Infant, Premature: A human infant born before 37 weeks of GESTATION.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Infant, Premature, DiseasesInfant Food: Food processed and manufactured for the nutritional health of children in their first year of life.Infant Care: Care of infants in the home or institution.Infant Formula: Liquid formulations for the nutrition of infants that can substitute for BREAST MILK.Child Welfare: Organized efforts by communities or organizations to improve the health and well-being of the child.Infant Behavior: Any observable response or action of a neonate or infant up through the age of 23 months.Infant Mortality: Postnatal deaths from BIRTH to 365 days after birth in a given population. Postneonatal mortality represents deaths between 28 days and 365 days after birth (as defined by National Center for Health Statistics). Neonatal mortality represents deaths from birth to 27 days after birth.Disabled Children: Children with mental or physical disabilities that interfere with usual activities of daily living and that may require accommodation or intervention.Child Behavior: Any observable response or action of a child from 24 months through 12 years of age. For neonates or children younger than 24 months, INFANT BEHAVIOR is available.Infant, Newborn, Diseases: Diseases of newborn infants present at birth (congenital) or developing within the first month of birth. It does not include hereditary diseases not manifesting at birth or within the first 30 days of life nor does it include inborn errors of metabolism. Both HEREDITARY DISEASES and METABOLISM, INBORN ERRORS are available as general concepts.Sudden Infant Death: The abrupt and unexplained death of an apparently healthy infant under one year of age, remaining unexplained after a thorough case investigation, including performance of a complete autopsy, examination of the death scene, and review of the clinical history. (Pediatr Pathol 1991 Sep-Oct;11(5):677-84)Infant Nutritional Physiological Phenomena: Nutritional physiology of children from birth to 2 years of age.Infant, Very Low Birth Weight: An infant whose weight at birth is less than 1500 grams (3.3 lbs), regardless of gestational age.Infant, Low Birth Weight: An infant having a birth weight of 2500 gm. (5.5 lb.) or less but INFANT, VERY LOW BIRTH WEIGHT is available for infants having a birth weight of 1500 grams (3.3 lb.) or less.Child Psychology: The study of normal and abnormal behavior of children.Breast Feeding: The nursing of an infant at the breast.Child Health Services: Organized services to provide health care for children.Child Rearing: The training or bringing-up of children by parents or parent-substitutes. It is used also for child rearing practices in different societies, at different economic levels, in different ethnic groups, etc. It differs from PARENTING in that in child rearing the emphasis is on the act of training or bringing up the child and the interaction between the parent and child, while parenting emphasizes the responsibility and qualities of exemplary behavior of the parent.Infant Welfare: Organized efforts by communities or organizations to improve the health and well-being of infants.Mothers: Female parents, human or animal.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Child Behavior Disorders: Disturbances considered to be pathological based on age and stage appropriateness, e.g., conduct disturbances and anaclitic depression. This concept does not include psychoneuroses, psychoses, or personality disorders with fixed patterns.Child, Institutionalized: A child who is receiving long-term in-patient services or who resides in an institutional setting.Child of Impaired Parents: Child with one or more parents afflicted by a physical or mental disorder.Parents: Persons functioning as natural, adoptive, or substitute parents. The heading includes the concept of parenthood as well as preparation for becoming a parent.Infant, Extremely Low Birth Weight: An infant whose weight at birth is less than 1000 grams (2.2 lbs), regardless of GESTATIONAL AGE.Dental Care for Children: The giving of attention to the special dental needs of children, including the prevention of tooth diseases and instruction in dental hygiene and dental health. The dental care may include the services provided by dental specialists.Child, Orphaned: Child who has lost both parents through death or desertion.Gestational Age: The age of the conceptus, beginning from the time of FERTILIZATION. In clinical obstetrics, the gestational age is often estimated as the time from the last day of the last MENSTRUATION which is about 2 weeks before OVULATION and fertilization.Milk, HumanChild Development: The continuous sequential physiological and psychological maturing of an individual from birth up to but not including ADOLESCENCE.Child Language: The language and sounds expressed by a child at a particular maturational stage in development.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Bottle Feeding: Use of nursing bottles for feeding. Applies to humans and animals.Child Nutrition Disorders: Disorders caused by nutritional imbalance, either overnutrition or undernutrition, occurring in children ages 2 to 12 years.Infant, Small for Gestational Age: An infant having a birth weight lower than expected for its gestational age.Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena: Nutritional physiology of children aged 2-12 years.Infant, Extremely Premature: A human infant born before 28 weeks of GESTATION.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Child Mortality: Number of deaths of children between one year of age to 12 years of age in a given population.Mother-Child Relations: Interaction between a mother and child.Infant Nutrition Disorders: Disorders caused by nutritional imbalance, either overnutrition or undernutrition, occurring in infants ages 1 month to 24 months.Crying: To utter an inarticulate, characteristic sound in order to communicate or express a feeling, or desire for attention.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical: The transmission of infectious disease or pathogens from one generation to another. It includes transmission in utero or intrapartum by exposure to blood and secretions, and postpartum exposure via breastfeeding.Intensive Care Units, Neonatal: Hospital units providing continuing surveillance and care to acutely ill newborn infants.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Growth: Gradual increase in the number, the size, and the complexity of cells of an individual. Growth generally results in increase in ORGAN WEIGHT; BODY WEIGHT; and BODY HEIGHT.Body Height: The distance from the sole to the crown of the head with body standing on a flat surface and fully extended.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Parent-Child Relations: The interactions between parent and child.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.United StatesInfant Equipment: Equipment and furniture used by infants and babies in the home, car, and play area.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Maternal Behavior: The behavior patterns associated with or characteristic of a mother.Language Development: The gradual expansion in complexity and meaning of symbols and sounds as perceived and interpreted by the individual through a maturational and learning process. Stages in development include babbling, cooing, word imitation with cognition, and use of short sentences.Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia: A chronic lung disease developed after OXYGEN INHALATION THERAPY or mechanical ventilation (VENTILATION, MECHANICAL) usually occurring in certain premature infants (INFANT, PREMATURE) or newborn infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RESPIRATORY DISTRESS SYNDROME, NEWBORN). Histologically, it is characterized by the unusual abnormalities of the bronchioles, such as METAPLASIA, decrease in alveolar number, and formation of CYSTS.Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn: A condition of the newborn marked by DYSPNEA with CYANOSIS, heralded by such prodromal signs as dilatation of the alae nasi, expiratory grunt, and retraction of the suprasternal notch or costal margins, mostly frequently occurring in premature infants, children of diabetic mothers, and infants delivered by cesarean section, and sometimes with no apparent predisposing cause.Pediatrics: A medical specialty concerned with maintaining health and providing medical care to children from birth to adolescence.Growth Disorders: Deviations from the average values for a specific age and sex in any or all of the following: height, weight, skeletal proportions, osseous development, or maturation of features. Included here are both acceleration and retardation of growth.Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects: The consequences of exposing the FETUS in utero to certain factors, such as NUTRITION PHYSIOLOGICAL PHENOMENA; PHYSIOLOGICAL STRESS; DRUGS; RADIATION; and other physical or chemical factors. These consequences are observed later in the offspring after BIRTH.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Play and Playthings: Spontaneous or voluntary recreational activities pursued for enjoyment and accessories or equipment used in the activities; includes games, toys, etc.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Child Development Disorders, Pervasive: Severe distortions in the development of many basic psychological functions that are not normal for any stage in development. These distortions are manifested in sustained social impairment, speech abnormalities, and peculiar motor movements.Nutritional Status: State of the body in relation to the consumption and utilization of nutrients.Child Custody: The formally authorized guardianship or care of a CHILD.Anthropometry: The technique that deals with the measurement of the size, weight, and proportions of the human or other primate body.Body Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.Intensive Care, Neonatal: Continuous care and monitoring of newborn infants with life-threatening conditions, in any setting.Respiratory Sounds: Noises, normal and abnormal, heard on auscultation over any part of the RESPIRATORY TRACT.Hospitals, Pediatric: Special hospitals which provide care for ill children.Asthma: A form of bronchial disorder with three distinct components: airway hyper-responsiveness (RESPIRATORY HYPERSENSITIVITY), airway INFLAMMATION, and intermittent AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION. It is characterized by spasmodic contraction of airway smooth muscle, WHEEZING, and dyspnea (DYSPNEA, PAROXYSMAL).Pregnancy Complications, Infectious: The co-occurrence of pregnancy and an INFECTION. The infection may precede or follow FERTILIZATION.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Developmental Disabilities: Disorders in which there is a delay in development based on that expected for a given age level or stage of development. These impairments or disabilities originate before age 18, may be expected to continue indefinitely, and constitute a substantial impairment. Biological and nonbiological factors are involved in these disorders. (From American Psychiatric Glossary, 6th ed)Child Nutrition Sciences: The study of NUTRITION PROCESSES as well as the components of food, their actions, interaction, and balance in relation to health and disease of children, infants or adolescents.Diarrhea: An increased liquidity or decreased consistency of FECES, such as running stool. Fecal consistency is related to the ratio of water-holding capacity of insoluble solids to total water, rather than the amount of water present. Diarrhea is not hyperdefecation or increased fecal weight.Neonatal Screening: The identification of selected parameters in newborn infants by various tests, examinations, or other procedures. Screening may be performed by clinical or laboratory measures. A screening test is designed to sort out healthy neonates (INFANT, NEWBORN) from those not well, but the screening test is not intended as a diagnostic device, rather instead as epidemiologic.Reference Values: The range or frequency distribution of a measurement in a population (of organisms, organs or things) that has not been selected for the presence of disease or abnormality.Child, Abandoned: A child or adolescent who is deserted by parents or parent substitutes without regard for its future care.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Incubators, Infant: Electrically powered devices that are intended to assist in the maintenance of the thermal balance of infants, principally by controlling the air temperature and humidity in an enclosure. (from UMDNS, 1999)Feces: Excrement from the INTESTINES, containing unabsorbed solids, waste products, secretions, and BACTERIA of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Poverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.Fathers: Male parents, human or animal.Schools: Educational institutions.Sucking Behavior: Any suction exerted by the mouth; response of the mammalian infant to draw milk from the breast. Includes sucking on inanimate objects. Not to be used for thumb sucking, which is indexed under fingersucking.Intelligence: The ability to learn and to deal with new situations and to deal effectively with tasks involving abstractions.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Apnea: A transient absence of spontaneous respiration.Term Birth: CHILDBIRTH at the end of a normal duration of PREGNANCY, between 37 to 40 weeks of gestation or about 280 days from the first day of the mother's last menstrual period.Language Development Disorders: Conditions characterized by language abilities (comprehension and expression of speech and writing) that are below the expected level for a given age, generally in the absence of an intellectual impairment. These conditions may be associated with DEAFNESS; BRAIN DISEASES; MENTAL DISORDERS; or environmental factors.Autistic Disorder: A disorder beginning in childhood. It is marked by the presence of markedly abnormal or impaired development in social interaction and communication and a markedly restricted repertoire of activity and interest. Manifestations of the disorder vary greatly depending on the developmental level and chronological age of the individual. (DSM-V)Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Temperament: Predisposition to react to one's environment in a certain way; usually refers to mood changes.Retinopathy of Prematurity: A bilateral retinopathy occurring in premature infants treated with excessively high concentrations of oxygen, characterized by vascular dilatation, proliferation, and tortuosity, edema, and retinal detachment, with ultimate conversion of the retina into a fibrous mass that can be seen as a dense retrolental membrane. Usually growth of the eye is arrested and may result in microophthalmia, and blindness may occur. (Dorland, 27th ed)Enterocolitis, Necrotizing: ENTEROCOLITIS with extensive ulceration (ULCER) and NECROSIS. It is observed primarily in LOW BIRTH WEIGHT INFANT.Diarrhea, Infantile: DIARRHEA occurring in infants from newborn to 24-months old.Congenital Abnormalities: Malformations of organs or body parts during development in utero.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Family: A social group consisting of parents or parent substitutes and children.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Pregnancy Complications: Conditions or pathological processes associated with pregnancy. They can occur during or after pregnancy, and range from minor discomforts to serious diseases that require medical interventions. They include diseases in pregnant females, and pregnancies in females with diseases.Failure to Thrive: A condition of substandard growth or diminished capacity to maintain normal function.IndiaFamily Characteristics: Size and composition of the family.BrazilHeart Defects, Congenital: Developmental abnormalities involving structures of the heart. These defects are present at birth but may be discovered later in life.Early Intervention (Education): Procedures and programs that facilitate the development or skill acquisition in infants and young children who have disabilities, who are at risk for developing disabilities, or who are gifted. It includes programs that are designed to prevent handicapping conditions in infants and young children and family-centered programs designed to affect the functioning of infants and children with special needs. (From Journal of Early Intervention, Editorial, 1989, vol. 13, no. 1, p. 3; A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, prepared for the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce, 1976)HIV Infections: Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Double-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Motor Skills: Performance of complex motor acts.Environmental Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals.Leukomalacia, Periventricular: Degeneration of white matter adjacent to the CEREBRAL VENTRICLES following cerebral hypoxia or BRAIN ISCHEMIA in neonates. The condition primarily affects white matter in the perfusion zone between superficial and deep branches of the MIDDLE CEREBRAL ARTERY. Clinical manifestations include VISION DISORDERS; CEREBRAL PALSY; PARAPLEGIA; SEIZURES; and cognitive disorders. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1021; Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1997, Ch4, pp30-1)Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Dietary Supplements: Products in capsule, tablet or liquid form that provide dietary ingredients, and that are intended to be taken by mouth to increase the intake of nutrients. Dietary supplements can include macronutrients, such as proteins, carbohydrates, and fats; and/or MICRONUTRIENTS, such as VITAMINS; MINERALS; and PHYTOCHEMICALS.Gastroenteritis: INFLAMMATION of any segment of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT from ESOPHAGUS to RECTUM. Causes of gastroenteritis are many including genetic, infection, HYPERSENSITIVITY, drug effects, and CANCER.Developing Countries: Countries in the process of change with economic growth, that is, an increase in production, per capita consumption, and income. The process of economic growth involves better utilization of natural and human resources, which results in a change in the social, political, and economic structures.Kenya: A republic in eastern Africa, south of ETHIOPIA, west of SOMALIA with TANZANIA to its south, and coastline on the Indian Ocean. Its capital is Nairobi.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Prenatal Care: Care provided the pregnant woman in order to prevent complications, and decrease the incidence of maternal and prenatal mortality.Bronchiolitis: Inflammation of the BRONCHIOLES.Vaccination: Administration of vaccines to stimulate the host's immune response. This includes any preparation intended for active immunological prophylaxis.Obesity: A status with BODY WEIGHT that is grossly above the acceptable or desirable weight, usually due to accumulation of excess FATS in the body. The standards may vary with age, sex, genetic or cultural background. In the BODY MASS INDEX, a BMI greater than 30.0 kg/m2 is considered obese, and a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2 is considered morbidly obese (MORBID OBESITY).BangladeshAcute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Milk: The white liquid secreted by the mammary glands. It contains proteins, sugar, lipids, vitamins, and minerals.Premature Birth: CHILDBIRTH before 37 weeks of PREGNANCY (259 days from the first day of the mother's last menstrual period, or 245 days after FERTILIZATION).Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Aid to Families with Dependent Children: Financial assistance provided by the government to indigent families with dependent children who meet certain requirements as defined by the Social Security Act, Title IV, in the U.S.Anemia, Iron-Deficiency: Anemia characterized by decreased or absent iron stores, low serum iron concentration, low transferrin saturation, and low hemoglobin concentration or hematocrit value. The erythrocytes are hypochromic and microcytic and the iron binding capacity is increased.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity: A behavior disorder originating in childhood in which the essential features are signs of developmentally inappropriate inattention, impulsivity, and hyperactivity. Although most individuals have symptoms of both inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity, one or the other pattern may be predominant. The disorder is more frequent in males than females. Onset is in childhood. Symptoms often attenuate during late adolescence although a minority experience the full complement of symptoms into mid-adulthood. (From DSM-V)Linear Models: Statistical models in which the value of a parameter for a given value of a factor is assumed to be equal to a + bx, where a and b are constants. The models predict a linear regression.Prone Position: The posture of an individual lying face down.Hospitalization: The confinement of a patient in a hospital.Intelligence Tests: Standardized tests that measure the present general ability or aptitude for intellectual performance.Cognition: Intellectual or mental process whereby an organism obtains knowledge.Beds: Equipment on which one may lie and sleep, especially as used to care for the hospital patient.Fever: An abnormal elevation of body temperature, usually as a result of a pathologic process.Asphyxia Neonatorum: Respiratory failure in the newborn. (Dorland, 27th ed)Pregnancy Outcome: Results of conception and ensuing pregnancy, including LIVE BIRTH; STILLBIRTH; SPONTANEOUS ABORTION; INDUCED ABORTION. The outcome may follow natural or artificial insemination or any of the various ASSISTED REPRODUCTIVE TECHNIQUES, such as EMBRYO TRANSFER or FERTILIZATION IN VITRO.Bronchiolitis, Viral: An acute inflammatory disease of the lower RESPIRATORY TRACT, caused by paramyxoviruses, occurring primarily in infants and young children; the viruses most commonly implicated are PARAINFLUENZA VIRUS TYPE 3; RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUS, HUMAN; and METAPNEUMOVIRUS.Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections: Pneumovirus infections caused by the RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUSES. Humans and cattle are most affected but infections in goats and sheep have been reported.Maternal-Fetal Exchange: Exchange of substances between the maternal blood and the fetal blood at the PLACENTA via PLACENTAL CIRCULATION. The placental barrier excludes microbial or viral transmission.Intensive Care Units, Pediatric: Hospital units providing continuous surveillance and care to acutely ill infants and children. Neonates are excluded since INTENSIVE CARE UNITS, NEONATAL is available.Sleep: A readily reversible suspension of sensorimotor interaction with the environment, usually associated with recumbency and immobility.Foster Home Care: Families who care for neglected children or patients unable to care for themselves.Weight Gain: Increase in BODY WEIGHT over existing weight.Caregivers: Persons who provide care to those who need supervision or assistance in illness or disability. They may provide the care in the home, in a hospital, or in an institution. Although caregivers include trained medical, nursing, and other health personnel, the concept also refers to parents, spouses, or other family members, friends, members of the clergy, teachers, social workers, fellow patients.Maternal Welfare: Organized efforts by communities or organizations to improve the health and well-being of the mother.Body Mass Index: An indicator of body density as determined by the relationship of BODY WEIGHT to BODY HEIGHT. BMI=weight (kg)/height squared (m2). BMI correlates with body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE). Their relationship varies with age and gender. For adults, BMI falls into these categories: below 18.5 (underweight); 18.5-24.9 (normal); 25.0-29.9 (overweight); 30.0 and above (obese). (National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)Statistics, Nonparametric: A class of statistical methods applicable to a large set of probability distributions used to test for correlation, location, independence, etc. In most nonparametric statistical tests, the original scores or observations are replaced by another variable containing less information. An important class of nonparametric tests employs the ordinal properties of the data. Another class of tests uses information about whether an observation is above or below some fixed value such as the median, and a third class is based on the frequency of the occurrence of runs in the data. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1284; Corsini, Concise Encyclopedia of Psychology, 1987, p764-5)Ethnic Groups: A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.Adoption: Voluntary acceptance of a child of other parents to be as one's own child, usually with legal confirmation.Motor Skills Disorders: Marked impairments in the development of motor coordination such that the impairment interferes with activities of daily living. (From DSM-V)Food, Fortified: Any food that has been supplemented with essential nutrients either in quantities that are greater than those present normally, or which are not present in the food normally. Fortified food includes also food to which various nutrients have been added to compensate for those removed by refinement or processing. (From Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Wounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.Nasopharynx: The top portion of the pharynx situated posterior to the nose and superior to the SOFT PALATE. The nasopharynx is the posterior extension of the nasal cavities and has a respiratory function.Object Attachment: Emotional attachment to someone or something in the environment.Dental Caries: Localized destruction of the tooth surface initiated by decalcification of the enamel followed by enzymatic lysis of organic structures and leading to cavity formation. If left unchecked, the cavity may penetrate the enamel and dentin and reach the pulp.Immunization Schedule: Schedule giving optimum times usually for primary and/or secondary immunization.Malnutrition: An imbalanced nutritional status resulted from insufficient intake of nutrients to meet normal physiological requirement.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Jaundice, Neonatal: Yellow discoloration of the SKIN; MUCOUS MEMBRANE; and SCLERA in the NEWBORN. It is a sign of NEONATAL HYPERBILIRUBINEMIA. Most cases are transient self-limiting (PHYSIOLOGICAL NEONATAL JAUNDICE) occurring in the first week of life, but some can be a sign of pathological disorders, particularly LIVER DISEASES.Odds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Social Class: A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.Social Environment: The aggregate of social and cultural institutions, forms, patterns, and processes that influence the life of an individual or community.Fetal Blood: Blood of the fetus. Exchange of nutrients and waste between the fetal and maternal blood occurs via the PLACENTA. The cord blood is blood contained in the umbilical vessels (UMBILICAL CORD) at the time of delivery.Respiration, Artificial: Any method of artificial breathing that employs mechanical or non-mechanical means to force the air into and out of the lungs. Artificial respiration or ventilation is used in individuals who have stopped breathing or have RESPIRATORY INSUFFICIENCY to increase their intake of oxygen (O2) and excretion of carbon dioxide (CO2).Learning Disorders: Conditions characterized by a significant discrepancy between an individual's perceived level of intellect and their ability to acquire new language and other cognitive skills. These disorders may result from organic or psychological conditions. Relatively common subtypes include DYSLEXIA, DYSCALCULIA, and DYSGRAPHIA.Colic: A clinical syndrome with intermittent abdominal pain characterized by sudden onset and cessation that is commonly seen in infants. It is usually associated with obstruction of the INTESTINES; of the CYSTIC DUCT; or of the URINARY TRACT.Tobacco Smoke Pollution: Contamination of the air by tobacco smoke.EnglandHousing: Living facilities for humans.Maternal Exposure: Exposure of the female parent, human or animal, to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals that may affect offspring. It includes pre-conception maternal exposure.Morbidity: The proportion of patients with a particular disease during a given year per given unit of population.Diet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.Overweight: A status with BODY WEIGHT that is above certain standard of acceptable or desirable weight. In the scale of BODY MASS INDEX, overweight is defined as having a BMI of 25.0-29.9 kg/m2. Overweight may or may not be due to increases in body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE), hence overweight does not equal "over fat".Ductus Arteriosus, Patent: A congenital heart defect characterized by the persistent opening of fetal DUCTUS ARTERIOSUS that connects the PULMONARY ARTERY to the descending aorta (AORTA, DESCENDING) allowing unoxygenated blood to bypass the lung and flow to the PLACENTA. Normally, the ductus is closed shortly after birth.Feeding Behavior: Behavioral responses or sequences associated with eating including modes of feeding, rhythmic patterns of eating, and time intervals.Videotape Recording: Recording of visual and sometimes sound signals on magnetic tape.Enteral Nutrition: Nutritional support given via the alimentary canal or any route connected to the gastrointestinal system (i.e., the enteral route). This includes oral feeding, sip feeding, and tube feeding using nasogastric, gastrostomy, and jejunostomy tubes.Language Tests: Tests designed to assess language behavior and abilities. They include tests of vocabulary, comprehension, grammar and functional use of language, e.g., Development Sentence Scoring, Receptive-Expressive Emergent Language Scale, Parsons Language Sample, Utah Test of Language Development, Michigan Language Inventory and Verbal Language Development Scale, Illinois Test of Psycholinguistic Abilities, Northwestern Syntax Screening Test, Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, Ammons Full-Range Picture Vocabulary Test, and Assessment of Children's Language Comprehension.Adaptation, Psychological: A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)MexicoFamily Health: The health status of the family as a unit including the impact of the health of one member of the family on the family as a unit and on individual family members; also, the impact of family organization or disorganization on the health status of its members.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis Vaccine: A vaccine consisting of DIPHTHERIA TOXOID; TETANUS TOXOID; and whole-cell PERTUSSIS VACCINE. The vaccine protects against diphtheria, tetanus, and whooping cough.Maternal Age: The age of the mother in PREGNANCY.
  • A natural thrush treatment for babies, when used with your doctor's recommended treatment plan, may help your child heal from the fungal infection. (colgate.com)
  • While most babies don't start getting teeth until they are 6 months old, infant dental care is important from the very beginning. (colgate.com)
  • How many HIV-seropositive boarder babies are there in hospitals awaiting foster care placements? (hhs.gov)
  • Among the issues investigated are boarder babies, recruitment and retention of foster parents, enrollment of foster care children in experimental trials, services and training, testing for HIV. (hhs.gov)
  • 1 ] Material continues to be published in 2016 in mainstream media which calls this practice into question, as reported by Arnold on the Australian Broadcasting Commission (ABC) that Doctors speak out against chiropractors treating children and Medew in the Sydney Morning Herald (SMH) that Doctors at war with chiropractors over treatment of babies and children. (chiro.org)
  • 12 We hypothesized that the pharmacokinetics of propofol in neonates and young babies might be substantially altered compared with older infants and children and that these differences may be clinically important. (asahq.org)
  • Within a culturally affirming environment and honoring the unique history of African-American women, Black Infant Health (BIH) aims to help women have healthy babies. (ca.gov)
  • Such habits frequently help many children and babies to fall asleep. (allsmileskids.com)
  • Each infant classroom is designed to develop physical, emotional, social and cognitive skills for babies between the ages of six weeks and twelve months. (childcarenetwork.com)
  • Social workers will be given updated directives on keeping mothers and infants together, plus new guidelines on promoting breastfeeding when babies are placed in care. (cbc.ca)
  • All babies in intensive care nurseries have their heart rates, breathing, and, in some cases, blood pressure monitored continuously. (partners4kids.com)
  • Did you know there are wide variations in nipple flow rates among various brands available for parents to purchase for feeding their babies after discharge from the neonatal intensive care unit? (lww.com)
  • 6-8 While there are limited data on the kinetics of propofol in well children, 9-11 even less is known of the kinetics in critically ill neonates and infants. (asahq.org)
  • After obtaining local ethics committee approval and written informed parental consent, we studied 21 neonates and children up to the age of 12 yr requiring sedation and ventilation following cardiac surgery or for single organ failure. (asahq.org)
  • Because of anatomic characteristics (small airway diameter) and specific respiratory mechanics (high resistance and low compliance) and because they often suffer from infectious airway diseases, neonates, infants, and small children are prone to respiratory failure and possibly require respiratory support via mechanical ventilation despite their youth. (rcjournal.com)
  • Question Is the implementation of an unplanned extubation (UE) bundle, as part of a national quality improvement initiative, associated with a reduction in UEs in critically ill neonates, infants, and children? (jamanetwork.com)
  • Findings In this quality improvement study of neonates, infants, and children from 43 participating children's hospitals, use of the UE bundle was associated with a 24.1% reduction in UEs. (jamanetwork.com)
  • For infants with birth defects consistent with congenital Zika syndrome, healthcare providers should monitor for an expanded listed of potential problems. (cdc.gov)
  • For infants who are recommended to receive testing for congenital Zika virus infection, concurrent Zika virus RNA nucleic acid testing (NAT) of serum and urine and Zika virus IgM testing of serum should be performed within a few days after birth, if possible. (cdc.gov)
  • Use these tools to guide evaluation and testing of infants with possible congenital Zika virus infection. (cdc.gov)
  • In this Medscape video, CDC expert, Dr. Cynthia Moore, discusses CDC guidance for caring for infants with congenital Zika exposure. (cdc.gov)
  • Clothing was responsible for an increased incidence of congenital hip dislocation (CDH) in Japanese infants. (wikipedia.org)
  • Additionally, mothers with poor oral health may be at a greater risk of passing the bacteria which causes cavities to their young children. (dentists4kids.com)
  • The children of the intervention group mothers were born between 2009 and 2010, and children of the control group in 2008. (uta.fi)
  • Some research has indicated that it is even possible for infants to acquire the agents that cause dental caries from their mothers. (allsmileskids.com)
  • The B.C. government has launched a plan to give infants in government care better access to breastfeeding by keeping them close to their mothers. (cbc.ca)
  • The province is also exploring housing alternatives where mothers and their infants at risk can be placed. (cbc.ca)
  • What's needed is funding to be provided so that mothers are given all the support necessary to ensure the bond between them and their infants is established and maintained. (cbc.ca)
  • Crying in infants is associated with high stress levels and depression in mothers. (wikipedia.org)
  • The burden of care of the mother, that is, mothers without assistance in caring for the infant, are more prone to physical aggression and angry speaking. (wikipedia.org)
  • The age of first-time mothers has been increasing in Western cultures, from 21.5 years old in 1970 to over 25 years old in the early 2000s, and hence they have more disposable income to spend for infant goods, including clothing. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hence, greater severity at presentation in younger children together with less maturity of autoregulatory systems combine to predispose children to cerebral edema, which occurs in ∼0.5-1% of all episodes of DKA in children and is the most common cause of mortality in children with DKA ( 9 - 12 ). (diabetesjournals.org)
  • Despite the use of CPR, mortality rates for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest are about 90% for infants and children. (merckmanuals.com)
  • 1,2 Propofol has been used to provide smooth and predictable sedation in children, 3,4 but recently its use has been contraindicated because of concerns that its use may be associated with increased mortality 5 and that it can cause a syndrome characterized by bradycardia, rhabdomyolisis, metabolic acidosis, hypotension, and death. (asahq.org)
  • Family Planning emerges as the mission to reduce maternal and child mortality & morbidity in India. (medindia.net)
  • The Health Minister has announced a change in the approach of family planning to be the key strategy for reducing child and maternal mortality rates. (medindia.net)
  • It explains that if such children are not tested and treated early, HIV infection causes rapidly progressive disease and high mortality in early childhood. (cdc.gov)
  • Importance Unplanned extubations (UEs) in children contribute to significant morbidity and mortality, with an arbitrary benchmark target of less than 1 UE per 100 ventilator days. (jamanetwork.com)
  • Emphasis on community issues is highlighted in Community Focus boxes throughout the text to provide additional resources and guidance on caring for children outside the clinical setting. (google.com)
  • A chapter on Community-Based Nursing Care of the Child and Family reflects new trends and general issues in the care of children outside the clinical setting. (google.com)
  • This longtime bestseller provides an evidence-based, clinical perspective that shows how the quality of nursing care can impact quality patient outcomes. (elsevier.com)
  • Commissioners (clinical commissioning groups, local authorities, NHS England) ensure that the services they commission use a stepped-care approach to managing frequent regurgitation associated with marked distress for formula‑fed infants. (nice.org.uk)
  • To illustrate the impact developmental biology and genetics have already had on the clinical management of the million infants born worldwide each year with CHD, we have chosen three stories which have had particular relevance for pediatric cardiologists, cardiothoracic surgeons, cardiac anesthesiologists, and cardiac nurses. (nih.gov)
  • David Wilson MS RNC-NIC is the author of 'Virtual Clinical Excursions 3.0 for Wong's Nursing Care of Infants and Children, 9e (Hockenberry, Virtual Clinical Excursions for Wong's Nursing Care of Infants and Child)', published 2010 under ISBN 9780323079723 and ISBN 0323079725. (valorebooks.com)
  • In child development it means that the person is not a clinical problem or a criminal or a drop out, even though they did not get their basic needs met in some fashion. (psychologytoday.com)
  • Yale New Haven Hospital staff volunteer their time to provide clinical care to hundreds of patient-campers every summer at this camp located in Ashford, Conn. The camp, founded by Paul Newman, is a nonprofit residential camp for children with cancer or life-threatening blood disorders. (ynhh.org)
  • Nursing the Highly Dependent Infant or Child is an accessible and clinical guide to the caring for the acutely ill child. (usakochan.net)
  • Carle Neonatal Medical Follow-Up Clinic provides an additional resource to parents once their infants have been discharged from the NICU. (carle.org)
  • Design, Setting, and Participants This multicenter quality improvement initiative enrolled patients from pediatric, neonatal, and cardiac intensive care units (ICUs) in 43 participating children's hospitals from March 2016 to December 2018. (jamanetwork.com)
  • The index cases included all premature children aged two and three years who were admitted to the neonatal unit of El-Shatby University Children's Hospital and were discharged alive over 2 six-month periods (1 November 1990 to 30 April 1991 and 1 November 1989 to 30 April 1990). (who.int)
  • It provides guidance on the specific nursing skills required to care for children and infants who require a 'step up' level of care from those on the general paediatric ward or a 'step down' level of care on discharge from neonatal or paediatric critical care facilities. (usakochan.net)
  • Evidence-Based Practice boxes throughout the text focus attention on the application of both research and critical thought processes to support and guide the outcomes of nursing care. (google.com)
  • Can preschool improve child health outcomes? (springer.com)
  • Quality Patient Outcomes are discussed for major childhood diseases and disorders, showing how nursing care directly impacts patient outcomes. (elsevier.com)
  • Nursing Care Plans provide models for planning patient care, with rationales explaining why specific nursing interventions have been chosen, and include nursing diagnoses, patient/family goals, nursing interventions/rationales, expected outcomes, and NIC and NOC guidelines. (elsevier.com)
  • Based on these guidelines, at least 13 visits to the gynecologist are scheduled for prenatal care, including preconception and postpartum visits. (lecturio.com)
  • Therefore, prenatal care should be sought with a caregiver who is up to date and comfortable with the management of a mother who is at risk for a preterm delivery. (partners4kids.com)
  • Children who have a dental home are more likely to receive appropriate preventive and routine oral health care. (dentists4kids.com)
  • In addition, this document aims to emphasize the key role dentists have in diagnosing, treating and/or referring pediatric patients and those medically compromised or with special health care needs affected by periodontal problems. (aapd.org)
  • Standards and guidelines for CPR from the American Heart Association are followed (see table Child and Infant CPR Techniques for Health Care Practitioners ). (merckmanuals.com)
  • Barnes-Jewish is a member of BJC HealthCare, which provides a full range of health care services through its 15 hospitals and more than 100 health care sites in Missouri and Illinois. (barnesjewish.org)
  • The study was a non-randomised controlled pragmatic trial aiming to prevent childhood obesity, the setting being municipal maternity health care clinics. (uta.fi)
  • You can get your child immunized with your health care provider or at the health unit. (swpublichealth.ca)
  • The Primary Care provides excellent outpatient health care and education for the entire family. (washington.edu)
  • He has masters degrees in health-fitness management and healthcare administration and a doctoral degree from The University of Texas at Austin focused on health care informatics, health administration, health education and health policy. (psychcentral.com)
  • We are encouraged by these results, which suggest that computer technology holds promise for efficiently delivering patient education in busy health care settings," said Allen R. Walker, MD, co-author of the study and director of emergency medicine for the Johns Hopkins Children's Center. (medindia.net)
  • 1891 words - 8 pages the years from a nurse being a mother or a woman to the nurse with duties integrating the growing and challenging to people in need of health care. (brightkite.com)
  • Programs are also provided for campers year-round, as well as for other seriously ill children, siblings, health care professionals, parents and teachers. (ynhh.org)
  • The health care provider will do a physical exam to determine the cause. (stlukes-stl.com)
  • During a physical examination, a health care provider studies your body to determine if you do or do not have a physical problem. (stlukes-stl.com)
  • Duke MyChart is our easy to use online patient portal that helps you manage your health care online. (dukehealth.org)
  • Guidelines for the Provision and Assessment of Nutrition Support Therapy in the Pediatric Critically Ill Patient: Society of Critical Care Medicine. (nih.gov)
  • This document represents the first collaboration between 2 organizations-the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition and the Society of Critical Care Medicine-to describe best practices in nutrition therapy in critically ill children. (nih.gov)
  • The public health system will act as a key in putting an end to all preventable maternal and child deaths. (medindia.net)
  • Family Planning will be a key strategy to reduce maternal and child mortalities and morbidities in India, stated Shri J P Nadda, Union Minister of Health and Family Welfare. (medindia.net)
  • At the two-day National Summit held on 5th April, 2016 in New Delhi, The Union Minister of Health and Family Welfare, Shri J P Nadda has stated that family planning could be the key strategy to reduce maternal and child mortalities and morbidities in the country . (medindia.net)
  • The new approach is a comprehensive strategy that has been worked out to place maternal and child health at the center point. (medindia.net)
  • Thought you might appreciate this item(s) I saw at MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. (lww.com)
  • MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing43(1):5, January/February 2018. (lww.com)
  • MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. (lww.com)
  • Consistency and promptness of maternal response is associated with a decline in frequency and duration of crying by the end of the first year individual differences in crying reflect the history of maternal responsiveness rather than constitutional differences in infant irritability. (wikipedia.org)
  • During evaluations of maternal depression responses to infant crying, sleeping problems are closely associated with excessive crying and may confound the conclusions of such research. (wikipedia.org)
  • Service providers (community care providers, secondary care and specialised women's trusts) ensure that healthcare professionals offer a stepped‑care approach to managing frequent regurgitation associated with marked distress for formula‑fed infants. (nice.org.uk)
  • For the 2012 revision, wholesale infant clothing is in category 424330 (Women's, Children's, and Infants' Clothing and Accessories Merchant Wholesalers) and retail infant clothing is in category 448130 (Children's and Infants' Clothing Stores). (wikipedia.org)
  • A focus on family-centered care emphasizes the role and influence of the family in health and illness with a separate chapter and Family-Centered Care boxes. (elsevier.com)
  • The framework emphasizes the importance of early HIV diagnosis, cotrimoxazole preventive treatment for children who are exposed to, or who are infected with, HIV, and timely entry to care and treatment. (cdc.gov)
  • Schedule your school or sports physical now with your primary care provider. (carle.org)
  • Well-child care is an integral aspect of primary care for the pediatric population. (ndnr.com)
  • Well child checks are imperative in primary care for the younger population because it indicated if there are any red flags to look for a developmental delay. (coursehero.com)
  • The primary care provider plays a vital role in promoting healthy development before the child begins school. (coursehero.com)
  • To contact your Primary Care Provider, call your provider's Medical Assistant (MA) or email them using e-Care . (washington.edu)
  • The Primary Care Clinic is staffed by physicians (MDs), Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioners (ARNPs or nurses with graduate level training), registered nurses (RNs), and medical assistants (MAs). (washington.edu)
  • The monograph gives information about scaling up HIV prevention, and the diagnosis, care, and treatment for children exposed to, or infected with, HIV. (cdc.gov)
  • Symptoms of depression and anxiety are assessed at every regular pediatric visit, and with end-of-year celebrations canceled and parents facing unique challenges, Costello notes, "kids feel like it's the end of the world. (go.com)
  • While the annual incidence of asthma in children in the United States is 7%, [ 26 ] the fact remains that it is the most common chronic disease in childhood [ 27 ] with its debut during the first year in life in about 30% of infants and in more than 50% before 2 years of age. (chiro.org)
  • 2006) reported that juice was second only to milk in the amount of energy contributed to the diets of children age 1 year. (nih.gov)
  • Among the other foods also reported to contribute significant percentages of the energy intake of children age 1 year were several that are high in solid fat and/or added sugars. (nih.gov)
  • Also, notably, more than 60 percent of 1-year-old children enrolled in WIC had usual sodium intakes above the Tolerable Upper Intake Level (UL) (IOM, 2006). (nih.gov)
  • the potential increase (over the five-year period beginning on the date of the enactment of this Act) in the number of infants and children with such syndrome who will require foster care. (hhs.gov)
  • How many infants are born each year? (nih.gov)
  • The Women & Infants Center, a collaborative partnership between Barnes-Jewish Hospital, St. Louis Children's Hospital and Washington University Physicians is commemorating the one year anniversary since its grand opening in 2018 on the Washington University Medical Campus. (barnesjewish.org)
  • We had an excellent inaugural year at the Women & Infants Center," said George Macones, MD, a Washington University obstetrician and gynecologist at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and department chairman. (barnesjewish.org)
  • Children who are infected with RSV or with another of the bronchiolitis viruses may even become infected again in their second year of life with the same virus. (childcarelimited.com)
  • Assistant Teacher for 2 to 5 year age children. (simplyhired.com)
  • On average, more than 500 infants who were less than a year old entered government care each year from 2013 to 2018. (cbc.ca)
  • The participant pool consisted of 23 infants classified as being under one year old, and 81 children classified as being over one years old but under 18 years old. (metroeastallergist.com)
  • In developing countries, a child under the age of 3 is likely to have three episodes of diarrhea a year. (healthline.com)
  • It takes the lives of approximately 760,000 children each year. (healthline.com)
  • Up to 38% identify a problem with their infant crying within the first year. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1 Nevertheless, when compared to dental caries, gingivitis in children has received much less attention in understanding the long-term impact that chronic inflammation of the periodontal tissues in childhood may have on overall health of the periodontium throughout life. (aapd.org)
  • The nursing process is used to present nursing care for major diseases and disorders. (google.com)
  • New data shows vaccine rates are drastically declining , raising concerns that kids will be at risk for life-threatening but preventable diseases, which Costello points out are much more dangerous for children than COVID-19. (go.com)
  • Signs of appropriate physical development for infants include increased control of arm and leg movements, pushing up, sitting or rolling over, increased mobility and the ability to lift and turn their heads, according to the North Carolina Division of Child Development (DCD). (livestrong.com)
  • Monitor your child carefully, looking for signs of dehydration. (healthline.com)
  • Details include signs your child may have an elevated bilirubin level, phototherapy treatment and how long it will take for your child to recover. (chop.edu)
  • Parents must discuss sleep position with any caretakers of their infants. (aappublications.org)
  • During the coronavirus pandemic, many parents are hesitant to take their children to the doctor for important vaccinations. (go.com)
  • But in spite of parents' best intentions, strict adherence to home quarantine has created a new problem that puts kids at risk: missed doctor's visits. (go.com)
  • Particularly, Bracho-Sanchez said she's seen children of essential workers already acting out, "the first sign they are stressed," as they "are being told to stay inside but have to see their parents go out and put themselves in harm's way. (go.com)
  • About 70 percent of parents place their child in some form of child care, according to Kids Health. (livestrong.com)
  • Parents in families traveling to or living in areas with Zika can help protect their children by strictly following steps to prevent mosquito bites. (cdc.gov)
  • A stepped‑care approach enables parents and carers of formula‑fed infants to try a sequence of easy modifications to the feeding practice that can help them manage frequent regurgitation with marked distress. (nice.org.uk)
  • With regard to smoking, infants with both parents who smoked exhibited a higher risk than infants where neither parent smoked, with an odds ratio of 3.50 (95% c.i. 1.74-8.32). (biomedsearch.com)
  • A recent survey found that what parents value the most during their well-child visit is the opportunity to obtain individualized information from their pediatrician, to gain reassurance that their child is growing and developing well, and to be reassured about their parenting skills. (ndnr.com)
  • These forms are usually provided to parents by the child care. (swpublichealth.ca)
  • Serves as an advocate with parents' consent to link the family and child to resources and services needed. (simplyhired.com)
  • Therefore, it is important for parents to be patient and provide their children with support. (allsmileskids.com)
  • Our teachers partner with each of our parents by offering information to help reinforce what their child is learning throughout the day. (childcarenetwork.com)
  • Not only will I take extra care to begin building a trusting bond with the infant from the start, building a trusting bond with the baby's parents is super important, too. (childcarenetwork.com)
  • One is that more and more parents themselves did not receive optimal care and so have no physical memory of it or intuitions for it. (psychologytoday.com)
  • But parents are expected to care for children on their own while holding multiple jobs. (psychologytoday.com)
  • Loved that there's a seating area for parents/family while child is being seen. (childrenandteendentalal.com)
  • Children copy what they see their parents do. (kidshealthyteeth.com)
  • Most likely, parents who make oral hygiene a priority will pass that mentality onto their kids. (kidshealthyteeth.com)
  • Using the popular and effective Creative Curriculum® , Holmdel Preschool partners with parents to provide a well-rounded, global experience for children. (holmdelpreschool.com)
  • For parents who need more time before or after classes to pick up their children, we offer before & after class childcare. (holmdelpreschool.com)
  • In addition, 90 percent of the infants were exposed to television and 50 percent actively watched TV (meaning parents put their children in front of the television in order to watch). (psychcentral.com)
  • The participants in the "Safety in Seconds" program used a computer kiosk set up for parents in the emergency department of the Johns Hopkins Children's Center to answer a series of questions about their children, their own experiences and personal beliefs about safety. (medindia.net)
  • Parents were mailed a request to attend the Public Health Department, Faculty of Medicine, Alexandria University, accompanied by their index child. (who.int)
  • Parents can be concerned about the amount of time that their infant cries, how the infant can be consoled, and disrupted sleeping patterns. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most parents also have a better ability to distinguish their own infant's cries than those of a different child. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the United States, before the 1890s children predominantly wore clothing made by their parents. (wikipedia.org)
  • Infants with frequent regurgitation associated with marked distress presenting in healthcare settings. (nice.org.uk)
  • Healthcare professionals (health visitors, midwives, paediatric nurses or GPs) use a stepped‑care approach to manage frequent regurgitation associated with marked distress for formula‑fed infants. (nice.org.uk)
  • As a broader array of healthcare services resumes, we want to reassure you that all St. Luke's facilities are safe, welcoming and prepared as always to provide you with the very best patient-focused care. (stlukes-stl.com)
  • 1 Because subsequent evidence suggested that side position put infants at higher risk than supine, this recommendation was modified in 1996 to state that supine was preferred over the side position for sleep. (aappublications.org)
  • Where medical services are less well developed, the risk of dying from DKA is greater, and children may die before receiving treatment. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • Relationships at risk: The policy environment as a context for infant development. (springer.com)
  • Very high-risk infants may need to see us earlier. (uncchildrens.org)
  • This can put the child at a much higher risk for cavities later on. (allsmileskids.com)
  • These would have been unthinkable practices and laughable ideas that would have put the group at increased risk for predation because unhappy children make for noisy and uncooperative children. (psychologytoday.com)
  • Children visiting foreign countries (especially developing countries) are at risk of getting traveler's diarrhea. (healthline.com)
  • Children with kidney problems are at higher risk for high blood pressure. (healthychildren.org)
  • Beyond food vouchers, the WIC staff reaches out into the community to educate and counsel women and children at nutritional risk. (ynhh.org)
  • However, research indicates that infants born prior to 39 weeks are at higher risk for more short- and long-term morbidities than those born after 39 weeks. (nih.gov)