Child Welfare: Organized efforts by communities or organizations to improve the health and well-being of the child.Foster Home Care: Families who care for neglected children or patients unable to care for themselves.Child, Abandoned: A child or adolescent who is deserted by parents or parent substitutes without regard for its future care.Child Abuse: Abuse of children in a family, institutional, or other setting. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Animal Welfare: The protection of animals in laboratories or other specific environments by promoting their health through better nutrition, housing, and care.Social Welfare: Organized institutions which provide services to ameliorate conditions of need or social pathology in the community.Child Custody: The formally authorized guardianship or care of a CHILD.Social Work, Psychiatric: Use of all social work processes in the treatment of patients in a psychiatric or mental health setting.Social Work: The use of community resources, individual case work, or group work to promote the adaptive capacities of individuals in relation to their social and economic environments. It includes social service agencies.Adoption: Voluntary acceptance of a child of other parents to be as one's own child, usually with legal confirmation.Child Health Services: Organized services to provide health care for children.Child, Exceptional: A child whose needs, abilities, or other characteristics vary so much from the average in mental, physical, or social areas that a greater than usual level of services is needed to facilitate the child's maximum potential development.Mental Health Services: Organized services to provide mental health care.Child Care: Care of CHILDREN in the home or in an institution.Child Behavior Disorders: Disturbances considered to be pathological based on age and stage appropriateness, e.g., conduct disturbances and anaclitic depression. This concept does not include psychoneuroses, psychoses, or personality disorders with fixed patterns.Child Behavior: Any observable response or action of a child from 24 months through 12 years of age. For neonates or children younger than 24 months, INFANT BEHAVIOR is available.United StatesJuvenile Delinquency: The antisocial acts of children or persons under age which are illegal or lawfully interpreted as constituting delinquency.Public Policy: A course or method of action selected, usually by a government, from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions.Parents: Persons functioning as natural, adoptive, or substitute parents. The heading includes the concept of parenthood as well as preparation for becoming a parent.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Caregivers: Persons who provide care to those who need supervision or assistance in illness or disability. They may provide the care in the home, in a hospital, or in an institution. Although caregivers include trained medical, nursing, and other health personnel, the concept also refers to parents, spouses, or other family members, friends, members of the clergy, teachers, social workers, fellow patients.Disabled Children: Children with mental or physical disabilities that interfere with usual activities of daily living and that may require accommodation or intervention.Community Mental Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive mental health services provided for individuals in the community.Health Services Needs and Demand: Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.Aid to Families with Dependent Children: Financial assistance provided by the government to indigent families with dependent children who meet certain requirements as defined by the Social Security Act, Title IV, in the U.S.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Substance-Related Disorders: Disorders related to substance abuse.Family: A social group consisting of parents or parent substitutes and children.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Animal Husbandry: The science of breeding, feeding and care of domestic animals; includes housing and nutrition.Animal Experimentation: The use of animals as investigational subjects.Child Rearing: The training or bringing-up of children by parents or parent-substitutes. It is used also for child rearing practices in different societies, at different economic levels, in different ethnic groups, etc. It differs from PARENTING in that in child rearing the emphasis is on the act of training or bringing up the child and the interaction between the parent and child, while parenting emphasizes the responsibility and qualities of exemplary behavior of the parent.Housing, AnimalChild, Institutionalized: A child who is receiving long-term in-patient services or who resides in an institutional setting.Child Psychology: The study of normal and abnormal behavior of children.Child, Orphaned: Child who has lost both parents through death or desertion.Child of Impaired Parents: Child with one or more parents afflicted by a physical or mental disorder.Dental Care for Children: The giving of attention to the special dental needs of children, including the prevention of tooth diseases and instruction in dental hygiene and dental health. The dental care may include the services provided by dental specialists.Mothers: Female parents, human or animal.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Animal Rights: The moral and ethical bases of the protection of animals from cruelty and abuse. The rights are extended to domestic animals, laboratory animals, and wild animals.Animal Care Committees: Institutional committees established to protect the welfare of animals used in research and education. The 1971 NIH Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals introduced the policy that institutions using warm-blooded animals in projects supported by NIH grants either be accredited by a recognized professional laboratory animal accrediting body or establish its own committee to evaluate animal care; the Public Health Service adopted a policy in 1979 requiring such committees; and the 1985 amendments to the Animal Welfare Act mandate review and approval of federally funded research with animals by a formally designated Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC).Animals, LaboratoryPoverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.Child Nutrition Disorders: Disorders caused by nutritional imbalance, either overnutrition or undernutrition, occurring in children ages 2 to 12 years.Child Language: The language and sounds expressed by a child at a particular maturational stage in development.Infant Welfare: Organized efforts by communities or organizations to improve the health and well-being of infants.Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena: Nutritional physiology of children aged 2-12 years.Maternal Welfare: Organized efforts by communities or organizations to improve the health and well-being of the mother.Child Mortality: Number of deaths of children between one year of age to 12 years of age in a given population.Animals, Domestic: Animals which have become adapted through breeding in captivity to a life intimately associated with humans. They include animals domesticated by humans to live and breed in a tame condition on farms or ranches for economic reasons, including LIVESTOCK (specifically CATTLE; SHEEP; HORSES; etc.), POULTRY; and those raised or kept for pleasure and companionship, e.g., PETS; or specifically DOGS; CATS; etc.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.

The role of domestic factors and day-care attendance on lung function of primary school children. (1/1572)

The results of studies examining the relationship of domestic factors to lung function are contradictory. We therefore examined the independent effects of maternal smoking during pregnancy, exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), the presence of a cat, type of heating and cooking used in the home and day-care attendance on lung function after controlling for socioeconomic status (SES). Nine hundred and eighty-nine children from 18 Montreal schools were studied between April 1990 and November 1992. Information on the child's health and exposure to domestic factors was collected by questionnaire. Spirometry was performed at school. The data were analysed by multiple linear regression with percent predicted FEV1, FVC, and FEV1/FVC as dependent variables. In the overall sample (both sexes combined), cat in the home (regression coefficient, beta = -1.15, 95% confidence interval, CI: -2.26-(-)0.05) and electric baseboard units (beta = -1.26, 95% CI: -2.39-(-)0.13) were independently associated with a lower FEV1/FVC, while day-care attendance (beta = -2.05, 95% CI: -3.71-(-)0.40) significantly reduced FEV1. Household ETS was significantly associated with increasing level of FVC (beta = 2.86, 95% CI: +0.55 to +5.17). In boys but not girls, household ETS (beta = -2.13, 95% CI: -4.07-(-)0.19) and the presence of a cat (beta = -2.19, 95% CI: -3.94-(-)0.45) were associated with lower FEV1/FVC. By contrast, day-care attendance was associated with lower FEV1 (beta = -2.92, 95% CI: -5.27-(-)0.56) and FEV1/FVC (beta = -1.53, 95% CI: -2.73-(-)0.33) in girls only. In conclusion, the results provide evidence that domestic factors and day-care attendance primarily affected airway caliber and gender differences were apparent in the effects of these factors.  (+info)

A management information system for nurse/midwives. (2/1572)

The experiences of nurse/midwives with a simple management information system in the private sector are reported from four facilities in Nigeria. When such a system is being introduced, special attention should be given to strengthening the ability of health workers to record and collate data satisfactorily.  (+info)

Developing communality: family-centered programs to improve children's health and well-being. (3/1572)

Despite decades of enormous investment in research and public programs, the United States continues to face pandemics of preventable health problems such as low birth weight, teenage pregnancy, drug abuse, and interpersonal violence. With some justification, these problems have been blamed on the failings of families. The reasons why families may function poorly in their child-rearing roles have not been coherently or vigorously addressed by our social policies; sometimes these policies have aggravated the problems. This paper provides background to allow a better understanding of families' role in the social determination of children's health, and argues for programs and policies that assist families through the creation of social supports embedded in communities that are characterized by trust and mutual obligation.  (+info)

The determinants of infant and child mortality in Tanzania. (4/1572)

This paper investigates the determinants of infant and child mortality in Tanzania using the 1991/92 Tanzania Demographic and Health Survey. A hazards model is used to assess the relative effect of the variables hypothesized to influence under-five mortality. Short birth intervals, teenage pregnancies and previous child deaths are associated with increased risk of death. The Government of the United Republic of Tanzania should therefore maintain its commitment to encouraging women to space their births at least two years apart and delay childbearing beyond the teenage years. Further, this study shows that there is a remarkable lack of infant and child mortality differentials by socioeconomic subgroups of the population, which may reflect post-independence health policy and development strategies. Whilst lack of socioeconomic differentials can be considered an achievement of government policies, mortality remains high so there is still a long way to go before Tanzania achieves its stated goal of 'Health for All'.  (+info)

Childcare needs of female street vendors in Mexico City. (5/1572)

This article reports on strategies developed by female street vendors (vendedoras ambulantes) in Mexico City to ensure the care of their young children in the absence of a specific and operational government policy to fulfil this need. The information concerning child care and health was gathered by a survey of 426 street traders selected by multi-stage random cluster sampling in four of the administrative districts (delegaciones politicas) of Mexico City during 1990. It was found that, as mothers of young children, street vendors most frequently looked after their children personally on the street or left them with other members of the family. Related factors were availability of alternative child care providers in the family, the age of the children and working conditions of the mother. Children who remained on the streets with their mothers suffered more frequently from gastro-intestinal diseases and accidents than the national average. The incidence of acute respiratory diseases, however, was similar in the cases of maternal care in the street and care by family members in another environment. Existing public health measures show a greater concern for the health of food consumers than that of workers in this area. Current public policy seeks to regulate street vending activities and to concentrate traders in ad hoc areas and facilities. Our research results document the need for actions that can contribute to an improvement in the care and health conditions of these young children.  (+info)

Dirt and diarrhoea: formative research in hygiene promotion programmes. (6/1572)

Investment in the promotion of better hygiene for the prevention of diarrhoeal diseases and as a component of water and sanitation programmes is increasing. Before designing programmes capable of sustainably modifying hygiene behaviour in large populations, valid answers to a number of basic questions concerning the site and the intended beneficiaries have to be obtained. Such questions include 'what practices favour the transmission of enteric pathogens?', 'what advantages will be perceived by those who adopt safe practices?' and 'what channels of communication are currently employed by the target population?' A study of hygiene and diarrhoea in Bobo-Dioulasso, Burkina Faso, used a mixture of methods to address such questions. This paper draws on that experience to propose a plan of preliminary research using a variety of techniques which could be implemented over a period of a few months by planners of hygiene promotion programmes. The techniques discussed include structured observation, focus group discussions and behavioural trials. Modest investment in such systematic formative research with clear and limited goals is likely to be repaid many times over in the increased effectiveness of hygiene promotion programmes.  (+info)

The census-based, impact-oriented approach: its effectiveness in promoting child health in Bolivia. (7/1572)

This paper describes the effectiveness for child health of a primary health care approach developed in Bolivia by Andean Rural Health Care and its colleagues, the census-based, impact-oriented (CBIO) approach. Here, we describe selected achievements, including child survival service coverage, mortality impact, and the level of resources required to attain these results. As a result of first identifying the entire programme population through visits at least biannually to all homes and then targeting selected high-impact services to those at highest risk of death, the mortality levels of children under five years of age in the established programme areas was one-third to one-half of mortality levels in comparison areas. Card-documented coverage for the complete series of all the standard six childhood immunizations among children 12-23 months of age was 78%, and card-documented coverage for three nutritional monitorings during the previous 12 months among the same group of children was 80%. Coverage rates in comparison areas for similar services was less than 21%. The local annual recurring cost of this approach was US $8.57 for each person (of all ages) in the programme population. This cost includes the provision of primary care services for all age groups as well as targeted child survival services. This cost is well within the affordable range for many, if not most, developing countries. Manpower costs for field staff in Bolivia are relatively high, so in countries with lower salary scales, the overall recurring cost could be substantially less. An Expert Review Panel reviewed the CBIO approach and found it to be worthy of replication, particularly if stronger community involvement and greater reliance on volunteer or minimally paid staff could be attained. The results of this approach are sufficiently promising to merit implementation and evaluation in other sites, including sites beyond Bolivia.  (+info)

Injury control strategies: extending the quality and quantity of data relating to road traffic accidents in children. (8/1572)

This review describes how an extended database of information can provide the opportunity to go beyond the traditionally distinct health, engineering, and education initiatives in order to identify the effectiveness of more overarching policies for injury control. Such information can be used to raise awareness and to encourage community participation in designing a road traffic accident prevention strategy.  (+info)

  • In an August 3, 2020 article in the Journal of American Medical Association Pediatrics, "Child Maltreatment in the Era of Coronavirus 2019," author Dr. Christopher Spencer Greeley notes: "As COVID-19 has forced a reevaluation of the social contract between what communities, cities, and states are obligated to provide for their citizenries, there should be an emphasis on eliminating the systemic and structural injustices that exist in our communities already. (alliance1.org)
  • Based in Phoenix, Arizona, New Directions is part of the Arizona's Children Association, a CWLA member agency. (cwla.org)
  • With the unveiling of the Republican coronavirus # 3, CWLA submitted a letter to Congress outlining some key child welfare concerns. (cwla.org)
  • The National Child Abuse Coalition, CWLA serves as a longtime member, delivered a letter that highlighted the need for greater funding for CAPTA state grants, Community-Based Child Abuse Prevention (CB-CAP), Title IV-B funding increases as well as $100 million for the Family Violence Prevention and Services Act and $30 million for the Court Improvement Program (CIP). (cwla.org)
  • CWLA provides training, consultation, and technical assistance to child welfare professionals and agencies while also educating the public on emerging issues that affect abused, neglected, and at-risk children. (childwelfare.gov)
  • She went on to say, "CWLA extends its support to congressional efforts to better address the vulnerabilities of youth in foster care. (cwla.org)
  • Even prior to passage of federal welfare reform, many demonstration programs anticipated key features of the 1996 law, such as "work-first" strategies, time limits on welfare receipt, and financial incentives to work. (childtrends.org)
  • A key element of welfare reform is the expectation that mothers with younger children work. (hhs.gov)
  • President Bill Clinton included the concept in the landmark welfare reform legislation he enacted in 1996, which allowed other states to adopt a similar law. (nj.com)
  • We are approaching the 20th anniversary of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Act-also called "welfare reform"-which was passed by President Clinton working with the Republican-controlled Congress. (rinf.com)
  • This welfare reform law changed the terms of federal aid to the poor. (rinf.com)
  • In 2008, Sen. Hillary Clinton defended and strongly endorsed her husband's welfare reform while on the campaign trail. (rinf.com)
  • We work with our members, partners, government and non-government agencies and other peak bodies to bring about positive systemic reform that will deliver better outcomes to the lives of children and young people, including those living in out-of-home care. (acwa.asn.au)
  • New published paper by Katrine V. Løken, Kjell Erik Lommerud and Katrine Holm Reiso: 'Single mothers and their children: Evaluating a work-encouraging welfare reform', in Journal of Public Economics. (nhh.no)
  • For these children, average school grades at age 16 dropped significantly by 0.7% of a standard deviation per additional year that their mothers were exposed to the reform. (nhh.no)
  • In line with this, we find that the reform increased the use of formal after-school care, and we find a larger reform effect for children of mothers with no informal network to help with child care. (nhh.no)
  • This is arguably the biggest reform of child welfare in the history of our country and there's been no dialogue. (peninsulanewsreview.com)
  • This work includes home studies, interviewing and evaluating appropriateness of substitute care placements when children are unable to live safely at home. (oregon.gov)
  • The grand chief said he doesn't agree with many of the recommendations, including one that would look at maintaining a centralized database for all children in care in Manitoba. (cbc.ca)
  • Foster care would be defined as a home of six or fewer children with exceptions for siblings, disabilities and other categories. (cwla.org)
  • If it can make it through committee with the required offsets, the legislation would be a significant step away from previous child welfare bills of recent years that have been cost neutral either through waiver proposals, time-limits on care or other approaches that have conditioned child welfare expansions on child welfare spending reductions in other areas. (cwla.org)
  • There would be new requirements and planning when a child is placed into residential care. (cwla.org)
  • Decisions made by the board is impartial and pursuant to the Child Welfare Act, and include care orders and forced intervention in the case of adolescents/youths with serious behavioural difficulties. (regjeringen.no)
  • Heroin has changed how they approach every step of their jobs, they said, from the first intake calls to that painstaking decision to place a child into temporary foster care or permanent custody. (cwla.org)
  • It was paid for with cuts in other parts of child welfare, temporarily delaying some adoption assistance payments and restrictions on some institutional care. (cwla.org)
  • After children enter temporary foster care, the agency spends up to two years working closely with the family while the parents try to stay sober. (cwla.org)
  • There are now 10% fewer children in care in the state, the number of children in care living with kin has doubled, and reliance on out-of-state care has been eliminated. (cwla.org)
  • Marcia Lowry, a child welfare attorney best known for her big-ticket settlements against unjust child welfare or foster care systems, has just received a significant amount of new funding. (cwla.org)
  • Lowry has been leading the legal fight to fully define and defend the rights of children, especially children in state care. (cwla.org)
  • They also have access to a Foster Parent facilitated support group to discuss issues and concerns related to the children in their care. (auntmarthas.org)
  • Parents' Child Care Preference. (hhs.gov)
  • A further provision of the Act is that all parents who exit from the AFDC program because of earnings are guaranteed 12 months of transitional child care assistance on a sliding scale fee basis. (hhs.gov)
  • A fundamental precept of the regulations governing the new child care guarantees is that parents reserve the right to chose their own child care arrangements (Federal Register, 1989). (hhs.gov)
  • Yet very little is known about the child care choices of AFDC mothers. (hhs.gov)
  • The last time data were collected about child care of recipients was in 1979 when the AFDC Recipient Survey found that 60 percent of AFDC mothers employed full time did not use available child care subsidies (Hofferth and Sonenstein, 1983). (hhs.gov)
  • Consequently, States efforts to expand child care options for AFDC parents have proceeded in the absence of any information about what these parents would prefer. (hhs.gov)
  • This paper addresses this issue by focusing on the child care arrangements made a by sample of AFDC mothers over a 14 month period starting in September 1, 1983. (hhs.gov)
  • The child care needs and options for preschool-age children, including those in half day kindergarten programs, typically differ from children who are in school (grades 1-6). (hhs.gov)
  • In light of this policy shift, information about the current care arrangements made by AFDC mothers with children under the age of 6 becomes critical to projections about the types of child care needed by these mothers. (hhs.gov)
  • YAP finds permanent resources for youth lingering in care without a viable discharge resource. (yapinc.org)
  • Every month, there are kids in Kansas forced to sleep on cots or couches in a foster care contractor's office because they don't have anywhere else to stay that night. (governing.com)
  • The number of children in foster care has been increasing dramatically over the last three years or more, and they're not leaving as fast as they're coming in. (governing.com)
  • Nationally, the number of children in foster care increased every year from 2012 to 2015 -- the last year for which national data are available. (governing.com)
  • It's not clear why more children are entering foster care, Gallagher says, but parental substance abuse is thought to be one of the reasons. (governing.com)
  • The state has raised its reimbursement rates for foster care providers, and Abbott found nearly $550,000 to increase the availability of emergency shelters and residential facilities so that children would not need to sleep in offices and motels. (governing.com)
  • Instead, the children are being sent into institutional care by the thousands, he said. (huffingtonpost.ca)
  • Provides information, reports, and webinars on the Children's Bureau funded projects to increase well-being outcomes for children in or at risk of out-of-home care due to a parent or caregiver's substance abuse disorder through strengthening interagency collaborations and coordinated service and program delivery. (childwelfare.gov)
  • Mr Justice Hayden had been asked to make decisions relating to the care of a disabled boy and a second child whose parents were separated. (pressgazette.co.uk)
  • The father, who the judge decided will care for one child with the disabled boy going into care, was in support of the council being named. (pressgazette.co.uk)
  • Still others expressed desires for improved collaboration between in-home social workers and school social workers and counselors, smaller caseloads for case workers and simplified standards - all measures they said would help the care team of a child better meet his needs. (salisburypost.com)
  • As the Senator describes it, the "Wyden proposal would expand the federal foster care entitlement to do more than just pay a daily rate to keep children housed in foster care homes. (cwla.org)
  • The legislation extends the Adoption Incentives Fund for three years, provides a current-year extension to the Family Connections Grants, strengthens provisions that direct states to re-invest state savings from the expansion of federal funding for Adoption Assistance program, and creates new court oversight for youth in foster care. (cwla.org)
  • Operations with long, troubled histories of standards violations and child abuse allegations remain open and are permitted to care for vulnerable children, some of whom are then hurt. (texastribune.org)
  • The lawsuit concerns a class of some 11,000 children who are in the state's care, whether they live in foster homes or group facilities. (texastribune.org)
  • Children are being hurt, children are dying in state care, and they're crying out - making reports and being ignored," said Paul Yetter, a partner with Yetter Coleman in Houston who represents children in the class-action lawsuit. (texastribune.org)
  • Secondly, based on the insights drawn from the abovementioned analysis, ACWA will then work with key stakeholders on identifying and implementing enhancements to practice, to deliver improved outcomes for children and young people with disabilities in out-of-home care. (acwa.asn.au)
  • Under this project, ACWA is engaging with a range of stakeholders, including out-of-home care and disability service providers, related government/ regulatory agencies, peaks, carers, and children and young people, to identify and implement key strategies that will lead to enhanced practice in this sphere. (acwa.asn.au)
  • Youth in foster care have high rates of early parenthood and face many personal and parenting challenges. (chapinhall.org)
  • An analysis of child welfare administrative data found high rates of child maltreatment investigations and out-of-home care placements among children born to young parents in foster care. (chapinhall.org)
  • We measured child maltreatment investigations, indicated reports, and out-of-home care placements from birth to age five among 2,487 children born to youth in foster care between 2000 and 2008. (chapinhall.org)
  • 11% of the children were placed in out-of-home care. (chapinhall.org)
  • This could include linking pregnant and parenting youth in foster care to evidence-based home visiting programs. (chapinhall.org)
  • 3. Compare and contrast child-centered and adult-centered care. (quantumunitsed.com)
  • Placing children in a "secure" institution also runs counter to foster care best practices that maintain children fare better in a home with a family. (tampabay.com)
  • But children in foster care are expressly exempted from that law, meaning there is no way to force foster placements through the courts, he said. (tampabay.com)
  • About eight per cent of children in Canada are First Nations, Inuit or Metis but they account for more than half the kids in care, and as many as 90 per cent in Manitoba. (mapleridgenews.com)
  • The government, public/private institutes and groups shall assist parents and guardians of children and youth or other people who take care of children and youth to keep healthy as well as encourage healthy physical and mental development. (gov.tw)
  • In the meantime the intersectorial committee initiated by ACWA (as part of our Let Them Learn Project ) to share information, discuss and develop responses to factors that contribute to the poor educational outcomes of children and young people in care continues to meet on a quarterly basis. (acwa.asn.au)
  • The committee is also considering the concept of 'corporate parenting' as a framework for collaboratively improving the educational outcomes of children in care. (acwa.asn.au)
  • In comparison to other similar-sized counties, York County is performing well when it comes to the median length of stay for children who are removed from their home and placed in out-of-home care. (yorkcountypa.gov)
  • Children removed from their homes in York County spend much less time in out of home care than children do in other counties in Pennsylvania. (yorkcountypa.gov)
  • Children Now used CCWIP data - Point-in-time/in care (Entry Cohort) for 2016 & 2017. (kidscount.org)
  • The federal government has said the legislation will reduce the number of Indigenous children in care by affirming the inherent rights of First Nation, Inuit and Metis communities. (peninsulanewsreview.com)
  • There are about 10,000 children in care in the province and about 90 per cent are Indigenous. (peninsulanewsreview.com)
  • The U.S. has nearly 440,000 children in foster care, more than 117,000 of whom are waiting to be adopted. (lgbtqnation.com)
  • Allowing child placing agencies to ignore federal nondiscrimination rules runs counter to the cardinal rule of child welfare: that the best interests of children in care must come first. (familyequality.org)
  • Her Majesty's Chief Inspector yesterday praised education and social care staff for their hard work and resilience against all the odds, as Ofsted published the third and final set of reports looking at the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on children and young people . (wired-gov.net)
  • Faced with all of these pressures, the education and social care sectors are showing considerable resilience and creativity to provide children and learners with the best experience they can … And all of this is being done against the most challenging backdrop for staff in recent times. (wired-gov.net)
  • There's so much that child welfare agencies are getting right. (accenture.com)
  • These reforms were accomplished with a reduced budget and show that time, effort, patience, and an open mind to accept new methods are the key to improving functionality of child welfare agencies. (cwla.org)
  • Last week, I wrote a post about how child welfare agencies can more effectively serve dads involved in child welfare. (fatherhood.org)
  • I also included National Fatherhood Initiative ® resources that can help child welfare agencies implement the recommendations. (fatherhood.org)
  • and what fathers want to communicate to child welfare agencies. (fatherhood.org)
  • This section contains resources and information about collaboration among public child welfare and other human service agencies, including State and local examples . (childwelfare.gov)
  • Provides information and tools for collaboration across child welfare, substance abuse, court systems, and other family-serving agencies. (childwelfare.gov)
  • We anticipate that the insights from this work will support exploration of this issue in relation to vulnerable children with disability who are supported by member agencies in other contexts, through programs such as Intensive Family Preservation, MST-CAN and the Family Referral Service. (acwa.asn.au)
  • Parents or guardians are responsible for the protection and education of children and youth, and should cooperate and assist any measure conducted by authorized agencies, competent authorities, welfare institutes, and groups for children and youth relating to this Act. (gov.tw)
  • For the affairs/issues specified in this Act, authorized agencies and competent authorities shall take responsibility for the needs of children and youth. (gov.tw)
  • They shall show respect for cultural diversity and actively plan for the welfare of children and youth while fully cooperating with the relevant authorized agencies on matters relating to the welfare of children and youth. (gov.tw)
  • Authorized agencies and competent authorities shall be in charge of safeguarding children and youth and implementing measures to prevent accidents and injuries. (gov.tw)
  • 1. Authorized agencies are responsible for the planning, promotion and supervision of affairs concerning the related welfare policies for children and youth. (gov.tw)
  • 5. Authorized agencies in charge of construction, public works and fire-fighting are responsible for maintaining the welfare and rights of children and youth in matters relating to construction management, public facilities, public safety, building environment, fire safety management, recreational facilities, restrooms for parents with infants, etc. (gov.tw)
  • 6. Authorized agencies in charge of police are responsible for the affairs of children and youth concerning the safeguarding of their personal security, the prevention of law-breaking, missing children and youth, assisting helpless children and youth in finding their parents and guardians, etc. (gov.tw)
  • 7. Authorized agencies in charge of legal affairs are responsible for the affairs regarding the prevention of children committing crimes and those children and youth that break laws subject to correctional measures, protection of victims, etc. (gov.tw)
  • 8. Authorized agencies in charge of transportation and communications are responsible for affairs regarding the transportation safety of children and youth, inspection of toddler's special vehicles, public parking, etc. (gov.tw)
  • HHS' decision comes in response to a request made by South Carolina Governor Henry McMaster last year, asking the Trump Administration to use the federal Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA) to waive federal nondiscrimination requirements for federally-funded child placing agencies. (familyequality.org)
  • She worked with the ACLU before founding her own organization, Children's Rights, where she continued bring high-profile, class-action lawsuits against child welfare systems. (cwla.org)
  • The key to developing a partnership with your local child welfare agency is to deliver a compelling value proposition on how your organization can help the agency do its job more effectively. (fatherhood.org)
  • In what ways can your organization bring value and help a child welfare agency do its job more effectively? (fatherhood.org)
  • Each charity or NGO featured in this section has been highlighted on RainbowKids as an organization committed to the underserved children around the world. (rainbowkids.com)
  • In January, Texas Gov. Greg Abbott called attention to the state's child protection agency in his State of the State address, asking lawmakers to approve structural reforms and increase funding. (governing.com)
  • Starting in March, no fewer than four reports had been made to the state's welfare agency alleging that the child's caregivers were inattentive and abusive, and the child's birth mother had sent a photograph of an injury to state workers. (texastribune.org)
  • One such report, initially marked as a top priority by a worker with the state's child welfare agency, was downgraded to a lower priority days later by a different unit in the agency. (texastribune.org)
  • In November, Jack held the state in contempt of court for failing to comply with some of her orders and made clear that based on initial information from the monitors, she no longer found the state's child welfare agency "to be credible in any way. (texastribune.org)
  • Every state child welfare agency faces challenges made worse by national immigration policies and the opioid crisis. (cwla.org)
  • The nine-page document casts some light on the pervasive poverty and deep social crisis confronting students and working-class youth on government welfare. (wsws.org)
  • Hundreds of thousands of youth confront soaring housing and utility costs, and a deepening jobs crisis. (wsws.org)
  • Direct service provision for children living and working in the streets is administered through 3 mobile teams and 3 daycare/crisis intervention centres in Tbilisi and Kutaisi. (wvi.org)
  • The Brotherhood's executive director Tony Nicholson said the situation was a crisis that Australians could not afford to ignore, and youth unemployment as high as 21% in some areas was "a scandal" for young people, the community and the economy. (theconversation.com)
  • The Quapaw Tribe maintains and operates an Indian Child Welfare program through the tribe. (quapawtribe.com)
  • This year's theme is the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA). (ou.edu)
  • The sites were selected based on their ability to support a collaborative, community-based approach to reducing child maltreatment fatalities and serious injuries. (alliance1.org)
  • Many of those children, mostly teenagers, become "night-to-night" placements , a small group of roughly 20 kids that often end up sleeping in offices. (tampabay.com)
  • Now leaders of the agency are pushing a controversial recommendation from the Hillsborough Juvenile Justice Advisory Board for a new law allowing children to be forced into placements - including a secure facility at a Tampa juvenile justice campus - for up to 90 days through a court order. (tampabay.com)
  • State law already allows parents to petition for court-ordered placements for children they can no longer control. (tampabay.com)
  • Children who end up as night-to-night placements end up with poor diets and inadequate sleep, the board found. (tampabay.com)
  • Caseworkers in this thinly populated region of southern Ohio, east of Cincinnati, have grown battle-weary from an opioid epidemic that's leaving behind a generation of traumatized children. (cwla.org)
  • Because of the added trauma, removing a child is always the last option, caseworkers said. (cwla.org)
  • In most cases, the office stays are for a single night, and caseworkers supervise the children. (governing.com)
  • As part of Child Welfare Professionals Appreciation Week, which was June 3-7, the county commissioners recognized caseworkers alongside CYF director, Terry Clark. (yorkcountypa.gov)
  • Caseworkers in our local child welfare agency are, in a sense, first responders without a uniform. (yorkcountypa.gov)
  • The stigma that a caseworker is there to take a child from his home unfortunately persists, even though this is never a caseworkers' initial goal. (yorkcountypa.gov)
  • But despite this, Connecticut has been praised as a national model of child welfare practice by the Annie E. Casey Foundation, the Harvard Kennedy School, and leaders from around the country. (cwla.org)
  • On the other hand, the scientific monitoring process is also intended to make a contribution to the practical implementation of gender mainstreaming in associations and youth-welfare institutions, both at the level of organizational development and staff development and also at the level of educational practice, through the provision of information and specialist expertise. (dji.de)
  • Lessons Learned When Building the Evidence for a Child Welfare Practice Model. (fatherhood.gov)
  • Speakers included Anastasia Glusko (Why Not You Project), Amanda Moors-Mailei (UTS Widening Participation Coordinator - Access Schemes and Pathways, Equity and Diversity Unit), and Lorna Genoud (Education Consultant, Practice Service and Outcomes, Youth Plus - Life Without Barriers). (acwa.asn.au)
  • The Congressional Caucus on Foster Youth also released a letter calling for increased funding for the Chafee program along with increases for education and training vouchers to address, in part, the needs of homeless youth on college campuses who may not have a place to go to if the campus shuts down. (cwla.org)
  • In 2011, Kansas had 17 psychiatric residential treatment facilities with 780 beds for foster youth. (governing.com)
  • guidelines and instructions, initiating research in the field, developing general child welfare policy and providing accessible information about child welfare. (regjeringen.no)
  • I would prefer to be in a discussion as to who is doing the best job by Indigenous children and not who has the right to continue to be doing a miserable job, which is what we've been doing up to now," he said. (mapleridgenews.com)
  • That lack of service is one of the reasons Indigenous children are more likely to be taken away from their parents than non-Indigenous children are. (mapleridgenews.com)
  • Ousley has twice introduced a bill to establish independent oversight of the state child welfare agency, but is now pushing it to next year. (kcur.org)
  • As a result, more children are able to stay in their home countries, living in nurturing environments with biological family members. (rainbowkids.com)
  • With millions of children worldwide waiting for a forever family, eliminating international adoption is not a sustainable solution. (rainbowkids.com)
  • This is the Norwegian name for the five regional offices under the central authority of the Directorate for Children, Youth and Family Affairs . (regjeringen.no)
  • The main takeaways: partner with parents, instead of punishing them, do what is scientifically proven to be best for the kids and the family, and do whatever it takes for that individual case. (cwla.org)
  • Every child that is placed internationally will be a child who has not successfully been matched with a domestic, Japanese adoptive family. (rainbowkids.com)
  • Birth mothers are given leeway in selecting the family in which their child is placed. (rainbowkids.com)
  • On 19 December 2000, the German Federal Ministry for Family Affairs, Senior Citizens, Women, and Youth (Bundesministerium für Familie, Senioren, Frauen und Jugend, BMFSFJ) incorporated the concept of gender mainstreaming into the promotion guidelines of the Federal Child and Youth Plan (Kinder- und Jugendplan, KJP) in order to enhance equality between boys and girls. (dji.de)
  • We work closely with the youth and referring authority to make positive, permanent connections with extended family or other caring adults from the youth's past. (yapinc.org)
  • This paper was written by Charlotte McCullough of McCullough and Associates and Elizabeth Lee of Planning and Learning Technologies, Inc. Paper review and comments were provided by Karl Ensign of Planning and Learning Technologies, Inc, Nancy Pindus of The Urban Institute and the Honorable Kathleen Kearney of the Children and Family Research Center, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. (hhs.gov)
  • New Jersey pioneered the family cap law - so named because the sponsors intended to discourage women on public assistance from having additional children. (nj.com)
  • If that right to free speech does not allow the media to tell the public that this council, a public authority, twice subjected to very high levels of criticism over its handling of the welfare of children, has again been criticised and… in trenchant terms by a judge based in the Family Division of the High Court, then what is that right to free speech for? (pressgazette.co.uk)
  • A public health approach to child safety and prevention of fatalities looks for the maximum benefit for the largest number of people, which means it works not only at the family level, but also at the community and societal level. (alliance1.org)
  • In addition, these policy changes significantly increased the probability that family heads of household would leave welfare for work. (ssrn.com)
  • Preferred Family Healthcare is involved in a number of ways in which we support children and adolescents who have either been removed from their home or are in a situation where the family is in need. (pfh.org)
  • While the two parties came together on many of the family separation amendments, more contentious amendments were heatedly discussed, including an amendment from Rep. Robert Aderholt (R-Ala.) that prohibits discrimination against a child welfare service provider based on the provider's religious or moral beliefs. (alliance1.org)
  • The executive director of the First Nations Child and Family Caring Society, which brought the challenge that led to the 2016 human-rights ruling, said the lack of any actual dollars is a big red flag that this will be nothing more than lip service. (mapleridgenews.com)
  • This research summary and brief describe nine programs and highlight ways they have addressed challenges to serving child welfare-involved parents with substance use issues, with a particular focus on their applicability to rural communities. (hhs.gov)
  • Barriers and challenges to children and young people and their carers being able to effectively access the NDIS. (acwa.asn.au)
  • New York Governor Andrew Cuomo has cut $170 million from New York City's child welfare agency. (cwla.org)
  • Norway's state welfare agency NAV is seeing some positive results from its current process of toughening rules for obtaining benefits. (newsinenglish.no)
  • The prevalence of physical restraints and injuries to children in some facilities is simply shocking, as are the numerous instances where DFPS staff document that the agency does not know where children are placed. (texastribune.org)
  • Oranga Ta-mariki chief ex-ec-u-tive Grainne Moss has told the Wai-tangi Tri-bunal that struc-tural racism ''at all lev-els'' in the child wel-fare agency has made life worse for Ma¯ori chil-dren. (pressreader.com)
  • A Watchdog For Kansas' Child Welfare Agency? (kcur.org)
  • The South Carolina Supreme Court ruled on July 17 that the child at the center of the U.S. Supreme Court ruling on June 25 in Adoptive Couple vs. Baby Girl , must be returned to her adoptive parents. (ncsl.org)
  • Over the past decade, 10 experimental evaluations of these programs have extended their studies to examine the impacts on children. (childtrends.org)
  • States have the option to reduce the age cutoff so that mothers with children over 1 year: of age are required to participate in employment programs. (hhs.gov)
  • Youth Advocate Programs, Inc. (yapinc.org)
  • The term privatization took on new dimensions in child welfare during the mid- to late-1990s when two states, Kansas and Florida, privatized most of their child welfare programs and a broader number of states began to outsource the case management function and introduce fiscal risks and rewards linked to performance. (hhs.gov)
  • The project will produce six technical assistance papers on a range of topics about planning for and implementing privatization initiatives in child welfare systems. (hhs.gov)
  • National Chief Perry Bellegarde of the Assembly of First Nations says provincial governments that want to cling to their authority over child welfare are one of the biggest barriers to implementing new legislation giving Indigenous communities control over their children's well-being. (mapleridgenews.com)
  • Stefanson said the legislation needs to address situations where kids have connections to multiple communities. (peninsulanewsreview.com)
  • The cost to kids of waiting a year is Ousley's biggest concern in pushing the bill to 2020. (kcur.org)
  • Demands that young welfare recipients "get up in the morning" have led to fewer obtaining benefits and more finishing high school, according to new research. (newsinenglish.no)
  • It's a disaster for our young people who want to work but are getting locked out of the workforce and locked into welfare dependency because they have no choice. (theconversation.com)
  • When both systems work, they create the same end result: happy, healthy children who grow into productive members of society. (cwla.org)
  • Bethany is proud to work hand-in-hand with its partnering countries in fostering the real change that is needed to minimize the number of waiting children. (rainbowkids.com)
  • We haven't seen, as a result, a significantly greater instance of safety and well-being and permanence for children across the country as a result of hundreds of years of child welfare work. (accenture.com)
  • And I think child welfare - I feel like that's the future it needs to head for [is]: How could we decide to go about our work in a wildly different way, so that the need for the kind of catastrophic interventions we offer now would be rare? (accenture.com)
  • Much of the work in this program is focused on supporting the parent(s) in developing effective parenting and life skills, positive community connections, and supporting a healthy attachment and bond with their children. (yapinc.org)
  • Child Trends collaborated on a series of briefs highlighting lessons learned from this initial work, and then designed a more rigorous outcome and implementation evaluation of the program. (fatherhood.gov)
  • For many, the measure of success is whether or not children are engaging with the work at all, rather than whether they are developing their knowledge and understanding - a case of remote attendance, rather than remote learning. (wired-gov.net)