ACETIC ACID or acetic acid esters substituted with one or more CHLORINE atoms.
A pathologic change in leukemia in which leukemic cells permeate various organs at any stage of the disease. All types of leukemia show various degrees of infiltration, depending upon the type of leukemia. The degree of infiltration may vary from site to site. The liver and spleen are common sites of infiltration, the greatest appearing in myelocytic leukemia, but infiltration is seen also in the granulocytic and lymphocytic types. The kidney is also a common site and of the gastrointestinal system, the stomach and ileum are commonly involved. In lymphocytic leukemia the skin is often infiltrated. The central nervous system too is a common site.
A group of connective tissue diseases in which skin hangs in loose pendulous folds. It is believed to be associated with decreased elastic tissue formation as well as an abnormality in elastin formation. Cutis laxa is usually a genetic disease, but acquired cases have been reported. (From Dorland, 27th ed)
Neoplasms associated with a proliferation of a single clone of PLASMA CELLS and characterized by the secretion of PARAPROTEINS.
The outer covering of the body that protects it from the environment. It is composed of the DERMIS and the EPIDERMIS.
A progressive, malignant disease of the blood-forming organs, characterized by distorted proliferation and development of leukocytes and their precursors in the blood and bone marrow. Leukemias were originally termed acute or chronic based on life expectancy but now are classified according to cellular maturity. Acute leukemias consist of predominately immature cells; chronic leukemias are composed of more mature cells. (From The Merck Manual, 2006)
Clonal expansion of myeloid blasts in bone marrow, blood, and other tissue. Myeloid leukemias develop from changes in cells that normally produce NEUTROPHILS; BASOPHILS; EOSINOPHILS; and MONOCYTES.
The external, nonvascular layer of the skin. It is made up, from within outward, of five layers of EPITHELIUM: (1) basal layer (stratum basale epidermidis); (2) spinous layer (stratum spinosum epidermidis); (3) granular layer (stratum granulosum epidermidis); (4) clear layer (stratum lucidum epidermidis); and (5) horny layer (stratum corneum epidermidis).

Trichloroacetylation of some cyclic enamines. (1/19)

The pyrrolidine and morpholine enamines of cyclic ketones such as cyclohexanone and cyclopentanone were successfully diacetylated at alpha- and alpha'-positions with trichloroacetyl chloride using zinc catalyst. Morpholine enamines of the cyclic ketones gave acetylated morpholine in good yields besides the corresponding diacetylated cyclic enamines. When the same reactions were performed by using triethylamine without using zinc, monoacetylation products of the same enamines were synthesized.  (+info)

Synthesis and hemolytic activity of some hederagenin diglycosides. (2/19)

Glycosylation of hederagenin with the trichloroacetimidate derivatives of six commercial disaccharides (D-cellobiose, D-lactose, D-maltose, D-melibiose, D-gentiobiose, D-isomaltose) was performed giving the protected saponins in high yields. Deprotection then gave the saponins which were transformed into the corresponding methyl esters. The hemolytic activity of these synthetic hederagenin diglycosides was measured in order to establish structure-activity relationships based on the type and sequence of the attached sugar for the free carboxylic acid and methyl ester saponins.  (+info)

Catalytic asymmetric synthesis of chiral allylic esters. (3/19)

Trichloroacetimidate derivatives of prochiral (Z)-2-alken-1-ols react at room temperature with carboxylic acids to give chiral 3-acyloxy-1-alkenes in high enantiopurity in the presence of di-mu-acetatobis[(eta5-(S)-(pR)-2-(2'-(4'-methylethyl)oxazolinyl)cyclopentadienyl ,1-C,3'-N)(eta4-tetraphenylcyclobutadiene)cobalt]dipalladium (COP-OAc) or its enantiomer. This reaction has broad scope, proceeds with predictable high stereoinduction, is accomplished at room temperature using high substrate concentrations and low catalyst loadings, and likely proceeds by a novel mechanism.  (+info)

Mechanism and selectivity of cinchona alkaloid catalyzed [1,3]-shifts of allylic trichloroacetimidates. (4/19)

 (+info)

Mitaplatin, a potent fusion of cisplatin and the orphan drug dichloroacetate. (5/19)

 (+info)

Enhanced stereoselectivity of alpha-mannosylation under thermodynamic control using trichloroacetimidates. (6/19)

 (+info)

Synthesis of immunostimulatory alpha-C-galactosylceramide glycolipids via Sonogashira coupling, asymmetric epoxidation, and trichloroacetimidate-mediated epoxide opening. (7/19)

 (+info)

Activation of glycosyl trichloroacetimidates with perchloric acid on silica (HClO(4)-SiO(2)) provides enhanced alpha-selectivity. (8/19)

 (+info)

Chloroacetates are organic compounds that contain the group-CHClCOO- (chloroacetate). They are derivatives of acetic acid, where one hydrogen atom is replaced by a chlorine atom. Chloroacetates can be esters or salts of chloroacetic acid. These compounds have various applications in industry and research, including as herbicides, biocides, and chemical intermediates. However, they can also be harmful to human health and the environment, requiring careful handling and disposal.

Leukemic infiltration is the abnormal spread and accumulation of malignant white blood cells (leukemia cells) in various tissues and organs outside the bone marrow. The bone marrow is the spongy tissue inside bones where blood cells are normally produced. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces large numbers of abnormal white blood cells that do not function properly. These abnormal cells can sometimes spill into the bloodstream and infiltrate other organs, such as the lymph nodes, spleen, liver, and central nervous system (brain and spinal cord). Leukemic infiltration can cause damage to these organs and lead to various symptoms. The pattern of organ involvement and the severity of infiltration depend on the type and stage of leukemia.

Cutis laxa is a group of rare connective tissue disorders characterized by loose, sagging, and inelastic skin. The term "cutis laxa" comes from Latin, meaning "loose skin." This condition can affect both the skin and the internal organs. Inherited forms of cutis laxa are caused by mutations in various genes involved in the structure and function of connective tissue, while acquired forms can be associated with autoimmune disorders, cancer, or certain medications.

The main features of cutis laxa include:

1. Sagging, redundant skin: The skin appears loose and wrinkled, especially on the face, neck, hands, and feet. This is due to a deficiency in elastic fibers, which provide flexibility and resilience to the skin.
2. Premature aging appearance: The sagging skin can give an individual a prematurely aged appearance, with deep wrinkles and folds around the eyes, mouth, and neck.
3. Pulmonary involvement: Recurrent respiratory infections, bronchiectasis (permanent enlargement of the airways), and emphysema can occur due to weakened lung tissue.
4. Gastrointestinal issues: Weakened intestinal walls may lead to hernias, bowel obstructions, or malabsorption.
5. Cardiovascular problems: The aorta and other major blood vessels may become weakened and dilated, leading to an increased risk of aneurysms and dissections (tears in the vessel wall).
6. Ophthalmic complications: Eye abnormalities such as blue sclerae (transparent blue appearance of the whites of the eyes) and strabismus (crossed eyes) can occur.
7. Skeletal abnormalities: Individuals with cutis laxa may have joint hypermobility, scoliosis (curvature of the spine), or hip dislocations.
8. Neurological issues: Rarely, cutis laxa can be associated with developmental delays, intellectual disability, or seizures.

There is no cure for cutis laxa, and treatment focuses on managing symptoms and preventing complications. This may include skin care, physical therapy, medications to control blood pressure, and surgery to repair hernias or aneurysms. Regular follow-up with a multidisciplinary team of healthcare professionals is essential to monitor disease progression and address any emerging issues.

Plasma cell neoplasms are a type of cancer that originates from plasma cells, which are a type of white blood cell found in the bone marrow. These cells are responsible for producing antibodies to help fight off infections. When plasma cells become cancerous and multiply out of control, they can form a tumor called a plasmacytoma.

There are two main types of plasma cell neoplasms: solitary plasmacytoma and multiple myeloma. Solitary plasmacytoma is a localized tumor that typically forms in the bone, while multiple myeloma is a systemic disease that affects multiple bones and can cause a variety of symptoms such as bone pain, fatigue, and anemia.

Plasma cell neoplasms are diagnosed through a combination of tests, including blood tests, imaging studies, and bone marrow biopsy. Treatment options depend on the stage and extent of the disease, but may include radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and stem cell transplantation.

In medical terms, the skin is the largest organ of the human body. It consists of two main layers: the epidermis (outer layer) and dermis (inner layer), as well as accessory structures like hair follicles, sweat glands, and oil glands. The skin plays a crucial role in protecting us from external factors such as bacteria, viruses, and environmental hazards, while also regulating body temperature and enabling the sense of touch.

Leukemia is a type of cancer that originates from the bone marrow - the soft, inner part of certain bones where new blood cells are made. It is characterized by an abnormal production of white blood cells, known as leukocytes or blasts. These abnormal cells accumulate in the bone marrow and interfere with the production of normal blood cells, leading to a decrease in red blood cells (anemia), platelets (thrombocytopenia), and healthy white blood cells (leukopenia).

There are several types of leukemia, classified based on the specific type of white blood cell affected and the speed at which the disease progresses:

1. Acute Leukemias - These types of leukemia progress rapidly, with symptoms developing over a few weeks or months. They involve the rapid growth and accumulation of immature, nonfunctional white blood cells (blasts) in the bone marrow and peripheral blood. The two main categories are:
- Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) - Originates from lymphoid progenitor cells, primarily affecting children but can also occur in adults.
- Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) - Develops from myeloid progenitor cells and is more common in older adults.

2. Chronic Leukemias - These types of leukemia progress slowly, with symptoms developing over a period of months to years. They involve the production of relatively mature, but still abnormal, white blood cells that can accumulate in large numbers in the bone marrow and peripheral blood. The two main categories are:
- Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) - Affects B-lymphocytes and is more common in older adults.
- Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) - Originates from myeloid progenitor cells, characterized by the presence of a specific genetic abnormality called the Philadelphia chromosome. It can occur at any age but is more common in middle-aged and older adults.

Treatment options for leukemia depend on the type, stage, and individual patient factors. Treatments may include chemotherapy, targeted therapy, immunotherapy, stem cell transplantation, or a combination of these approaches.

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a type of cancer that originates in the bone marrow, the soft inner part of certain bones where new blood cells are made. In AML, the immature cells, called blasts, in the bone marrow fail to mature into normal blood cells. Instead, these blasts accumulate and interfere with the production of normal blood cells, leading to a shortage of red blood cells (anemia), platelets (thrombocytopenia), and normal white blood cells (leukopenia).

AML is called "acute" because it can progress quickly and become severe within days or weeks without treatment. It is a type of myeloid leukemia, which means that it affects the myeloid cells in the bone marrow. Myeloid cells are a type of white blood cell that includes monocytes and granulocytes, which help fight infection and defend the body against foreign invaders.

In AML, the blasts can build up in the bone marrow and spread to other parts of the body, including the blood, lymph nodes, liver, spleen, and brain. This can cause a variety of symptoms, such as fatigue, fever, frequent infections, easy bruising or bleeding, and weight loss.

AML is typically treated with a combination of chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and/or stem cell transplantation. The specific treatment plan will depend on several factors, including the patient's age, overall health, and the type and stage of the leukemia.

The epidermis is the outermost layer of the skin, composed mainly of stratified squamous epithelium. It forms a protective barrier that prevents water loss and inhibits the entry of microorganisms. The epidermis contains no blood vessels, and its cells are nourished by diffusion from the underlying dermis. The bottom-most layer of the epidermis, called the stratum basale, is responsible for generating new skin cells that eventually move up to replace dead cells on the surface. This process of cell turnover takes about 28 days in adults.

The most superficial part of the epidermis consists of dead cells called squames, which are constantly shed and replaced. The exact rate at which this happens varies depending on location; for example, it's faster on the palms and soles than elsewhere. Melanocytes, the pigment-producing cells, are also located in the epidermis, specifically within the stratum basale layer.

In summary, the epidermis is a vital part of our integumentary system, providing not only physical protection but also playing a crucial role in immunity and sensory perception through touch receptors called Pacinian corpuscles.

Chloroacetate is a good alkylating agent, serving as a reagent for affixing the -CH2CO2− group to a wide variety of even weak ... Sodium chloroacetate is the organic compound with the formula CH2ClCO2Na. A white, water-soluble solid, it is the sodium salt ... Sodium chloroacetate is a common laboratory reagent in organic chemistry as illustrated by many entries in the book series ... With bifunctional nucleophiles, sodium chloroacetate is a precursor to heterocycles. Reaction with sodium nitrite give ...
... at Sigma-Aldrich "Ethyl chloroacetate" (PDF). U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. April 2009.[permanent ... Ethyl chloroacetate is a chemical compound used primarily in the chemical industry. It is used as a solvent for organic ...
Chloroacetamide Ethyl chloroacetate Ibrahim, F.; Sharaf El-Din, M. K.; Eid, M.; Wahba, M. E. K. (2011). "Spectrofluorimetric ...
Darzens reaction between benzaldehyde and chloroacetate esters. Wacker oxidation of styrene. Hofmann rearrangement of ...
The alcohol is then further oxidized via chloroacetaldehyde to chloroacetate. This metabolic pathway is topical since billions ...
Trichloroacetic acid Sodium trifluoroacetate Sodium chloroacetate Murray, M. G. (1986). "Use of sodium trichloroacetate and ...
Reformatsky, S. (1890). "Action of zinc and ethyl chloroacetate on ketones and aldehydes". J. Russ. Phys. Chem. Soc. 22: 44. ...
The salt is synthesized by treating sodium chloroacetate with potassium fluoride. Both sodium and potassium salts are ...
It is prepared by treating the chloro-acetate Tc2(O2CCH3)4Cl2 with HCl. Like Re3Cl9, the structure of the α-polymorph consists ...
This reacts with 1 equivalent of sodium chloroacetate to give the final product. A reaction with 2 equivalents gives the di- ...
It is prepared by treating the chloro-acetate Tc2(O2CCH3)4Cl2 with HCl. Like Re3Cl9, the structure of the α-polymorph consists ...
It is prepared by treating the chloro-acetate Tc2(O2CCH3)4Cl2 with HCl. Like Re3Cl9, the structure of the α-polymorph consists ...
Nitromethane can be produced in the laboratory by treating sodium chloroacetate with sodium nitrite. Oxidation of oximes or ...
... is prepared by treatment of chloroacetate salts with sodium cyanide followed by acidification. ...
Ethyl chloroacetate Chloroacetic acid Methyl chloroformate at Sigma-Aldrich Siegfried Böhm, Maren Beth-Hübner: Chloroformic ...
... may be prepared in various ways: Kolbe nitrile synthesis using ethyl chloroacetate and sodium cyanide. ... The cyanoacetic acid can be prepared via Kolbe nitrile synthesis using sodium chloroacetate and sodium cyanide. Reaction of the ...
Its preparation from sodium phenolate and sodium chloroacetate in hot water was first reported in 1880. 1) C6H5O−Na+ + ClCH2COO ...
The chloroacetate anion is the most toxic, with a rat, oral LD50 of about 0.5 g/kg. "Ionization Constants of Heteroatom Organic ...
To obtain this starting Compound 1, a simple Wittig condensation of ethyl chloroacetate with 4'-bromobiphenylcarboxaldehyde is ...
... is prepared by reaction of sodium or potassium chloroacetate with alkali metal hydrosulfide in aqueous medium ...
It is derived from ajmaline, an alkaloid from the roots of Rauvolfia serpentina, by synthetically adding a chloroacetate ...
... involves converting methyl nonyl ketone to its glycidate by allowing it to react with alkyl chloroacetate. The glycidate then ... first synthesis of 2-methylundecanal was recorded by Georges Darzens in 1904 from methyl nonyl ketone and ethyl chloroacetate. ...
Whitesell by adding Pseudomonas fluorescens lipase to racemic trans-2-phenylcyclohexyl chloroacetate. This enzyme is able to ... "Lipase-Catalyzed Kinetic Resolution of Alcohols via Chloroacetate Esters: (−)-(1R,2S)-Trans-2-Phenylcyclohexanol And (+)-(1S,2R ...
Influence of Furan and Allenyl Chloroacetate Groups on Enantioselectivity". Org. Lett. 2022, 24 (4) (4): 995-999. doi:10.1021/ ...
... or sometimes other vinyl ester-derived polymers with formate or chloroacetate groups instead of acetate. The conversion of the ...
These by-products can be avoided by a moderate excess chloroacetate and the exact adjustment of pH value during betainization ...
Polycondensation is carried out by heating an halogenoacetate, like sodium chloroacetate, at a temperature between 160 and 180 ...
... methyl chloroacetate is continuously added in the reactor at a speed of 5~10 kg/min with the mass ratio of methyl chloroacetate ... Methyl chloroacetate is condensed within the condenser set at 100~105 °C, it is then returned to the reactor to continue ... It can also be synthesized by reacting methyl chloroacetate with potassium fluoride Because of its toxicity, MFA was studied ...
... presence of metachromatic granules staining with alpha-naphthyl chloroacetate esterase, but not with peroxidase). Mast cell ... tryptase immunostaining because very poorly granulated cells may stain very weakly if at all for alpha-naphthol chloroacetate ...
... can be obtained by the hydrolysis of praseodymium(III) chloroacetate: 2 Pr(C2Cl3O2)3 + 3 H2O → Pr2( ...
Chloroacetate is a good alkylating agent, serving as a reagent for affixing the -CH2CO2− group to a wide variety of even weak ... Sodium chloroacetate is the organic compound with the formula CH2ClCO2Na. A white, water-soluble solid, it is the sodium salt ... Sodium chloroacetate is a common laboratory reagent in organic chemistry as illustrated by many entries in the book series ... With bifunctional nucleophiles, sodium chloroacetate is a precursor to heterocycles. Reaction with sodium nitrite give ...
2023 PGL Chemie, Kiev, Ukraine ...
Sodium Mono Chloro Acetate. Sodium Monochloro Acetate (SMCA) is a versatile product and is used as raw material or intimidates ...
甲氧胺鹽酸鹽|乙氧胺鹽酸鹽|2-氯乙胺鹽酸
A mixture of the regulated THMs and HAAs (including MCA) at concentrations 500× greater than regulatory MCLs (Maximum Contaminant Level) had no adverse effects; furthermore, 2,000×, the highest concentration evaluated, did not affect the animals ability to reproduce. The lack of effects on prenatal survival and birth weight in this study contrast with associations reported in some epidemiological studies (e.g. epidemiological associations reported for low birth weight and spontaneous abortion in humans exposed to chlorinated water (Levallois et al. 2012; Niewenhuijsen et al. 2009)). Although reproduction per se was unaffected, retained nipples and sperm motility effects in males at 2,000× and pubertal delays in both sexes at ≥ 1,000× the regulatory MCLs indicate that a mixture of these regulated DBPs (Disinfection By-Products) can influence endocrine physiology; however, these findings may have been secondary to reduced water consumption and body weight (viz. delayed puberty at ≥ ...
The substance sodium chloroacetate completely dissociates (in water) into sodium and chloroacetate. Since this is not an ... In solution, the chloroacetate ion is the conjugate base of monochloroacetic acid. Therefore the dissociation constant of ...
Chloroacetate esterase usually negative. CD68 positive in well-differentiated monocytes. CD163 less sensitive but more specific ...
chloroacetate esterase * Chymases Grants and funding * R21 HL104422-01A1/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/United States ...
Metabolism of chloroacetate-14C in the mouse. Acta Pharmacol. Toxicol., 30(1-2): 69. ... Determination of chloroacetates in atmospheric particulate matter. Environ. Sci. Technol., 37(11): 2336-2339. ...
Methyl chloroacetate (CAS 96-34-4) Global Market Research Report 2023 *  Report ...
IUPAC Name: [[chloro-(2-chlorophenyl)methylidene]amino] 2-chloroacetate , CAS Registry Number: 61101-52-8. Synonyms: CTK2E6959 ...
In the picture below, Ibuprofen was prepared using a solvent containing ammonium chloroacetate, a non-volatile salt. With ... conventional preparative LC, ammonium chloroacetate precipitated at the same time during evaporation. However, ibuprofen was ...
52] H. Ehrenberg, B. Hasse, K. Schwarz, M. Epple, Structure determination of lithium chloroacetate, lithium bromoacetate and ... 28] M. Epple, H. Kirschnick, Silver chloro¬acetate: crystal structure and solid-state polymerization mechanism, Chemische ... Thermal elimination of NaCl from sodium chloroacetate, Journal of Thermal Analysis 47 (1996) 331-338. ... In-situ monitoring of solid state polymerization reactions in sodium chloro-acetate and sodium bromoacetate by 23Na and 13C ...
2.04 in chloroacetate to -2.34 in pivalate, with a value of -1.94 for the hydronium ion catalysed reaction. As the electron- ... 0.43 in chloroacetate to 1.25 in pivalate. The P value for the hydronium ion catalysed reaction was -0.45. Similarly, the ... formate and chloroacetate buffers, and in hydrochloric and deutero-chloric acids. The hydrolysis rates measured in buffer ...
... chloroethane and chloroacetate), aromatic hydrocarbons, and genes involved in metal resistance. ...
Naphthol AS-D Chloroacetate Esterase (AS-DCE) Stain, Acid Alpha-Naphthyl Acetate Esterase Stain (ANAE), Sudan Black B Stain ( ...
Reactions were stopped with two equal volumes of 100 mM sodium chloroacetate/30 mM sodium acetate/70 mM acetic acid buffer (pH ...
The quinazolinone reacted with benzoyl chloride, acetyl chloride and ethyl chloroacetate to afford N-(3-benzoyl- ... Reaction of hydroxyquinazolinone with acetic anhydride and ethyl chloroacetate afforded (quinazolinyl)acetate and ethyl ( ...
ETHANOL, 2-CHLORO-, ACETATE. E 110-80-5. ETHANOL, 2-ETHOXY-. 111-15-9. ETHANOL, 2-ETHOXY-, ACETATE. ...
... ethyl chloroacetate (2.017 g, 0.017 mol) and anhydrous potassium carbonate (1.10 g, 0.01 mol) in dry acetone (15 ml) and ... and ethyl chloroacetate was refluxed in the presence of anhydrous sodium carbonate resulted in the formation of ethyl [(4,6- ... with ethyl chloroacetate followed by condensation with hydrazine hydrate yielded 2-[(4,6-disubstituted pyrimidine-2-yl) thio] ...
... and increased cellular expression of chloroacetate esterase. No effect on cellular nonspecific esterase activity. ...
Methyl Chloro Acetate , 96-34-4 , C3H4BrClO2 , methyl 2-chloroacetate Back to Home ...
Ethyl Chloro Acetate , 105-39-5 , C4H7ClO2 ,ethyl 2-chloroacetate Back to Home ...
The effects of NaOH, H2O, temperature, ethanol, sodium mono chloro acetate, sodium tripolyphosphate, citric acid, ...
In addition to conventional staining, such as Giemsa, naphthol AS-D chloroacetate esterase, and Gömöris silver impregnation, ... which may be easily underestimated when only Giemsa or chloroacetate esterase stains are used, is also possible after the ...
The cellulose is treated with alkali, then reacted with sodium chloroacetate to yield sodium carboxymethyl cellulose. An ... and reaction of the latter intermediate with dry sodium chloroacetate to form sodium carboxymethyl cellulose and sodium ...
  • Sodium chloroacetate is the organic compound with the formula CH2ClCO2Na. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sodium chloroacetate is a common laboratory reagent in organic chemistry as illustrated by many entries in the book series Organic Syntheses. (wikipedia.org)
  • With bifunctional nucleophiles, sodium chloroacetate is a precursor to heterocycles. (wikipedia.org)
  • The substance sodium chloroacetate completely dissociates (in water) into sodium and chloroacetate. (europa.eu)
  • A detailed review and analysis was conducted of the biological effects of chloroacetic-acid (79118), sodium-chloroacetate (3926623), fluoroacetic-acid (144490), sodium-fluoroacetate (62748), iodoacetic-acid (64697), sodium- iodoacetate (305533), and bromoacetic-acid (79083). (cdc.gov)
  • Reaction of hydroxyquinazolinone with acetic anhydride and ethyl chloroacetate afforded (quinazolinyl)acetate and ethyl (quinazolinyloxy)acetate derivatives. (heterocycles.jp)
  • The quinazolinone reacted with benzoyl chloride, acetyl chloride and ethyl chloroacetate to afford N -(3-benzoyl-dihydroquinazolinyl) -N -phenylbenzamide, 3-acetylquinazolinone and ethyl quinazolinylacetate respectively. (heterocycles.jp)
  • Reaction of (2a-i) with ethyl chloroacetate followed by condensation with hydrazine hydrate yielded 2-[(4,6-disubstituted pyrimidine-2-yl) thio] acetohydrazides (4a-c). (ijpsonline.com)
  • German chemist Rudolf Fittig had tried to prepare a C-Zn nucleophile by reacting the metal with ethyl chloroacetate. (chemistryworld.com)
  • In addition, a series of thiazole derivatives was synthesized by reaction of thioamide 3 with a number of α-halo compounds, namely, 3-chloropentane-2,4-dione ( 8 ) or 2-chloro-3-oxo- N -phenyl butanamide ( 10 ) phenacyl bromide 12 ethyl chloroacetate ( 14 ) in EtOH in the presence of triethylamine. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Those cells were focally positive for naphthol AS-D chloroacetate esterase. (bvsalud.org)
  • Mast cells had been visualized using chloroacetate esterase staining as defined previously, as this staining process may identify mucosal mast cells (25, 26). (aboutsciencenow.info)
  • While investigating the reactions of various carboxylic esters with organozinc reagents, Reformatskii had used methyl chloroacetate - which has chlorine attached adjacent to the carbonyl group. (chemistryworld.com)
  • Upon attempting to form diallylzinc in the same vessel, using Zaitsev's method, he found that zinc inserted into the carbon-chlorine bond of methyl chloroacetate instead of reacting with the allyl iodide. (chemistryworld.com)
  • 2.04 in chloroacetate to -2.34 in pivalate, with a value of -1.94 for the hydronium ion catalysed reaction. (gla.ac.uk)
  • Sodium chloroacetate is the organic compound with the formula CH2ClCO2Na. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sodium chloroacetate is a common laboratory reagent in organic chemistry as illustrated by many entries in the book series Organic Syntheses. (wikipedia.org)
  • With bifunctional nucleophiles, sodium chloroacetate is a precursor to heterocycles. (wikipedia.org)
  • The mixture of the products contains sodium tri chloroacetate and another compound. (quiz-magic.com)
  • Chloroacetate is the precursor to Dianabol and is a source of Dianabol, dianabol tablets price. (biztalkwithyou.com)
  • Herein, we propose a self-template synthesis strategy for preparing oxygen-rich porous carbons (ORC) by directly carbonizing potassium chloroacetate (ClCH2COOK) as the single carbon source. (edu.sa)
  • Chloroacetate is a good alkylating agent, serving as a reagent for affixing the -CH2CO2− group to a wide variety of even weak nucleophiles. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chloroacetate is a very expensive source of Dianabol to manufacture, so obtaining cheap and inexpensive Chloroacetate is what is needed to produce Dianabol. (biztalkwithyou.com)
  • It is commonly believed that using Chloroacetate to make Dianabol is extremely expensive to create and that this has caused the rise of Dianabol as the popular steroid, steroid tablets dbol. (biztalkwithyou.com)
  • While there are many compounds that are derived from Chlorin such as Chlorhexadienone, the active ingredient in Dianabol is Chloroacetate. (biztalkwithyou.com)
  • 3- Cyano pyridone derivatives were synthesized by treating 1-(4-bromophenyl)-3-(4-(dimethyl amino) phenyl) prop-2-en-1-one with compounds containing active methylene group in the presence of ammonium acetate. (tsijournals.com)