Chloroflexus: A genus of green nonsulfur bacteria in the family Chloroflexaceae. They are photosynthetic, thermophilic, filamentous gliding bacteria found in hot springs.Chlorobi: A phylum of anoxygenic, phototrophic bacteria including the family Chlorobiaceae. They occur in aquatic sediments, sulfur springs, and hot springs and utilize reduced sulfur compounds instead of oxygen.Bacteriochlorophylls: Pyrrole containing pigments found in photosynthetic bacteria.Rhodospirillales: An order of photosynthetic bacteria representing a physiological community of predominantly aquatic bacteria.Multifunctional Enzymes: Molecules that contain multiple active sites which are used to catalyze more than one enzymatic reaction. Proteins in this class generally contain multiple active sites within a single peptide chain and may also contain more than one enzymatically active subunit. They are distinguished from MULTIENZYME COMPLEXES in that their subunits are not found as distinct enzymes.Bacteria: One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.GlyoxylatesAutotrophic Processes: The processes by which organisms use simple inorganic substances such as gaseous or dissolved carbon dioxide and inorganic nitrogen as nutrient sources. Contrasts with heterotrophic processes which make use of organic materials as the nutrient supply source. Autotrophs can be either chemoautotrophs (or chemolithotrophs), largely ARCHAEA and BACTERIA, which also use simple inorganic substances for their metabolic energy reguirements; or photoautotrophs (or photolithotrophs), such as PLANTS and CYANOBACTERIA, which derive their energy from light. Depending on environmental conditions some organisms can switch between different nutritional modes (autotrophy; HETEROTROPHY; chemotrophy; or PHOTOTROPHY) to utilize different sources to meet their nutrient and energy requirements.Photosynthesis: The synthesis by organisms of organic chemical compounds, especially carbohydrates, from carbon dioxide using energy obtained from light rather than from the oxidation of chemical compounds. Photosynthesis comprises two separate processes: the light reactions and the dark reactions. In higher plants; GREEN ALGAE; and CYANOBACTERIA; NADPH and ATP formed by the light reactions drive the dark reactions which result in the fixation of carbon dioxide. (from Oxford Dictionary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2001)Photosynthetic Reaction Center Complex Proteins: Protein complexes that take part in the process of PHOTOSYNTHESIS. They are located within the THYLAKOID MEMBRANES of plant CHLOROPLASTS and a variety of structures in more primitive organisms. There are two major complexes involved in the photosynthetic process called PHOTOSYSTEM I and PHOTOSYSTEM II.WyomingHot Springs: Habitat of hot water naturally heated by underlying geologic processes. Surface hot springs have been used for BALNEOLOGY. Underwater hot springs are called HYDROTHERMAL VENTS.Wolves: Any of several large carnivorous mammals of the family CANIDAE that usually hunt in packs.Bison: A genus of the family Bovidae having two species: B. bison and B. bonasus. This concept is differentiated from BUFFALOES, which refers to Bubalus arnee and Syncerus caffer.Sulfolobales: An order of CRENARCHAEOTA consisting of aerobic or facultatively aerobic, chemolithotrophic cocci which are extreme thermoacidophiles. They lack peptidoglycan in their cell walls.MontanaArchaeal Viruses: Viruses whose hosts are in the domain ARCHAEA.Geology: The science of the earth and other celestial bodies and their history as recorded in the rocks. It includes the study of geologic processes of an area such as rock formations, weathering and erosion, and sedimentation. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Desulfurococcales: An order of CRENARCHAEOTA comprised of irregular coccoid to disc-shaped, hyperthermophiles, and found in submarine hydrothermal systems and solfataric hot springs.Metabolic Phenomena: The CHEMICAL PROCESSES that occur within the cells, tissues, or an organism and related temporal, spatial, qualitative, and quantitative concepts.Peptide Nucleic Acids: DNA analogs containing neutral amide backbone linkages composed of aminoethyl glycine units instead of the usual phosphodiester linkage of deoxyribose groups. Peptide nucleic acids have high biological stability and higher affinity for complementary DNA or RNA sequences than analogous DNA oligomers.Metabolic Engineering: Methods and techniques used to genetically modify cells' biosynthetic product output and develop conditions for growing the cells as BIOREACTORS.Industrial Microbiology: The study, utilization, and manipulation of those microorganisms capable of economically producing desirable substances or changes in substances, and the control of undesirable microorganisms.Nucleic Acid Conformation: The spatial arrangement of the atoms of a nucleic acid or polynucleotide that results in its characteristic 3-dimensional shape.Nucleic Acid Hybridization: Widely used technique which exploits the ability of complementary sequences in single-stranded DNAs or RNAs to pair with each other to form a double helix. Hybridization can take place between two complimentary DNA sequences, between a single-stranded DNA and a complementary RNA, or between two RNA sequences. The technique is used to detect and isolate specific sequences, measure homology, or define other characteristics of one or both strands. (Kendrew, Encyclopedia of Molecular Biology, 1994, p503)Nucleic Acid Probes: Nucleic acid which complements a specific mRNA or DNA molecule, or fragment thereof; used for hybridization studies in order to identify microorganisms and for genetic studies.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Escherichia coli: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.Nonsense Mediated mRNA Decay: An mRNA metabolic process that distinguishes a normal STOP CODON from a premature stop codon (NONSENSE CODON) and facilitates rapid degradation of aberrant mRNAs containing premature stop codons.Codon, Nonsense: An amino acid-specifying codon that has been converted to a stop codon (CODON, TERMINATOR) by mutation. Its occurance is abnormal causing premature termination of protein translation and results in production of truncated and non-functional proteins. A nonsense mutation is one that converts an amino acid-specific codon to a stop codon.RNA Stability: The extent to which an RNA molecule retains its structural integrity and resists degradation by RNASE, and base-catalyzed HYDROLYSIS, under changing in vivo or in vitro conditions.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Antitoxins: Antisera from immunized animals that is purified and used as a passive immunizing agent against specific BACTERIAL TOXINS.PubMed: A bibliographic database that includes MEDLINE as its primary subset. It is produced by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), part of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. PubMed, which is searchable through NLM's Web site, also includes access to additional citations to selected life sciences journals not in MEDLINE, and links to other resources such as the full-text of articles at participating publishers' Web sites, NCBI's molecular biology databases, and PubMed Central.BooksPublishing: "The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.MEDLINE: The premier bibliographic database of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. MEDLINE® (MEDLARS Online) is the primary subset of PUBMED and can be searched on NLM's Web site in PubMed or the NLM Gateway. MEDLINE references are indexed with MEDICAL SUBJECT HEADINGS (MeSH).Serial Publications: Publications in any medium issued in successive parts bearing numerical or chronological designations and intended to be continued indefinitely. (ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983, p203)

Arsenite oxidase, an ancient bioenergetic enzyme. (1/30)

Operons coding for the enzyme arsenite oxidase have been detected in the genomes from Archaea and Bacteria by Blast searches using the amino acid sequences of the respective enzyme characterized in two different beta-proteobacteria as templates. Sequence analyses show that in all these species, arsenite oxidase is transported over the cytoplasmic membrane via the tat system and most probably remains membrane attached by an N-terminal transmembrane helix of the Rieske subunit. The biochemical and biophysical data obtained for arsenite oxidase in the green filamentous bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus allow a structural model of the enzyme's membrane association to be proposed. Phylogenies for the two constituent subunits (i.e., the molybdopterin-containing and the Rieske subunit) of the heterodimeric enzyme and their respective homologs in DMSO-reductase, formate dehydrogenase, nitrate reductase, and the Rieske/cytb complexes were calculated from multiple sequence alignments. The obtained phylogenetic trees indicate an early origin of arsenite oxidase before the divergence of Archaea and Bacteria. Evolutionary implications of these phylogenies are discussed.  (+info)

Compound-specific isotopic fractionation patterns suggest different carbon metabolisms among Chloroflexus-like bacteria in hot-spring microbial mats. (2/30)

Stable carbon isotope fractionations between dissolved inorganic carbon and lipid biomarkers suggest photoautotrophy by Chloroflexus-like organisms in sulfidic and nonsulfidic Yellowstone hot springs. Where co-occurring, cyanobacteria appear to cross-feed Chloroflexus-like organisms supporting photoheterotrophy as well, although the relatively small 13C fractionation associated with cyanobacterial sugar biosynthesis may sometimes obscure this process.  (+info)

Exciton theory for supramolecular chlorosomal aggregates: 1. Aggregate size dependence of the linear spectra. (3/30)

The interior of chlorosomes of green bacteria forms an unusual antenna system organized without proteins. The steady-spectra (absorption, circular dichroism, and linear dichroism) have been modeled using the Frenkel Hamiltonian for the large tubular aggregates of bacteriochlorophylls with geometries corresponding to those proposed for Chloroflexus aurantiacus and Chlorobium tepidum chlorosomes. For the Cf. aurantiacus aggregates we apply a structure used previously (V. I. Prokhorenko., D. B. Steensgaard, and A. R. Holzwarth, Biophys: J. 2000, 79:2105-2120), whereas for the Cb. tepidum aggregates a new extended model of double-tube aggregates, based on recently published solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance studies (B.-J. van Rossum, B. Y. van Duhl, D. B. Steensgaard, T. S. Balaban, A. R. Holzwarth, K. Schaffner, and H. J. M. de Groot, Biochemistry 2001, 40:1587-1595), is developed. We find that the circular dichroism spectra depend strongly on the aggregate length for both types of chlorosomes. Their shape changes from "type-II" (negative at short wavelengths to positive at long wavelengths) to the "mixed-type" (negative-positive-negative) in the nomenclature proposed in K. Griebenow, A. R. Holzwarth, F. van Mourik, and R. van Grondelle, Biochim: Biophys. Acta 1991, 1058:194-202, for an aggregate length of 30-40 bacteriochlorophyll molecules per stack. This "size effect" on the circular dichroism spectra is caused by appearance of macroscopic chirality due to circular distribution of the transition dipole moment of the monomers. We visualize these distributions, and also the corresponding Frenkel excitons, using a novel presentation technique. The observed size effects provide a key to explain many previously puzzling and seemingly contradictory experimental data in the literature on the circular and linear dichroism spectra of seemingly identical types of chlorosomes.  (+info)

A cambialistic superoxide dismutase in the thermophilic photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus. (4/30)

Superoxide dismutase from the thermophilic anoxygenic photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus was cloned, purified, and characterized. This protein is in the manganese- and iron-containing family of superoxide dismutases and is able to use both manganese and iron catalytically. This appears to be the only soluble superoxide dismutase in C. aurantiacus. Iron and manganese cofactors were identified by using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and were quantified by atomic absorption spectroscopy. By metal enrichment of growth media and by performing metal fidelity studies, the enzyme was found to be most efficient with manganese incorporated, yet up to 30% of the activity was retained with iron. Assimilation of iron or manganese ions into superoxide dismutase was also found to be affected by the growth conditions. This enzyme was also found to be remarkably thermostable and was resistant to H2O2 at concentrations up to 80 mM. Reactive oxygen defense mechanisms have not been previously characterized in the organisms belonging to the phylum Chloroflexi. These systems are of interest in C. aurantiacus since this bacterium lives in a hyperoxic environment and is subject to high UV radiation fluxes.  (+info)

PentaPlot: a software tool for the illustration of genome mosaicism. (5/30)

BACKGROUND: Dekapentagonal maps depict the phylogenetic relationships of five genomes in a visually appealing diagram and can be viewed as an alternative to a single evolutionary consensus tree. In particular, the generated maps focus attention on those gene families that significantly deviate from the consensus or plurality phylogeny. PentaPlot is a software tool that computes such dekapentagonal maps given an appropriate probability support matrix. RESULTS: The visualization with dekapentagonal maps critically depends on the optimal layout of unrooted tree topologies representing different evolutionary relationships among five organisms along the vertices of the dekapentagon. This is a difficult optimization problem given the large number of possible layouts. At its core our tool utilizes a genetic algorithm with demes and a local search strategy to search for the optimal layout. The hybrid genetic algorithm performs satisfactorily even in those cases where the chosen genomes are so divergent that little phylogenetic information has survived in the individual gene families. CONCLUSION: PentaPlot is being made publicly available as an open source project at http://pentaplot.sourceforge.net.  (+info)

Properties of succinyl-coenzyme A:L-malate coenzyme A transferase and its role in the autotrophic 3-hydroxypropionate cycle of Chloroflexus aurantiacus. (6/30)

The 3-hydroxypropionate cycle has been proposed to operate as the autotrophic CO2 fixation pathway in the phototrophic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus. In this pathway, acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) and two bicarbonate molecules are converted to malate. Acetyl-CoA is regenerated from malyl-CoA by L-malyl-CoA lyase. The enzyme forming malyl-CoA, succinyl-CoA:L-malate coenzyme A transferase, was purified. Based on the N-terminal amino acid sequence of its two subunits, the corresponding genes were identified on a gene cluster which also contains the gene for L-malyl-CoA lyase, the subsequent enzyme in the pathway. Both enzymes were severalfold up-regulated under autotrophic conditions, which is in line with their proposed function in CO2 fixation. The two CoA transferase genes were cloned and heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant enzyme was purified and studied. Succinyl-CoA:L-malate CoA transferase forms a large (alphabeta)n complex consisting of 46- and 44-kDa subunits and catalyzes the reversible reaction succinyl-CoA + L-malate --> succinate + L-malyl-CoA. It is specific for succinyl-CoA as the CoA donor but accepts L-citramalate instead of L-malate as the CoA acceptor; the corresponding d-stereoisomers are not accepted. The enzyme is a member of the class III of the CoA transferase family. The demonstration of the missing CoA transferase closes the last gap in the proposed 3-hydroxypropionate cycle.  (+info)

Functional differences between galactolipids and glucolipids revealed in photosynthesis of higher plants. (7/30)

Galactolipids represent the most abundant lipid class in thylakoid membranes, where oxygenic photosynthesis is performed. The identification of galactolipids at specific sites within photosynthetic complexes by x-ray crystallography implies specific roles for galactolipids during photosynthetic electron transport. The preference for galactose and not for the more abundant sugar glucose in thylakoid lipids and their specific roles in photosynthesis are not understood. Introduction of a bacterial glucosyltransferase from Chloroflexus aurantiacus into the galactolipid-deficient dgd1 mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana resulted in the accumulation of a glucose-containing lipid in the thylakoids. At the same time, the growth defect of the dgd1 mutant was complemented. However, the degree of trimerization of light-harvesting complex II and the photosynthetic quantum yield of transformed dgd1 plants were only partially restored. These results indicate that specific interactions of the galactolipid head group with photosynthetic protein complexes might explain the preference for galactose in thylakoid lipids of higher plants. Therefore, galactose in thylakoid lipids can be exchanged with glucose without severe effects on growth, but the presence of galactose is crucial to maintain maximal photosynthetic efficiency.  (+info)

Properties of succinyl-coenzyme A:D-citramalate coenzyme A transferase and its role in the autotrophic 3-hydroxypropionate cycle of Chloroflexus aurantiacus. (8/30)

The phototrophic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus uses the 3-hydroxypropionate cycle for autotrophic CO(2) fixation. This cycle starts with acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) and produces glyoxylate. Glyoxylate is an unconventional cell carbon precursor that needs special enzymes for assimilation. Glyoxylate is combined with propionyl-CoA to beta-methylmalyl-CoA, which is converted to citramalate. Cell extracts catalyzed the succinyl-CoA-dependent conversion of citramalate to acetyl-CoA and pyruvate, the central cell carbon precursor. This reaction is due to the combined action of enzymes that were upregulated during autotrophic growth, a coenzyme A transferase with the use of succinyl-CoA as the CoA donor and a lyase cleaving citramalyl-CoA to acetyl-CoA and pyruvate. Genomic analysis identified a gene coding for a putative coenzyme A transferase. The gene was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and shown to code for succinyl-CoA:d-citramalate coenzyme A transferase. This enzyme, which catalyzes the reaction d-citramalate + succinyl-CoA --> d-citramalyl-CoA + succinate, was purified and studied. It belongs to class III of the coenzyme A transferase enzyme family, with an aspartate residue in the active site. The homodimeric enzyme composed of 44-kDa subunits was specific for succinyl-CoA as a CoA donor but also accepted d-malate and itaconate instead of d-citramalate. The CoA transferase gene is part of a cluster of genes which are cotranscribed, including the gene for d-citramalyl-CoA lyase. It is proposed that the CoA transferase and the lyase catalyze the last two steps in the glyoxylate assimilation route.  (+info)

*Chloroflexus aggregans

... is a thermophilic, filamentous, phototrophic bacterium that forms dense cell aggregates. Its type strain ... Weltzer, M. L.; Miller, S. R. (2012). "Ecological Divergence of a Novel Group of Chloroflexus Strains along a Geothermal ... LPSN Type strain of Chloroflexus aggregans at BacDive - the Bacterial Diversity Metadatabase. ... "Diversity and Distribution in Hypersaline Microbial Mats of Bacteria Related to Chloroflexus spp". Applied and Environmental ...

*Chloroflexus aurantiacus

The complete electron transport chain for Chloroflexus spp. is not yet known. Particularly, Chloroflexus aurantiacus has not ... Chloroflexus aurantiacus has been of interest in the search for origins of the so-called type II photosynthetic reaction center ... Chloroflexus aurantiacus is a photosynthetic bacterium isolated from hot springs, belonging to the green non-sulfur bacteria. ... Chloroflexus aurantiacus is thought to grow photoheterotrophically in nature, but it has the capability of fixing inorganic ...

*Chloroflexi (phylum)

2013 Genus Chloroflexus Pierson & Castenholz 1974 Species C. aggregans Hanada et al. 1995 Species C. aurantiacus Pierson & ... Hanada, S.; Hiraishi, A.; Shimada, K.; Matsuura, K. (1995). "Chloroflexus aggregans sp. nov., a Filamentous Phototrophic ... Pierson, B. K.; Castenholz, R. W. (1974). "A phototrophic gliding filamentous bacterium of hot springs, Chloroflexus ... "Chloroflexus", which the name of the first genus described. The noun is a combination of the Greek adjective chloros, -a, on ( ...

*Plastocyanin family of copper-binding proteins

... auracyanins A and B from Chloroflexus aurantiacus; blue copper protein from Alcaligenes faecalis; cupredoxin (CPC) from Cucumis ... blue copper proteins from the green photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus". J. Biol. Chem. 267 (10): 6531-6540. ...

*Carbon fixation

It was proposed in 2002 for the anoxygenic photosynthetic Chloroflexus aurantiacus. None of the enzymes that participate in the ... Herter S, Fuchs G, Bacher A, Eisenreich W (2002). "A bicyclic autotrophic CO2 fixation pathway in Chloroflexus aurantiacus". J ... "Identifying the missing steps of the autotrophic 3-hydroxypropionate CO2 fixation cycle in Chloroflexus aurantiacus". Proc. ...

*Microbial metabolism

Some photosynthetic bacteria (e.g. Chloroflexus) are photoheterotrophs, meaning that they use organic carbon compounds as a ... Examples: Rhodobacter, Rhodopseudomonas, Rhodospirillum, Rhodomicrobium, Rhodocyclus, Heliobacterium, Chloroflexus ( ... Chloroflexus), or the heliobacteria (Low %G+C Gram positives). In addition to these organisms, some microbes (e.g. the Archaeon ... Chloroflexus (hydrogen (H 2) as reducing equivalent donor) chemolithoheterotrophs obtain energy from the oxidation of inorganic ...

*Chloroflexi (class)

2013 Genus Chloroflexus Pierson and Castenholz 1974 C. aggregans Hanada et al. 1995 C. aurantiacus Pierson and Castenholz 1974 ... The name "Chloroflexi" is a Neolatin plural of "Chloroflexus", which is the name of the first genus described. The noun is a ... has been found exclusively among all members in the Chloroflexus genus, and is thought to play an important functional role. ... Chloroflexus aurantiacus, cyanobacteria, Chlorobium tepidum and proteobacteria): implications regarding the origin of ...

*El Tatio

Chloroflexus is a thermophilic filamentous green bacterium which is found in hot waters at Yellowstone; filamentous structures ... There is a thermal gradation of microorganisms, with the hottest waters supporting Chloroflexus green bacteria and ...

*Metabolism

Strauss G, Fuchs G (1993). "Enzymes of a novel autotrophic CO2 fixation pathway in the phototrophic bacterium Chloroflexus ...

*Malonyl CoA reductase (malonate semialdehyde-forming)

Hugler, M.; Menendez, C.; Schagger, H.; Fuchs, G. (2002). "Malonyl-coenzyme A reductase from Chloroflexus aurantiacus, a key ... "Enzymes of a novel autotrophic CO2 fixation pathway in the phototrophic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus, the 3- ...

*Chloroflexi-1 RNA motif

The Chloroflexi-1 RNA motif is a conserved RNA structure detected by bioinformatics within the species Chloroflexus aggregans. ...

*3-hydroxypropionate dehydrogenase (NADP+)

The enzyme from Chloroflexus aurantiacus is bifunctional, and also catalyses the upstream reaction in the pathway, EC 1.2.1.75 ... Hugler, M.; Menendez, C.; Schagger, H.; Fuchs, G. (2002). "Malonyl-coenzyme A reductase from Chloroflexus aurantiacus, a key ... "Enzymes of a novel autotrophic CO2 fixation pathway in the phototrophic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus, the 3- ...

*Photosynthesis

Chloroflexus aurantiacus, cyanobacteria, Chlorobium tepidum and proteobacteria): implications regarding the origin of ...

*3-Hydroxypropionate bicycle

This pathway has been demonstrated in Chloroflexus, a nonsulfur photosynthetic bacterium, however other studies suggest that 3- ...

*Chlorosome

Chlorobium tepidum Pelodictyon lutoleum Prostecochloris aestuarii Chloroflexaceae Chloroflexus aurantiacus Chloroflexus ...

*Bacterial phyla

Chloroflexus group (Chloroflexus, Herpetosiphon) Thermomicrobium group (Thermomicrobium roseum) Thermotogae (Thermotoga ...

*Waimangu Volcanic Rift Valley

Different species of bacteria, such as Chloroflexus, co-exist with blue-green algae in the beds of hot water streams in the ... while the stream bed is home to blue-green algae and filamentous colonies of the photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus ...

*Branching order of bacterial phyla (Woese, 1987)

Chloroflexus group (Chloroflexus, Herpetosiphon) Thermomicrobium group (Thermomicrobium roseum) Thermotogae (Thermotoga ...

*Bacterial taxonomy

... from Chloroflexus) Chrysiogenetes (from Chrysiogenes) Gemmatimonadetes (from Gemmatimonas) Deferribacteres (from Deferribacter ...
Chloroflexus aurantiacus is a photosynthetic bacterium isolated from hot springs, belonging to the green non-sulfur bacteria. This organism is thermophilic and can grow at temperatures from 35 °C to 70 °C. Chloroflexus aurantiacus can survive in the dark if oxygen is available. When grown in the dark, Chloroflexus aurantiacus has a dark orange color. When grown in sunlight it is dark green. The individual bacteria tend to form filamentous colonies enclosed in sheaths, which are known as trichomes. As a genus, Chloroflexus spp. are filamentous anoxygenic phototrophic (FAP) organisms that utilize type II photosynthetic reaction centers containing bacteriochlorophyll a similar to the purple bacteria, and light-harvesting chlorosomes containing bacteriochlorophyll c similar to green sulfur bacteria of the Chlorobi. Like other members of its phylum (cf. Chloroflexi), the species stains Gram negative, yet has a single lipid layer (monoderm), but with thin peptidoglycan, which is compensated for by ...
Chloroflexus aurantiacus ATCC ® 29366D-5™ Designation: Genomic DNA from Chloroflexus aurantiacus strain J-10-fl TypeStrain=True Application:
Primary photochemistry in the facultatively aerobic green photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus: Photochemical activity was examined in membrane fra
Shop L-malyl-CoA/beta-methylmalyl-CoA lyase ELISA Kit, Recombinant Protein and L-malyl-CoA/beta-methylmalyl-CoA lyase Antibody at MyBioSource. Custom ELISA Kit, Recombinant Protein and Antibody are available.
Photosynthetic organisms have evolved diverse antennas to harvest light of various qualities and intensities. Anoxygenic phototrophs can have bacteriochlorophyll Qy antenna absorption bands ranging from about 700-1100 nm. This broad range of usable wavelengths has allowed many organisms to thrive in unique environments. Roseiflexus castenholzii is a niche-adapted, filamentous anoxygenic phototroph: FAP) that lacks chlorosomes, the dominant antenna found in all green bacteria. Light-harvesting is realized only in the membrane with BChl a and a variety of carotenoids. Through biochemical and spectroscopic methods, a model for the size and organization of the photosynthetic antenna is presented. Despite the wide distribution of antennas, photochemistry occurs in the reaction center: RC), which can be separated into two groups distinguishable by the identity of the terminal electron acceptor. These are the Fe-S type or type-I and the quinone-type or type -II RCs. All known anoxygenic phototrophs have
en] alpha-Amylases are present in all kingdoms of the living world. Despite strong conservation of the tertiary structure, only a few amino acids are conserved in interkingdom comparisons. Animal alpha-amylases are characterized by several typical motifs and biochemical properties. A few cases of such alpha-amylases have been previously reported in some eubacterial species. We screened the bacterial genomes available in the sequence databases for new occurrences of animal-like alpha-amylases. Three novel cases were found, which belong to unrelated bacterial phyla: Chloroflexus aurantiacus, Microbulbifer degradans, and Thermobifida fusca. All the animal-like alpha-amylases in Bacteria probably result from repeated horizontal gene transfer from animals. The M. degradans genome also contains bacterial-type and plant-type alpha-amylases in addition to the animal-type one. Thus, this species exhibits alpha-amylases of animal, plant, and bacterial origins. Moreover, the similarities in the extra ...
DNA mismatch repair (MMR) is a highly conserved biological pathway that plays a key role in maintaining genomic stability. MMR corrects DNA mismatches generated during DNA replication, thereby preventing mutations from becoming permanent in dividing cells. MMR also suppresses homologous recombination and was recently shown to play a role in DNA damage signaling. Defects in MMR are associated with genome-wide instability, predisposition to certain types of cancer including HNPCC, resistance to certain chemotherapeutic agents, and abnormalities in meiosis and sterility in mammalian systems. The Escherichia coli MMR pathway has been extensively studied and is well characterized. In E. coli, the mismatch-activated MutS-MutL-ATP complex licenses MutH to incise the nearest unmethylated GATC sequence. UvrD and an exonuclease generate a gap. This gap is filled by pol III and DNA ligase. The GATC sites are then methylated by Dam. Several human MMR proteins have been identified based on their homology to ...
Lactarius aurantiacus Lactarius mitissimus Lactarius aurantiofulvus oranssirousku brandriska Orange milkcap enyhe tejelőgomba aranys rga tejelőgomba narancssz nű tejelőgomba oranž riisikas Milder Milchling Orangebrauner Milchling oranje melkzwam Orangebrauner Milchling Orange M lkehat mleczaj delikatny branngul riske Švelnusis piengrybis mleczaj pomarańczowy ...
Where, they are often digging through the sediment trying to find goodies to eat, such as this clam. But really whatever they find, they will swallow and devour. Note that Astropecten and its relatives LACK an eversible stomach (that you might see in other starfish). So they literally can ONLY swallow their prey.. This image is fr. A. aurantiacus in the N. Atlantic somewhere ...
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Investors are rewarding Bluebird Bio for wracking up accolades with its experimental gene therapies for serious genetic diseases. The Cambridge, MA-based b
To search for genetic clues to carbon and energy metabolism in Crenarchaeota, the researchers extracted C. symbiosum DNA from its host sponge and constructed a DNA library for sequencing the symbiont s genome. Hallam et al. then searched for representative genes linked to pathways associated with autotrophic carbon assimilation. They found many components of two pathways: the 3-hydroxypropionate cycle and the reductive tricarboxylic acid (citric acid) pathway (TCA). Both cycles involve a multistep series of chemical reactions that convert inorganic compounds in this case, carbon dioxide into organic carbon molecules. Though some components of the 3-hydroxypropionate cycle were missing in C. symbiosum, enough elements (including core proteins) were found to support a modified version of this pathway for carbon assimilation, using carbon dioxide ...
This Forum contains Member Profiles. These members have achieved Hall of Fan Status (5000 posts) and as such have demonstrated their commitment to the CFL and 13thman.com. Hall of Fan Members will of course receive respect and admiration from your peers and have the opportunity to place your profile here ...
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Recommended standards for the description of new species of the anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria are proposed in accordance with Recommendation 30b of the International Code of Nomenclature of Bacteria. These standards include information on the natural habitat, ecology and phenotypic properties including morphology, physiology and pigments and on genetic information and nucleic acid data. The recommended standards were supported by the Subcommittee on the taxonomy of phototrophic bacteria of the International Committee on Systematics of Prokaryotes. They are considered as guidelines for authors to prepare descriptions of new species.
From genomic libraries of purple sulphur bacteria, fragments were cloned that encoded for proteins involved in the synthesis of poly(3-hydroxyalkanoic acids), PHA. A 12.5- and a 15.0- plus a 15.6-kbp
Mould, B., 1994. A world list of rays. The scientific nomenclature and distribution of the recent Batoidea (Batoidea, Elasmobranchii, Chondrichthyes). University of Nottingham, [UK]. 82 p. (Ref. 8630 ...
I am a professor of economics at Santa Clara University. I like to write; hence this blog. Views expressed are mine and mine alone. Thanks for visiting. (Photo above: Mimulus aurantiacus, one of our lovely California native monkeyflowers ...
I am a professor of economics at Santa Clara University. I like to write; hence this blog. Views expressed are mine and mine alone. Thanks for visiting. (Photo above: Mimulus aurantiacus, one of our lovely California native monkeyflowers ...
The aerial surface of plants, the phyllosphere, is colonized by numerous bacteria displaying diverse metabolic properties that enable their survival in this specific habitat. Recently, we reported on the presence of microbial rhodopsin harbouring bacteria on the top of leaf surfaces. Here, we report on the presence of additional bacterial populations capable of harvesting light as a means of supplementing their metabolic requirements. An analysis of six phyllosphere metagenomes revealed the presence of a diverse community of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria, including the previously reported methylobacteria, as well as other known and unknown phototrophs. The presence of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria was also confirmed in situ by infrared epifluorescence microscopy. The microscopic enumeration correlated with estimates based on metagenomic analyses, confirming both the presence and high abundance of these microorganisms in the phyllosphere. Our data suggest that the phyllosphere contains a ...
2-Oxocarboxylic acids, also called 2-oxo acids and alpha-keto acids, are the most elementary set of metabolites that includes pyruvate (2-oxopropanoate), 2-oxobutanoate, oxaloacetate (2-oxosuccinate) and 2-oxoglutarate. This diagram illustrates the architecture of chain extension and modification reaction modules for 2-oxocarboxylic acids. The chain extension module RM001 is a tricarboxylic pathway where acetyl-CoA derived carbon is used to extend the chain length by one. The chain modification modules RM002 (including RM032) and RM033, together with a reductive amination step (RC00006 or RC00036), generate basic and branched-chain amino acids, respectively. The modification module RM030 is used in the biosynthesis of glucosinolates, a class of plant secondary metabolites, for conversion to oxime followed by addition of thio-glucose moiety. Furthermore, the chain extension from 2-oxoadipate to 2-oxosuberate is followed by coenzyme B biosynthesis in methonogenic archaea ...
Green photosynthetic bacteria adjust the structure and functionality of the chlorosome - the light absorbing antenna complex - in response to environmental stress factors. The chlorosome is a natural self-assembled aggregate of bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) molecules. In this study we report the regulation of the biogenesis of the Chlorobaculum tepidum chlorosome by carbon assimilation in conjunction with temperature changes. Our studies indicate that the carbon source and thermal stress culture of Cba. tepidum grows slower and incorporates less BChl c in the chlorosome. Compared with the chlorosome from other cultural conditions we investigated, the chlorosome from the carbon source and thermal stress culture displays: (a) smaller cross-sectional radius and overall size; (b) simplified BChl c homologues with smaller side chains; (c) blue-shifted Qy absorption maxima and (d) a sigmoid-shaped circular dichroism (CD) spectra. Using a theoretical model we analyze how the observed spectral ...
Although ovarian cancer implants can be targeted using an avidin-3 rhodamineX complex, there are several reasons to consider alternative complexes. GmSA-20ROX is substantially less immunogenic compared with avidin, and GmSA has been used as the basis for a technetium-99m-labeled radiopharmaceutical to assess hepatic reserve in humans. Additionally, GmSA-20ROX binds target cells more rapidly and more efficiently than avidin due to its multivalency (7, 16). Because GmSA synthesis involves the conjugation of 23 d-galactosamines reacted with carboxyl groups rather than amino groups on an albumin molecule (7), there are multiple binding sites for the d-galactose receptor and the molecule has a favorably high isoelectric point (7, 16). Moreover, activation via dequenching of the rhodamineX after cellular internalization provides a generalizable platform for targeted fluorescent probes by exchanging the targeting moiety (5). We used the d-galactose receptor as a target in this study because it is ...
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This methylase recognizes the double-stranded sequence GRCGYC, causes specific methylation on C-? on both strands, and protects the DNA from cleavage by the HgiDI endonuclease.
ALL CFL Semi-Auto Closet Project (FirstGrow) (Flower strain seed) **ENDED ABRUPTLY: SEIZED & DESTROYED BY COPS ** Critical Update Date: May 2, 2010 Early this morning, my living plant, only 2 weeks
Ladies, and gentleman, I would like to present the winner of the Grey Cup, this year... Buffalo! Although the idea of a CFL commissioner making such a statement in the future seems far fetched, ...
The mutations identified thus generic cialis india far in human patients with tooth agenesis also affect these pathways. The principle of the test is a qualitative in-vitro-assay that contains test strips coated with parallel lines of 14 highly purified antigens. Mortality benefit of statin use in traumatic spinal cord injury: a retrospective analysis. Advanced imaging techniques as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are increasingly performed in the diagnostic workup of patients. Pathological findings in patients suffering from transitory ischemic attacks by means of using neuroradiological methods (CCT included) are a rare condition.. Cultivation and genomic, nutritional, and lipid biomarker characterization of Roseiflexus strains closely related to predominant in situ populations inhabiting Yellowstone hot spring microbial mats. The resulting relative alkylation indices (RAIs) were calculated in order to correlate these indices with the results of the guinea pig sensitization test data. ...
Natural photosynthetic pigments bacteriochlorophyllsc, d and e in green bacteria undergo self-assembly to create an organized antenna system known as the chlorosome, which collects photons and funnels the resulting excitation energy toward the reaction centers. Mimicry of chlorosome function is a central pro
Quiescence (G0) represents an assortment of reversible, cell cycle-arrested states that are resistant to unfavorable conditions and associated with cancer persistence. G0 involves regulated gene expression with selective mRNA expression and decreased canonical translation. Low mTOR activity in G0 activates the cap complex inhibitor, eIF4EBP, and impairs canonical translation. The alternative translation mechanisms in G0 remain to be uncovered. Our data show that microRNAs, regulatory, non-coding RNAs that target distinct mRNAs to alter gene expression, can associate with alternative complexes and translation factors to regulate specific mRNA translation in G0. One subset of transcripts expressed in G0 includes specific mRNAs recruited by an FXR1a-associated microRNP (microRNA-protein complex) for translation activation in G0 mammalian cells. MicroRNPs predominantly mediate repression and downregulation; however, FXR1a-microRNP lacks conventional microRNP repressors, and instead, contains a ...
Matt planted five yellow iceplants (Lampranthus aurantiacus)around the base of the Agave scabra we planted yesterday. I tidied the Calla lilies (entering summer dormancy unless they get more water!) and watered the steps area and back slope plants thoroughly. Deadheaded the Kniphofias and roses. And sold several plants to Mark who came to us via Craigslist. He came back later for more plants and gave me a few too! One was a Dudleya cutting I think - mmm, I like Dudleyas ...
www.MOLUNA.de Chlorophylls and Bacteriochlorophylls [4093768] - The first dedicated new work since 1991, this book reviews recent progress and current studies in the chemistry, metabolism and spectroscopy of chlorophylls, bacteriochlorophylls and their protein complexes. Also discussed is progress on the applications of chlorophylls as photosensitizers in photodynamic therapy of cancerous tumours, and as molecular probes in
The Purple Phototrophic Bacteria und Buchbewertungen gibt es auf ReadRate.com. Bücher können hier direkt online erworben werden.
Wondering which light bulbs have been banned and whats available in 2014? Heres a guide to CFLs, LEDs and new halogen incandescent bulbs.

Chloroflexus aurantiacus - WikipediaChloroflexus aurantiacus - Wikipedia

The complete electron transport chain for Chloroflexus spp. is not yet known. Particularly, Chloroflexus aurantiacus has not ... Chloroflexus aurantiacus has been of interest in the search for origins of the so-called type II photosynthetic reaction center ... Chloroflexus aurantiacus is a photosynthetic bacterium isolated from hot springs, belonging to the green non-sulfur bacteria. ... Chloroflexus aurantiacus is thought to grow photoheterotrophically in nature, but it has the capability of fixing inorganic ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chloroflexus_aurantiacus

KEGG PATHWAY: Carbon metabolism - Chloroflexus aurantiacusKEGG PATHWAY: Carbon metabolism - Chloroflexus aurantiacus

Carbon metabolism is the most basic aspect of life. This map presents an overall view of central carbon metabolism, where the number of carbons is shown for each compound denoted by a circle, excluding a cofactor (CoA, CoM, THF, or THMPT) that is replaced by an asterisk. The map contains carbon utilization pathways of glycolysis (map00010), pentose phosphate pathway (map00030), and citrate cycle (map00020), and six known carbon fixation pathways (map00710 and map00720) as well as some pathways of methane metabolism (map00680). The six carbon fixation pathways are: (1) reductive pentose phosphate cycle (Calvin cycle) in plants and cyanobacteria that perform oxygenic photosynthesis, (2) reductive citrate cycle in photosynthetic green sulfur bacteria and some chemolithoautotrophs, (3) 3-hydroxypropionate bi-cycle in photosynthetic green nonsulfur bacteria, two variants of 4-hydroxybutyrate pathways in Crenarchaeota called (4) hydroxypropionate-hydroxybutyrate cycle and (5) ...
more infohttp://www.genome.jp/kegg-bin/show_pathway?cau01200+Caur_3888

KEGG PATHWAY: Pentose phosphate pathway - Chloroflexus aurantiacusKEGG PATHWAY: Pentose phosphate pathway - Chloroflexus aurantiacus

Pentose phosphate pathway - Chloroflexus aurantiacus [ Pathway menu , Organism menu , Pathway entry , Download KGML , Show ...
more infohttp://www.genome.jp/kegg-bin/show_pathway?cau00030+Caur_0258

Chloroflexus aurantiacus Pierson and Castenholz ATCC ® 29366D-5&trChloroflexus aurantiacus Pierson and Castenholz ATCC ® 29366D-5&tr

Genomic DNA from Chloroflexus aurantiacus strain J-10-fl TypeStrain=True Application: ... Chloroflexus aurantiacus Pierson and Castenholz (ATCC® 29366D-5™) Strain Designations: Genomic DNA from Chloroflexus ... Chloroflexus aurantiacus Pierson and Castenholz ATCC® 29366D-5™ freeze-dried Total DNA: At least 5 µg in 1X TE buffer. OD260/OD ... Genomic DNA from Chloroflexus aurantiacus strain J-10-fl [ATCC® 29366™] Biosafety Level 1 Biosafety classification is based on ...
more infohttps://www.atcc.org/en/Global/Products/5/B/7/C/29366D-5.aspx

Chloroflexus aggregans - WikipediaChloroflexus aggregans - Wikipedia

Chloroflexus aggregans is a thermophilic, filamentous, phototrophic bacterium that forms dense cell aggregates. Its type strain ... Weltzer, M. L.; Miller, S. R. (2012). "Ecological Divergence of a Novel Group of Chloroflexus Strains along a Geothermal ... LPSN Type strain of Chloroflexus aggregans at BacDive - the Bacterial Diversity Metadatabase. ... "Diversity and Distribution in Hypersaline Microbial Mats of Bacteria Related to Chloroflexus spp". Applied and Environmental ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chloroflexus_aggregans

protein complex B806-866, Chloroflexus aurantiacus - Semantic Scholarprotein complex B806-866, Chloroflexus aurantiacus - Semantic Scholar

protein complex B806-866, Chloroflexus aurantiacus. Known as: B806-866 antenna complex, Chloroflexus aurantiacus ... Chloroflexus aurantiacus is a thermophilic, filamentous green gliding photosynthetic bacterium from the family of the… (More) ... Optoelectronic energy transfer at novel biohybrid interfaces using light harvesting complexes from Chloroflexus aurantiacus. ... Structure and Protein Binding Interactions of the Primary Donor of Chloroflexus aurantiacus ...
more infohttps://www.semanticscholar.org/topic/protein-complex-B806-866%2C-Chloroflexus-aurantiacus/10941269

Comparison of Chloroflexus aurantiacus strain J-10-fl proteomes of cells grown chemoheterotrophically and...Comparison of Chloroflexus aurantiacus strain J-10-fl proteomes of cells grown chemoheterotrophically and...

Chloroflexus aurantiacus J-10-fl is a thermophilic green bacterium, a filamentous anoxygenic phototroph, and the model organism ... Comparison of Chloroflexus aurantiacus strain J-10-fl proteomes of cells grown chemoheterotrophically and ...
more infohttps://www.uniprot.org/citations/22249883

dcd - dCTP deaminase - Chloroflexus aurantiacus (strain ATCC 29364 / DSM 637 / Y-400-fl) - dcd gene & proteindcd - dCTP deaminase - Chloroflexus aurantiacus (strain ATCC 29364 / DSM 637 / Y-400-fl) - dcd gene & protein

Chloroflexus aggregans (strain MD-66 / DSM 9485). Chloroflexus islandicus. Chloroflexus sp. Y-396-1. Chloroflexus sp. MS-G. 186 ... Chloroflexus sp. Y-396-1. Chloroflexus aggregans (strain MD-66 / DSM 9485). Chloroflexus islandicus. Chloroflexus sp. MS-G. ... Chloroflexus aurantiacus (strain ATCC 29366 / DSM 635 / J-10-fl). 186. UniRef100_A9WHV4. Cluster: dCTP deaminase. 2. ... sp,B9LAF7,DCD_CHLSY dCTP deaminase OS=Chloroflexus aurantiacus (strain ATCC 29364 / DSM 637 / Y-400-fl) OX=480224 GN=dcd PE=3 ...
more infohttp://www.uniprot.org/uniprot/B9LAF7

A thermostable flavin-based fluorescent protein from Chloroflexus aggregans: a framework for ultra-high resolution structural...A thermostable flavin-based fluorescent protein from Chloroflexus aggregans: a framework for ultra-high resolution structural...

The crystal structure of the wild-type Chloroflexus aggregans LOV domain determined at 1.22 Å resolution confirmed the presence ... A thermostable flavin-based fluorescent protein from Chloroflexus aggregans: a framework for ultra-high resolution structural ... A thermostable flavin-based fluorescent protein from Chloroflexus aggregans: a framework for ultra-high resolution structural ... protein CagFbFP derived from a soluble LOV domain-containing histidine kinase from the thermophilic bacterium Chloroflexus ...
more infohttps://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlelanding/2019/PP/C9PP00067D

The unusual blocked N-terminal sequence of auracyanin, a copper protein from Chloroflexus aurantiacus. Structure and Function...The unusual blocked N-terminal sequence of auracyanin, a copper protein from Chloroflexus aurantiacus. 'Structure and Function...

Van Beeumen, J., & HU, W. (n.d.). The unusual blocked N-terminal sequence of auracyanin, a copper protein from Chloroflexus ... Van Beeumen J, HU W. The unusual blocked N-terminal sequence of auracyanin, a copper protein from Chloroflexus aurantiacus. " ... The unusual blocked N-terminal sequence of auracyanin, a copper protein from Chloroflexus aurantiacus. Structure and Function ... "The Unusual Blocked N-terminal Sequence of Auracyanin, a Copper Protein from Chloroflexus Aurantiacus. Structure and Function ...
more infohttps://biblio.ugent.be/publication/222134

Recombinant Chloroflexus aggregans Methionine--tRNA ligase(metG) ,partial - CusabioRecombinant Chloroflexus aggregans Methionine--tRNA ligase(metG) ,partial - Cusabio

Purchase Recombinant Chloroflexus aggregans Methionine--tRNA ligase(metG) ,partial. It is produced in Yeast. High purity. Good ... Recombinant Chloroflexus aggregans Methionine--tRNA ligase(metG) ,partial. Recombinant Chloroflexus aggregans Methionine--tRNA ...
more infohttps://www.cusabio.com/Recombinant-Protein/Recombinant-Chloroflexus-aggregans-Methionine-tRNA-ligasemetG-partial-564409.html

Draft genome sequence of a sulfide-oxidizing, autotrophic filamentous anoxygenic phototrophic bacterium, Chloroflexus sp....Draft genome sequence of a sulfide-oxidizing, autotrophic filamentous anoxygenic phototrophic bacterium, Chloroflexus sp....

The draft genome sequence of the thermophilic filamentous anoxygenic phototrophic bacterium Chloroflexus sp. strain MS-G ( ... Draft genome sequence of a sulfide-oxidizing, autotrophic filamentous anoxygenic phototrophic bacterium, Chloroflexus sp. ... Chloroflexus sp. strain MS-G (Chloroflexi). Genome Announcements, 2(5), e00872-14-. doi:10.1128/genomeA.00872-14. ...
more infohttps://dr.ntu.edu.sg/handle/10220/50035

Organism Detail - Yellowstone Research Coordination NetworkOrganism Detail - Yellowstone Research Coordination Network

... in Chloroflexus, phototrophic growth is best with organic compounds as carbon sources (photoheterotrophy). Chloroflexus also ... Chloroflexus sp. 396-1. NCBI Taxonomy ID: 152259. NCBI Taxonomy Rank: Species. Chloroflexis and most other green non-sulfur ... Physiologically, Chloroflexus resembles purple nonsulfur bacteria in that photoautotrophy can be supported by (H2S + CO2) or (H ... However, the bacteriochlorophyll a located in the cytoplasmic membrane of cells of Chloroflexus is arranged to form a ...
more infohttp://www.rcn.montana.edu/Organisms/Detail.aspx?id=243

Organism Detail - Yellowstone Research Coordination NetworkOrganism Detail - Yellowstone Research Coordination Network

... in Chloroflexus, phototrophic growth is best with organic compounds as carbon sources (photoheterotrophy). Chloroflexus also ... uncultured Chloroflexus sp.. NCBI Taxonomy ID: 214040. NCBI Taxonomy Rank: Species. Chloroflexis and most other green non- ... Physiologically, Chloroflexus resembles purple nonsulfur bacteria in that photoautotrophy can be supported by (H2S + CO2) or (H ... However, the bacteriochlorophyll a located in the cytoplasmic membrane of cells of Chloroflexus is arranged to form a ...
more infohttp://www.rcn.montana.edu/Organisms/Detail.aspx?id=245

MB 451 : ChloroflexiMB 451 : Chloroflexi

Chloroflexus aurantiacus. Chloroflexus aurantiacus : photomicrograph from the Joint Genome Institute of the United States ... Chloroflexus mat, Yellwostone National Park ; James W. Brown . Although C. aurantiacus is capable of carbon fixation, in most ... Chloroflexus contains chlorosomes and bacteriochlorophyl c, whereas other Chloroflexi do not. These are traits otherwise found ... Roseiflexus very closely resembles Chloroflexus except that it lacks chlorosomes and the associated accessory ...
more infohttp://jwbrown.mbio.ncsu.edu/MB451/lectureModules/Bacteria/greenPhototrophs/chloroflexi/chloroflexi.html

Bacterial Nucleic Acids Page 8Bacterial Nucleic Acids Page 8

Chloroflexus aurantiacus Pierson and Castenholz (ATCC® 29366D-5™) ATCC® Number: 29366D-5™ Strain Designations: Genomic DNA from ...
more infohttps://www.atcc.org/Products/Cells_and_Microorganisms/Bacteria/Bacterial_Nucleic_Acids.aspx?dsNav=Ro:90,Ns:Organism_Accepted_Name%7C101%7C1%7C

Frontiers | Comparative genomics and functional analysis of rhamnose catabolic pathways and regulons in bacteria | MicrobiologyFrontiers | Comparative genomics and functional analysis of rhamnose catabolic pathways and regulons in bacteria | Microbiology

... in vitro biochemical assays we validated both enzymatic activities of the purified recombinant RhaEW proteins from Chloroflexus ... in vitro biochemical assays we validated both enzymatic activities of the purified recombinant RhaEW proteins from Chloroflexus ... In the Bacillales and Rhizobiales groups, as well as in the Ewrinia and Chloroflexus spp., homologous ABC transporters and ... Although Chloroflexus spp. can grow heterotrophically on various organic carbon sources, their sugar utilization pathways have ...
more infohttps://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmicb.2013.00407/full

ChloroflexiChloroflexi

Garrity, G. M., J. A. Bell, and T. G. Lilburn. 2004. Taxonomic Outline of the Prokaryotes. Bergeys Manual of Systematic Bacteriology, Second Edition. Release 5.0.. Gich, F., J. Garcia-Gil, and J. Overmann. 2001. Previously unknown and phylogenetically diverse members of the green nonsulfur bacteria are indigenous to freshwater lakes. Archives of Microbiology 177(1):1-10.. Hugenholtz, P. and E. Stackebrandt. 2004. Reclassification of Sphaerobacter thermophilus from the subclass Sphaerobacteridae in the phylum Actinobacteria to the class Thermomicrobia (emended description) in the phylum Chloroflexi (emended description). International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology 54(6):2049-2051.. ...
more infohttp://www.tolweb.org/Chloroflexi

The Family Chloroflexaceae | SpringerLinkThe Family Chloroflexaceae | SpringerLink

... and Chloroflexus aurantiacuswas the first genus and species described (Pierson and Castenholz, 1974a).... ... Genus Chloroflexus, p. 1698-1702. In: Staley, J. T., Bryant, M. P., Pfennig, N., and Holt, J. G. (ed.), Bergeys manual of ... Cytochromes in Chloroflexus aurantiacus grown with and without oxygen. Arch. Microbiol. 143: 260-265.Google Scholar ... The primary structure of the Chloroflexus aurantiacus reaction-center polypeptides. Eur. J. Biochem. 180: 75-84.PubMedGoogle ...
more infohttps://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-1-4757-2191-1_44

Bacterias verdes del azufre y no del azufre by anayeli vega on PreziBacterias verdes del azufre y no del azufre by anayeli vega on Prezi

Chloroflexus aurantiacus. Madigan M. et. al., BROCK, BIOLOGÍA DE LOS MICROORGANISMOS, Prentice Hall, octava edición, Madrid ... La única bacteria verde inmóvil, es Chloroflexus, crece en aguas termales en asociación con Cianobacterias termófilas, es ...
more infohttps://prezi.com/xdzplbysl7tt/bacterias-verdes-del-azufre-y-no-del-azufre/

Bacterial phyla - WikipediaBacterial phyla - Wikipedia

Chloroflexus group (Chloroflexus, Herpetosiphon). *Thermomicrobium group (Thermomicrobium roseum). *Thermotogae (Thermotoga ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bacterial_phyla

Frontiers | Diurnal Changes in Active Carbon and Nitrogen Pathways Along the Temperature Gradient in Porcelana Hot Spring...Frontiers | Diurnal Changes in Active Carbon and Nitrogen Pathways Along the Temperature Gradient in Porcelana Hot Spring...

Another relevant guild was the FAPs, represented mostly by Roseiflexus and Chloroflexus. Particularly, Chloroflexus can use ... and Chloroflexus sp. (van der Meer et al., 2010; Klatt et al., 2011; Liu et al., 2011; Kim et al., 2015). Several diversity ... 2013b) showed that Chloroflexus and Roseiflexus expressed pufM and bchC genes preferentially in the dark in YNP, which is in ... Transcripts associated with the 3-HP bi-cycle were all assigned to Chloroflexus sp. and Roseiflexus sp. (Figure 4B). The total ...
more infohttps://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmicb.2018.02353/full

Chloroflexi (phylum) - WikipediaChloroflexi (phylum) - Wikipedia

Genus Chloroflexus Pierson & Castenholz 1974 *Species C. aggregans Hanada et al. 1995[32] ... The name Chloroflexi is a Neolatin nominative case masculine plural of Chloroflexus, which is the name of the first genus ... Hanada, S.; Hiraishi, A.; Shimada, K.; Matsuura, K. (1995). "Chloroflexus aggregans sp. nov., a Filamentous Phototrophic ... Pierson, B. K.; Castenholz, R. W. (1974). "A phototrophic gliding filamentous bacterium of hot springs, Chloroflexus ...
more infohttps://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chloroflexi_
  • Chloroflexus aurantiacus has been of interest in the search for origins of the so-called type II photosynthetic reaction center. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1987, Carl Woese , regarded as the forerunner of the molecular phylogeny revolution, divided Eubacteria into 11 divisions based on 16S ribosomal RNA (SSU) sequences and grouped the genera Chloroflexus , Herpetosiphon and Thermomicrobium into the "green non-sulfur bacteria and relatives", which was temporarily renamed as "Chloroflexi" in Volume One of Bergey's Manual of Systematic Bacteriology. (wikipedia.org)
  • Interstingly, and this should be considered in light of the evolutionary position of Chloroflexus as the most phylogenetically ancient of anoxygenic phototrophs, autotrophy in Chloroflexus is based on a CO 2 incorporation pathway, the hydroxypropionate cycle, unique to this organism. (montana.edu)
  • As a genus, Chloroflexus spp. (wikipedia.org)
  • The taxon name was created in the 2001 edition of Volume 1 of Bergey's Manual of Systematic Bacteriology and is the Latin plural of the name Chloroflexus , the name of the type genus of the phylum, a common practice . (wikipedia.org)
  • While oxygenic phototrophs use water as an electron donor for phototrophy, Chloroflexus uses reduced sulfur compounds such as hydrogen sulfide, thiosulfate, or elemental sulfur. (wikipedia.org)
  • This belies their antiquated name green non-sulfur bacteria, however Chloroflexus spp. (wikipedia.org)
  • These are traits otherwise found only in the green sulfur Bacteria (Chlorobi), and it is likely that the genes encoding these were acquired by Chloroflexus by horizontal transfer. (ncsu.edu)
  • La única bacteria verde inmóvil, es Chloroflexus, crece en aguas termales en asociación con Cianobacterias termófilas, es fotoheterotrófico y aerobio facultativo. (prezi.com)
  • The complete electron transport chain for Chloroflexus spp. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chloroflexus also grows well in the dark as a chemoorganotroph by aerobic respiration. (montana.edu)