A genus of the family CHLAMYDIACEAE comprising gram-negative non CHLAMYDIA TRACHOMATIS-like species infecting vertebrates. Chlamydophila do not produce detectable quantities of glycogen. The type species is CHLAMYDOPHILA PSITTACI.
Infections with bacteria of the genus CHLAMYDOPHILA.
A species of CHLAMYDOPHILA that causes acute respiratory infection, especially atypical pneumonia, in humans, horses, and koalas.
A genus of CHLAMYDOPHILA infecting primarily birds. It contains eight known serovars, some of which infect more than one type of host, including humans.
Infection with CHLAMYDOPHILA PSITTACI (formerly Chlamydia psittaci), transmitted to humans by inhalation of dust-borne contaminated nasal secretions or excreta of infected BIRDS. This infection results in a febrile illness characterized by PNEUMONITIS and systemic manifestations.
A family of gram-negative, coccoid microorganisms, in the order CHLAMYDIALES, pathogenic for vertebrates. Genera include CHLAMYDIA and CHLAMYDOPHILA.
Premature expulsion of the FETUS in animals.
An order of obligately intracellular, gram-negative bacteria that have the chlamydia-like developmental cycle of replication. This is a two-stage cycle that includes a metabolically inactive infectious form, and a vegetative form that replicates by binary fission. Members of Chlamydiales are disseminated by aerosol or by contact. There are at least six recognized families: CHLAMYDIACEAE, Criblamydiaceae, Parachlamydiaceae, Rhabdochlamydia, Simkaniaceae, and Waddliaceae.
A large family of lytic bacteriophages infecting enterobacteria; SPIROPLASMA; BDELLOVIBRIO; and CHLAMYDIA. It contains four genera: MICROVIRUS; Spiromicrovirus; Bdellomicrovirus; and Chlamydiamicrovirus.
Infections with bacteria of the family CHLAMYDIACEAE.
Diseases of birds not considered poultry, therefore usually found in zoos, parks, and the wild. The concept is differentiated from POULTRY DISEASES which is for birds raised as a source of meat or eggs for human consumption, and usually found in barnyards, hatcheries, etc.
Short filamentous organism of the genus Mycoplasma, which binds firmly to the cells of the respiratory epithelium. It is one of the etiologic agents of non-viral primary atypical pneumonia in man.
Interstitial pneumonia caused by extensive infection of the lungs (LUNG) and BRONCHI, particularly the lower lobes of the lungs, by MYCOPLASMA PNEUMONIAE in humans. In SHEEP, it is caused by MYCOPLASMA OVIPNEUMONIAE. In CATTLE, it may be caused by MYCOPLASMA DISPAR.
Diseases of domestic and mountain sheep of the genus Ovis.
A mammalian fetus expelled by INDUCED ABORTION or SPONTANEOUS ABORTION.
Diseases of the domestic cat (Felis catus or F. domesticus). This term does not include diseases of the so-called big cats such as CHEETAHS; LIONS; tigers, cougars, panthers, leopards, and other Felidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.
BIRDS of the large family Psittacidae, widely distributed in tropical regions and having a distinctive stout, curved hooked bill. The family includes LOVEBIRDS; AMAZON PARROTS; conures; PARAKEETS; and many other kinds of parrots.
Diseases of non-human animals that may be transmitted to HUMANS or may be transmitted from humans to non-human animals.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.
Immunoglobulins produced in a response to BACTERIAL ANTIGENS.
A genus of the family CHLAMYDIACEAE whose species cause a variety of diseases in vertebrates including humans, mice, and swine. Chlamydia species are gram-negative and produce glycogen. The type species is CHLAMYDIA TRACHOMATIS.
In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.
One of the largest genera of PARROTS, ranging from South American to Northern Mexico. Many species are commonly kept as house pets.
A family of snakes comprising the boas, anacondas, and pythons. They occupy a variety of habitats through the tropics and subtropics and are arboreal, aquatic or fossorial (burrowing). Some are oviparous, others ovoviviparous. Contrary to popular opinion, they do not crush the bones of their victims: their coils exert enough pressure to stop a prey's breathing, thus suffocating it. There are five subfamilies: Boinae, Bolyerinae, Erycinae, Pythoninae, and Tropidophiinae. (Goin, Goin, and Zug, Introduction to Herpetology, 3d ed, p315-320)
Inflammation of the lung parenchyma that is caused by bacterial infections.
Diseases of the domestic or wild goat of the genus Capra.
BIRDS that hunt and kill other animals, especially higher vertebrates, for food. They include the FALCONIFORMES order, or diurnal birds of prey, comprised of EAGLES, falcons, HAWKS, and others, as well as the STRIGIFORMES order, or nocturnal birds of prey, which includes OWLS.
Proteins isolated from the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria.
A dilated cavity extended caudally from the hindgut. In adult birds, reptiles, amphibians, and many fishes but few mammals, cloaca is a common chamber into which the digestive, urinary and reproductive tracts discharge their contents. In most mammals, cloaca gives rise to LARGE INTESTINE; URINARY BLADDER; and GENITALIA.
Assistants to a veterinarian, biological or biomedical researcher, or other scientist who are engaged in the care and management of animals, and who are trained in basic principles of animal life processes and routine laboratory and animal health care procedures. (Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)
Purulent infections of the conjunctiva by several species of gram-negative, gram-positive, or acid-fast organisms. Some of the more commonly found genera causing conjunctival infections are Haemophilus, Streptococcus, Neisseria, and Chlamydia.
Infections with bacteria of the genus CHLAMYDIA.
Infection, moderate to severe, caused by bacteria, fungi, or viruses, which occurs either on the external surface of the eye or intraocularly with probable inflammation, visual impairment, or blindness.
Large woodland game BIRDS in the subfamily Meleagridinae, family Phasianidae, order GALLIFORMES. Formerly they were considered a distinct family, Melegrididae.
A genus, commonly called budgerigars, in the family PSITTACIDAE. In the United States they are considered one of the five species of PARAKEETS.
Warm-blooded VERTEBRATES possessing FEATHERS and belonging to the class Aves.
Any of numerous agile, hollow-horned RUMINANTS of the genus Capra, in the family Bovidae, closely related to the SHEEP.
Tumors or cancer of the EYE.
A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.
Type species of CHLAMYDIA causing a variety of ocular and urogenital diseases.

Naturally occurring lesions of the uterine tube in sheep and serologic evidence of exposure to Chlamydophila abortus. (1/69)

The uterine tubes from 405 ewes, collected at an abattoir, were assessed grossly and microscopically for abnormalities that correlated with serological evidence of exposure to Chlamydophila abortus. Gross lesions were found in 41 ewes and 86 had microscopic lesions. Enzyme immunoassay (EIA) of serum was used as an indication of exposure of individual ewes to C. abortus; 52 were found to be positive. Chi-squared analysis indicated no association between EIA-positive animals and lesions of the uterine tube.  (+info)

Use of real-time quantitative PCR to detect Chlamydophila felis infection. (2/69)

A real-time PCR assay was developed to detect and quantify Chlamydophila felis infection of cats. The assay uses a molecular beacon to specifically identify the major outer membrane protein gene, is highly reproducible, and is able to detect fewer than 10 genomic copies.  (+info)

Polymorphic outer-membrane proteins of Chlamydophila abortus are glycosylated. (3/69)

Antigenic profiles of mono-, bi- and poly-specific monoclonal antibodies against 90 kDa polymorphic outer-membrane proteins (POMPs) and a 105 kDa POMP-related protein of Chlamydophila abortus ATCC VR 656(T), after one- and two-dimensional electrophoretic analysis, helped identify each one of the triplets POMP 90, 91A and 91B, and a POMP-related protein at 85 kDa. The lectin concanavalin A bound to the four POMPs and the POMP-related protein in a specific manner and the binding was sensitive to treatment with the amidase N-endoglycosidase F, suggesting the presence of small asparagine-linked oligosaccharide chains. The exposure of the five proteins on the chlamydial surface and the orientation of the attached oligosaccharide chains was examined by protease and endoglycosidase treatments of intact bacteria. The results were consistent with the concept that some of the oligosaccharides in the POMPs face outwards, possibly protecting the polypeptides from proteolytic enzymes, whereas the oligosaccharides in the 105 kDa POMP-related protein are oriented inwards, thereby rendering the polypeptide chain accessible to proteases. A possible role for the N-linked oligosaccharides in the POMPs might be the promotion of the proper folding and processing of these proteins.  (+info)

Prevalence of Chlamydophila abortus infection in domesticated ruminants in Taiwan. (4/69)

This study is to (1) investigate the prevalence of Chlamydophila abortus infection in cows and goats in Taiwan, and (2) compare the genetic properties of Taiwanese isolates with abortion strains from other sources. Approximately 71% of aborted cows and 58% of aborted does had IgG against C. abortus in their sera. The seroprevalence rate in cows may be overestimated, because a certain degree of cross-reactivity with C. pecorum cannot be ruled out. Only 22.7% (from aborted cows) and 33.3% (from aborted dogs) of vaginal swabs that tested positive by polymerase chain reaction led to successful isolation of C. abortus by inoculation into chicken embryos, equivalent to 7.1% and 7.9% of isolation rates, respectively. The major outer membrane protein gene of 15 Taiwanese abortion isolates was compared with that of various strains by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and nucleotide sequencing. Restriction enzyme CfoI was able to distinguish Taiwanese ruminant isolates, which have identical RFLP patterns, from C. felis (feline) and C. psittaci (avian) strains. Taiwanese isolates had 98.8-100% homology with known ruminant abortion strains and were phylogenetically closest to bovine LW508 strain.  (+info)

Gamma interferon fails to induce expression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase and does not control the growth of Chlamydophila abortus in BeWo trophoblast cells. (5/69)

The BeWo trophoblast cell line does not constitutively express the tryptophan degrading enzyme indolamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), nor can IDO expression be induced by gamma interferon. This correlates with the inability of BeWo cells to control the growth of Chlamydophila abortus, in contrast to effects observed in HeLa cells treated with gamma interferon.  (+info)

Biological properties and cell tropism of Chp2, a bacteriophage of the obligate intracellular bacterium Chlamydophila abortus. (6/69)

A number of bacteriophages belonging to the Microviridae have been described infecting chlamydiae. Phylogenetic studies divide the Chlamydiaceae into two distinct genera, Chlamydia and Chlamydophila, containing three and six different species, respectively. In this work we investigated the biological properties and host range of the recently described bacteriophage Chp2 that was originally discovered in Chlamydophila abortus. The obligate intracellular development cycle of chlamydiae has precluded the development of quantitative approaches to assay bacteriophage infectivity. Thus, we prepared hybridomas secreting monoclonal antibodies (monoclonal antibodies 40 and 55) that were specific for Chp2. We demonstrated that Chp2 binds both C. abortus elementary bodies and reticulate bodies in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Monoclonal antibodies 40 and 55 also detected bacteriophage Chp2 antigens in chlamydia-infected eukaryotic cells. We used these monoclonal antibodies to monitor the ability of Chp2 to infect all nine species of chlamydiae. Chp2 does not infect members of the genus Chlamydia (C. trachomatis, C. suis, or C. muridarum). Chp2 can infect C. abortus, C. felis, and C. pecorum but is unable to infect other members of this genus, including C. caviae and C. pneumoniae, despite the fact that these chlamydial species support the replication of very closely related bacteriophages.  (+info)

An etiological investigation of domestic cats with conjunctivitis and upper respiratory tract disease in Japan. (7/69)

Chlamydophila felis (C. felis), feline herpesvirus-1 (FHV-1) and feline calicivirus (FCV) were detected in 39 (59.1%), 11 (16.7%) and 14 (21.2%) cats respectively, from 66 domestic cats presented with conjunctivitis and upper respiratory tract disease (URTD) in 9 prefectures of Japan. Dual and multiple infections were found in 7 (10.6%) cats with both C. felis and FHV-1, 10 (15.2%) cats with both C. felis and FCV, and 1 (1.5%) cat with all three agents. C. felis was isolated from 11 (28.2%) of 39 PCR positive cats. Antigenic difference was found in a 96 kDa protein of our isolates and Fe/145 strain isolated in USA. In conclusion, C. felis is the most common agent of feline conjunctivitis and URTD, and the coinfection with C. felis, FHV-1 and FCV are also common in cats in Japan.  (+info)

Protection evaluation against Chlamydophila abortus challenge by DNA vaccination with a dnaK-encoding plasmid in pregnant and non-pregnant mice. (8/69)

Mice were intramuscularly immunized with a dnaK-encoding DNA plasmid. The protective effect of DNA immunization against Chlamydophila abortus infection was studied in pregnant and non-pregnant mice models. In non-pregnant mice, the dnaK vaccine induced a specific humoral response with the predominant IgG2a isotype, which failed to have in vitro neutralizing properties. No delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction was observed and the spleens of dnaK vaccinated-mice were not protected against C. abortus challenge. In pregnant mice, the dnaK vaccine induced a non-specific partial protection from abortion. This may be due to the immunogenic properties of the CpG motifs of bacterial DNA present in the vaccinal plasmid backbone. Nevertheless, spleens of dnaK vaccinated-pregnant mice were not protected.  (+info)

Some common types of Chlamydophila infections include:

1. Pneumonia: Chlamydophila pneumoniae can cause pneumonia, which is an inflammation of the lungs that can lead to fever, cough, chest pain, and difficulty breathing.
2. Trachoma: Chlamydia trachomatis can cause trachoma, a highly contagious eye infection that can lead to blindness if left untreated.
3. Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID): Chlamydia trachomatis and Chlamydia psittaci can cause PID, an infection of the female reproductive organs that can lead to chronic pelvic pain, infertility, and ectopic pregnancy.
4. Urinary tract infections (UTIs): Chlamydia trachomatis and Chlamydia caviae can cause UTIs, which are infections of the urinary tract that can lead to symptoms such as burning during urination and frequent urination.
5. Rectal infections: Chlamydia trachomatis and Chlamydia psittaci can cause rectal infections, which can lead to symptoms such as rectal pain, bleeding, and discharge.

Chlamydophila infections are typically treated with antibiotics, and early treatment can help prevent long-term complications and reduce the risk of transmission to others. It is important to practice safe sex and good hygiene to prevent the spread of these infections.

Psittacosis is a zoonotic disease, meaning it can be transmitted between animals and humans. It is important to take precautions when handling birds or their droppings to avoid infection. Treatment of psittacosis typically involves antibiotics, and early diagnosis and treatment can help prevent complications and improve outcomes.

Psittacosis is a rare disease, but it is important for veterinarians, avian specialists, and other professionals who work with birds to be aware of the risk of transmission and take appropriate precautions to protect themselves and others.

Definition:

Veterinary abortion refers to the intentional termination of a pregnancy in an animal, typically a farm or domesticated animal such as a dog, cat, horse, cow, or pig. The procedure is performed by a veterinarian and is usually done for reasons such as unwanted breeding, disease or genetic disorders in the fetus, or to prevent overpopulation of certain species.

Types of Veterinary Abortion:

1. Spontaneous Abortion (Miscarriage): This occurs naturally when the pregnancy is terminated by natural causes such as infection or trauma.
2. Induced Abortion: This is performed by a veterinarian using various methods such as injection of drugs or surgical procedures to terminate the pregnancy.

Methods of Veterinary Abortion:

1. Drug-induced abortion: This method involves administering medication to the animal to cause uterine contractions and expulsion of the fetus.
2. Surgical abortion: This method involves surgical intervention to remove the fetus from the uterus, usually through a small incision in the abdomen.
3. Non-surgical abortion: This method uses a device to remove the fetus from the uterus without making an incision.

Complications and Risks of Veterinary Abortion:

1. Infection: As with any surgical procedure, there is a risk of infection.
2. Hemorrhage: Excessive bleeding can occur during or after the procedure.
3. Uterine rupture: In rare cases, the uterus may rupture during the procedure.
4. Incomplete abortion: In some cases, not all of the fetus may be removed, leading to complications later on.
5. Scarring: Scars may form in the uterus or abdomen after the procedure, which can lead to reproductive problems in the future.

Prevention of Unwanted Pregnancies in Animals:

1. Spaying/neutering: This is the most effective way to prevent unwanted pregnancies in animals.
2. Breeding management: Proper breeding management, including selecting healthy and fertile breeding animals, can help reduce the risk of unwanted pregnancies.
3. Use of contraceptives: Hormonal contraceptives, such as injection or implants, can be used in some species to prevent pregnancy.
4. Behavioral management: In some cases, behavioral management techniques, such as separation or rehoming of animals, may be necessary to prevent unwanted breeding.

Ethical Considerations of Veterinary Abortion:

1. Animal welfare: The procedure should only be performed when necessary and with the intention of improving the animal's welfare.
2. Owner consent: Owners must provide informed consent before the procedure can be performed.
3. Veterinarian expertise: The procedure should only be performed by a licensed veterinarian with experience in the procedure.
4. Alternative options: All alternative options, such as spaying/neutering or rehoming, should be considered before performing an abortion.

Conclusion:

Veterinary abortion is a complex issue that requires careful consideration of ethical and practical factors. While it may be necessary in some cases to prevent the suffering of unwanted litters, it is important to approach the procedure with caution and respect for animal welfare. Owners must provide informed consent, and the procedure should only be performed by a licensed veterinarian with experience in the procedure. Alternative options, such as spaying/neutering or rehoming, should also be considered before performing an abortion. Ultimately, the decision to perform a veterinary abortion should be made with the intention of improving the animal's welfare and quality of life.

Chlamydiaceae infections are a group of bacterial infections caused by the bacterium Chlamydia. These infections can affect various parts of the body, including the respiratory tract, genitourinary tract, and eyes. Chlamydia is a common cause of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and can also be spread through contact with infected bodily fluids.

Types of Chlamydiaceae Infections:

1. Trachoma: A bacterial eye infection that can lead to blindness if left untreated.
2. Chlamydia trachomatis pneumonia: A type of pneumonia caused by the bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis.
3. Lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV): A rare and severe STI caused by the bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis that affects the lymphatic system.
4. Rectal infections: Chlamydia can infect the rectum and cause symptoms such as rectal pain, bleeding, and discharge.
5. Proctitis: Inflammation of the rectum and anus caused by Chlamydia.
6. Endometritis: Inflammation of the lining of the uterus caused by Chlamydia.
7. Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID): A condition that affects the reproductive organs in women and can be caused by Chlamydia.
8. Epididymitis: Inflammation of the epididymis, a tube that stores sperm, caused by Chlamydia.

Symptoms of Chlamydiaceae Infections:

The symptoms of Chlamydiaceae infections can vary depending on the type of infection and the individual infected. Common symptoms include:

* Discharge from the eyes or genitals
* Painful urination
* Abnormal vaginal bleeding
* Pain during sex
* Swollen lymph nodes
* Fever
* Headache
* Fatigue
* Abdominal pain
* Nausea and vomiting

Diagnosis of Chlamydiaceae Infections:

Diagnosis of Chlamydiaceae infections is typically made through a combination of physical examination, medical history, and laboratory tests. Laboratory tests may include:

1. PCR (polymerase chain reaction) test: A test that detects the presence of Chlamydia trachomatis DNA in a sample of cells or tissue.
2. NAAT (nucleic acid amplification test): A test that detects the presence of Chlamydia trachomatis RNA or DNA in a sample of cells or tissue.
3. Culture: A test that grows Chlamydia trachomatis bacteria from a sample of cells or tissue.
4. Immunoassay: A test that detects the presence of antibodies against Chlamydia trachomatis in the blood or other body fluids.

Treatment of Chlamydiaceae Infections:

Chlamydiaceae infections are typically treated with antibiotics. The choice of antibiotic depends on the severity and location of the infection, as well as the patient's age, health status, and any allergies they may have. Common antibiotics used to treat Chlamydiaceae infections include:

1. Azithromycin (Z-Pak)
2. Doxycycline
3. Erythromycin
4. Levofloxacin (Levaquin)
5. Ofloxacin (Floxin)
6. Ceftriaxone (Rocephin)
7. Ciprofloxacin (Cipro)

It is important to note that antibiotics should only be prescribed by a healthcare professional, and the patient should complete the full course of treatment as directed, even if symptoms resolve before finishing the medication. Untreated Chlamydiaceae infections can lead to serious complications, such as infertility, ectopic pregnancy, and pelvic inflammatory disease.

Prevention of Chlamydiaceae Infections:
To prevent Chlamydiaceae infections, it is important to practice safe sex, including:

1. Using condoms or dental dams for all sexual activities
2. Avoiding sexual contact with anyone who has a Chlamydiaceae infection
3. Getting regularly tested for Chlamydiaceae infections if you are sexually active
4. Informing any sexual partners if you have a Chlamydiaceae infection
5. Using a new condom or dental dam for each sexual activity
6. Avoiding sharing of sex toys
7. Washing your hands after sexual activity
8. Getting vaccinated against Chlamydia trachomatis if you are at high risk for infection.

It is also important to note that Chlamydiaceae infections can be spread from mother to child during pregnancy and childbirth, so it is important for pregnant women to be screened and treated for Chlamydiaceae infections if they are positive.

In conclusion, Chlamydiaceae infections are a common cause of genitourinary tract infections and can have serious complications if left untreated. It is important to practice safe sex, get regularly tested, and seek medical attention if symptoms persist or worsen over time. With proper treatment and prevention methods, Chlamydiaceae infections can be effectively managed and the risk of complications reduced.

Examples of Bird Diseases:

1. Avian Influenza (Bird Flu): A viral disease that affects birds and can be transmitted to humans, causing respiratory illness and other symptoms.
2. Psittacosis (Parrot Fever): A bacterial infection caused by Chlamydophila psittaci, which can infect a wide range of bird species and can be transmitted to humans.
3. Aspergillosis: A fungal infection that affects birds, particularly parrots and other Psittacines, causing respiratory problems and other symptoms.
4. Beak and Feather Disease: A viral disease that affects birds, particularly parrots and other Psittacines, causing feather loss and beak deformities.
5. West Nile Virus: A viral disease that can affect birds, as well as humans and other animals, causing a range of symptoms including fever, headache, and muscle weakness.
6. Chlamydophila psittaci: A bacterial infection that can infect birds, particularly parrots and other Psittacines, causing respiratory problems and other symptoms.
7. Mycobacteriosis: A bacterial infection caused by Mycobacterium avium, which can affect a wide range of bird species, including parrots and other Psittacines.
8. Pacheco's Disease: A viral disease that affects birds, particularly parrots and other Psittacines, causing respiratory problems and other symptoms.
9. Polyomavirus: A viral disease that can affect birds, particularly parrots and other Psittacines, causing a range of symptoms including respiratory problems and feather loss.
10. Retinoblastoma: A type of cancer that affects the eyes of birds, particularly parrots and other Psittacines.

It's important to note that many of these diseases can be prevented or treated with proper care and management, including providing a clean and spacious environment, offering a balanced diet, and ensuring access to fresh water and appropriate medical care.

Symptoms:

* Fever
* Cough
* Chest pain or tightness
* Shortness of breath
* Headache
* Muscle aches
* Fatigue

Diagnosis:

* Physical examination
* Complete blood count (CBC)
* Blood cultures
* Chest X-ray
* Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)

Treatment:

* Antibiotics (macrolides, fluoroquinolones, and aminoglycosides)
* Supportive care (fluids, oxygen therapy, pain management)

Prevention:

* Vaccination (not available in the US)
* Good hand hygiene
* Avoiding close contact with people who are sick

Prognosis:

* Most cases of Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia are mild and resolve quickly with antibiotic treatment.
* In severe cases, the infection can spread to other parts of the body and cause serious complications such as respiratory failure, sepsis, and meningitis.

Epidemiology:

* Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a common cause of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) worldwide.
* It is more common in children than adults.
* The incidence of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection varies by age, with the highest incidence in children under 5 years old.

Sheep diseases can be caused by a variety of factors, including bacteria, viruses, parasites, and environmental factors. Here are some common sheep diseases and their meanings:

1. Scrapie: A fatal neurological disorder that affects sheep and goats, caused by a prion.
2. Ovine Progressive Pneumonia (OPP): A contagious respiratory disease caused by Mycobacterium ovipneumoniae.
3. Maedi-Visna: A slow-progressing pneumonia caused by a retrovirus, which can lead to OPP.
4. Foot-and-Mouth Disease (FMD): A highly contagious viral disease that affects cloven-hoofed animals, including sheep and goats.
5. Bloat: A condition caused by gas accumulation in the rumen, which can lead to abdominal pain and death if not treated promptly.
6. Pneumonia: An inflammation of the lungs, often caused by bacteria or viruses.
7. Cryptosporidiosis: A diarrheal disease caused by Cryptosporidium parvum, which can be fatal in young lambs.
8. Babesiosis: A blood parasitic disease caused by Babesia oviparasites, which can lead to anemia and death if left untreated.
9. Fascioliasis: A liver fluke infection that can cause anemia, jaundice, and liver damage.
10. Anthrax: A serious bacterial disease caused by Bacillus anthracis, which can be fatal if left untreated.

Sheep diseases can have a significant impact on the health and productivity of flocks, as well as the economy of sheep farming. It is important for sheep farmers to be aware of these diseases and take appropriate measures to prevent and control them.

1. Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLV): This is a highly contagious virus that weakens the immune system, making cats more susceptible to other infections and cancer.
2. Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV): Similar to HIV in humans, this virus attacks the immune system and can lead to a range of secondary infections and diseases.
3. Feline Infectious Peritonitis (FIP): A viral disease that causes fluid accumulation in the abdomen and chest, leading to difficulty breathing and abdominal pain.
4. Feline Lower Urinary Tract Disease (FLUTD): A group of conditions that affect the bladder and urethra, including urinary tract infections and kidney stones.
5. Feline Diabetes: Cats can develop diabetes, which can lead to a range of complications if left untreated, including urinary tract infections, kidney disease, and blindness.
6. Feline Hyperthyroidism: An overactive thyroid gland that can cause weight loss, anxiety, and heart problems if left untreated.
7. Feline Cancer: Cats can develop various types of cancer, including lymphoma, leukemia, and skin cancer.
8. Dental disease: Cats are prone to dental problems, such as tartar buildup, gum disease, and tooth resorption.
9. Obesity: A common problem in cats, obesity can lead to a range of health issues, including diabetes, arthritis, and heart disease.
10. Behavioral disorders: Cats can develop behavioral disorders such as anxiety, stress, and aggression, which can impact their quality of life and relationships with humans.

It's important to note that many of these diseases can be prevented or managed with proper care, including regular veterinary check-ups, vaccinations, parasite control, a balanced diet, exercise, and mental stimulation. Additionally, early detection and treatment can significantly improve the outcome for cats with health issues.

Zoonoses (zoonosis) refers to infectious diseases that can be transmitted between animals and humans. These diseases are caused by a variety of pathogens, including bacteria, viruses, parasites, and fungi, and can be spread through contact with infected animals or contaminated animal products.

Examples of Zoonoses

Some common examples of zoonoses include:

1. Rabies: a viral infection that can be transmitted to humans through the bite of an infected animal, typically dogs, bats, or raccoons.
2. Lyme disease: a bacterial infection caused by Borrelia burgdorferi, which is spread to humans through the bite of an infected blacklegged tick (Ixodes scapularis).
3. Toxoplasmosis: a parasitic infection caused by Toxoplasma gondii, which can be transmitted to humans through contact with contaminated cat feces or undercooked meat.
4. Leptospirosis: a bacterial infection caused by Leptospira interrogans, which is spread to humans through contact with contaminated water or soil.
5. Avian influenza (bird flu): a viral infection that can be transmitted to humans through contact with infected birds or contaminated surfaces.

Transmission of Zoonoses

Zoonoses can be transmitted to humans in a variety of ways, including:

1. Direct contact with infected animals or contaminated animal products.
2. Contact with contaminated soil, water, or other environmental sources.
3. Through vectors such as ticks, mosquitoes, and fleas.
4. By consuming contaminated food or water.
5. Through close contact with an infected person or animal.

Prevention of Zoonoses

Preventing the transmission of zoonoses requires a combination of personal protective measures, good hygiene practices, and careful handling of animals and animal products. Some strategies for preventing zoonoses include:

1. Washing hands frequently, especially after contact with animals or their waste.
2. Avoiding direct contact with wild animals and avoiding touching or feeding stray animals.
3. Cooking meat and eggs thoroughly to kill harmful bacteria.
4. Keeping pets up to date on vaccinations and preventative care.
5. Avoiding consumption of raw or undercooked meat, particularly poultry and pork.
6. Using insect repellents and wearing protective clothing when outdoors in areas where vectors are prevalent.
7. Implementing proper sanitation and hygiene practices in animal housing and husbandry.
8. Implementing strict biosecurity measures on farms and in animal facilities to prevent the spread of disease.
9. Providing education and training to individuals working with animals or in areas where zoonoses are prevalent.
10. Monitoring for and reporting cases of zoonotic disease to help track and control outbreaks.

Conclusion

Zoonoses are diseases that can be transmitted between animals and humans, posing a significant risk to human health and animal welfare. Understanding the causes, transmission, and prevention of zoonoses is essential for protecting both humans and animals from these diseases. By implementing appropriate measures such as avoiding contact with wild animals, cooking meat thoroughly, keeping pets up to date on vaccinations, and implementing proper sanitation and biosecurity practices, we can reduce the risk of zoonotic disease transmission and protect public health and animal welfare.

The most common bacteria that cause pneumonia are Streptococcus pneumoniae (also known as pneumococcus), Haemophilus influenzae, and Staphylococcus aureus. These bacteria can infect the lungs through various routes, including respiratory droplets, contaminated food or water, or direct contact with an infected person.

Symptoms of pneumonia may include cough, fever, chills, shortness of breath, and chest pain. In severe cases, pneumonia can lead to serious complications such as respiratory failure, sepsis, and death.

Diagnosis of pneumonia typically involves a physical examination, medical history, and diagnostic tests such as chest X-rays or blood cultures. Treatment typically involves antibiotics to eliminate the infection, as well as supportive care to manage symptoms and prevent complications. Vaccines are also available to protect against certain types of bacterial pneumonia, particularly in children and older adults.

Preventative measures for bacterial pneumonia include:

* Getting vaccinated against Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib)
* Practicing good hygiene, such as washing hands regularly and covering the mouth and nose when coughing or sneezing
* Avoiding close contact with people who are sick
* Staying hydrated and getting enough rest
* Quitting smoking, if applicable
* Managing underlying medical conditions, such as diabetes or heart disease

It is important to seek medical attention promptly if symptoms of pneumonia develop, particularly in high-risk populations. Early diagnosis and treatment can help prevent serious complications and improve outcomes for patients with bacterial pneumonia.

1. Caprine arthritis-encephalitis (CAE): A viral disease that affects the joints and central nervous system of goats.
2. Caseous lymphadenitis (CLA): A bacterial infection that causes abscesses in the lymph nodes and other organs.
3. Contagious ecthyma (Orf): A viral disease that causes skin lesions and scarring.
4. Goat pox: A viral disease that causes fever, weakness, and skin lesions.
5. Pneumonia: A bacterial or viral infection of the lungs that can be caused by a variety of pathogens.
6. Scabies: A parasitic infestation that causes skin irritation and hair loss.
7. Tetanus: A neurological disorder caused by a bacterial toxin that affects muscle contractions.
8. Toxoplasmosis: A parasitic infection that can cause fever, anemia, and other symptoms in goats.
9. Urinary tract infections (UTIs): Bacterial infections of the urinary system that can affect both male and female goats.
10. Vitamin deficiencies: Deficiencies in vitamins such as vitamin A, D, or E can cause a range of health problems in goats, including skin conditions, poor appetite, and weakness.

Goat diseases can be diagnosed through physical examination, laboratory tests, and imaging studies. Treatment depends on the specific disease and may involve antibiotics, antiviral medications, or supportive care such as fluid therapy and nutritional supplements. Prevention is key in managing goat diseases, and this includes maintaining good hygiene, providing clean water and a balanced diet, and vaccinating goats against common diseases.

Symptoms include:

* Redness and swelling of the conjunctiva
* Discharge (pus) in the eye
* Itching or burning sensation in the eye
* Crusting of the eyelids
* Blurred vision
* Sensitivity to light

Diagnosis is usually made based on symptoms and physical examination, but may require laboratory testing to rule out other causes.

Treatment typically includes antibiotic eye drops or ointments, which can help to clear up the infection within a few days. In severe cases, oral antibiotics may be prescribed. Anti-inflammatory medications may also be used to reduce swelling and discomfort. Good hygiene practices, such as washing hands frequently and avoiding close contact with others, can help to prevent the spread of the infection.

Prognosis is generally good, but complications can include corneal ulcers, which can lead to vision loss if left untreated. Recurrent conjunctivitis may occur in some individuals, particularly those with weakened immune systems or other underlying medical conditions.

Prevention includes good hygiene practices, avoiding close contact with others, and avoiding sharing personal items such as towels or makeup. Vaccination against streptococcal infections can also help to prevent conjunctivitis caused by this type of bacteria.

The symptoms of chlamydia infections can vary depending on the location of the infection. In genital infections, symptoms may include:

* Discharge from the penis or vagina
* Painful urination
* Abnormal bleeding or spotting
* Painful sex
* Testicular pain in men
* Pelvic pain in women

In eye infections, symptoms can include:

* Redness and swelling of the eye
* Discharge from the eye
* Pain or sensitivity to light

In respiratory infections, symptoms may include:

* Cough
* Fever
* Shortness of breath or wheezing

If left untreated, chlamydia infections can lead to serious complications, such as pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) in women and epididymitis in men. Chlamydia infections can also increase the risk of infertility and other long-term health problems.

Chlamydia infections are typically diagnosed through a physical examination, medical history, and laboratory tests such as a nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT) or a culture test. Treatment for chlamydia infections typically involves antibiotics, which can effectively cure the infection. It is important to note that sexual partners of someone with a chlamydia infection should also be tested and treated, as they may also have the infection.

Prevention methods for chlamydia infections include safe sex practices such as using condoms and dental dams, as well as regular screening and testing for the infection. It is important to note that chlamydia infections can be asymptomatic, so regular testing is crucial for early detection and treatment.

In conclusion, chlamydia is a common sexually transmitted bacterial infection that can cause serious complications if left untreated. Early detection and treatment are key to preventing long-term health problems and the spread of the infection. Safe sex practices and regular screening are also important for preventing chlamydia infections.

Some common types of eye infections include:

1. Conjunctivitis - a highly contagious infection of the conjunctiva, which is the thin membrane that covers the white part of the eye and the inside of the eyelids. It can be caused by bacteria or virus and is commonly known as pink eye.
2. Keratitis - an inflammation of the cornea, which is the clear dome-shaped surface at the front of the eye. It can be caused by bacteria, virus or fungi.
3. Uveitis - an inflammation of the uvea, which is the layer of tissue between the sclera and retina. It can cause pain, sensitivity to light and blurred vision.
4. Endophthalmitis - a severe infection inside the eye that can cause damage to the lens, retina and other structures. It is usually caused by bacteria or fungi and can be a complication of cataract surgery or other eye procedures.
5. Dacryocystitis - an inflammation of the tear ducts and sac that can cause pain, redness and swelling in the eyelid. It is usually caused by bacteria.

Eye infections can be diagnosed through a comprehensive eye exam, which may include a visual acuity test, dilated eye exam, tonometry and imaging tests such as ultrasound or CT scans. Treatment depends on the type of infection and severity of the condition, and may involve antibiotic or antiviral medication, anti-inflammatory medication or surgery. It is important to seek medical attention if symptoms persist or worsen over time, as untreated eye infections can lead to complications such as vision loss, corneal scarring and even blindness.

There are several different types of conjunctivitis, including:

1. Allergic conjunctivitis: This type is caused by an allergic reaction and is more common in people who have a history of allergies.
2. Bacterial conjunctivitis: This type is caused by a bacterial infection and is often accompanied by a thick discharge and redness of the eye.
3. Viral conjunctivitis: This type is caused by a viral infection and is highly contagious.
4. Chemical conjunctivitis: This type is caused by exposure to chemicals or foreign objects, such as smoke, dust, or pollen.
5. Irritant conjunctivitis: This type is caused by exposure to irritants such as chemicals or foreign objects.

Symptoms of conjunctivitis can include redness and discharge of the eye, itching, burning, and tearing. Treatment typically involves antibiotic eye drops or ointments for bacterial conjunctivitis, anti-inflammatory medication for allergic conjunctivitis, and viral conjunctivitis is usually self-limiting and requires supportive care only.

It's important to note that conjunctivitis can be highly contagious, so it's important to practice good hygiene, such as washing your hands frequently, avoiding sharing personal items like towels or makeup, and not touching the eyes. If you suspect you have conjunctivitis, it's important to see a healthcare professional for proper diagnosis and treatment.

Some common types of eye neoplasms include:

1. Uveal melanoma: This is a malignant tumor that develops in the uvea, the middle layer of the eye. It is the most common primary intraocular cancer in adults and can spread to other parts of the body if left untreated.
2. Retinoblastoma: This is a rare type of cancer that affects children and develops in the retina. It is usually diagnosed before the age of 5 and is highly treatable with surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy.
3. Conjunctival melanoma: This is a malignant tumor that develops in the conjunctiva, the thin membrane that covers the white part of the eye. It is more common in older adults and can be treated with surgery and/or radiation therapy.
4. Ocular sarcomas: These are rare types of cancer that develop in the eye tissues, including the retina, optic nerve, and uvea. They can be benign or malignant and may require surgical removal or radiation therapy.
5. Secondary intraocular tumors: These are tumors that metastasize (spread) to the eye from other parts of the body, such as breast cancer or lung cancer.

The symptoms of eye neoplasms can vary depending on their location and type, but may include:

* Blurred vision
* Eye pain or discomfort
* Redness or inflammation in the eye
* Sensitivity to light
* Floaters (specks or cobwebs in vision)
* Flashes of light
* Abnormal pupil size or shape

Early detection and treatment of eye neoplasms are important to preserve vision and prevent complications. Diagnosis is typically made through a combination of physical examination, imaging tests such as ultrasound or MRI, and biopsy (removing a small sample of tissue for examination under a microscope). Treatment options may include:

* Surgery to remove the tumor
* Radiation therapy to kill cancer cells
* Chemotherapy to destroy cancer cells with medication
* Observation and monitoring if the tumor is slow-growing or benign

It's important to seek medical attention if you experience any unusual symptoms in your eye, as early detection and treatment can improve outcomes.

... was recognized by a number of scientists in 1999, with six species in Chlamydophila and three in the original ... "Chlamydophila". List of Prokaryotic names with Standing in Nomenclature. Retrieved 2011-06-11. Chlamydophila at the US National ... Chlamydophila was still mentioned in some databases, but controversial. The merger of the genus Chlamydophila back into the ... In 2015 the Chlamydophila species were reclassified as Chlamydia. The history of the classification and reclassification is as ...
"Chlamydophila abortus". www.gov.uk. Retrieved 2017-03-25. Thomson, NR.; Yeats, C.; Bell, K.; Holden, MT.; Bentley, SD.; ... May 2005). "The Chlamydophila abortus genome sequence reveals an array of variable proteins that contribute to interspecies ... Chlamydia abortus was renamed in 1999 as Chlamydophila psittaci along with all Chlamydiota except Chlamydia trachomatis. This ... Chen, Qiwei; Gong, Xiaowei; Zheng, Fuying; Cao, Xiaoan; Li, Zhaocai; Zhou, Jizhang (2014). "Seroprevalence of Chlamydophila ...
Chlamydophila felis was then reclassified to Chlamydia felis due to dispute on the taxonomic usage of Chlamydophila, which is ... November 2011). "Chlamydophila felis in cats--are the stray cats dangerous source of infection?". Zoonoses and Public Health. ... Chlamydia felis (formerly Chlamydophila felis and before that Chlamydia psittaci var. felis) is a Gram-negative, obligate ... James A. Baker published the finding of Chlamydia felis (known as Chlamydophila felis at the time) in 1942, but did not ...
Briefly, it was known as Chlamydophila pneumoniae, and that name is used as an alternate in some sources. In some cases, to ... Chlamydia and Chlamydophila". Bacteriology Section of Microbiology and Immunology On-line. University of South Carolina School ... "Inhibition of apoptosis in neuronal cells infected with Chlamydophila (Chlamydia) pneumoniae". BMC Neuroscience. 9: 13. doi: ... "Simultaneous use of direct and indirect diagnostic techniques in atypical respiratory infections from Chlamydophila pneumoniae ...
Chlamydophila pneumoniae, formerly known as Chlamydia pneumoniae, is a bacterium that belongs to the phylum Chlamydiae, order ... Larsen, R., Pogliano, K. "Chlamydophila pneumoniae". Microbe Wiki. Retrieved 24 October 2012. Beatty, WL; Morrison, RP.; Byrne ... Chlamydiales, and genus Chlamydophila. It is rod-shaped and Gram-negative. It has a characteristic pear-shaped elementary body ...
2021 Chlamydophila Everett, Bush & Andersen 1999 ?"Ca. Medusoplasma" Viver et al. 2017 Family Parachlamydiaceae Everett, Bush ...
Mieczkowski, Melissa (2012). "Chlamydophila psittaci in a Catalina Macaw". CiteSeerX 10.1.1.899.3995. {{cite journal}}: Cite ...
Apr 2003). "Genome sequence of Chlamydophila caviae (Chlamydia psittaci GPIC): examining the role of niche-specific genes in ... Chlamydiae.com Type strain of Chlamydophila caviae at BacDive - the Bacterial Diversity Metadatabase Gaede, Wolfgang; Reckling ... "Detection of all Chlamydophila and Chlamydia spp. of veterinary interest using species-specific real-time PCR assays". ... "Detection of Chlamydophila caviae and Streptococcus equi subsp zooepidemicus in horses with signs of rhinitis and ...
... and Chlamydophila status of the waved albatross (Phoebastria irrorata) on the Galapagos Islands". Journal of Zoo and Wildlife ... Chlamydophila psittaci, and Salmonella spp. in Galapagos Islands columbiformes". Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine. 35 (1): ...
Wheldon, David B.; Stratton, Charles W. (2006-11-01). "Multiple sclerosis: an infectious syndrome involving Chlamydophila ...
2005). "The Chlamydophila abortus genome sequence reveals an array of variable proteins that contribute to interspecies ... Feb 2006). "Genome sequence of the cat pathogen, Chlamydophila felis". DNA Res. 13 (1): 15-23. doi:10.1093/dnares/dsi027. PMID ... 2003). "Genome sequence of Chlamydophila caviae (Chlamydia psittaci GPIC): examining the role of niche-specific genes in the ...
... avian ticks to transmit Chlamydophila psittaci to chickens; and claimed to have developed an automated mass insect breeding ...
In a sampling of captive birds in Poland for detection of the bacteria Chlamydophila psittaci, implicated in the infectious ... 56: 1-3. Piasecki, Tomasz; Chrząstek, Klaudia; Wieliczko, Alina (2012). "Detection and identification of Chlamydophila psittaci ...
... although in 2006 some scientists still supported the distinctness of Chlamydophila. In 2009 the validity of Chlamydophila was ... abortus was added in 2015, and the Chlamydophila species reclassified. A number of new species were originally classified as ... Chlamydophila and Chlamydia groups of species". BMC Genomics. 7: 14. doi:10.1186/1471-2164-7-14. PMC 1403754. PMID 16436211. ... split three of the species from the genus Chlamydia and reclassified them in the then newly created genus Chlamydophila, and ...
2021 Chlamydophila Everett, Bush & Andersen 1999 "Ca. Medusoplasma" Viver et al. 2017 List of bacterial orders List of bacteria ...
Harkinezhad, Taher; Geens, Tom; Vanrompay, Daisy (1 March 2009). "Chlamydophila psittaci infections in birds: A review with ...
A more controversial link is that between Chlamydophila pneumoniae infection and atherosclerosis. While this intracellular ...
Infections proposed include mononucleosis, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, human herpesvirus 6, and Lyme disease. Inflammation may be ...
The Blue Mountains Tree Frog is a host of Chlamydophila pneumoniae and Mesocoelium. It is also preyed upon by the Australian ...
Chlamydophila psittaci, a parasitic agent that can be passed between avian species, was specifically studied in the saffron ... "Survey on Chlamydophila Psittaci in Captive Ramphastids in São Paulo State, Brazil." Ciência Rural 42.7 (2012): 1249-252. Web ...
Chlamydophila is also common in pionus birds residing in Central and South America. BirdLife International (2016). "Pionus ...
Liu J, Liu JH (2006). "Ubiquinone (coenzyme Q) biosynthesis in Chlamydophila pneumoniae AR39: identification of the ubiD gene ...
Kocazeybek B (August 2003). "Chronic Chlamydophila pneumoniae infection in lung cancer, a risk factor: a case-control study". ...
Obligate intracellular parasites (e.g. Chlamydophila, Ehrlichia, Rickettsia) have the ability to only grow and replicate inside ...
... are useful in the treatment of Chlamydophila pneumoniae (Cpn) infection. Rifabutin is being tested in clinical trials for ...
Chlamydia, (specifically Chlamydophila psittaci) can persist for years if not treated, for example with tetracycline. ...
Some contagions are transmitted by pigeons; for example, the bacteria Chlamydophila psittaci is endemic among pigeons and ...
"Epizootic abortion related to infections by Chlamydophila abortus and Chlamydophila pecorum in water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis ... "Simultaneous differential detection of Chlamydophila abortus, Chlamydophila pecorum and Coxiella burnetii from aborted ... Chlamydia pecorum, also known as Chlamydophila pecorum is a species of Chlamydiaceae that originated from ruminants, such as ... Chlamydiae.com Type strain of Chlamydophila pecorum at BacDive - the Bacterial Diversity Metadatabase (Articles with short ...
... ciprofloxacin Moraxella catarrhalis Chlamydophila pneumoniae - doxycycline Chlamydophila psittaci - erythromycin Mycoplasma ... Atypical bacteria causing pneumonia are Coxiella burnetii, Chlamydophila pneumoniae (J16.0), Mycoplasma pneumoniae (J15.7), and ...
"Pink eye in sheep and goat" is another infectious keratoconjunctivitis of veterinary concern, mostly caused by Chlamydophila ...
Chlamydophila (Cp.) abortus, whose strains are nearly 100% conserved in ribosomal and ompA genes, has recently been derived as ... Chlamydophila abortus Pelvic Inflammatory Disease. Volume 9, Number 12-December 2003. Article Views: 501. Data is collected ... Chlamydophila abortus Pelvic Inflammatory Disease. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2003;9(12):1642-1644. doi:10.3201/ ... We report the first documented case of an extragestational infection with Chlamydophila abortus in humans. The pathogen was ...
Diff-Quik Cytologic Recognition of Chlamydophila psittaci in Orolabial Lesions of Stevens-Johnson Syndrome: A Case Report ... Cesar V. Reyes; Diff-Quik Cytologic Recognition of Chlamydophila psittaci in Orolabial Lesions of Stevens-Johnson Syndrome: A ...
Chlamydophila psittaci). On this page:. What to report. How to report. Who is required to report ... Psittacosis (Chlamydophila psittaci) must be reported to MDH within one working day. ...
Chlamydophila psittaci) case definitions; uniform criteria used to define a disease for public health surveillance. ... Psittacosis / Ornithosis (Chlamydophila psittaci) , 2010 Case Definition. *Psittacosis / Ornithosis (Chlamydophila psittaci) , ...
Infecções por Chlamydophila/epidemiologia Infecções por Chlamydophila/microbiologia Chlamydophila pneumoniae/genética ... Infecções por Chlamydophila/veterinária Chlamydophila pneumoniae/isolamento & purificação Reservatórios de Doenças/ ... Molecular evidence of Chlamydophila pneumoniae infection in reptiles in Argentina.. Frutos, María C; Monetti, Marina S; Ré, ... In the central area of Argentina, the epidemiological and molecular characteristics of Chlamydophila pneumoniae infections in ...
Chlamydophila pneumoniae; Haemophilus influenzae: Legionella pneumophila; Mycoplasma pneumoniae; Streptococcus pneumoniae; and ...
Chlamydophila pneumoniae / genetics * Chlamydophila pneumoniae / isolation & purification* * Community-Acquired Infections / ...
Chlamydophila pneumoniae. Mycoplasma pneumoniae The following in vitro data are available, but their clinical significance is ... influenzae, Haemophilus parainfluenzae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, or Chlamydophila pneumoniae [see Indications and Usage (1.3)]. ... Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila, or Mycoplasma pneumoniae [see Indications and Usage (1.2)]. § Due to ... or Chlamydophila pneumoniae [see Dosage and Administration (2.1) and Clinical Studies (14.3)]. ...
Chlamydophila pneumoniae also causes pneumonia. The related organism, C psittaci, is an unusual cause of pneumonia that occurs ... while the atypical bacteria Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydophila pneumoniae were detected in 14% and 9%, respectively. ...
Chlamydophila species (C psittaci, C pneumoniae): Psittacosis, also known as parrot disease or parrot fever, is caused by C ...
... and Chlamydophila abortus. The Préalpes du Sud breed was chosen for its low prolificity (1.43). Sheep were housed at the ...
CHLAMYDOPHILA. CHLAMYDOPHILA. CHLAMYDOPHILA. CICLOFILINA A. CYCLOPHILIN A. CICLOFILINA A. CICLOFILINAS. CYCLOPHILINS. ...
Categories: Chlamydophila Image Types: Photo, Illustrations, Video, Color, Black&White, PublicDomain, CopyrightRestricted 7 ...
Pneumonia due to Chlamydophila pneumoniae bacteria occurs year round.. *Pneumonia due to Legionella pneumophila bacteria is ... Pneumonia due to mycoplasma and chlamydophila bacteria is usually mild. Pneumonia due to legionella gets worse during the first ... Most people with pneumonia due to mycoplasma or chlamydophila get better with the right antibiotics. Legionella pneumonia can ...
Chlamydophila psittaci, a parasitic agent that can be passed between avian species, was specifically studied in the saffron ... "Survey on Chlamydophila Psittaci in Captive Ramphastids in São Paulo State, Brazil." Ciência Rural 42.7 (2012): 1249-252. Web ...
"Chlamydophila pneumoniae Infection and Its Role in Neurological Disorders.". Interdiscip Perspect Infect Dis. 2010;2010:273573 ... Chlamydophila pneumoniae inhibits differentiation of progenitor adipose cells and impairs insulin signaling ...
Psittacosis (ornithosis) caused by Chlamydophila psittaci. *Indicated for respiratory tract infections caused by the following ...
The most common bacterial antagonist is feline chlamydophila, which can be accompanied by upper respiratory symptoms, says the ...
The presence of antibodies against Chlamydophila (Chlamydia) psittaci insmall mammals ( Insectivora, Rodentia ) in the region ... The presence of antibodies against Chlamydophila (Chlamydia) psittaci insmall mammals (Insectivora, Rodentia) in the region of ... Each serum was examined by micromethod of complement binding reactions using antigen Chlamydophila (Chlamydia) psittaci. ... Occurrence of antibodies against Chlamydophila abortus in sheep and goats in the Slovak Republic. ...
Objective-To use PCR assays to determine the prevalence of feline herpesvirus 1 (FHV-1), Chlamydophila felis, and Mycoplasma ... Prevalence of feline herpesvirus 1, Chlamydophila felis, and Mycoplasma spp DNA in conjunctival cells collected from cats with ...
Epithelial cells infected with Chlamydophila pneumoniae (Chlamydia pneumoniae) are resistant to apoptosis. Infection and ... of apoptosis proteins are required for apoptosis resistance of epithelial cells persistently infected with Chlamydophila ...
... and Chlamydophila pneumoniae. (Web site). ...
Chlamydophila abortus United Kingdom 11/02/2021 Metomotyl 2.5 mg/ml Solution for Injection for Cats and Dogs Le Vet Beheer B.V ...
Chlamydophila do not produce detectable quantities of glycogen. The type species is CHLAMYDOPHILA PSITTACI. ... Chlamydophila do not produce detectable quantities of glycogen. The type species is CHLAMYDOPHILA PSITTACI.. ... Chlamydophila no produce cantidades detectables de glucógeno. La especie tipo es CHLAMYDOPHILA PSITTACI.. ... Chlamydophila - Preferred Concept UI. M0363640. Scope note. A genus of the family CHLAMYDIACEAE comprising gram-negative non ...
Chlamydophila abortus. *Cultura sêmen/ diluente Para: bactérias + fungos. *Cultura material uterino para: bactérias + fungos ...
Chlamydophila pneumoniae. Description of the Pathogen. Influenza A:. *Influenza A is a type of virus that causes influenza (the ...
668 Chlamydophila Pneumoniae................................................684 Pulmonary Fibrosis: Role of Chlamydophila ...
  • CDC researchers have isolated select Chlamydophila pneumoniae peptide epitopes for development of vaccines and diagnostic assays. (nih.gov)
  • Molecular evidence of Chlamydophila pneumoniae infection in reptiles in Argentina. (bvsalud.org)
  • In the central area of Argentina , the epidemiological and molecular characteristics of Chlamydophila pneumoniae infections in reptiles are still unknown. (bvsalud.org)
  • Pneumonia due to Chlamydophila pneumoniae bacteria occurs year round. (medlineplus.gov)
  • The prevalence and burden of disease caused by the atypical bacteria ( Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae and Legionella pneumophila) are not well defined in South Africa. (who.int)
  • Other chlamydiae ( Chlamydia trachomatis, C. muridarum and Chlamydophila pneumoniae ) lack genes encoding PRPP synthase, kynureninase, and either lack tryptophan-pathway genes altogether or exhibit various stages of reductive loss. (biomedcentral.com)
  • NF-kappa B and inhibitor of apoptosis proteins are required for apoptosis resistance of epithelial cells persistently infected with Chlamydophila pneumoniae. (mpg.de)
  • Epithelial cells infected with Chlamydophila pneumoniae (Chlamydia pneumoniae) are resistant to apoptosis. (mpg.de)
  • Atypical pneumonia refers to pneumonia caused by certain bacteria, including Legionella pneumophila, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, and Chlamydophila pneumoniae. (keywen.com)
  • Psittacosis ( Chlamydophila psittaci ) must be reported to MDH within one working day. (mn.us)
  • Chlamydophila psittaci was found to possess a compact operon containing PRPP synthase, kynureninase, and genes encoding all but the first step of tryptophan biosynthesis. (biomedcentral.com)
  • 16. Biased immunoglobulin light chain use in the Chlamydophila psittaci negative ocular adnexal marginal zone lymphomas. (nih.gov)
  • The presence of antibodies against Chlamydophila (Chlamydia) psittaci insmall mammals ( Insectivora, Rodentia ) in the region of East Slovakia are presented. (aaem.pl)
  • Each serum was examined by micromethod of complement binding reactions using antigen Chlamydophila ( Chlamydia ) psittaci . (aaem.pl)
  • Pneumonia due to mycoplasma and chlamydophila bacteria is usually mild. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Most people with pneumonia due to mycoplasma or chlamydophila get better with the right antibiotics. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Occurrence of Chlamydophila felis in a cattery in Osasco city, São Paulo state. (usp.br)
  • We report the first documented case of an extragestational infection with Chlamydophila abortus in humans. (cdc.gov)
  • The most common bacterial antagonist is feline chlamydophila, which can be accompanied by upper respiratory symptoms, says the ASPCA Pet Health Insurance . (hillspet.com)
  • Chlamydophila do not produce detectable quantities of glycogen. (nih.gov)
  • Chlamydophila no produce cantidades detectables de glucógeno. (bvsalud.org)
  • Pneumonia due to mycoplasma and chlamydophila bacteria is usually mild. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Most people with pneumonia due to mycoplasma or chlamydophila get better with the right antibiotics. (medlineplus.gov)
  • High prevalence of natural Chlamydophila species infection in calves. (nih.gov)