A colorless to white crystalline compound with a camphoraceous odor and taste. It is a widely used preservative in various pharmaceutical solutions, especially injectables. Also, it is an active ingredient in certain oral sedatives and topical anesthetics.
Substances added to pharmaceutical preparations to protect them from chemical change or microbial action. They include ANTI-BACTERIAL AGENTS and antioxidants.
A hypnotic and sedative used in the treatment of INSOMNIA.
Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)
A broad category of multi-ingredient preparations that are marketed for the relief of upper respiratory symptoms resulting from the COMMON COLD; ALLERGIES; or HUMAN INFLUENZA. While the majority of these medications are available as OVER-THE-COUNTER DRUGS some of them contain ingredients that require them to be sold as PRESCRIPTION DRUGS or as BEHIND-THE COUNTER DRUGS.

Mutations in Drosophila heat shock cognate 4 are enhancers of Polycomb. (1/22)

The homeotic genes controlling segment identity in Drosophila are repressed by the Polycomb group of genes (PcG) and are activated by genes of the trithorax group (trxG). An F(1) screen for dominant enhancers of Polycomb yielded a point mutation in the heat shock cognate gene, hsc4, along with mutations corresponding to several known PcG loci. The new mutation is a more potent enhancer of Polycomb phenotypes than an apparent null allele of hsc4 is, although even the null allele occasionally displays homeotic phenotypes associated with the PcG. Previous biochemical results had suggested that HSC4 might interact with BRAHMA, a trxG member. Further analyses now show that there is no physical or genetic interaction between HSC4 and the Brahma complex. HSC4 might be needed for the proper folding of a component of the Polycomb repression complex, or it may be a functional member of that complex.  (+info)

Rapid stimulation of free glucuronate formation by non-glucuronidable xenobiotics in isolated rat hepatocytes. (2/22)

Vitamin C synthesis in rat liver is enhanced by several xenobiotics, including aminopyrine and chloretone. The effect of these agents has been linked to induction of enzymes potentially involved in the formation of glucuronate, a precursor of vitamin C. Using isolated rat hepatocytes as a model, we show that a series of agents (aminopyrine, antipyrine, chloretone, clotrimazole, metyrapone, proadifen, and barbital) induced in a few minutes an up to 15-fold increase in the formation of glucuronate, which was best observed in the presence of sorbinil, an inhibitor of glucuronate reductase. They also caused an approximately 2-fold decrease in the concentration of UDP-glucuronate but little if any change in the concentration of UDP-glucose. Depletion of UDP-glucuronate with resorcinol or d-galactosamine markedly decreased the formation of glucuronate both in the presence and in the absence of aminopyrine, confirming the precursor-product relationship between UDP-glucuronate and free glucuronate. Most of the agents did not induce the formation of detectable amounts of glucuronides, indicating that the formation of glucuronate is not due to a glucuronidation-deglucuronidation cycle. With the exception of barbital (which inhibits glucuronate reductase), all of the above mentioned agents also caused an increase in the concentration of ascorbic acid. They had little effect on glutathione concentration, and their effect on glucuronate and vitamin C formation was not mimicked by glutathione-depleting agents such as diamide and buthionine sulfoximine. It is concluded that the stimulation of vitamin C synthesis exerted by some xenobiotics is mediated through a rapid increase in the conversion of UDP-glucuronate to glucuronate, which does not apparently involve a glucuronidation-deglucuronidation cycle.  (+info)

Epithelial activity of hexokinase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in cultured bovine lenses recovering from pharmaceutical-induced optical damage. (3/22)

PURPOSE: In a previous toxicological study, cultured bovine lenses exposed to three topical anesthetics displayed distinct patterns of optical damage and recovery. This work investigated the epithelial activity of the metabolic enzymes hexokinase (HK) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) in lenses recovering from anesthetic-induced damage. METHODS: Cultured bovine lenses were exposed to the anesthetics Alcaine, Fluress and Fluoracaine for 2 h. An automated laser scanner was used to determine the focal length variability (FLV) of the lenses at time-points up to 24 h following their return to fresh culture medium. The epithelial enzyme activities for HK and G6PD were then assayed at the 24 h time-point. RESULTS: Lenses exposed to Alcaine displayed an abrupt increase in FLV, while Fluoracaine treated lenses exhibited optical damage at a slower rate. The FLV in these two groups recovered to near-control levels after 24 h. Fluress treated lenses did not differ in FLV from controls at any time. The activities of both HK and G6PD were significantly reduced in epithelial samples from each of the three anesthetic treatment groups, relative to controls. CONCLUSIONS: These results show that lens optical quality can recover despite a severe reduction in epithelial HK and G6PD activity, indicating that the optical function of the lens may not be directly related to epithelial metabolic activity. The ScanTox In Vitro Assay System provides an objective measure of lens optical quality, enabling a direct comparison of optical damage and recovery to lens biochemical changes.  (+info)

Neurotoxicity of intra-arterial papaverine preserved with chlorobutanol used for the treatment of cerebral vasospasm after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. (4/22)

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Papaverine is used to vasodilate cerebral arteries undergoing vasospasm from subarachnoid hemorrhage. However, papaverine inhibits cellular respiration in vitro and could cause neurotoxicity in humans. METHODS: We studied 5 consecutive patients with cerebral vasospasm who were treated with intra-arterial papaverine preserved with chlorobutanol and imaged with MRI fluid-attenuated inversion recovery and diffusion-weighted imaging after treatment. One patient had histological analysis of the brain at autopsy. RESULTS: All 5 patients exhibited marked neurological decline immediately after treatment, and this was sustained through hospital discharge. In all cases, MRI images showed selective gray matter-only signal changes within the vascular territory treated with papaverine. Histological analysis of 1 case brought to autopsy showed selective injury to islands of neurons with relative sparing of white matter. CONCLUSIONS: Intra-arterial delivery of papaverine preserved with chlorobutanol into vasospastic anterior cerebral arteries may result in marked neurological deterioration with selective gray matter changes on MRI imaging. This effect is consistent with a permanent toxic effect to human brain. It is unclear whether this toxicity is caused by papaverine or chlorobutanol, and its use in the treatment of cerebral vasospasm should be reserved for cases without alternatives.  (+info)

Comparative toxicity of preservatives on immortalized corneal and conjunctival epithelial cells. (5/22)

 (+info)

GC determination of acetone, acetaldehyde, ethanol, and methanol in biological matrices and cell culture. (6/22)

A gas chromatography with flame ionization detection method (GC-FID) with direct injection, using a capillary column, was validated to determine ethanol, acetaldehyde, methanol, and acetone in different human matrices, such as whole blood, vitreous humour, and urine, with clinical and forensic interest. This method was also employed to quantify these compounds in cell culture medium, thus being useful in basic research. A good peak resolution was achieved, with linear correlation between concentration and peak areas for all the compounds in all the matrices. The inter- and intra-day precisions of the method were always under 15% and 10%, respectively. The accuracy of the method, calculated as the percentage of the target concentration, was within the acceptable limits. The obtained limits of detection were below 0.85 mg/L for acetaldehyde and below 0.75 mg/L for the other considered compounds. The small injection volume and the high split ratios applied, allied to the high performance of the GC column, resulted in very good peak resolution and high sensitivities. This method is easy to perform, making it suitable for the routine of clinical biochemistry and forensic laboratories.  (+info)

Interactions at human ether-a-go-go-related gene channels. (7/22)

 (+info)

A non-bronchoconstrictor, bacteriostatic preservative for nebuliser solutions. (8/22)

We have studied the bacteriostatic and airways effects of the preservatives chlorocresol and chlorbutol, to assess if they may be safely used in nebuliser solutions. The bacteriostatic study was carried out according to standard techniques, and the preservatives were able to inhibit the growth of a range of bacteria and yeasts for a period of 28 days. The airways effects were studied in eight asthmatic subjects, who were challenged with either the preservatives or saline (as placebo). Pulmonary function was followed as FEV1 for 60 min after inhalation, and there was no change in FEV1 following inhalation. We conclude that these preservatives may be used safely in nebuliser solutions.  (+info)

Chlorobutanol is a chemical compound that is used primarily as a preservative in pharmaceutical and cosmetic products. It is an organic compound that belongs to the class of compounds known as halogenated hydrocarbons, which contain one or more halogens (such as chlorine, fluorine, bromine, or iodine) and hydrogen atoms bonded to a carbon skeleton.

In medical terms, Chlorobutanol is used as an antimicrobial agent, which means it helps to prevent the growth of bacteria, fungi, and other microorganisms in products such as eye drops, nasal sprays, and injectable medications. It works by denaturing proteins in microorganisms, which makes it difficult for them to survive and multiply.

It is important to note that Chlorobutanol can be harmful if ingested or absorbed through the skin in large quantities, so it should be used with caution and only under the direction of a healthcare professional.

Pharmaceutical preservatives are substances that are added to medications, pharmaceutical products, or biological specimens to prevent degradation, contamination, or spoilage caused by microbial growth, chemical reactions, or environmental factors. These preservatives help extend the shelf life and ensure the stability, safety, and efficacy of the pharmaceutical formulation during storage and use.

Commonly used pharmaceutical preservatives include:

1. Antimicrobials: These are further classified into antifungals (e.g., benzalkonium chloride, chlorhexidine, thimerosal), antibacterials (e.g., parabens, phenol, benzyl alcohol), and antivirals (e.g., phenolic compounds). They work by inhibiting the growth of microorganisms like bacteria, fungi, and viruses.
2. Antioxidants: These substances prevent or slow down oxidation reactions that can degrade pharmaceutical products. Examples include ascorbic acid (vitamin C), tocopherols (vitamin E), sulfites, and butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT).
3. Chelating agents: These bind to metal ions that can catalyze degradation reactions in pharmaceutical products. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) is an example of a chelating agent used in pharmaceuticals.

The choice of preservative depends on the type of formulation, route of administration, and desired shelf life. The concentration of the preservative should be optimized to maintain product stability while minimizing potential toxicity or adverse effects. It is essential to conduct thorough safety and compatibility studies before incorporating any preservative into a pharmaceutical formulation.

Chloral hydrate is a sedative and hypnotic medication, which means it can help to promote sleep and reduce anxiety. It is a type of compound called a chloral derivative and works by increasing the activity of a neurotransmitter in the brain called gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), which has a calming effect on the nervous system.

Chloral hydrate is available in various forms, including tablets, capsules, and liquid solutions. It is typically used for short-term treatment of insomnia or anxiety, but it may also be used for other purposes as determined by a healthcare provider.

Like all medications, chloral hydrate can have side effects, which can include dizziness, headache, stomach upset, and changes in behavior or mood. It is important to use this medication only as directed by a healthcare provider and to report any unusual symptoms or concerns promptly.

An encyclopedia is a comprehensive reference work containing articles on various topics, usually arranged in alphabetical order. In the context of medicine, a medical encyclopedia is a collection of articles that provide information about a wide range of medical topics, including diseases and conditions, treatments, tests, procedures, and anatomy and physiology. Medical encyclopedias may be published in print or electronic formats and are often used as a starting point for researching medical topics. They can provide reliable and accurate information on medical subjects, making them useful resources for healthcare professionals, students, and patients alike. Some well-known examples of medical encyclopedias include the Merck Manual and the Stedman's Medical Dictionary.

Multi-ingredient cold, flu, and allergy medications are over-the-counter (OTC) or prescription formulations that contain multiple active ingredients to treat symptoms associated with the common cold, influenza (flu), and allergies. These medications may include a combination of decongestants, antihistamines, analgesics (pain relievers), cough suppressants, expectorants, and/or anti-inflammatory agents.

Examples of multi-ingredient cold, flu, and allergy medications:

1. Combination decongestant-analgesic-antihistamine: These products typically contain a decongestant (e.g., pseudoephedrine or phenylephrine) to relieve nasal congestion, an analgesic (e.g., acetaminophen or ibuprofen) for fever and pain relief, and an antihistamine (e.g., diphenhydramine or loratadine) to help with allergy symptoms like itching and sneezing.
2. Combination decongestant-cough suppressant: These medications typically contain a decongestant to relieve nasal congestion and a cough suppressant (e.g., dextromethorphan) to control a persistent cough.
3. Combination antihistamine-decongestant-analgesic-cough suppressant: These products contain multiple active ingredients to treat various symptoms, including nasal congestion, itching, sneezing, pain, fever, and cough.
4. Prescription cold, flu, and allergy medications: Some prescription formulations may also contain a combination of active ingredients to manage more severe or persistent symptoms associated with colds, flu, and allergies. These products might include corticosteroids for inflammation, antivirals for influenza, or leukotriene receptor antagonists for allergy symptoms.

It is essential to follow the recommended dosage guidelines and consult a healthcare professional before using multi-ingredient cold, flu, and allergy medications, especially in children, pregnant women, older adults, and individuals with underlying health conditions or those taking other medications.

... was first synthesized in 1881 by the German chemist Conrad Willgerodt (1841-1930). Chlorobutanol is formed by the ... Chlorobutanol has been used in anesthesia and euthanasia of invertebrates and fishes. It is a white, volatile solid with a ... Chlorobutanol (trichloro-2-methyl-2-propanol) is an organic compound with the formula CCl3C(OH)(CH3)2. The compound is an ... Chlorobutanol is toxic to the liver, a skin irritant and a severe eye irritant. Noecker, Robert (2001). "Effects of common ...
Alongside the Willgerodt reaction, he had also discovered Iodosobenzene and chlorobutanol. As for his career, Conrad Willgerodt ...
Chloral cyanohydrin Chlorobutanol Chloroform Disulfiram-like drug Trichloroethanol Notes Vardanyan, R.S.; Hruby, V.J. (2006). " ...
Injectable products have a pH from 3.5-5. Benzyl alcohol or chlorobutanol is added as a preservative agent in the commercially ...
Brødbaek HB, Damkier P (May 2007). "[The treatment of hyperemesis gravidarum with chlorobutanol-caffeine rectal suppositories ... and of chlorobutanol and caffeine (for the treatment of hyperemesis). However, rectal absorption is less efficient than oral: ...
In the past merthiolate and chlorobutanol were also used as an alternative to azide for preservation of biochemical solutions. ...
Preservatives include benzalkonium chloride (BAK), ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), purite, chlorobutanol, sodium ...
... and of chlorobutanol. Historically, it has been used as a sedative hypnotic. The hypnotic drug triclofos (2,2,2-trichloroethyl ...
Nasal medications containing diluted hydrochloric acid, chlorobutanol, and benzyl alcohol have been reported to be effective in ...
Medicine portal Aroma compound Carvone Chlorobutanol Ethyl benzoate Ethyl salicylate Menthoxypropanediol Methyl salicylate ...
... chlorobutanol (INN) chlorocresol (INN) Chlorofair Chlorofon-A Tablet Chloromag Chloromycetin Chloromyxin chloroprednisone (INN ...
Dimenhydrinate Diphenhydramine Doxylamine Hydroxyzine Promethazine General anaesthetics Chloral hydrate Chlorobutanol ...
... combinations A04AD54 Chlorobutanol, combinations QA04AD90 Maropitant "ATC (Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Classification ... combinations A04AD01 Scopolamine A04AD02 Cerium oxalate A04AD04 Chlorobutanol A04AD05 Metopimazine A04AD10 Dronabinol A04AD11 ...
... chlorobutanol MeSH D02.033.415.110.855 - tert-butyl alcohol MeSH D02.033.415.220 - dodecanol MeSH D02.033.415.220.720 - sodium ... chlorobutanol MeSH D02.033.260.335 - ethchlorvynol MeSH D02.033.260.350 - ethylene chlorohydrin MeSH D02.033.375.270 - ...
... chlorobutanol MeSH D10.289.110.855 - tert-butyl alcohol MeSH D10.289.220.720 - sodium dodecyl sulfate MeSH D10.289.230.250 - ...
Chlorobutanol was first synthesized in 1881 by the German chemist Conrad Willgerodt (1841-1930). Chlorobutanol is formed by the ... Chlorobutanol has been used in anesthesia and euthanasia of invertebrates and fishes. It is a white, volatile solid with a ... Chlorobutanol (trichloro-2-methyl-2-propanol) is an organic compound with the formula CCl3C(OH)(CH3)2. The compound is an ... Chlorobutanol is toxic to the liver, a skin irritant and a severe eye irritant. Noecker, Robert (2001). "Effects of common ...
Chlorobutanol. » Chlorohexidine Digluconate. » Chloromethylisothiazolinone. » Chlorophylle. » Chloroxylenol. » Chromium ...
Ointment Ingredients: Atropine Sulfate 1%, Lanolin, White Petrolatum, Mineral Oil, Purified Water, Chlorobutanol 0.5% ...
Other additives, such as phenylmercuric nitrate, phenylmercuric acetate, chlorobutanol, and phenol have been studied ...
... mL of sterile colorless-to-pale yellow solution provides 200 mg testosterone enanthate in sesame oil with 5 mg chlorobutanol ( ...
CHLOROBUTANOL 51080 CHLOROFORM 51085 CHLOROPHYLL 51090 CHLOROPROCAINE 51095 CHLOROQUINE 51100 CHLOROTHIAZIDE 51105 CHLOROTHYMOL ...
Chlorobutanol has mild local anesthetic, anti-inflammatory and antiseptic action. Camphor has irritant and somewhat antiseptic ... Ingredients: 1 container (vial) of 30 or 45g contains: active substances: chlorobutanol 0, 3G, or 0 45g, camphor of 0, or 3G, ...
... chlorobutanol, hydroxybenzoate, and/or phenylethyl alcohol. Exemplary acidic preservatives include, but are not limited to, ... chlorobutanol, chlorocresol, chloroxylenol, cresol, ethyl alcohol, glycerin, hexetidine, imidurea, phenol, phenoxyethanol, ...
On the other hand, chlorobutanol has antibacterial and antifungal properties acting as a preservative, however, it induces good ... Ketamine can produce an erratic awakening characterized by vocalization, ataxia and seizures; Chlorobutanol decreases these ...
Chlorobutanol. Anaesthetic sometimes used in aquaculture. Used at 1000 mg/l as a bath / dip. ...
... colorless to pale yellow solution provides 200 mg testosterone enanthate in sesame oil with 5 mg chlorobutanol (chloral ...
... chlorobutanol, and 2-phenoxyethanolâ ¯+â ¯benzyl alcohol combination. Interestingly, for single-AP containing multi-dose ...
... mL of sterile colorless-to-pale yellow solution provides 200 mg testosterone enanthate in sesame oil with 5 mg chlorobutanol ( ...
Aviso legal Sobre C3BIO y objetivos [email protected] Esdos Labs S.L. ...
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.. ...
Cyclobenzaprine is also known as Synonym. SynZeal provides high-quality Cyclobenzaprine Reference Standard, pharmacopeial and non-pharmacopeial impurities, degradants, and stable isotope products.
Chlorobutanol hemihydrate Chloroform liniment complex Chlorophylline-OZ Chlorophyllipt Chlorophyllipt solution in ethanol 0,25% ...
Chlorobutanol CAS 57-15-8 , Diphenylmethane CAS 101-81-5 , 5-Chlorovaleryl chloride CAS 1575-61-7 , L(+)-Tartaric acid CAS 87- ...
Chlorobutanol Chlorophene Chlorophyllin Chlorophyllin Copper Complex Chlorophyllin Magnesium Complex Chlorothymol Chloroxylenol ...
Unlike BAK, chlorobutanol does not act like a surfactant.[17] The method of action of chlorobutanol is cell lysis by way of ... Chlorobutanol. Chlorobutanol is a detergent preservative that was formerly used as an active ingredient in hypnotic and ... Although the antimicrobial activity of chlorobutanol is extensive,[18] its use has been limited due to the fact that it becomes ... Chlorobutanol does not, however, affect the stability of the lipid component of the tear film.[17] ...
CHLOROBUTANOL (UNII: HM4YQM8WRC) 5 mg in 1 mL. SODIUM CHLORIDE (UNII: 451W47IQ8X) 9 mg in 1 mL. ...
In Vivo Evaluation of the Oral Toxicity of the Chlorobutanol. Jeong D, Shin H, Lee J, Yang J, Jung K, Jeong J, Won H, Oh J. ...
... the 1 mL single dose vial does not contain chlorobutanol; contraindicated only in patients with a known allergy or ... is contraindicated in patients with known allergy or hypersensitivity to 8-L-arginine vasopressin or chlorobutanol; ...
Chlorobutanol,N0000006881, Phospholipids,N0000006880, Sulfamerazine,N0000006879, Trioxsalen,N0000006878, isopropyl myristate, ...
Given the apparent synergistic effects of parenteral methadone and chlorobutanol, oral methadone should be used whenever ...
Chlorobutanol (substance). Code System Preferred Concept Name. Chlorobutanol (substance). Concept Status. Published. ...
Chlorobutanol, Anhydrous Narrower Concept UI. M0574148. Registry Number. 0. Terms. Chlorobutanol, Anhydrous Preferred Term Term ... Chlorobutanol Preferred Term Term UI T007899. Date01/01/1999. LexicalTag NON. ThesaurusID ... Chlorobutanol Preferred Concept UI. M0004163. Registry Number. HM4YQM8WRC. Related Numbers. 57-15-8. Scope Note. A colorless to ... Chlorobutanol. Tree Number(s). D02.033.260.220. D02.033.415.110.220. D10.289.110.220. Unique ID. D002724. RDF Unique Identifier ...
Chlorobutanol, Anhydrous Narrower Concept UI. M0574148. Registry Number. 0. Terms. Chlorobutanol, Anhydrous Preferred Term Term ... Chlorobutanol Preferred Term Term UI T007899. Date01/01/1999. LexicalTag NON. ThesaurusID ... Chlorobutanol Preferred Concept UI. M0004163. Registry Number. HM4YQM8WRC. Related Numbers. 57-15-8. Scope Note. A colorless to ... Chlorobutanol. Tree Number(s). D02.033.260.220. D02.033.415.110.220. D10.289.110.220. Unique ID. D002724. RDF Unique Identifier ...
Chlorobutanol hemihydrate …………………………… 5.0 mg. Pharmaceutical form:. Injectable solution , 20 ml glass bottle ...
... and chlorobutanol. Of these two preservatives, experts say that the latter is easier on the eye surface. Chlorobutanol is based ...
Hydrochloric Acid may be added to adjust pH (3.5 - 6.0). PRESERVATIVE ADDED: Chlorobutanol 0.5%. ...
Chlorobutanol?0.5? Caution: To be dispensed only by or on the prescription of a physician * * * Note: There is no scientific ... Chlorobu- tanol?0.5? For Intramuscular Use Only Caution: Federal law prohibits dispensing without prescription. Note: There is ... Chlorobutanol?0.5? Caution: Federal law prohibits dispensing with* out prescription * * * For Intramuscular Use There is no ... Chlorobutanol?(as preservative) ?0.5? Caution: Federal law1 prohibits dispensing without prescription * * * Intermuscular ...
... chlorobutanol, E0070129,Aldactone,spironolactone, E0070135,Diprosone,beta-methasone dipropionate, E0070143,Depo-Testosterone, ...
"Chlorobutanol", "Chloroprocaine", "Cocaine", "Contiuation of Cocaine", "Cyclomethycaine", "Dibucaine", "Dimethisoquin", " ... "Chlorobutanol", "Chloroprocaine", "Cocaine", "Contiuation of Cocaine", "Cyclomethycaine", "Dibucaine", "Dimethisoquin", " ... Chlorobutanol, Chloroprocaine, Cocaine, Contiuation of Cocaine, Cyclomethycaine, Dibucaine, Dimethisoquin, ... Chlorobutanol, Chloroprocaine, Cocaine, Contiuation of Cocaine, Cyclomethycaine, Dibucaine, Dimethisoquin, ...
On heating tetrahydrofuran interacts with hydrogen chloride gas and rearranges to 4-chlorobutanol. In the presence of aluminum ...
Thanks to the use of specific surfactants it was possible to solubilize chlorobutanol in water without the aid of alcohol. ... The optimal concentration of chlorobutanol allows a soothing action of pain in case of irritation, the synergy with ... Contains 0.20% chlorhexidine digluconate and 0.5% chlorobutanol and is indicated for intensive anti-plaque and soothing ... Chlorobutanol, Aroma, Poloxamer 407, Sodium Metabis.I Citricidate, Sodium Citrate, C.I. 1720. ...
Cerumol Ear Drops comprise Arachis oil and Chlorobutanol to lubricate and break down ear wax for simpler extraction. The ...
Other additives, such as phenylmercuric nitrate, phenylmercuric acetate, chlorobutanol, and phenol have been studied ...
... benzyl alcohol and chlor-obutanol (USP 29; Groves, 1988; Pearlman and Bewley, 1993). The use of mercury containing pre- ...
parahydroxybenzoate (E218) and chlorobutanol hemihydrate. 7. Known allergic reactions or hypersensitivity/intolerance to latex ...
... chlorobutanol, methyl paraben, propyl paraben) were examined for their effects on the storage stability (4 °C, 25 °C) of an ... the parabens and chlorobutanol were least destabilizing). We used hydrogen exchange-mass spectrometry (HX-MS) to better ...
D8.811.682.732.360 Chlorobutanol D10.516.289.110.220 D10.289.110.220 Chlorogenic Acid D2.241.223.201.185 Chlorophyll D3.383. ...
QV 665 Chlorobutanol QV 115 Chloroform QV 81; WO 279 Chloropicrin QV 664 Chlorosis WH 160 Egyptian WC 890 Chocolate WB 438 ...
Capmatinib is also known as Synonym. SynZeal provides high-quality Capmatinib Reference Standard, pharmacopeial and non-pharmacopeial impurities, degradants, and stable isotope products.
  • On the other hand, chlorobutanol has antibacterial and antifungal properties acting as a preservative, however, it induces good analgesia, good immobilization, rapid induction of numbness and rapid recovery in accordance with the stages of sedation. (premierhorsemed.com)
  • Each mL of sterile colorless-to-pale yellow solution provides 200 mg testosterone enanthate in sesame oil with 5 mg chlorobutanol (chloral derivative) as preservative. (medscape.com)