ...
1831 Chloroform Chloroform is a chemical compound in the trihalomethane family that does not undergo combustion in air, ... Chloroform was first discovered in July 1831 by American physician Samuel Guthrie, independently a few months later by French ... "Chloroform". BBC Radio 4. "Finding the World's First Dinosaur Skeleton Hadrosaurus foulki". Hoag Levins. "Discovery of Midway ...
"Methyl chloroform". Immediately Dangerous to Life or Health Concentrations (IDLH). National Institute for Occupational Safety ... The organic compound 1,1,1-trichloroethane, also known as methyl chloroform and chlorothene, is a chloroalkane with the ...
In 2013 she starred in the music videos for "First Fires" by British musician Bonobo and for "Chloroform" by French band ... "Phoenix - Chloroform". 13 November 2014. Retrieved 29 November 2017. "Hplus Nano Teoranta - About the Company". Retrieved 29 ...
Its odor is "strong, ethereal; chloroform-like". It is toxic and may be carcinogenic in humans. Furan is used as a starting ...
For example, reaction with chloral hydrate gives deuterated chloroform, and reaction with n-nitrosodimethylamine gives the ... Breuer, F. W. (1935). "Chloroform-d (Deuteriochloroform)". Journal of the American Chemical Society. 57 (11): 2236-2237. doi: ...
Today one must…chloroform the Yugoslavians. But later on one must adopt a politics of deep interest in Kosovo. This will help ... Today one must ... chloroform the Yugoslavians. But later on one must adopt a politics of deep interest in Kosovo. This will ...
Chloroform is recognized carcinogen, meaning it can cause cancer if one is exposed to it for a long period of time. It is ... Chloroform is a colorless liquid that is non-flammable. This chemical can be found in floor polishing substances and pesticides ... "Chemical Profile: Chloroform". Scorecard. GoodGuide. Retrieved 28 September 2017. "Lead". Tox Town. U.S. National Library of ... "Frequently Asked Questions: Chloroform" (PDF). Delaware Health and Social Services: Division of Public Health: 1. September ...
One doctor described using equal parts alcohol and chloroform in minor operations, but chloroform with Eau de Cologne (which ... No 2: 45 parts chloroform, 150 parts sulphuric ether, 15 parts petroleum ether. No 3: 30 parts chloroform, 80 parts sulphuric ... It was a mixture of alcohol, chloroform and ether which gives the mixture its name. Its effects were said to be between that of ... Chloroform (which was first used in 1847) used on its own produces myocardial depression, however the excitatory properties of ...
The basic principle of the phenol-chloroform extraction is that DNA and RNA are relatively insoluble in phenol and chloroform, ... "Phenol-Chloroform Extraction , Herman Lab , Nebraska". hermanlab.unl.edu. Retrieved 2023-01-10. Ali N, Rampazzo RC, Costa AD, ... The addition of a phenol/chloroform mixture will dissolve protein and lipid contaminants, leaving the nucleic acids in the ...
Discoverer of chloroform. National Galleries of Scotland. Retrieved 11 January 2018. Dunn, P. M. (1 May 2002). "Sir James Young ... His innovations in anaesthetics and properties of chloroform in November 1847 overshadowed his contributions to obstetrics. ...
The procedure became known to women as "chloroform à la reine" (in the style of the queen). In the early 20th century, a drug- ... Anesthesia's use was popularized in 1853 by Queen Victoria's decision to use chloroform for pain relief during the birth of her ... Barry, Ellen (6 May 2019). "Chloroform in Childbirth? Yes, Please, the Queen Said". The New York Times. Retrieved 15 October ...
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Chloroform, 1 oz.; Laudanum, 1 oz.; Oil Sassafras, 1 oz.; Oil Hemlock, 1 oz.; Oil Turpentine, 1 oz.; Balsam fir, 1 oz.; ...
Chloroform could be obtained from a druggist, but nitrous oxide and the highly flammable ether had to be manufactured by the ... Perhaps ironically, Sims later became an expert on anesthesia, publishing on nitrous oxide in 1868, and in 1874 on chloroform. ... "Chloroform in midwifery". American Medical Monthly. 1 (1): 55-63. January 1854. Vedantam, Shankar; Gamble, Vanessa Northington ... Simpson, James Young (1847). Account of a new anaesthetic agent [chloroform], as a substitute for sulphuric ether in sugery and ...
Harcourt chloroform regulator Harcourt pentane-air lamp 1863: Fellow of the Royal Society 1865-1873: Secretary of the Chemical ... Harcourt's chloroform regulator. Harcourt, A. Vernon (1899). "The Ten-Candle Standard Lamp". In Cole, Thomas (ed.). ... Harcourt's other activities included inventing a device to safely administer chloroform as an anesthesic, and the analysis and ...
She was the author of Arctic Experiences; Teeth, Ether and Chloroform; History of Newburyport; A History of Tammany Hall, and ... and a scientific work on the use of ether and chloroform applied to practical dentistry. She wrote the first considerable ...
"The Professor Under Chloroform" . The Atlantic Monthly. Washington D.C.: Jay Lauf. Vol. 2, no. 5 - via Wikisource. Bartlett, ...
In September 1900, chloroform was implicated in the murder of the U.S. businessman William Marsh Rice. Chloroform was deemed a ... The use of chloroform during surgery expanded rapidly in Europe; for instance in the 1850s, chloroform was used by the ... In a 2007 plea bargain, a man confessed to using stun guns and chloroform to sexually assault minors. Use of chloroform as an ... "Chloroform as a pollutant". The Encyclopedia of World Problems. Srebnik, M.; Laloë, E. (2001). "Chloroform". Encyclopedia of ...
Workers may be harmed from exposure to chloroform. The level of exposure depends upon the dose, duration, and work being done. ... Chloroform can be toxic if inhaled or swallowed. Exposure to chloroform may also cause cancer. Workers may be harmed from ... New Jersey Hazardous Substance Fact Sheets: Chloroform. International Resources. *European Chemicals Agency (ECHA): Chloroform ... NIOSH Revised Recommended Chloroform Standard. *Occupational Health Guideline for Chloroform-This guideline is intended as a ...
Breathing chloroform can cause dizziness, fatigue, and headaches. Breathing chloroform or ingesting chloroform over long ... Exposure to chloroform can occur when breathing contaminated air or when drinking or touching the substance or water containing ... Breathing chloroform can cause dizziness, fatigue, and headaches. Breathing chloroform or ingesting chloroform over long ... How can chloroform affect my health?. Breathing about 900 parts of chloroform per million parts air (900 ppm) for a short time ...
Singular Death from Inhaling Chloroform BMJ 1860; s4-1 :484 doi:10.1136/bmj.s4-1.182.484 ... Singular Death from Inhaling Chloroform. BMJ 1860; s4-1 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.s4-1.182.484 (Published 23 June 1860) ...
Chloroform. Find out what is in your tap water ... EWGs Tap Water Database Chloroform results for Hilton Village ... Chloroform. Hilton Village. Chloroform, one of the total trihalomethanes (TTHMs), is formed when chlorine or other ... Human studies show that chloroform damages the kidneys, liver and central nervous system. In animals, chloroform causes ... Chloroform and other disinfection byproducts increase the risk of cancer and may cause problems during pregnancy. Read More. ...
Chloroform. Find out what is in your tap water ... EWGs Tap Water Database Chloroform results for White Oak ... Chloroform. White Oak Plantation. Chloroform, one of the total trihalomethanes (TTHMs), is formed when chlorine or other ... Human studies show that chloroform damages the kidneys, liver and central nervous system. In animals, chloroform causes ... Chloroform and other disinfection byproducts increase the risk of cancer and may cause problems during pregnancy. Read More. ...
Black Butterfly in Chloroform features the works and life of Bernardo Couto Castillo, a 21-year-old ... Black Butterfly in Chloroform features the works and life of Bernardo Couto Castillo, a 21-year-old "enfant terrible". A ...
... Added on May 10th, 2007 by juanpastation , Report Post Tags:Humor, WTF ... Chloroform has a bad habit of decomposing into phosgene gas. Inhaling phosgene is REAL bad for you, in a destroys-your-central- ... Too bad the true amount of chloroform would probably cause brain damage.. But hey, then you got a shot. 😛 ... Stick with whippets and roofies and E and whatnot, but leave the chloroform alone. The more you know! ...
Nucleic Acid Base-pairing and N-methylacetamide Self-association in Chloroform: Affinity and Conformation. ... Nucleic Acid Base-pairing and N-methylacetamide Self-association in Chloroform: Affinity and Conformation, Biophysical ... https://www.nist.gov/publications/nucleic-acid-base-pairing-and-n-methylacetamide-self-association-chloroform-affinity ...
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Occupational exposure to chloroform Cite CITE. Title : Occupational exposure to chloroform Corporate Authors(s) : National ... Chloroform shall be controlled in the workplace so that the concentration of chloroform is not greater than 2 ppm (9.78 mg/m3) ... "Occupational exposure to chloroform" (1974). National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. "Occupational exposure to ... Title : Revised recommended chloroform standard Corporate Authors(s) : National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health ...
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... and chloroform extraction (AGPC) is a commonly used procedure to extract RNA from fresh frozen tissues and cell lines. In ... Acid guanidinium thiocyanate, phenol, and chloroform extraction (AGPC) is a commonly used procedure to extract RNA from fresh ... Keywords: RNA Bee; acid guanidinium phenol-chloroform; breast cancer; genomics; proteomics; sample preparation. ... and proteomics data on clinical breast cancer tissue specimens extracted with acid guanidinium thiocyanate-phenol-chloroform J ...
Horizontal NFPA Chloroform Label - LB-1592-037 - from MySafetyLabels.com ... Chloroform can be dangerous. Warn your workers about its symptoms in case of mishandling. ... Chloroform can be dangerous. Warn your workers about its symptoms in case of mishandling. ...
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Hazards of Chloroform (CHCl3 ) Vapor. Chloroform exposure mainly occurs through inhalation. Due to its sweet, nonirritating ... Exposure Guidelines for Chloroform (Trichloromethane // CAS: 67-66-3). Agency. Type of Limit. Limit Amount. ... Chloroform is a by-product formed when chlorine disinfects water but also has many industrial uses (Delaware). French chemist, ... Breathing air with chloroform for a long period damages the brain, liver and kidneys. It may cause cancer. ...
Ether and chloroform had been published previously in the Boston medical and surgical journal. Disbound, original printed pink ... Ether and chloroform: a compendium of their history, surgical use, dangers, and discovery. Boston: David Clapp, 1848. 8vo, pp ... Ether and chloroform had been published previously in the Boston medical and surgical journal. Disbound, original printed pink ... See Garrison-Morton 5730 for Ether and chloroform independently issued. Item #54937 ...
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From Chloroform to Home Rule: Queen Victoria Rides One Wave and Resists Another ... in aristocratic acceptance and then public enthusiasm for chloroform analgesia and anesthesia during childbirth. (Copyright © ... in aristocratic acceptance and then public enthusiasm for chloroform analgesia and anesthesia during childbirth. (Copyright © ... From Chloroform to Home Rule: Queen Victoria Rides One Wave and Resists Another. Anesthesiology 2017; 126:737 doi: https://doi. ...
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  • Chloroform, or trichloromethane (often abbreviated as TCM), is an organic compound with the formula CHCl3 and a common solvent. (wikipedia.org)
  • At 400-500 °C, a free radical halogenation occurs, converting these precursors to progressively more chlorinated compounds: CH4 + Cl2 → CH3Cl + HCl CH3Cl + Cl2 → CH2Cl2 + HCl CH2Cl2 + Cl2 → CHCl3 + HCl Chloroform undergoes further chlorination to yield carbon tetrachloride (CCl4): CHCl3 + Cl2 → CCl4 + HCl The output of this process is a mixture of the four chloromethanes: chloromethane, methylene chloride (dichloromethane), trichloromethane (chloroform), and tetrachloromethane (carbon tetrachloride). (wikipedia.org)
  • Useful search terms for chloroform include "methane trichloride" and "trichloromethane. (cdc.gov)
  • Other names for chloroform are trichloromethane and methyl trichloride. (cdc.gov)
  • Other names for chloroform are trichloromethane and Breathing about 900 parts of chloroform per million parts methyl trichloride. (cdc.gov)
  • Chloroform is also called Trichloromethane , Methyl trichloride and Methane trichloride . (everything2.com)
  • Synthesized mRNA can be purified by LiCl precipitation, phenol:chloroform extraction followed by ethanol precipitation, or by using a spin column based method (e.g. (neb.com)
  • For removal of proteins and most of the free nucleotides, phenol:chloroform extraction and ethanol precipitation of RNA transcripts is the preferred method. (neb.com)
  • Extract with an equal volume of 1:1 phenol:chloroform mixture, followed by two extractions with chloroform. (neb.com)
  • 10, phenol chloroform. (cdc.gov)
  • Comparison of Modified Manual Acid-Phenol Chloroform Method and Commercial RNA Extraction Kits for Resource Limited Laboratories. (medscape.com)
  • Chloroform (CHCl 3 ) is a colorless liquid that quickly evaporates into gas. (cdc.gov)
  • Chloroform is a colorless liquid with a pleasant, nonirritating odor and a slightly sweet taste. (cdc.gov)
  • Chloroform is a colorless liquid with a pleasant, containing chloroform. (cdc.gov)
  • Chloroform, a colorless liquid with a distinct sweet odor, has had historical industrial applications. (journalnewshub.com)
  • Occupational Health Guideline for Chloroform -This guideline is intended as a source of information for employees, employers, and those in the health professions who need more information on exposure to chloroform. (cdc.gov)
  • The EWG Health Guideline of 0.4 ppb for chloroform was proposed in 2018 by the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment as a one-in-a-million lifetime risk of cancer. (ewg.org)
  • This means that if you are able to smell chloroform in the room air, you have surpassed the exposure limit guideline. (sentryair.com)
  • Tests compliant or similar to guideline-studies on the bioconcentration of chloroform are available for different species of freshwater fish. (europa.eu)
  • All tests were carried out in flow-through systems exposing fish to concentrations of 0.1 to 1 mg/L. The results of the Japanese bioconcentration study (MITI 1992) carried out in accordance with the OECD guideline No. 305 indicate low bioconcentration of chloroform after 42 days, and the bioconcentration factors are between 1.4 and 13. (europa.eu)
  • Industrially, chloroform is produced by heating a mixture of chlorine and either methyl chloride (CH3Cl) or methane (CH4). (wikipedia.org)
  • It isn't known whether chloroform causes reproductive effects or birth defects in people. (cdc.gov)
  • Offspring of rats and mice that breathed chloroform during pregnancy had birth defects. (cdc.gov)
  • In animals, chloroform causes infertility, birth defects and cancer. (ewg.org)
  • Once or twice I had smelled chloroform, and thought its odor pleasant. (druglibrary.net)
  • Chloroform ≥99% Lab Grade is stabilized with Ethanol and appears as a clear, colorless, volatile solvent at room temperature. (laballey.com)
  • Chloroform ≥99% Lab Grade is suitable for use in pesticide analysis, and gas chromatography, and it can be widely used as a common, general laboratory solvent. (laballey.com)
  • In Pakistan, the cost of chloroform spray Chloroform was originally used as an inhalation anaesthetic during surgery, but today it is most commonly used as a solvent in American business. (deal2steal.pk)
  • Chloroform, often in the deuterated form CDCl 3 , is a very common solvent for NMR and other types of spectroscopy. (imperial.ac.uk)
  • Quantum mechanics is increasingly used to calculate such spectra to aid assignment and the solvent is here normally simulated as a continuum rather than by explicit inclusion of one or more chloroform molecules. (imperial.ac.uk)
  • In industries, chloroform found application as a solvent for various substances, particularly in the production of pharmaceuticals, dyes, and resins. (journalnewshub.com)
  • The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) developed a ToxFAQs sheet on chloroform, where it states that most of the chloroform in air eventually breaks down, but it is a slow process. (sentryair.com)
  • The chloroform molecule can be viewed as a methane molecule with three hydrogen atoms replaced with three chlorine atoms, leaving a single hydrogen atom. (wikipedia.org)
  • Today, chloroform - along with dichloromethane - is prepared exclusively and on a massive scale by the chlorination of methane and chloromethane. (wikipedia.org)
  • Breathing chloroform or ingesting chloroform over long periods of time may damage your liver and kidneys. (cdc.gov)
  • Breathing air, eating food, or drinking water containing high levels of chloroform for long periods of time may damage your liver and kidneys. (cdc.gov)
  • Rats and mice that ate food or drank water with chloroform developed cancer of the liver and kidneys. (cdc.gov)
  • Human studies show that chloroform damages the kidneys, liver and central nervous system. (ewg.org)
  • Breathing air with chloroform for a long period damages the brain, liver and kidneys. (sentryair.com)
  • Exposure to chloroform may also cause cancer. (cdc.gov)
  • Workers may be harmed from exposure to chloroform. (cdc.gov)
  • The following resources provide information about occupational exposure to chloroform. (cdc.gov)
  • NIOSH Criteria for a Recommended Standard: Occupational Exposure to Chloroform -DHHS (NIOSH) Publication No. 75-114. (cdc.gov)
  • Exposure to chloroform can occur when breathing contaminated air or when drinking or touching the substance or water containing it. (cdc.gov)
  • Chloroform exposure mainly occurs through inhalation. (sentryair.com)
  • The EPA drinking water limit for total trihalomethanes, a class of chemicals that includes chloroform, is 100 micrograms per liter of water (100 µg/L). (cdc.gov)
  • Chloroform, one of the total trihalomethanes (TTHMs), is formed when chlorine or other disinfectants are used to treat drinking water. (ewg.org)
  • Ether and chloroform had been published previously in the Boston medical and surgical journal. (rulon.com)
  • See Garrison-Morton 5730 for Ether and chloroform independently issued. (rulon.com)
  • Acid guanidinium thiocyanate, phenol, and chloroform extraction (AGPC) is a commonly used procedure to extract RNA from fresh frozen tissues and cell lines. (nih.gov)
  • The present study was designed to investigate the thrombolytic activity of chloroform extract of leaves of Dioscorea bulbifera. (citefactor.org)
  • Single-dose Acute Oral Toxicity Study of Chloroform Extract of Snake Plant ( Sansevieria trifasciata Prain. (ugm.ac.id)
  • This research aimed to evaluate toxicity and safety of consuming chloroform extract of S. trifasciata leaf (CESTL) in acute phase using female Wistar rats as model animal. (ugm.ac.id)
  • To ensure chloroform vapors have plenty of time to breakdown and adsorb, a larger carbon filter is recommended. (sentryair.com)
  • Chloroform evaporates easily into the air. (cdc.gov)
  • Chloroform is not a proven carcinogen , however it caused liver and kidney cancer in rats fed water or food containing chloroform. (everything2.com)
  • Today, chloroform is used to make other chemicals and can also be formed in small amounts when chlorine is added to water. (cdc.gov)
  • Chloroform dissolves easily in water and some of it may break down to other chemicals. (cdc.gov)
  • Chloroform in your body might also indicate that you have come into contact with other chemicals. (cdc.gov)
  • Today, · Skin contact with chloroform or water that contains chloroform is used to make other chemicals and can also it, such as in swimming pools. (cdc.gov)
  • When combined, certain chemicals such as bleach create toxic fumes such as chloroform (yes, I said TOXIC), hydrochloric acid, chloroacetone, and other things you really don't want to breathe. (allselfsustained.com)
  • chloroform, is 80 micrograms per liter of water (80µg/L). (cdc.gov)
  • Chloroform shall be controlled in the workplace so that the concentration of chloroform is not greater than 2 ppm (9.78 mg/m3) of breathing zone air in a 45 liter air sample taken over a period not to exceed 1 hour in duration. (cdc.gov)
  • Chloroform Lab Grade, 1 Liter. (laballey.com)
  • Chloroform Lab Grade, 4x1 Liter Case. (laballey.com)
  • Chloroform Lab Grade, 4x4 Liter Case. (laballey.com)
  • Granule carbon has an intricate porous structure that adsorbs hazardous chloroform molecules before they become airborne and potentially inhaled. (sentryair.com)
  • Chloroform is used in some refrigerants, solvents, and chemical manufacturing. (cdc.gov)
  • As chloroform is a volatile organic compound, it dissipates readily from soil and surface water and undergoes degradation in air to produce phosgene, dichloromethane, formyl chloride, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen chloride. (wikipedia.org)
  • A source capture chemical fume extractor equipped with activated granule carbon filtration, is an excellent solution for chloroform vapor control. (sentryair.com)
  • Equipped with a carbon pre-filter and activated granule carbon main filter, these systems help protect the operator from the inhalation hazards of chloroform. (sentryair.com)
  • carbon tetrachloride and chloroform, respectively, are much greater than that of the average human. (cdc.gov)
  • In the first and second quarters of 2023, the price trend of chloroform in Asia declined due to rising inventories and decreased demand from both domestic and international buyers. (journalnewshub.com)
  • Chloroform is a trihalomethane that serves as a powerful anesthetic, euphoriant, anxiolytic, and sedative when inhaled or ingested. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chloroform was used as an anesthetic between the 19th century and the first half of the 20th century. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the past, chloroform was used as an inhaled anesthetic during surgery, but it isn't used that way today. (cdc.gov)
  • The Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) has determined that chloroform may reasonably be anticipated to be a carcinogen. (cdc.gov)
  • Chloroform is a colorless, heavy, and volatile liquid with a sweet aroma. (journalnewshub.com)
  • Breathing chloroform can cause dizziness, fatigue, and headaches. (cdc.gov)
  • Breathing about 900 parts of chloroform per million parts air (900 ppm) for a short time can cause dizziness, fatigue, and headache. (cdc.gov)
  • Abnormal sperm were found in mice that breathed air containing 400 ppm chloroform for a few days. (cdc.gov)
  • The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has set the maximum allowable concentration of chloroform in workroom air during an 8-hour workday in a 40-hour workweek at 50 ppm. (cdc.gov)
  • NIOSHTIC-2 search results on chloroform -NIOSHTIC-2 is a searchable database of worker safety and health publications, documents, grant reports, and journal articles supported in whole or in part by NIOSH. (cdc.gov)
  • Chloroform evaporate s easily and will break down into many products including phosgene and hydrogen chloride , both of which are toxic . (everything2.com)
  • Hydrogen bonding to chloroform. (imperial.ac.uk)
  • But what are the features of the hydrogen bonds that form from chloroform to other acceptors? (imperial.ac.uk)
  • Chloroform is a by-product formed when chlorine disinfects water but also has many industrial uses (Delaware) . (sentryair.com)
  • Chloroform can be toxic if inhaled or swallowed. (cdc.gov)
  • Many kinds of seaweed produce chloroform, and fungi are believed to produce chloroform in soil. (wikipedia.org)
  • It doesn't stick to soil very well and can travel through ppm chloroform during pregnancy and also in rats that soil to groundwater. (cdc.gov)
  • citation needed] In 1842, Robert Mortimer Glover in London discovered the anaesthetic qualities of chloroform on laboratory animals. (wikipedia.org)
  • The name "chloroform" is a portmanteau of terchloride (tertiary chloride, a trichloride) and formyle, an obsolete name for the methylidene radical (CH) derived from formic acid. (wikipedia.org)
  • This caused me to bestow this substance with the name "chloroform" [i.e., formyl chloride or chloride of formic acid]. (wikipedia.org)
  • A substance with the ability to large amounts of chloroform, but these tests are useful for cause cancer. (cdc.gov)
  • Procurement Resource does an in-depth analysis of the price trend to bring forth the monthly, quarterly, half-yearly, and yearly information on Chloroform in its latest pricing dashboard. (journalnewshub.com)
  • The Chloroform Price chart , including India Chloroform price, USA Chloroform price, pricing database, and analysis can prove valuable for procurement managers, directors, and decision-makers to build up their strongly backed-up strategic insights to attain progress and profitability in the business. (journalnewshub.com)
  • To purchase chloroform from lab alley online is against the law according to US regulations. (deal2steal.pk)
  • In 1847, Scottish obstetrician James Y. Simpson was the first to demonstrate the anaesthetic properties of chloroform on humans, provided by local pharmacist William Flockhart of Duncan, Flockhart and company, and helped to popularise the drug for use in medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • Animal studies have shown that miscarriages occurred in rats and mice that breathed air containing 30 to 300 ppm chloroform during pregnancy and also in rats that ate chloroform during pregnancy. (cdc.gov)
  • ate chloroform during pregnancy. (cdc.gov)
  • Chloroform and other disinfection byproducts increase the risk of cancer and may cause problems during pregnancy. (ewg.org)
  • The measurement of chloroform in body fluids and tissues may help to determine if you have come into contact with large amounts of chloroform, but these tests are useful for only a short time after you are exposed. (cdc.gov)
  • Chloroform Lab Grade, 6x500mL Case. (laballey.com)
  • Chloroform Lab Grade, 5 Gallon Pal Metal. (laballey.com)
  • Please contact us to request a Safety Data Sheet (SDS) and Certificate of Analysis (COA) for Chloroform, Lab Grade. (laballey.com)
  • Chloroform, whether pharmaceutical grade or homemade, is lethal in the wrong hands. (allselfsustained.com)
  • Immediately Dangerous to Life or Health Concentrations (IDLH) Value Profile: Chloroform -NIOSH reviews relevant scientific data and researches methods for developing IDLH values. (cdc.gov)
  • Chloroform lasts a long time in groundwater. (cdc.gov)
  • I took the bottle home with me and when I went to bed put a little of the chloroform on a handkerchief, and for the first time felt the delightful sensation of being wafted through an enchanted land into Nirvana. (druglibrary.net)
  • I found that there was a bad taste in my mouth all the time@ keeping me in mind of chloroform. (druglibrary.net)
  • The vapor of chloroform, when inhaled for some time, produces a temporary insensibility to pain. (everything2.com)
  • Chloroform must be used exceedingly cautiously because it can be harmful and fatal to a person if exposed to extremely high dosages for a prolonged length of time. (deal2steal.pk)
  • Drinking water or beverages made using water containing chloroform. (cdc.gov)
  • Skin contact with chloroform or water that contains it, such as in swimming pools. (cdc.gov)
  • In addition to tap water disinfection, chloroform pollution in the environment also comes from industrial discharges from pulp and paper mills, and from urban wastewater effluent. (ewg.org)
  • If you work in an industry that uses chloroform, please read chemical labels and the accompanying Safety Data Sheets for hazard information. (cdc.gov)
  • Chloroform must be safely used to protect respiratory safety. (sentryair.com)
  • Chloroform is used in many industries. (cdc.gov)