A genus of green nonsulfur bacteria in the family Chloroflexaceae. They are photosynthetic, thermophilic, filamentous gliding bacteria found in hot springs.
A phylum of anoxygenic, phototrophic bacteria including the family Chlorobiaceae. They occur in aquatic sediments, sulfur springs, and hot springs and utilize reduced sulfur compounds instead of oxygen.
Pyrrole containing pigments found in photosynthetic bacteria.
An order of photosynthetic bacteria representing a physiological community of predominantly aquatic bacteria.
One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.
Molecules that contain multiple active sites which are used to catalyze more than one enzymatic reaction. Proteins in this class generally contain multiple active sites within a single peptide chain and may also contain more than one enzymatically active subunit. They are distinguished from MULTIENZYME COMPLEXES in that their subunits are not found as distinct enzymes.
The synthesis by organisms of organic chemical compounds, especially carbohydrates, from carbon dioxide using energy obtained from light rather than from the oxidation of chemical compounds. Photosynthesis comprises two separate processes: the light reactions and the dark reactions. In higher plants; GREEN ALGAE; and CYANOBACTERIA; NADPH and ATP formed by the light reactions drive the dark reactions which result in the fixation of carbon dioxide. (from Oxford Dictionary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2001)
Glyoxylates are organic compounds that are intermediate products in the metabolic pathways responsible for the breakdown and synthesis of various molecules, including amino acids and carbohydrates, and are involved in several biochemical processes such as the glyoxylate cycle.
The processes by which organisms use simple inorganic substances such as gaseous or dissolved carbon dioxide and inorganic nitrogen as nutrient sources. Contrasts with heterotrophic processes which make use of organic materials as the nutrient supply source. Autotrophs can be either chemoautotrophs (or chemolithotrophs), largely ARCHAEA and BACTERIA, which also use simple inorganic substances for their metabolic energy reguirements; or photoautotrophs (or photolithotrophs), such as PLANTS and CYANOBACTERIA, which derive their energy from light. Depending on environmental conditions some organisms can switch between different nutritional modes (autotrophy; HETEROTROPHY; chemotrophy; or PHOTOTROPHY) to utilize different sources to meet their nutrient and energy requirements.
Protein complexes that take part in the process of PHOTOSYNTHESIS. They are located within the THYLAKOID MEMBRANES of plant CHLOROPLASTS and a variety of structures in more primitive organisms. There are two major complexes involved in the photosynthetic process called PHOTOSYSTEM I and PHOTOSYSTEM II.
Complexes containing CHLOROPHYLL and other photosensitive molecules. They serve to capture energy in the form of PHOTONS and are generally found as components of the PHOTOSYSTEM I PROTEIN COMPLEX or the PHOTOSYSTEM II PROTEIN COMPLEX.
Phylum of green nonsulfur bacteria including the family Chloroflexaceae, among others.
S-Acyl coenzyme A. Fatty acid coenzyme A derivatives that are involved in the biosynthesis and oxidation of fatty acids as well as in ceramide formation.
Proteins found in any species of bacterium.
A normal intermediate in the fermentation (oxidation, metabolism) of sugar. The concentrated form is used internally to prevent gastrointestinal fermentation. (From Stedman, 26th ed)
The transfer of energy of a given form among different scales of motion. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed). It includes the transfer of kinetic energy and the transfer of chemical energy. The transfer of chemical energy from one molecule to another depends on proximity of molecules so it is often used as in techniques to measure distance such as the use of FORSTER RESONANCE ENERGY TRANSFER.
Specific particles of membrane-bound organized living substances present in eukaryotic cells, such as the MITOCHONDRIA; the GOLGI APPARATUS; ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM; LYSOSOMES; PLASTIDS; and VACUOLES.
Porphyrin derivatives containing magnesium that act to convert light energy in photosynthetic organisms.
A colorless, odorless gas that can be formed by the body and is necessary for the respiration cycle of plants and animals.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.

Arsenite oxidase, an ancient bioenergetic enzyme. (1/30)

Operons coding for the enzyme arsenite oxidase have been detected in the genomes from Archaea and Bacteria by Blast searches using the amino acid sequences of the respective enzyme characterized in two different beta-proteobacteria as templates. Sequence analyses show that in all these species, arsenite oxidase is transported over the cytoplasmic membrane via the tat system and most probably remains membrane attached by an N-terminal transmembrane helix of the Rieske subunit. The biochemical and biophysical data obtained for arsenite oxidase in the green filamentous bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus allow a structural model of the enzyme's membrane association to be proposed. Phylogenies for the two constituent subunits (i.e., the molybdopterin-containing and the Rieske subunit) of the heterodimeric enzyme and their respective homologs in DMSO-reductase, formate dehydrogenase, nitrate reductase, and the Rieske/cytb complexes were calculated from multiple sequence alignments. The obtained phylogenetic trees indicate an early origin of arsenite oxidase before the divergence of Archaea and Bacteria. Evolutionary implications of these phylogenies are discussed.  (+info)

Compound-specific isotopic fractionation patterns suggest different carbon metabolisms among Chloroflexus-like bacteria in hot-spring microbial mats. (2/30)

Stable carbon isotope fractionations between dissolved inorganic carbon and lipid biomarkers suggest photoautotrophy by Chloroflexus-like organisms in sulfidic and nonsulfidic Yellowstone hot springs. Where co-occurring, cyanobacteria appear to cross-feed Chloroflexus-like organisms supporting photoheterotrophy as well, although the relatively small 13C fractionation associated with cyanobacterial sugar biosynthesis may sometimes obscure this process.  (+info)

Exciton theory for supramolecular chlorosomal aggregates: 1. Aggregate size dependence of the linear spectra. (3/30)

The interior of chlorosomes of green bacteria forms an unusual antenna system organized without proteins. The steady-spectra (absorption, circular dichroism, and linear dichroism) have been modeled using the Frenkel Hamiltonian for the large tubular aggregates of bacteriochlorophylls with geometries corresponding to those proposed for Chloroflexus aurantiacus and Chlorobium tepidum chlorosomes. For the Cf. aurantiacus aggregates we apply a structure used previously (V. I. Prokhorenko., D. B. Steensgaard, and A. R. Holzwarth, Biophys: J. 2000, 79:2105-2120), whereas for the Cb. tepidum aggregates a new extended model of double-tube aggregates, based on recently published solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance studies (B.-J. van Rossum, B. Y. van Duhl, D. B. Steensgaard, T. S. Balaban, A. R. Holzwarth, K. Schaffner, and H. J. M. de Groot, Biochemistry 2001, 40:1587-1595), is developed. We find that the circular dichroism spectra depend strongly on the aggregate length for both types of chlorosomes. Their shape changes from "type-II" (negative at short wavelengths to positive at long wavelengths) to the "mixed-type" (negative-positive-negative) in the nomenclature proposed in K. Griebenow, A. R. Holzwarth, F. van Mourik, and R. van Grondelle, Biochim: Biophys. Acta 1991, 1058:194-202, for an aggregate length of 30-40 bacteriochlorophyll molecules per stack. This "size effect" on the circular dichroism spectra is caused by appearance of macroscopic chirality due to circular distribution of the transition dipole moment of the monomers. We visualize these distributions, and also the corresponding Frenkel excitons, using a novel presentation technique. The observed size effects provide a key to explain many previously puzzling and seemingly contradictory experimental data in the literature on the circular and linear dichroism spectra of seemingly identical types of chlorosomes.  (+info)

A cambialistic superoxide dismutase in the thermophilic photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus. (4/30)

Superoxide dismutase from the thermophilic anoxygenic photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus was cloned, purified, and characterized. This protein is in the manganese- and iron-containing family of superoxide dismutases and is able to use both manganese and iron catalytically. This appears to be the only soluble superoxide dismutase in C. aurantiacus. Iron and manganese cofactors were identified by using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and were quantified by atomic absorption spectroscopy. By metal enrichment of growth media and by performing metal fidelity studies, the enzyme was found to be most efficient with manganese incorporated, yet up to 30% of the activity was retained with iron. Assimilation of iron or manganese ions into superoxide dismutase was also found to be affected by the growth conditions. This enzyme was also found to be remarkably thermostable and was resistant to H2O2 at concentrations up to 80 mM. Reactive oxygen defense mechanisms have not been previously characterized in the organisms belonging to the phylum Chloroflexi. These systems are of interest in C. aurantiacus since this bacterium lives in a hyperoxic environment and is subject to high UV radiation fluxes.  (+info)

PentaPlot: a software tool for the illustration of genome mosaicism. (5/30)

BACKGROUND: Dekapentagonal maps depict the phylogenetic relationships of five genomes in a visually appealing diagram and can be viewed as an alternative to a single evolutionary consensus tree. In particular, the generated maps focus attention on those gene families that significantly deviate from the consensus or plurality phylogeny. PentaPlot is a software tool that computes such dekapentagonal maps given an appropriate probability support matrix. RESULTS: The visualization with dekapentagonal maps critically depends on the optimal layout of unrooted tree topologies representing different evolutionary relationships among five organisms along the vertices of the dekapentagon. This is a difficult optimization problem given the large number of possible layouts. At its core our tool utilizes a genetic algorithm with demes and a local search strategy to search for the optimal layout. The hybrid genetic algorithm performs satisfactorily even in those cases where the chosen genomes are so divergent that little phylogenetic information has survived in the individual gene families. CONCLUSION: PentaPlot is being made publicly available as an open source project at http://pentaplot.sourceforge.net.  (+info)

Properties of succinyl-coenzyme A:L-malate coenzyme A transferase and its role in the autotrophic 3-hydroxypropionate cycle of Chloroflexus aurantiacus. (6/30)

The 3-hydroxypropionate cycle has been proposed to operate as the autotrophic CO2 fixation pathway in the phototrophic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus. In this pathway, acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) and two bicarbonate molecules are converted to malate. Acetyl-CoA is regenerated from malyl-CoA by L-malyl-CoA lyase. The enzyme forming malyl-CoA, succinyl-CoA:L-malate coenzyme A transferase, was purified. Based on the N-terminal amino acid sequence of its two subunits, the corresponding genes were identified on a gene cluster which also contains the gene for L-malyl-CoA lyase, the subsequent enzyme in the pathway. Both enzymes were severalfold up-regulated under autotrophic conditions, which is in line with their proposed function in CO2 fixation. The two CoA transferase genes were cloned and heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant enzyme was purified and studied. Succinyl-CoA:L-malate CoA transferase forms a large (alphabeta)n complex consisting of 46- and 44-kDa subunits and catalyzes the reversible reaction succinyl-CoA + L-malate --> succinate + L-malyl-CoA. It is specific for succinyl-CoA as the CoA donor but accepts L-citramalate instead of L-malate as the CoA acceptor; the corresponding d-stereoisomers are not accepted. The enzyme is a member of the class III of the CoA transferase family. The demonstration of the missing CoA transferase closes the last gap in the proposed 3-hydroxypropionate cycle.  (+info)

Functional differences between galactolipids and glucolipids revealed in photosynthesis of higher plants. (7/30)

Galactolipids represent the most abundant lipid class in thylakoid membranes, where oxygenic photosynthesis is performed. The identification of galactolipids at specific sites within photosynthetic complexes by x-ray crystallography implies specific roles for galactolipids during photosynthetic electron transport. The preference for galactose and not for the more abundant sugar glucose in thylakoid lipids and their specific roles in photosynthesis are not understood. Introduction of a bacterial glucosyltransferase from Chloroflexus aurantiacus into the galactolipid-deficient dgd1 mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana resulted in the accumulation of a glucose-containing lipid in the thylakoids. At the same time, the growth defect of the dgd1 mutant was complemented. However, the degree of trimerization of light-harvesting complex II and the photosynthetic quantum yield of transformed dgd1 plants were only partially restored. These results indicate that specific interactions of the galactolipid head group with photosynthetic protein complexes might explain the preference for galactose in thylakoid lipids of higher plants. Therefore, galactose in thylakoid lipids can be exchanged with glucose without severe effects on growth, but the presence of galactose is crucial to maintain maximal photosynthetic efficiency.  (+info)

Properties of succinyl-coenzyme A:D-citramalate coenzyme A transferase and its role in the autotrophic 3-hydroxypropionate cycle of Chloroflexus aurantiacus. (8/30)

The phototrophic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus uses the 3-hydroxypropionate cycle for autotrophic CO(2) fixation. This cycle starts with acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) and produces glyoxylate. Glyoxylate is an unconventional cell carbon precursor that needs special enzymes for assimilation. Glyoxylate is combined with propionyl-CoA to beta-methylmalyl-CoA, which is converted to citramalate. Cell extracts catalyzed the succinyl-CoA-dependent conversion of citramalate to acetyl-CoA and pyruvate, the central cell carbon precursor. This reaction is due to the combined action of enzymes that were upregulated during autotrophic growth, a coenzyme A transferase with the use of succinyl-CoA as the CoA donor and a lyase cleaving citramalyl-CoA to acetyl-CoA and pyruvate. Genomic analysis identified a gene coding for a putative coenzyme A transferase. The gene was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and shown to code for succinyl-CoA:d-citramalate coenzyme A transferase. This enzyme, which catalyzes the reaction d-citramalate + succinyl-CoA --> d-citramalyl-CoA + succinate, was purified and studied. It belongs to class III of the coenzyme A transferase enzyme family, with an aspartate residue in the active site. The homodimeric enzyme composed of 44-kDa subunits was specific for succinyl-CoA as a CoA donor but also accepted d-malate and itaconate instead of d-citramalate. The CoA transferase gene is part of a cluster of genes which are cotranscribed, including the gene for d-citramalyl-CoA lyase. It is proposed that the CoA transferase and the lyase catalyze the last two steps in the glyoxylate assimilation route.  (+info)

Chloroflexus is a genus of bacteria that belongs to the phylum Chloroflexi. These bacteria are known for their unique photosynthetic ability, which involves both oxygenic and anoxygenic processes. They possess flexible filamentous morphology and can form multicellular aggregates or mats in various environments such as hot springs, freshwater, and marine habitats.

The name "Chloroflexus" comes from two Greek words - "chloros," meaning green, and "flexus," meaning flexible. This refers to the green color and filamentous shape of these bacteria. Chloroflexus species are important members of microbial communities in various ecosystems and play a significant role in carbon cycling and energy flow.

It is essential to note that 'Chloroflexus' is not a medical term but rather a taxonomic name for a group of bacteria with unique physiological and ecological characteristics.

Chlorobi, also known as green sulfur bacteria, are a group of anaerobic, phototrophic bacteria that contain chlorophylls a and b, as well as bacteriochlorophyll c, d, or e. They obtain energy through photosynthesis, using light as an energy source and sulfide or other reduced sulfur compounds as electron donors. These bacteria are typically found in environments with limited sunlight and high sulfide concentrations, such as in sediments of stratified water bodies or in microbial mats. They play a significant role in the global carbon and sulfur cycles.

Bacteriochlorophylls are a type of pigment that are found in certain bacteria and are used in photosynthesis. They are similar to chlorophylls, which are found in plants and algae, but have some differences in their structure and absorption spectrum. Bacteriochlorophylls absorb light at longer wavelengths than chlorophylls, with absorption peaks in the near-infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum. This allows bacteria that contain bacteriochlorophylls to carry out photosynthesis in environments with low levels of light or at great depths in the ocean where sunlight is scarce.

There are several different types of bacteriochlorophylls, including bacteriochlorophyll a, bacteriochlorophyll b, and bacteriochlorophyll c. These pigments play a role in the capture of light energy during photosynthesis and are involved in the electron transfer processes that occur during this process. Bacteriochlorophylls are also used as a taxonomic marker to help classify certain groups of bacteria.

Rhodospirillales is an order of predominantly gram-negative, aerobic or anaerobic, motile bacteria that are found in various environments such as freshwater, marine habitats, and soil. Many species in this order are capable of photosynthesis, particularly those belonging to the family Rhodospirillaceae. These photosynthetic bacteria, called purple bacteria, use bacteriochlorophyll and can grow under anaerobic conditions using light as an energy source. The order Rhodospirillales belongs to the class Alphaproteobacteria within the phylum Proteobacteria.

It is important to note that medical definitions typically focus on bacteria, viruses, or other microorganisms of clinical relevance. While Rhodospirillales does include some species that can be pathogenic in certain circumstances, it is not primarily a medical term and is more commonly used in the context of environmental or general microbiology.

Bacteria are single-celled microorganisms that are among the earliest known life forms on Earth. They are typically characterized as having a cell wall and no membrane-bound organelles. The majority of bacteria have a prokaryotic organization, meaning they lack a nucleus and other membrane-bound organelles.

Bacteria exist in diverse environments and can be found in every habitat on Earth, including soil, water, and the bodies of plants and animals. Some bacteria are beneficial to their hosts, while others can cause disease. Beneficial bacteria play important roles in processes such as digestion, nitrogen fixation, and biogeochemical cycling.

Bacteria reproduce asexually through binary fission or budding, and some species can also exchange genetic material through conjugation. They have a wide range of metabolic capabilities, with many using organic compounds as their source of energy, while others are capable of photosynthesis or chemosynthesis.

Bacteria are highly adaptable and can evolve rapidly in response to environmental changes. This has led to the development of antibiotic resistance in some species, which poses a significant public health challenge. Understanding the biology and behavior of bacteria is essential for developing strategies to prevent and treat bacterial infections and diseases.

Multifunctional enzymes, also known as bifunctional or moonlighting enzymes, are proteins that possess the ability to perform more than one biochemical function. They can catalyze multiple chemical reactions or have additional roles in cell signaling, structural support, or transport processes. This versatility allows cells to optimize resources and respond efficiently to various physiological demands with a limited number of gene products. The multifunctionality of these enzymes often arises from their ability to bind different substrates, cofactors, or protein partners, leading to diverse molecular interactions and functional outcomes.

Photosynthesis is not strictly a medical term, but it is a fundamental biological process with significant implications for medicine, particularly in understanding energy production in cells and the role of oxygen in sustaining life. Here's a general biological definition:

Photosynthesis is a process by which plants, algae, and some bacteria convert light energy, usually from the sun, into chemical energy in the form of organic compounds, such as glucose (or sugar), using water and carbon dioxide. This process primarily takes place in the chloroplasts of plant cells, specifically in structures called thylakoids. The overall reaction can be summarized as:

6 CO2 + 6 H2O + light energy → C6H12O6 + 6 O2

In this equation, carbon dioxide (CO2) and water (H2O) are the reactants, while glucose (C6H12O6) and oxygen (O2) are the products. Photosynthesis has two main stages: the light-dependent reactions and the light-independent reactions (Calvin cycle). The light-dependent reactions occur in the thylakoid membrane and involve the conversion of light energy into ATP and NADPH, which are used to power the Calvin cycle. The Calvin cycle takes place in the stroma of chloroplasts and involves the synthesis of glucose from CO2 and water using the ATP and NADPH generated during the light-dependent reactions.

Understanding photosynthesis is crucial for understanding various biological processes, including cellular respiration, plant metabolism, and the global carbon cycle. Additionally, research into artificial photosynthesis has potential applications in renewable energy production and environmental remediation.

Glyoxylates are organic compounds that are intermediates in various metabolic pathways, including the glyoxylate cycle. The glyoxylate cycle is a modified version of the Krebs cycle (also known as the citric acid cycle) and is found in plants, bacteria, and some fungi.

Glyoxylates are formed from the breakdown of certain amino acids or from the oxidation of one-carbon units. They can be converted into glycine, an important amino acid involved in various metabolic processes. In the glyoxylate cycle, glyoxylates are combined with acetyl-CoA to form malate and succinate, which can then be used to synthesize glucose or other organic compounds.

Abnormal accumulation of glyoxylates in the body can lead to the formation of calcium oxalate crystals, which can cause kidney stones and other health problems. Certain genetic disorders, such as primary hyperoxaluria, can result in overproduction of glyoxylates and increased risk of kidney stone formation.

Autotrophic processes refer to the ability of certain organisms, known as autotrophs, to synthesize their own organic nutrients from inorganic substances using light or chemical energy. This process is essential for the production of organic matter and the formation of the basis of food chains in ecosystems.

In autotrophic processes, organisms use energy to convert carbon dioxide into organic compounds, such as glucose, through a series of metabolic reactions known as carbon fixation. There are two main types of autotrophic processes: photosynthesis and chemosynthesis.

Photosynthesis is the process used by plants, algae, and some bacteria to convert light energy from the sun into chemical energy in the form of organic compounds. This process involves the use of chlorophyll and other pigments to capture light energy, which is then converted into ATP and NADPH through a series of reactions known as the light-dependent reactions. These energy carriers are then used to power the Calvin cycle, where carbon dioxide is fixed into organic compounds.

Chemosynthesis, on the other hand, is the process used by some bacteria to convert chemical energy from inorganic substances, such as hydrogen sulfide or methane, into organic compounds. This process does not require light energy and typically occurs in environments with limited access to sunlight, such as deep-sea vents or soil.

Overall, autotrophic processes are critical for the functioning of ecosystems and the production of food for both plants and animals.

Photosynthetic Reaction Center (RC) Complex Proteins are specialized protein-pigment structures that play a crucial role in the primary process of light-driven electron transport during photosynthesis. They are present in the thylakoid membranes of cyanobacteria, algae, and higher plants.

The Photosynthetic Reaction Center Complex Proteins are composed of two major components: the light-harvesting complex (LHC) and the reaction center (RC). The LHC contains antenna pigments like chlorophylls and carotenoids that absorb sunlight and transfer the excitation energy to the RC. The RC is a multi-subunit protein complex containing cofactors such as bacteriochlorophyll, pheophytin, quinones, and iron-sulfur clusters.

When a photon of light is absorbed by the antenna pigments in the LHC, the energy is transferred to the RC, where it initiates a charge separation event. This results in the transfer of an electron from a donor molecule to an acceptor molecule, creating a flow of electrical charge and generating a transmembrane electrochemical gradient. The energy stored in this gradient is then used to synthesize ATP and reduce NADP+, which are essential for carbon fixation and other metabolic processes in the cell.

In summary, Photosynthetic Reaction Center Complex Proteins are specialized protein structures involved in capturing light energy and converting it into chemical energy during photosynthesis, ultimately driving the synthesis of ATP and NADPH for use in carbon fixation and other metabolic processes.

Light-harvesting protein complexes are specialized structures in photosynthetic organisms, such as plants, algae, and some bacteria, that capture and transfer light energy to the reaction centers where the initial chemical reactions of photosynthesis occur. These complexes consist of proteins and pigments (primarily chlorophylls and carotenoids) arranged in a way that allows them to absorb light most efficiently. The absorbed light energy is then converted into electrical charges, which are transferred to the reaction centers for further chemical reactions leading to the production of organic compounds and oxygen. The light-harvesting protein complexes play a crucial role in initiating the process of photosynthesis and optimizing its efficiency by capturing and distributing light energy.

Chloroflexi is a phylum of bacteria that contains gram-negative, filamentous, and often thermophilic or piezophilic species. These bacteria are characterized by their unique flexirubin-type pigments and the presence of chlorosomes, which are specialized structures for light-harvesting in some photosynthetic members of the phylum. Chloroflexi bacteria are widely distributed in various environments, including soil, freshwater, marine habitats, and hot springs. Some species are capable of anaerobic respiration or fermentation, while others perform oxygenic photosynthesis. The phylum was previously known as green non-sulfur bacteria or flexibacteria.

Acyl Coenzyme A (often abbreviated as Acetyl-CoA or Acyl-CoA) is a crucial molecule in metabolism, particularly in the breakdown and oxidation of fats and carbohydrates to produce energy. It is a thioester compound that consists of a fatty acid or an acetate group linked to coenzyme A through a sulfur atom.

Acyl CoA plays a central role in several metabolic pathways, including:

1. The citric acid cycle (Krebs cycle): In the mitochondria, Acyl-CoA is formed from the oxidation of fatty acids or the breakdown of certain amino acids. This Acyl-CoA then enters the citric acid cycle to produce high-energy electrons, which are used in the electron transport chain to generate ATP (adenosine triphosphate), the main energy currency of the cell.
2. Beta-oxidation: The breakdown of fatty acids occurs in the mitochondria through a process called beta-oxidation, where Acyl-CoA is sequentially broken down into smaller units, releasing acetyl-CoA, which then enters the citric acid cycle.
3. Ketogenesis: In times of low carbohydrate availability or during prolonged fasting, the liver can produce ketone bodies from acetyl-CoA to supply energy to other organs, such as the brain and heart.
4. Protein synthesis: Acyl-CoA is also involved in the modification of proteins by attaching fatty acid chains to them (a process called acetylation), which can influence protein function and stability.

In summary, Acyl Coenzyme A is a vital molecule in metabolism that connects various pathways related to energy production, fatty acid breakdown, and protein modification.

Bacterial proteins are a type of protein that are produced by bacteria as part of their structural or functional components. These proteins can be involved in various cellular processes, such as metabolism, DNA replication, transcription, and translation. They can also play a role in bacterial pathogenesis, helping the bacteria to evade the host's immune system, acquire nutrients, and multiply within the host.

Bacterial proteins can be classified into different categories based on their function, such as:

1. Enzymes: Proteins that catalyze chemical reactions in the bacterial cell.
2. Structural proteins: Proteins that provide structural support and maintain the shape of the bacterial cell.
3. Signaling proteins: Proteins that help bacteria to communicate with each other and coordinate their behavior.
4. Transport proteins: Proteins that facilitate the movement of molecules across the bacterial cell membrane.
5. Toxins: Proteins that are produced by pathogenic bacteria to damage host cells and promote infection.
6. Surface proteins: Proteins that are located on the surface of the bacterial cell and interact with the environment or host cells.

Understanding the structure and function of bacterial proteins is important for developing new antibiotics, vaccines, and other therapeutic strategies to combat bacterial infections.

Lactic acid, also known as 2-hydroxypropanoic acid, is a chemical compound that plays a significant role in various biological processes. In the context of medicine and biochemistry, lactic acid is primarily discussed in relation to muscle metabolism and cellular energy production. Here's a medical definition for lactic acid:

Lactic acid (LA): A carboxylic acid with the molecular formula C3H6O3 that plays a crucial role in anaerobic respiration, particularly during strenuous exercise or conditions of reduced oxygen availability. It is formed through the conversion of pyruvate, catalyzed by the enzyme lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), when there is insufficient oxygen to complete the final step of cellular respiration in the Krebs cycle. The accumulation of lactic acid can lead to acidosis and muscle fatigue. Additionally, lactic acid serves as a vital intermediary in various metabolic pathways and is involved in the production of glucose through gluconeogenesis in the liver.

"Energy transfer" is a general term used in the field of physics and physiology, including medical sciences, to describe the process by which energy is passed from one system, entity, or location to another. In the context of medicine, energy transfer often refers to the ways in which cells and organ systems exchange and utilize various forms of energy for proper functioning and maintenance of life.

In a more specific sense, "energy transfer" may refer to:

1. Bioenergetics: This is the study of energy flow through living organisms, including the conversion, storage, and utilization of energy in biological systems. Key processes include cellular respiration, photosynthesis, and metabolic pathways that transform energy into forms useful for growth, maintenance, and reproduction.
2. Electron transfer: In biochemistry, electrons are transferred between molecules during redox reactions, which play a crucial role in energy production and consumption within cells. Examples include the electron transport chain (ETC) in mitochondria, where high-energy electrons from NADH and FADH2 are passed along a series of protein complexes to generate an electrochemical gradient that drives ATP synthesis.
3. Heat transfer: This is the exchange of thermal energy between systems or objects due to temperature differences. In medicine, heat transfer can be relevant in understanding how body temperature is regulated and maintained, as well as in therapeutic interventions such as hyperthermia or cryotherapy.
4. Mechanical energy transfer: This refers to the transmission of mechanical force or motion from one part of the body to another. For instance, muscle contractions generate forces that are transmitted through tendons and bones to produce movement and maintain posture.
5. Radiation therapy: In oncology, ionizing radiation is used to treat cancer by transferring energy to malignant cells, causing damage to their DNA and leading to cell death or impaired function.
6. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): This non-invasive diagnostic technique uses magnetic fields and radio waves to excite hydrogen nuclei in the body, which then release energy as they return to their ground state. The resulting signals are used to generate detailed images of internal structures and tissues.

In summary, "energy transfer" is a broad term that encompasses various processes by which different forms of energy (thermal, mechanical, electromagnetic, etc.) are exchanged or transmitted between systems or objects in the context of medicine and healthcare.

Organelles are specialized structures within cells that perform specific functions essential for the cell's survival and proper functioning. They can be thought of as the "organs" of the cell, and they are typically membrane-bound to separate them from the rest of the cellular cytoplasm. Examples of organelles include the nucleus (which contains the genetic material), mitochondria (which generate energy for the cell), ribosomes (which synthesize proteins), endoplasmic reticulum (which is involved in protein and lipid synthesis), Golgi apparatus (which modifies, sorts, and packages proteins and lipids for transport), lysosomes (which break down waste materials and cellular debris), peroxisomes (which detoxify harmful substances and produce certain organic compounds), and vacuoles (which store nutrients and waste products). The specific organelles present in a cell can vary depending on the type of cell and its function.

Chlorophyll is a green pigment found in the chloroplasts of photosynthetic plants, algae, and some bacteria. It plays an essential role in light-dependent reactions of photosynthesis by absorbing light energy, primarily from the blue and red parts of the electromagnetic spectrum, and converting it into chemical energy to fuel the synthesis of carbohydrates from carbon dioxide and water. The structure of chlorophyll includes a porphyrin ring, which binds a central magnesium ion, and a long phytol tail. There are several types of chlorophyll, including chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b, which have distinct absorption spectra and slightly different structures. Chlorophyll is crucial for the process of photosynthesis, enabling the conversion of sunlight into chemical energy and the release of oxygen as a byproduct.

Carbon dioxide (CO2) is a colorless, odorless gas that is naturally present in the Earth's atmosphere. It is a normal byproduct of cellular respiration in humans, animals, and plants, and is also produced through the combustion of fossil fuels such as coal, oil, and natural gas.

In medical terms, carbon dioxide is often used as a respiratory stimulant and to maintain the pH balance of blood. It is also used during certain medical procedures, such as laparoscopic surgery, to insufflate (inflate) the abdominal cavity and create a working space for the surgeon.

Elevated levels of carbon dioxide in the body can lead to respiratory acidosis, a condition characterized by an increased concentration of carbon dioxide in the blood and a decrease in pH. This can occur in conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, or other lung diseases that impair breathing and gas exchange. Symptoms of respiratory acidosis may include shortness of breath, confusion, headache, and in severe cases, coma or death.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

Phylogeny is the evolutionary history and relationship among biological entities, such as species or genes, based on their shared characteristics. In other words, it refers to the branching pattern of evolution that shows how various organisms have descended from a common ancestor over time. Phylogenetic analysis involves constructing a tree-like diagram called a phylogenetic tree, which depicts the inferred evolutionary relationships among organisms or genes based on molecular sequence data or other types of characters. This information is crucial for understanding the diversity and distribution of life on Earth, as well as for studying the emergence and spread of diseases.

... is a thermophilic, filamentous, phototrophic bacterium that forms dense cell aggregates. Its type strain ... Weltzer, M. L.; Miller, S. R. (2012). "Ecological Divergence of a Novel Group of Chloroflexus Strains along a Geothermal ... LPSN Type strain of Chloroflexus aggregans at BacDive - the Bacterial Diversity Metadatabase v t e (Articles with short ... "Diversity and Distribution in Hypersaline Microbial Mats of Bacteria Related to Chloroflexus spp". Applied and Environmental ...
The complete electron transport chain for Chloroflexus spp. is not yet known. Particularly, Chloroflexus aurantiacus has not ... Chloroflexus aurantiacus has been of interest in the search for origins of the so-called type II photosynthetic reaction center ... Chloroflexus aurantiacus is a photosynthetic bacterium isolated from hot springs, belonging to the green non-sulfur bacteria. ... Chloroflexus aurantiacus is thought to grow photoheterotrophically in nature, but it has the capability of fixing inorganic ...
DDH for Chloroflexus islandicus strain vs other known Chloroflexus strains. The separated species based on ANI is 95.0% or less ... a new species of Chloroflexus was confirmed. The 16S rRNA analysis showed it is closely related to Chloroflexus aggregans (97.0 ... Chloroflexus islandicus is a photosynthetic bacterium isolated from the Strokkur Geyser in Iceland. This organism is ... As a genus, Chloroflexus spp. are filamentous anoxygenic phototrophic (FAP) organisms that utilize type II photosynthetic ...
The Chloroflexus-1 RNA motif is a conserved RNA structure that was discovered by bioinformatics.Chloroflexus-1 motifs are found ... Chloroflexus-1 RNAs likely function in trans as sRNAs. The motif's nucleic acid secondary structure consists of several small ... in the genus Chloroflexus, under the phylum Chloroflexota. ...
Example genera: Chloroflexus Chloronema Family Oscillochloridaceae. Example genera: Oscillochloris Species Chloracidobacterium ...
... auracyanins A and B from Chloroflexus aurantiacus; blue copper protein from Alcaligenes faecalis; cupredoxin (CPC) from Cucumis ... blue copper proteins from the green photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus". J. Biol. Chem. 267 (10): 6531-6540. ...
Gloe, A; Risch, N (1 August 1978). "Bacteriochlorophyll cs, a new bacteriochlorophyll from Chloroflexus aurantiacus". Archives ...
... the top two layers contained cyanobacteria and Chloroflexus spp. These mats were found in multiple Japanese hot springs ranging ... The reaction center in Roseiflexus castenholzii is closely related to the RC of Chloroflexus aurantiacus. R. castenholzii's RC ...
Some photosynthetic bacteria (e.g. Chloroflexus) are photoheterotrophs, meaning that they use organic carbon compounds as a ... Examples: Rhodobacter, Rhodopseudomonas, Rhodospirillum, Rhodomicrobium, Rhodocyclus, Heliobacterium, Chloroflexus ( ... Chloroflexus), or the heliobacteria (Low %G+C Gram positives). In addition to these organisms, some microbes (e.g. the Archaeon ... Chloroflexus (hydrogen (H 2) as reducing equivalent donor) chemolithoheterotrophs obtain energy from the oxidation of inorganic ...
This pathway has been demonstrated in Chloroflexus, a nonsulfur photosynthetic bacterium; however, other studies suggest that 3 ... "A Bicyclic Autotrophic CO2 Fixation Pathway in Chloroflexus aurantiacus". Journal of Biological Chemistry. 277 (23): 20277- ... "Identifying the missing steps of the autotrophic 3-hydroxypropionate CO2 fixation cycle in Chloroflexus aurantiacus". ...
2016 Genus Chloroflexus Pierson & Castenholz 1974 ["Chlorocrinis"] Family Oscillochloridaceae Gupta et al. 2013 Genus ...
The name "Chloroflexi" is a Neolatin plural of "Chloroflexus", which is the name of the first genus described. The noun is a ... 2016 Genus Chloroflexus Pierson & Castenholz 1974 ["Chlorocrinis"] Family Oscillochloridaceae Gupta et al. 2013 Genus ... has been found exclusively among all members in the genus Chloroflexus, and is thought to play an important functional role. ... Chloroflexus aurantiacus, cyanobacteria, Chlorobium tepidum and proteobacteria): Implications regarding the origin of ...
2018 The name Chloroflexi is a Neolatin nominative case masculine plural of Chloroflexus, which is the name of the first genus ... 2016 Genus Chloroflexus Pierson & Castenholz 1974 ["Chlorocrinis"] Family Oscillochloridaceae Gupta et al. 2013 Genus ... sequences and grouped the genera Chloroflexus, Herpetosiphon and Thermomicrobium into the "green non-sulfur bacteria and ... in the 2001 edition of Volume 1 of Bergey's Manual of Systematic Bacteriology and is the Latin plural of the name Chloroflexus ...
Chloroflexus is a thermophilic filamentous green bacterium found in hot waters at Yellowstone; filamentous structures within ... There is a thermal gradation of microorganisms, with the hottest waters supporting Chloroflexus green bacteria and ...
Type II, found in chloroflexus, purple bacteria, and plant/cyanobacterial PS-II, use quinones. Not only do all members inside ...
Herter S, Busch A, Fuchs G (November 2002). "L-Malyl-coenzyme A lyase/beta-methylmalyl-coenzyme A lyase from Chloroflexus ... including the maximum exponent of this family Chloroflexus auranticus by which this way was discovered and demonstrated. The 3- ... "Enzymes of a novel autotrophic CO2 fixation pathway in the phototrophic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus, the 3- ... "Identifying the missing steps of the autotrophic 3-hydroxypropionate CO2 fixation cycle in Chloroflexus aurantiacus". ...
"Enzymes of a novel autotrophic CO2 fixation pathway in the phototrophic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus, the 3- ...
Hügler M, Menendez C, Schägger H, Fuchs G (May 2002). "Malonyl-coenzyme A reductase from Chloroflexus aurantiacus, a key enzyme ... "Enzymes of a novel autotrophic CO2 fixation pathway in the phototrophic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus, the 3- ...
The Chloroflexi-1 RNA motif is a conserved RNA structure detected by bioinformatics within the species Chloroflexus aggregans. ...
The enzyme from Chloroflexus aurantiacus is bifunctional, and also catalyses the upstream reaction in the pathway, EC 1.2.1.75 ... Hügler M, Menendez C, Schägger H, Fuchs G (May 2002). "Malonyl-coenzyme A reductase from Chloroflexus aurantiacus, a key enzyme ... "Enzymes of a novel autotrophic CO2 fixation pathway in the phototrophic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus, the 3- ...
Chloroflexus aurantiacus, cyanobacteria, Chlorobium tepidum and proteobacteria): implications regarding the origin of ...
... and green sulfur bacteria such as Chloroflexus. These organisms are all capable of photosynthesis, though green sulfur bacteria ...
Chloroflexus group (Chloroflexus, Herpetosiphon) Thermomicrobium group (Thermomicrobium roseum) Thermotogae (Thermotoga ...
Different species of bacteria, such as Chloroflexus, co-exist with blue-green algae in the beds of hot water streams in the ... while the stream bed is home to blue-green algae and filamentous colonies of the photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus ...
Chloroflexus group (Chloroflexus, Herpetosiphon) Thermomicrobium group (Thermomicrobium roseum) Thermotogae (Thermotoga ...
... from Chloroflexus) Chrysiogenota (from Chrysiogenes) Coprothermobacterota (from Coprothermobacter) Deferribacterota (from ...
Chloroflexus aggregans is a thermophilic, filamentous, phototrophic bacterium that forms dense cell aggregates. Its type strain ... Weltzer, M. L.; Miller, S. R. (2012). "Ecological Divergence of a Novel Group of Chloroflexus Strains along a Geothermal ... LPSN Type strain of Chloroflexus aggregans at BacDive - the Bacterial Diversity Metadatabase v t e (Articles with short ... "Diversity and Distribution in Hypersaline Microbial Mats of Bacteria Related to Chloroflexus spp". Applied and Environmental ...
name=HrcA regulon. species= Chloroflexus aggregans DSM 9485. (optional)size=2. ...
Chloroflexus (cloe-row-flecks-us) is a filamentous green prokaryote, but not a cyanobacterium. It is common in some of the ... Chloroflexus (cloe-row-flecks-us) is a filamentous green prokaryote, but not a cyanobacterium. It is common in some of the ... Chloroflexus; Terrabacteria; Bacteria; Life (creatures); Cellular (cellular organisms) ... Chloroflexus; Terrabacteria; Bacteria; Life (creatures); Cellular (cellular organisms) ...
Kabasakal BV, Cotton CAR, Murray JW, 2023, Dynamic lid domain of Chloroflexus aurantiacus Malonyl-CoA reductase controls the ...
Structure and function of the Q-type centers in Chloroflexus and purple bacteria, comparison with photosystem II. Q-type ...
Species Chloroflexus aurantiacus [TaxId:1108] [69415] (7 PDB entries). Uniprot P80040. *. Domain d1uxkc1: 1uxk C:2-143 [108118] ... d1uxkc1 c.2.1.5 (C:2-143) Malate dehydrogenase {Chloroflexus aurantiacus [TaxId: 1108]} ... d1uxkc1 c.2.1.5 (C:2-143) Malate dehydrogenase {Chloroflexus aurantiacus [TaxId: 1108]} ...
... by a nonunit membrane containing the light harvesting bacteriochlorophyll found in green sulfur bacteria and in Chloroflexus. ...
... gDLLVADVIdNDSWRIWPSGDPAQMLDKQVYRNAQV 222 Chloroflexus s... A7NKB4 145 ASADEVEQLASESRRVFLLIEEAWAAQDIVLCDLKIEFGRDas-gALVVADVIdNDS ... 143 Chloroflexus s... A7NKB4 77 PTVMIVRRCVMIPLEVVNRRIATGSYIRrh---pdVAEGTRFdPPLLEFFLKDDaRHDPQISPEEIVAQGI--------- 144 ... E 76 Chloroflexus s... A7NKB4 1 MNLGEKLTEGKTKIVYAHPNDp--tLAIIIHKDGISAGDGARRHiiPGKGALSGRTTANVFTMLNHAGVATHFVAAp--E 76 Roseiflexus ... ALLADVRARYALVAELTGR 244 Chloroflexus sp. Y-400-fl A7NKB4 224 VTD-------------------DGLEQVRRLYEEVAHRTDA 245 Roseiflexus ...
Chloroflexus aggregans DSM 9485 Bacteria normal 1 normal 1 -. NC_009523 RoseRS_4601 dTDP-4-dehydrorhamnose reductase 53.26 ...
Host Lineage: Chloroflexus aurantiacus; Chloroflexus; Chloroflexaceae; Chloroflexales; Chloroflexi; Bacteria. General ... Query: NC_010175:3115021:3135411 Chloroflexus aurantiacus J-10-fl, complete genome. Start: 3135411, End: 3136073, Length: 663. ... Chloroflexus sp. Y-400-fl, complete genome. phage shock protein A, PspA. 1e-90. 332. ... Information: Chloroflexus aurantiacus J-10-fl (DSM 635) was isolated from the Hakone hot spring area in Japan. This organism is ...
Carotenoid and bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer in the B808-866 complex from chloroflexus aurantiacus. Montaño, G. A., Xin, ... Isolation and characterization of the B798 light-harvesting baseplate from the chlorosomes of Chloroflexus aurantiacus. Montaño ... Purification and characterization of the B808-866 light-harvesting complex from green filamentous bacterium Chloroflexus ...
Chloroflexus sp. Y-400-fl Site: position = -50. score = 5.99541 sequence = CCACTTAATCGATTAACCGC. Site: position = -34. score = ... Chloroflexus aggregans DSM 9485 Site: position = -57. score = 5.99651 sequence = CTACTTAACCGATTAAGTGG. Site: position = -41. ... Chloroflexus sp. Y-400-fl Gene: Chy400_3713: Multiple sugar ABC transporter, ATP-binding protein, orthologs of ggtA- ... Chloroflexus aggregans DSM 9485 Gene: Cagg_0274: Multiple sugar ABC transporter, ATP-binding protein, orthologs of ggtA- ...
keywords = "energy-transfer processes, bacteriochlorophyll-c, chloroflexus-aurantiacus, photosynthetic bacteria, cross- ...
Example; Chloroflexus species. 8. Pleomorphic bacteria: Bacteria having irregular shape and can change their structure. Example ...
Chloroflexus aurantiacus molecule tags Oxidoreductase total genus 106 structure length 295 sequence length 306 ...
Chloroflexus (0) * Gram-Negative Aerobic Bacteria (1) * Gram-Negative Anaerobic Bacteria (1) ...
Number of sequences belonging to cluster in the Chloroflexus aurantiacus sequence. Cch. Number of sequences belonging to ...
Chloroflexus-1 RNA. 3. 0.750. 26.2. 3. RF02937. Clostridiales-2 RNA. 10. 0.227. 84.5. ...
Chloroflexus aggregans DSM 9485 Bacteria decreased coverage 0.000390342 hitchhiker 0.00283274 -. NC_013525 Tter_0868 glycosyl ...
Chloroflexus auranticus and Chloroflexus sp. were the only species among the taxa analyzed in this study where 16S rRNA ...
pcs / A9WEU4: propionyl-CoA synthase subunit (EC 1.3.1.84; EC 4.2.1.116; EC 6.2.1.36) from Chloroflexus aurantiacus ... pcs / A9WEU4: propionyl-CoA synthase subunit (EC 1.3.1.84; EC 4.2.1.116; EC 6.2.1.36) from Chloroflexus aurantiacus ... pcs / A9WEU4: propionyl-CoA synthase subunit (EC 1.3.1.84; EC 4.2.1.116; EC 6.2.1.36) from Chloroflexus aurantiacus ... pcs / A9WEU4: propionyl-CoA synthase subunit (EC 1.3.1.84; EC 4.2.1.116; EC 6.2.1.36) from Chloroflexus aurantiacus ...
Glycosyl hydrolase family 32 domain protein [Chloroflexus sp. Y-400-fl]. RefSeq. YP_002753177.1. 2e-36. 1. 226. 41. 260. ...
2004 Модель агрегации пигментов в хлоросомной антенне зеленых бактерий Chloroflexus aurantiacus * Мауринг К., Новодережкин В.И. ... 2014 Polarized transient absorption spectroscopy of Chloroflexus aurantiacus chlorosomes * Авторы: Yakovlev A.G., Novoderezhkin ... 1999 Exciton delocalization in the B808-866 antenna of the green bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus as revealed by ultrafast ... 2014 POLARIZED TRANSIENT ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY OF Chloroflexus aurantiacus CHLOROSOMES * YAKOVLEV Andrei G., NOVODEREZHKIN ...
1998 Photosynthetic electrogenic events in native membranes of Chloroflexus aurantiacus. Flash-induced charge displacements in ... 1994 PHOTOSYNTHETIC ELECTROGENIC EVENTS IN NATIVE MEMBRANES OF CHLOROFLEXUS-AURANTIACUS - FLASH-INDUCED CHARGE DISPLACEMENTS ...
In this concept cloud, the sizes of the concepts are based not only on the number of corresponding publications, but also how relevant the concepts are to the overall topics of the publications, how long ago the publications were written, whether the person was the first or senior author, and how many other people have written about the same topic. The largest concepts are those that are most unique to this person ...
Chloroflexus ‎ (← links). *Chroococcus ‎ (← links). *Clostridium ‎ (← links). *Adenoviridae ‎ (← links). *Corynebacterium ‎ (← ...
Structural and Functional Elucidation of IF-3 Protein of Chloroflexus aurantiacus Involved in Protein Biosynthesis: An In ... Chloroflexus aurantiacus is a thermophilic bacterium that produces a multitude of proteins within its genome. Bioinformatics ... Proteínas de Bactérias/química , Proteínas de Bactérias/metabolismo , Chloroflexus/metabolismo , Simulação por Computador , ...
V, Korppi-Tommola J (2009) Excitation energy transfer in isolated chlorosomes selleck from Chloroflexus aurantiacus. Chem Phys ... Bacteriochlorophyll organization and energy transfer kinetics in chlorosomes from Chloroflexus aurantiacus depend on the light ... c antennae in bacteriochlorophyll a-containing chlorosomes from the green photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus. ... of bacteriochlorophyll-c and bacteriochlorophyll-a in chlorosomes of the green photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus ...
Id love to see some environmental isolates like Chloroflexus and Desulfibrio and other wetland anaerobes. (Im a wetlands nut ...
Malyl-CoA/beta-methylmalyl-CoA/citramalyl-CoA lyase OS=Chloroflexus aurantiacus GN=mcl PE=1 SV=1. 50. 278. 2.0E-13. ... Malyl-CoA/beta-methylmalyl-CoA/citramalyl-CoA lyase OS=Chloroflexus aurantiacus (strain ATCC 29366 / DSM 635 / J-10-fl) GN=mclA ...
  • Kabasakal BV, Cotton CAR, Murray JW, 2023, Dynamic lid domain of Chloroflexus aurantiacus Malonyl-CoA reductase controls the reaction. (imperial.ac.uk)
  • General Information: Chloroflexus aurantiacus J-10-fl (DSM 635) was isolated from the Hakone hot spring area in Japan. (up.ac.za)
  • Photosynthetic electrogenic events in native membranes of Chloroflexus aurantiacus. (msu.ru)
  • The main aim of this project is to investigate bRCs from two different organisms: purple bacteria Rhodobacter sphaeroides and green bacteria Chloroflexus aurantiacus , using two dimensional electronic spectroscopy at cryogenic temperature (77K). (lu.se)
  • Chloroflexus aggregans is a thermophilic, filamentous, phototrophic bacterium that forms dense cell aggregates. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chloroflexus aggregans sp. (wikipedia.org)
  • Structure and function of the Q-type centers in Chloroflexus and purple bacteria, comparison with photosystem II. (elte.hu)
  • Chloroflexus (cloe-row-flecks-us) is a filamentous green prokaryote, but not a cyanobacterium. (eol.org)