Benzoic acid or benzoic acid esters substituted with one or more chlorine atoms.
An enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of catechol to muconic acid with the use of Fe3+ as a cofactor. This enzyme was formerly characterized as EC 1.13.1.1 and EC 1.99.2.2.
Elimination of ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANTS; PESTICIDES and other waste using living organisms, usually involving intervention of environmental or sanitation engineers.
A group of 1,2-benzenediols that contain the general formula R-C6H5O2.
Derivatives of BENZOIC ACID. Included under this heading are a broad variety of acid forms, salts, esters, and amides that contain the carboxybenzene structure.
Industrial products consisting of a mixture of chlorinated biphenyl congeners and isomers. These compounds are highly lipophilic and tend to accumulate in fat stores of animals. Many of these compounds are considered toxic and potential environmental pollutants.
Oxidases that specifically introduce DIOXYGEN-derived oxygen atoms into a variety of organic molecules.
Non-heme iron-containing enzymes that incorporate two atoms of OXYGEN into the substrate. They are important in biosynthesis of FLAVONOIDS; GIBBERELLINS; and HYOSCYAMINE; and for degradation of AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS.

Intestinal prokinesia by two esters of 4-amino-5-chloro-2- methoxybenzoic acid: involvement of 5-hydroxytryptamine-4 receptors and dissociation from cardiac effects in vivo. (1/180)

In five fasting, conscious dogs, we compared the prokinetic action of two selective 5-hydroxytryptamine-4 (5-HT4) receptor agonists with low affinity for 5-HT3 receptors ML10302 (2-piperidinoethyl 4-amino-5-chloro-2-methoxybenzoate) and SR59768 (2-[(3S)-3-hydroxypiperidino]ethyl 4-amino-5-chloro-2-methoxybenzoate) in the duodenum and jejunum, using cisapride as a reference compound. Heart rate and rate-corrected QT (QTc) also were monitored to assess whether or not the cardiac effects of cisapride are shared by other 5-HT4 receptor agonists. Both ML10302 and SR59768 dose-dependently stimulated spike activity in the duodenum with similar potencies (dose range, 3-300 nmol/kg i.v.; ED50 values: 24 and 23 nmol/kg i.v., respectively), mimicking the effect of cisapride (30-3000 nmol/kg i.v.). The maximal effect was achieved with the dose of 100 nmol/kg i.v. for both compounds. Similar findings were obtained in the jejunum. Atropine and GR125487 (1-[2-[(methylsulfonyl)amino]ethyl]-4-piperidinyl-methyl 5-fluoro-2-methoxy-1H-indole-3-carboxylate, selective 5-HT4 receptor antagonist), at doses having no effect per se, antagonized intestinal prokinesia by maximal doses of ML10302 and SR59768. Neither ML10302 nor SR59768 had any effect on heart rate or QTc at any of the doses tested, whereas cisapride, at the highest dose (3000 nmol/kg), induced tachycardia and lengthened the QTC (p <.01). In conclusion, ML10302 and SR59768 share with cisapride a similar prokinetic action in the canine duodenum and jejunum in vivo. This effect is mediated by pathways involving activation of 5-HT4 and muscarinic receptors. Unlike cisapride, which induces tachycardia and prolongs the QTc by a mechanism probably unrelated to 5-HT4 receptor activation, ML10302 and SR59768 are devoid of cardiac effects in this model.  (+info)

Selection of clc, cba, and fcb chlorobenzoate-catabolic genotypes from groundwater and surface waters adjacent to the Hyde park, Niagara Falls, chemical landfill. (2/180)

The frequency of isolation of three nonhomologous chlorobenzoate catabolic genotypes (clc, cba, and fcb) was determined for 464 isolates from freshwater sediments and groundwater in the vicinity of the Hyde Park industrial landfill site in the Niagara watershed. Samples were collected from both contaminated and noncontaminated sites during spring, summer, and fall and enriched at 4, 22, or 32 degrees C with micromolar to millimolar concentrations of chlorobenzoates and 3-chlorobiphenyl (M. C. Peel and R. C. Wyndham, Microb. Ecol: 33:59-68, 1997). Hybridization at moderate stringency to restriction-digested genomic DNA with DNA probes revealed the chlorocatechol 1,2-dioxygenase operon (clcABD), the 3-chlorobenzoate 3,4-(4,5)-dioxygenase operon (cbaABC), and the 4-chlorobenzoate dehalogenase (fcbB) gene in isolates enriched from all contaminated sites in the vicinity of the industrial landfill. Nevertheless, the known genes were found in less than 10% of the isolates from the contaminated sites, indicating a high level of genetic diversity in the microbial community. The known genotypes were not enriched from the noncontaminated control sites nearby. The clc, cba, and fcb isolates were distributed across five phenotypically distinct groups based on Biolog carbon source utilization, with the breadth of the host range decreasing in the order clc > cba > fcb. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) patterns showed that the cba genes were conserved in all isolates whereas the clc and fcb genes exhibited variation in RFLP patterns. These observations are consistent with the recent spread of the cba genes by horizontal transfer as part of transposon Tn5271 in response to contaminant exposure at Hyde Park. Consistent with this hypothesis, IS1071, the flanking element in Tn5271, was found in all isolates that carried the cba genes. Interestingly, IS1071 was also found in a high proportion of isolates from Hyde Park carrying the clc and fcb genes, as well as in type strains carrying the clcABD operon and the biphenyl (bph) catabolic genes.  (+info)

Cloning, expression, and nucleotide sequence of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa 142 ohb genes coding for oxygenolytic ortho dehalogenation of halobenzoates. (3/180)

We have cloned and characterized novel oxygenolytic ortho-dehalogenation (ohb) genes from 2-chlorobenzoate (2-CBA)- and 2,4-dichlorobenzoate (2,4-dCBA)-degrading Pseudomonas aeruginosa 142. Among 3,700 Escherichia coli recombinants, two clones, DH5alphaF'(pOD22) and DH5alphaF'(pOD33), converted 2-CBA to catechol and 2,4-dCBA and 2,5-dCBA to 4-chlorocatechol. A subclone of pOD33, plasmid pE43, containing the 3,687-bp minimized ohb DNA region conferred to P. putida PB2440 the ability to grow on 2-CBA as a sole carbon source. Strain PB2440(pE43) also oxidized but did not grow on 2,4-dCBA, 2,5-dCBA, or 2,6-dCBA. Terminal oxidoreductase ISPOHB structural genes ohbA and ohbB, which encode polypeptides with molecular masses of 20,253 Da (beta-ISP) and 48,243 Da (alpha-ISP), respectively, were identified; these proteins are in accord with the 22- and 48-kDa (as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis) polypeptides synthesized in E. coli and P. aeruginosa parental strain 142. The ortho-halobenzoate 1,2-dioxygenase activity was manifested in the absence of ferredoxin and reductase genes, suggesting that the ISPOHB utilized electron transfer components provided by the heterologous hosts. ISPOHB formed a new phylogenetic cluster that includes aromatic oxygenases featuring atypical structural-functional organization and is distant from the other members of the family of primary aromatic oxygenases. A putative IclR-type regulatory gene (ohbR) was located upstream of the ohbAB genes. An open reading frame (ohbC) of unknown function that overlaps lengthwise with ohbB but is transcribed in the opposite direction was found. The ohbC gene codes for a 48,969-Da polypeptide, in accord with the 49-kDa protein detected in E. coli. The ohb genes are flanked by an IS1396-like sequence containing a putative gene for a 39,715-Da transposase A (tnpA) at positions 4731 to 5747 and a putative gene for a 45,247-Da DNA topoisomerase I/III (top) at positions 346 to 1563. The ohb DNA region is bordered by 14-bp imperfect inverted repeats at positions 56 to 69 and 5984 to 5997.  (+info)

Construction and characterization of two recombinant bacteria that grow on ortho- and para-substituted chlorobiphenyls. (4/180)

Cloning and expression of the aromatic ring dehalogenation genes in biphenyl-growing, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-cometabolizing Comamonas testosteroni VP44 resulted in recombinant pathways allowing growth on ortho- and para-chlorobiphenyls (CBs) as a sole carbon source. The recombinant variants were constructed by transformation of strain VP44 with plasmids carrying specific genes for dehalogenation of chlorobenzoates (CBAs). Plasmid pE43 carries the Pseudomonas aeruginosa 142 ohb genes coding for the terminal oxygenase (ISPOHB) of the ortho-halobenzoate 1,2-dioxygenase, whereas plasmid pPC3 contains the Arthrobacter globiformis KZT1 fcb genes, which catalyze the hydrolytic para-dechlorination of 4-CBA. The parental strain, VP44, grew only on low concentrations of 2- and 4-CB by using the products from the fission of the nonchlorinated ring of the CBs (pentadiene) and accumulated stoichiometric amounts of the corresponding CBAs. The recombinant strains VP44(pPC3) and VP44(pE43) grew on, and completely dechlorinated high concentrations (up to 10 mM), of 4-CBA and 4-CB and 2-CBA and 2-CB, respectively. Cell protein yield corresponded to complete oxidation of both biphenyl rings, thus confirming mineralization of the CBs. Hence, the use of CBA dehalogenase genes appears to be an effective strategy for construction of organisms that will grow on at least some congeners important for remediation of PCBs.  (+info)

Cloning and sequencing of the fcbB gene encoding 4-chlorobenzoate-coenzyme A dehalogenase from Pseudomonas sp. DJ-12. (5/180)

Pseudomonas sp. DJ-12 degrades 4-chlorobenzoate through hydrolytic dechlorination to produce 4-hydroxybenzoate and a chloride ion. The fcbB gene encoding the 4-chlorobenzoate-coenzyme A (4CBA-CoA) dehalogenase which catalyzes the nucleophilic substitution reaction to convert 4CBA-CoA to 4-hydroxybenzoate-coenzyme A (4HBA-CoA) in the consecutive steps of dechlorination was cloned from the chromosome of the organism. A nucleotide sequence analysis of the gene showed an open reading frame consisting of 810 nucleotides, which can encode for a polypeptide of molecular mass 30 kDa, containing 269 amino acid residues. A promoter-like sequence (-35 and -10 region) and a putative ribosome-binding sequence were identified. A deduced amino acid sequence of the 4CBA-CoA dehalogenase showed 86%, 50%, and 50% identity with those of corresponding enzymes in the Pseudomonas sp. CBS3, Arthrobacter sp. SU, and Arthrobacter sp. TM1, respectively.  (+info)

Membrane tubule-mediated reassembly and maintenance of the Golgi complex is disrupted by phospholipase A2 antagonists. (6/180)

Although membrane tubules can be found extending from, and associated with, the Golgi complex of eukaryotic cells, their physiological function has remained unclear. To gain insight into the biological significance of membrane tubules, we have developed methods for selectively preventing their formation. We show here that a broad range of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) antagonists not only arrest membrane tubule-mediated events that occur late in the assembly of the Golgi complex but also perturb its normal steady-state tubulovesicular architecture by inducing a reversible fragmentation into separate "mini-stacks." In addition, we show that these same compounds prevent the formation of membrane tubules from Golgi stacks in an in vitro reconstitution system. This in vitro assay was further used to demonstrate that the relevant PLA2 activity originates from the cytoplasm. Taken together, these results demonstrate that Golgi membrane tubules, sensitive to potent and selective PLA2 antagonists, mediate both late events in the reassembly of the Golgi complex and the dynamic maintenance of its steady-state architecture. In addition, they implicate a role for cytoplasmic PLA2 enzymes in mediating these membrane trafficking events.  (+info)

Regiospecificity of dioxygenation of di- to pentachlorobiphenyls and their degradation to chlorobenzoates by the bph-encoded catabolic pathway of Burkholderia sp. strain LB400. (7/180)

Burkholderia sp. strain LB400 is one of the most potent aerobic polychlorobiphenyl (PCB)-degrading microorganisms that have been characterized. Its PCB-dioxygenating activity originates predominantly or exclusively from the biphenyl dioxygenase encoded by its bph gene cluster. Analysis of the dioxygenation products of several di- to pentachlorinated biphenyls formed by this enzyme revealed a complex dependence of the regiospecificity and the yield of dioxygenation on the substitution patterns of both the oxidized and the nonoxidized rings. No dioxygenolytic attack involving chlorinated meta or para carbons was observed. Therefore, the ability of the enzyme to hydroxylate chlorinated carbons appears to be limited to the ortho position. However, it is not limited to monochlorinated rings, as evidenced by dioxygenation of the 2, 4-disubstituted ring at carbons 2 and 3. This site of attack is strikingly different from that of the 2,5-dichlorinated ring, which has been shown to be dihydroxylated at positions 3 and 4 (J. D. Haddock, J. R. Horton, and D. T. Gibson, J. Bacteriol. 177:20-26, 1995). These results demonstrate that a second substituent of ortho-chlorinated rings crucially influences the site of dioxygenation at this ring and thereby determines whether or not the initial chlorobiphenyl oxidation product is further metabolized through the bph-encoded pathway. The 2,4-dichlorinated ring can alternatively be attacked at carbons 5 and 6. The preferred site crucially depends on the substitution pattern of the other ring. The formation of more than a single dioxygenation product was found predominantly with congeners that contain two chlorinated rings, both of which are similarly prone to dioxygenation or one is substituted only at carbon 3.  (+info)

The p53 tumor suppressor protein reduces point mutation frequency of a shuttle vector modified by the chemical mutagens (+/-)7, 8-dihydroxy-9,10-epoxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydrobenzo[a]pyrene, aflatoxin B1 and meta-chloroperoxybenzoic acid. (8/180)

p53 has been postulated to be the guardian of the genome. However, results supporting the prediction that point mutation frequencies are elevated in p53-deficient cells either have not been forthcoming or have been equivocal. To analyse the effect of p53 on point mutation frequency, we used the supF gene of the pYZ289 shuttle vector as a mutagenic target. pYZ289 was treated in vitro by ultraviolet irradiation, aflatoxin B1, (+/-)7,8-dihydroxy-9, 10-epoxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydrobenzo[a]pyrene and meta-chloroperoxybenzoic acid and then transfected into p53-deficient cells with or without a p53 expression vector. p53 reduced the mutant frequency up to fivefold when pYZ289 was treated with aflatoxin B1, (+/-)7,8-dihydroxy-9,10-epoxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydrobenzo[a]pyrene or meta-chloroperoxybenzoic acid but not when it was ultraviolet-irradiated. The p53-dependent mutation frequency reduction was higher at a higher level of premutational lesions for aflatoxin B1 and (+/-)7,8-dihydroxy-9,10-epoxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydrobenzo[a]pyrene and at a lower level of lesions for meta-chloroperoxybenzoic acid. This suggests that the chemical mutagens produce, in a dose-dependent fashion, two kinds of DNA damage, one subject to p53-dependent mutation frequency reduction and the other not. These results indicate that p53 can reduce the point mutation frequency in a shuttle vector treated by chemical mutagens and suggest that p53 can act as guardian of the genome for at least some kinds of point mutations.  (+info)

Chlorobenzoates are a group of chemical compounds that consist of a benzene ring substituted with one or more chlorine atoms and a carboxylate group. They are derivatives of benzoic acid, where one or more hydrogen atoms on the benzene ring have been replaced by chlorine atoms.

Chlorobenzoates can be found in various industrial applications, such as solvents, plasticizers, and pesticides. Some chlorobenzoates also have medical uses, for example, as antimicrobial agents or as intermediates in the synthesis of pharmaceuticals.

However, some chlorobenzoates can be toxic and harmful to the environment, so their use is regulated in many countries. It's important to handle and dispose of these substances properly to minimize potential health and environmental risks.

Catechol 1,2-dioxygenase is an enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of catechols to muconic acids as part of the meta-cleavage pathway in the breakdown of aromatic compounds in bacteria. The enzyme requires iron as a cofactor and functions by cleaving the aromatic ring between the two hydroxyl groups in the catechol molecule. This reaction is an important step in the degradation of various environmental pollutants, such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and lignin, by certain bacterial species.

Environmental biodegradation is the breakdown of materials, especially man-made substances such as plastics and industrial chemicals, by microorganisms such as bacteria and fungi in order to use them as a source of energy or nutrients. This process occurs naturally in the environment and helps to break down organic matter into simpler compounds that can be more easily absorbed and assimilated by living organisms.

Biodegradation in the environment is influenced by various factors, including the chemical composition of the substance being degraded, the environmental conditions (such as temperature, moisture, and pH), and the type and abundance of microorganisms present. Some substances are more easily biodegraded than others, and some may even be resistant to biodegradation altogether.

Biodegradation is an important process for maintaining the health and balance of ecosystems, as it helps to prevent the accumulation of harmful substances in the environment. However, some man-made substances, such as certain types of plastics and industrial chemicals, may persist in the environment for long periods of time due to their resistance to biodegradation, leading to negative impacts on wildlife and ecosystems.

In recent years, there has been increasing interest in developing biodegradable materials that can break down more easily in the environment as a way to reduce waste and minimize environmental harm. These efforts have led to the development of various biodegradable plastics, coatings, and other materials that are designed to degrade under specific environmental conditions.

Catechols are a type of chemical compound that contain a benzene ring with two hydroxyl groups (-OH) attached to it in the ortho position. The term "catechol" is often used interchangeably with "ortho-dihydroxybenzene." Catechols are important in biology because they are produced through the metabolism of certain amino acids, such as phenylalanine and tyrosine, and are involved in the synthesis of various neurotransmitters and hormones. They also have antioxidant properties and can act as reducing agents. In chemistry, catechols can undergo various reactions, such as oxidation and polymerization, to form other classes of compounds.

Benzoates are the salts and esters of benzoic acid. They are widely used as preservatives in foods, cosmetics, and pharmaceuticals to prevent the growth of microorganisms. The chemical formula for benzoic acid is C6H5COOH, and when it is combined with a base (like sodium or potassium), it forms a benzoate salt (e.g., sodium benzoate or potassium benzoate). When benzoic acid reacts with an alcohol, it forms a benzoate ester (e.g., methyl benzoate or ethyl benzoate).

Benzoates are generally considered safe for use in food and cosmetics in small quantities. However, some people may have allergies or sensitivities to benzoates, which can cause reactions such as hives, itching, or asthma symptoms. In addition, there is ongoing research into the potential health effects of consuming high levels of benzoates over time, particularly in relation to gut health and the development of certain diseases.

In a medical context, benzoates may also be used as a treatment for certain conditions. For example, sodium benzoate is sometimes given to people with elevated levels of ammonia in their blood (hyperammonemia) to help reduce those levels and prevent brain damage. This is because benzoates can bind with excess ammonia in the body and convert it into a form that can be excreted in urine.

Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are a group of man-made organic chemicals consisting of 209 individual compounds, known as congeners. The congeners are formed by the combination of two benzene rings with varying numbers and positions of chlorine atoms.

PCBs were widely used in electrical equipment, such as transformers and capacitors, due to their non-flammability, chemical stability, and insulating properties. They were also used in other applications, including coolants and lubricants, plasticizers, pigments, and copy oils. Although PCBs were banned in many countries in the 1970s and 1980s due to their toxicity and environmental persistence, they still pose significant health and environmental concerns because of their continued presence in the environment and in products manufactured before the ban.

PCBs are known to have various adverse health effects on humans and animals, including cancer, immune system suppression, reproductive and developmental toxicity, and endocrine disruption. They can also cause neurological damage and learning and memory impairment in both human and animal populations. PCBs are highly persistent in the environment and can accumulate in the food chain, leading to higher concentrations in animals at the top of the food chain, including humans.

Oxygenases are a class of enzymes that catalyze the incorporation of molecular oxygen (O2) into their substrates. They play crucial roles in various biological processes, including the biosynthesis of many natural products, as well as the detoxification and degradation of xenobiotics (foreign substances).

There are two main types of oxygenases: monooxygenases and dioxygenases. Monooxygenases introduce one atom of molecular oxygen into a substrate while reducing the other to water. An example of this type of enzyme is cytochrome P450, which is involved in drug metabolism and steroid hormone synthesis. Dioxygenases, on the other hand, incorporate both atoms of molecular oxygen into their substrates, often leading to the formation of new carbon-carbon bonds or the cleavage of existing ones.

It's important to note that while oxygenases are essential for many life-sustaining processes, they can also contribute to the production of harmful reactive oxygen species (ROS) during normal cellular metabolism. An imbalance in ROS levels can lead to oxidative stress and damage to cells and tissues, which has been linked to various diseases such as cancer, neurodegeneration, and cardiovascular disease.

Dioxygenases are a class of enzymes that catalyze the incorporation of both atoms of molecular oxygen (O2) into their substrates. They are classified based on the type of reaction they catalyze and the number of iron atoms in their active site. The two main types of dioxygenases are:

1. Intradiol dioxygenases: These enzymes cleave an aromatic ring by inserting both atoms of O2 into a single bond between two carbon atoms, leading to the formation of an unsaturated diol (catechol) intermediate and the release of CO2. They contain a non-heme iron(III) center in their active site.

An example of intradiol dioxygenase is catechol 1,2-dioxygenase, which catalyzes the conversion of catechol to muconic acid.

2. Extradiol dioxygenases: These enzymes cleave an aromatic ring by inserting one atom of O2 at a position adjacent to the hydroxyl group and the other atom at a more distant position, leading to the formation of an unsaturated lactone or cyclic ether intermediate. They contain a non-heme iron(II) center in their active site.

An example of extradiol dioxygenase is homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase, which catalyzes the conversion of homogentisate to maleylacetoacetate in the tyrosine degradation pathway.

Dioxygenases play important roles in various biological processes, including the metabolism of aromatic compounds, the biosynthesis of hormones and signaling molecules, and the detoxification of xenobiotics.

... chlorobenzoates MeSH D02.241.223.100.140.100.375 - iodobenzoates MeSH D02.241.223.100.140.100.375.880 - triiodobenzoic acids ...
"Chlorobenzoates" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicines controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject ... This graph shows the total number of publications written about "Chlorobenzoates" by people in this website by year, and ... Below are the most recent publications written about "Chlorobenzoates" by people in Profiles. ... whether "Chlorobenzoates" was a major or minor topic of these publications. To see the data from this visualization as text, ...
... chlorobenzoates MeSH D02.241.223.100.140.100.375 - iodobenzoates MeSH D02.241.223.100.140.100.375.880 - triiodobenzoic acids ...
... and chlorobenzoates could be dehalogenated and the chloride being accumulated by the cells [2]. Phenol removal levels of ...
Acids, Carbocyclic - Chlorobenzoates PubMed MeSh Term ©2023 Regents of the University of Colorado , Terms of Use , Powered by ...
Chlorobenzoates. Benzoic acid or benzoic acid esters substituted with one or more chlorine atoms.. ... CupriavidusCupriavidus necatorBurkholderiaceaeMimosa2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic AcidFuraldehydeChlorobenzoatesVolcanic Eruptions ... 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic AcidFuraldehydeChlorobenzoatesIsethionic AcidChlorophenolsSelenic AcidAlkanesulfonates ...
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strain NK8 are involved in chlorobenzoate degradation and induced by chlorobenzoates and chlorocatechols. ... reactions encoded by xyl genes and the chlorocatechol pathway encoded by tfd genes for the degradation of chlorobenzoates by ...
Several naturally occurring bacteria can degrade polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) to chlorobenzoates, while others can degrade ... Several naturally occurring bacteria can degrade polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) to chlorobenzoates, while others can degrade ... UC Riverside plant pathologist Dennis Focht genetically engineered a microbe to clean up chlorobenzoates. ... UC Riverside plant pathologist Dennis Focht genetically engineered a microbe to clean up chlorobenzoates. ...
... circular dichroism of acyclic sugar poly-p-chlorobenzoates. Carbohydrates Research 1990, 206, 41. ,http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/ ...
... chlorobenzoates, methylbenzoates, dinitrobenzoates, hydroxybenzoates, methoxybenzoates, phthalates, phenylacetates, ...
D2.705.400.120 Chlorobenzoates D2.241.223.100.140.100.250 D2.241.223.100.200 D2.455.426.559.389.127.250 Chlorogenic Acid D2.241 ...
D2.705.400.120 Chlorobenzoates D2.241.223.100.140.100.250 D2.241.223.100.200 D2.455.426.559.389.127.250 Chlorogenic Acid D2.241 ...
D2.705.400.120 Chlorobenzoates D2.241.223.100.140.100.250 D2.241.223.100.200 D2.455.426.559.389.127.250 Chlorogenic Acid D2.241 ...
D2.705.400.120 Chlorobenzoates D2.241.223.100.140.100.250 D2.241.223.100.200 D2.455.426.559.389.127.250 Chlorogenic Acid D2.241 ...
D2.705.400.120 Chlorobenzoates D2.241.223.100.140.100.250 D2.241.223.100.200 D2.455.426.559.389.127.250 Chlorogenic Acid D2.241 ...
D2.705.400.120 Chlorobenzoates D2.241.223.100.140.100.250 D2.241.223.100.200 D2.455.426.559.389.127.250 Chlorogenic Acid D2.241 ...
D2.705.400.120 Chlorobenzoates D2.241.223.100.140.100.250 D2.241.223.100.200 D2.455.426.559.389.127.250 Chlorogenic Acid D2.241 ...
D2.705.400.120 Chlorobenzoates D2.241.223.100.140.100.250 D2.241.223.100.200 D2.455.426.559.389.127.250 Chlorogenic Acid D2.241 ...
Mathieu LN, Larkins E, Akinboro O, Roy P, Amatya AK, Fiero MH, Mishra-Kalyani PS, Helms WS, Myers CE, Skinner AM, Aungst S, Jin R, Zhao H, Xia H, Zirkelbach JF, Bi Y, Li Y, Liu J, Grimstein M, Zhang X, Woods S, Reece K, Abukhdeir AM, Ghosh S, Philip R, Tang S, Goldberg KB, Pazdur R, Beaver JA, Singh H. FDA Approval Summary: Capmatinib and Tepotinib for the Treatment of Metastatic NSCLC Harboring MET Exon 14 Skipping Mutations or Alterations. Clin Cancer Res. 2022 01 15; 28(2):249-254 ...
"Chlorobenzoates" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicines controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject ... This graph shows the total number of publications written about "Chlorobenzoates" by people in this website by year, and ... Below are the most recent publications written about "Chlorobenzoates" by people in Profiles. ... whether "Chlorobenzoates" was a major or minor topic of these publications. To see the data from this visualization as text, ...
MeSH Terms: Biodegradation; Chlorobenzoates/metabolism*; Colony Count, Microbial; Comamonas testosteroni/genetics; Comamonas ...
Chlorobenzoates / therapeutic use Actions. * Search in PubMed * Search in MeSH * Add to Search ...
... gene cluster implicated in the degradation of PCBs to chlorobenzoates through the 2,3-deoxygenation pathway (Furukawa and ...
D2.705.400.120 Chlorobenzoates D2.241.223.100.140.100.250 D2.241.223.100.200 D2.455.426.559.389.127.250 Chlorogenic Acid D2.241 ...
Chlorobenzoates Preferred Term Term UI T007895. Date01/01/1999. LexicalTag NON. ThesaurusID NLM (1975). ... Chlorobenzoates [D02.241.223.100.200] * Bezafibrate [D02.241.223.100.200.249] * Chloromercuribenzoates [D02.241.223.100.200.311 ... Chlorobenzoates [D02.455.426.559.389.127.250] * Bezafibrate [D02.455.426.559.389.127.250.249] * Chloromercuribenzoates [D02.455 ... Chlorobenzoates Preferred Concept UI. M0004162. Registry Number. 0. Scope Note. Benzoic acid or benzoic acid esters substituted ...
Chlorobenzoates Preferred Term Term UI T007895. Date01/01/1999. LexicalTag NON. ThesaurusID NLM (1975). ... Chlorobenzoates [D02.241.223.100.200] * Bezafibrate [D02.241.223.100.200.249] * Chloromercuribenzoates [D02.241.223.100.200.311 ... Chlorobenzoates [D02.455.426.559.389.127.250] * Bezafibrate [D02.455.426.559.389.127.250.249] * Chloromercuribenzoates [D02.455 ... Chlorobenzoates Preferred Concept UI. M0004162. Registry Number. 0. Scope Note. Benzoic acid or benzoic acid esters substituted ...
Dive into the research topics where Piero Armenante is active. These topic labels come from the works of this person. Together they form a unique fingerprint ...
Chlorobenzoates - Preferred Concept UI. M0004162. Scope note. Benzoic acid or benzoic acid esters substituted with one or more ...
Chlorobenzoates Medicine & Life Sciences 100% * Electrochemical oxidation Engineering & Materials Science 82% * Boron Medicine ...
Chlormethiazole N0000006870 Chlormezanone N0000006400 chloroacetic acid N0000008177 Chlorobenzenes N0000166658 Chlorobenzoates ...
D2.705.400.120 Chlorobenzoates D2.241.223.100.140.100.250 D2.241.223.100.200 D2.455.426.559.389.127.250 Chlorogenic Acid D2.241 ...
D2.705.400.120 Chlorobenzoates D2.241.223.100.140.100.250 D2.241.223.100.200 D2.455.426.559.389.127.250 Chlorogenic Acid D2.241 ...
D2.705.400.120 Chlorobenzoates D2.241.223.100.140.100.250 D2.241.223.100.200 D2.455.426.559.389.127.250 Chlorogenic Acid D2.241 ...
D2.705.400.120 Chlorobenzoates D2.241.223.100.140.100.250 D2.241.223.100.200 D2.455.426.559.389.127.250 Chlorogenic Acid D2.241 ...
D2.705.400.120 Chlorobenzoates D2.241.223.100.140.100.250 D2.241.223.100.200 D2.455.426.559.389.127.250 Chlorogenic Acid D2.241 ...
Chlorobenzoates Chlorobi Chlorobium Chlorobutanol Chlorodiphenyl (54% Chlorine) Chloroflexi Chloroflexus Chlorofluorocarbons ...
  • The algae could use nitro and amino- substituents, from amino naphthalenes, and amino- and nitrobenzoates as nitrogen sources, and chlorobenzoates could be dehalogenated and the chloride being accumulated by the cells [ 2 ]. (omicsonline.org)
  • Chlorobenzoates" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicine's controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) . (jefferson.edu)