Severe distortions in the development of many basic psychological functions that are not normal for any stage in development. These distortions are manifested in sustained social impairment, speech abnormalities, and peculiar motor movements.
The continuous sequential physiological and psychological maturing of an individual from birth up to but not including ADOLESCENCE.
Conditions characterized by language abilities (comprehension and expression of speech and writing) that are below the expected level for a given age, generally in the absence of an intellectual impairment. These conditions may be associated with DEAFNESS; BRAIN DISEASES; MENTAL DISORDERS; or environmental factors.
A group of Indian Ocean Islands, east of Tanzania. Their capital is Victoria. They were first claimed by the French in 1744 but taken by the English in 1794 and made a dependency of MAURITIUS in 1810. They became a crown colony in 1903 and a republic within the Commonwealth in 1976. They were named for the French finance minister, Jean Moreau de Sechelles, but respelled by the English in 1794. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p1102 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p496)
The training or bringing-up of children by parents or parent-substitutes. It is used also for child rearing practices in different societies, at different economic levels, in different ethnic groups, etc. It differs from PARENTING in that in child rearing the emphasis is on the act of training or bringing up the child and the interaction between the parent and child, while parenting emphasizes the responsibility and qualities of exemplary behavior of the parent.
Disorders in which there is a delay in development based on that expected for a given age level or stage of development. These impairments or disabilities originate before age 18, may be expected to continue indefinitely, and constitute a substantial impairment. Biological and nonbiological factors are involved in these disorders. (From American Psychiatric Glossary, 6th ed)
Organized efforts by communities or organizations to improve the health and well-being of the child.
Care of CHILDREN in the home or in an institution.
Organic compounds in which mercury is attached to a methyl group.
Interaction between a mother and child.
Any observable response or action of a child from 24 months through 12 years of age. For neonates or children younger than 24 months, INFANT BEHAVIOR is available.
Female parents, human or animal.
Performing the role of a parent by care-giving, nurturance, and protection of the child by a natural or substitute parent. The parent supports the child by exercising authority and through consistent, empathic, appropriate behavior in response to the child's needs. PARENTING differs from CHILD REARING in that in child rearing the emphasis is on the act of training or bringing up the children and the interaction between the parent and child, while parenting emphasizes the responsibility and qualities of exemplary behavior of the parent.
The consequences of exposing the FETUS in utero to certain factors, such as NUTRITION PHYSIOLOGICAL PHENOMENA; PHYSIOLOGICAL STRESS; DRUGS; RADIATION; and other physical or chemical factors. These consequences are observed later in the offspring after BIRTH.
The interactions between parent and child.
Disturbances considered to be pathological based on age and stage appropriateness, e.g., conduct disturbances and anaclitic depression. This concept does not include psychoneuroses, psychoses, or personality disorders with fixed patterns.
Prolonged separation of the offspring from the father.
The study of normal and abnormal behavior of children.
Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.
A major affective disorder marked by severe mood swings (manic or major depressive episodes) and a tendency to remission and recurrence.
Organized services to provide health care for children.
Spontaneous or voluntary recreational activities pursued for enjoyment and accessories or equipment used in the activities; includes games, toys, etc.
Persons functioning as natural, adoptive, or substitute parents. The heading includes the concept of parenthood as well as preparation for becoming a parent.
Neurologic disorders associated with exposure to inorganic and organic forms of MERCURY. Acute intoxication may be associated with gastrointestinal disturbances, mental status changes, and PARAPARESIS. Chronic exposure to inorganic mercury usually occurs in industrial workers, and manifests as mental confusion, prominent behavioral changes (including psychosis), DYSKINESIAS, and NEURITIS. Alkyl mercury poisoning may occur through ingestion of contaminated seafood or grain, and its characteristic features include POLYNEUROPATHY; ATAXIA; vision loss; NYSTAGMUS, PATHOLOGIC; and DEAFNESS. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1997, Ch20, pp10-15)
The gradual expansion in complexity and meaning of symbols and sounds as perceived and interpreted by the individual through a maturational and learning process. Stages in development include babbling, cooing, word imitation with cognition, and use of short sentences.
Disorders caused by nutritional imbalance, either overnutrition or undernutrition, occurring in children ages 2 to 12 years.
The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.
Marine fish and shellfish used as food or suitable for food. (Webster, 3d ed) SHELLFISH and FISH PRODUCTS are more specific types of SEAFOOD.
An infant during the first month after birth.
The ability to learn and to deal with new situations and to deal effectively with tasks involving abstractions.
Children with mental or physical disabilities that interfere with usual activities of daily living and that may require accommodation or intervention.
Child with one or more parents afflicted by a physical or mental disorder.
Persistent and disabling ANXIETY.
Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.
Those disorders that have a disturbance in mood as their predominant feature.
The language and sounds expressed by a child at a particular maturational stage in development.
Procedures and programs that facilitate the development or skill acquisition in infants and young children who have disabilities, who are at risk for developing disabilities, or who are gifted. It includes programs that are designed to prevent handicapping conditions in infants and young children and family-centered programs designed to affect the functioning of infants and children with special needs. (From Journal of Early Intervention, Editorial, 1989, vol. 13, no. 1, p. 3; A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, prepared for the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce, 1976)
Standardized tests that measure the present general ability or aptitude for intellectual performance.
Nutritional physiology of children aged 2-12 years.
A medical specialty concerned with maintaining health and providing medical care to children from birth to adolescence.
Any observable response or action of a neonate or infant up through the age of 23 months.
Exposure of the female parent, human or animal, to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals that may affect offspring. It includes pre-conception maternal exposure.
Male parents, human or animal.
Intellectual or mental process whereby an organism obtains knowledge.
Human artificial insemination in which the semen used is that of a man other than the woman's husband.
Categorical classification of MENTAL DISORDERS based on criteria sets with defining features. It is produced by the American Psychiatric Association. (DSM-IV, page xxii)
Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.
The training or molding of an individual through various relationships, educational agencies, and social controls, which enables him to become a member of a particular society.
Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
Depression in POSTPARTUM WOMEN, usually within four weeks after giving birth (PARTURITION). The degree of depression ranges from mild transient depression to neurotic or psychotic depressive disorders. (From DSM-IV, p386)
The presence in food of harmful, unpalatable, or otherwise objectionable foreign substances, e.g. chemicals, microorganisms or diluents, before, during, or after processing or storage.
A behavior disorder originating in childhood in which the essential features are signs of developmentally inappropriate inattention, impulsivity, and hyperactivity. Although most individuals have symptoms of both inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity, one or the other pattern may be predominant. The disorder is more frequent in males than females. Onset is in childhood. Symptoms often attenuate during late adolescence although a minority experience the full complement of symptoms into mid-adulthood. (From DSM-V)
A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.
The behavior patterns associated with or characteristic of a mother.
Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.
Voluntary acceptance of a child of other parents to be as one's own child, usually with legal confirmation.
The determination and evaluation of personality attributes by interviews, observations, tests, or scales. Articles concerning personality measurement are considered to be within scope of this term.
A disorder beginning in childhood. It is marked by the presence of markedly abnormal or impaired development in social interaction and communication and a markedly restricted repertoire of activity and interest. Manifestations of the disorder vary greatly depending on the developmental level and chronological age of the individual. (DSM-V)
Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.
Adaptation of the person to the social environment. Adjustment may take place by adapting the self to the environment or by changing the environment. (From Campbell, Psychiatric Dictionary, 1996)
The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.
Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.
The term "United States" in a medical context often refers to the country where a patient or study participant resides, and is not a medical term per se, but relevant for epidemiological studies, healthcare policies, and understanding differences in disease prevalence, treatment patterns, and health outcomes across various geographic locations.
Marked depression appearing in the involution period and characterized by hallucinations, delusions, paranoia, and agitation.
The distance from the sole to the crown of the head with body standing on a flat surface and fully extended.
The aggregate of social and cultural institutions, forms, patterns, and processes that influence the life of an individual or community.
A child who is receiving long-term in-patient services or who resides in an institutional setting.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Bangladesh" is a country located in South Asia, not a medical term or concept. Therefore, it doesn't have a medical definition. It shares borders with India, Myanmar (Burma), and Bay of Bengal. The population is primarily Bengali, and the official language is Bangla (Bengali). The capital city is Dhaka. If you have any questions related to medicine or health, feel free to ask!
General and comprehensive nursing practice directed to individuals, families, or groups as it relates to and contributes to the health of a population or community. This is not an official program of a Public Health Department.
Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.
An affective disorder manifested by either a dysphoric mood or loss of interest or pleasure in usual activities. The mood disturbance is prominent and relatively persistent.
Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.
A filament-like structure consisting of a shaft which projects to the surface of the SKIN from a root which is softer than the shaft and lodges in the cavity of a HAIR FOLLICLE. It is found on most surfaces of the body.
Predisposition to react to one's environment in a certain way; usually refers to mood changes.
Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.
Personality construct referring to an individual's perception of the locus of events as determined internally by his or her own behavior versus fate, luck, or external forces. (ERIC Thesaurus, 1996).
Size and composition of the family.
A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.
A class of traumatic stress disorders with symptoms that last more than one month. There are various forms of post-traumatic stress disorder, depending on the time of onset and the duration of these stress symptoms. In the acute form, the duration of the symptoms is between 1 to 3 months. In the chronic form, symptoms last more than 3 months. With delayed onset, symptoms develop more than 6 months after the traumatic event.
A social group consisting of parents or parent substitutes and children.
An anxiety disorder characterized by recurrent, persistent obsessions or compulsions. Obsessions are the intrusive ideas, thoughts, or images that are experienced as senseless or repugnant. Compulsions are repetitive and seemingly purposeful behavior which the individual generally recognizes as senseless and from which the individual does not derive pleasure although it may provide a release from tension.
Conditions or pathological processes associated with pregnancy. They can occur during or after pregnancy, and range from minor discomforts to serious diseases that require medical interventions. They include diseases in pregnant females, and pregnancies in females with diseases.
The giving of attention to the special dental needs of children, including the prevention of tooth diseases and instruction in dental hygiene and dental health. The dental care may include the services provided by dental specialists.
Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.
Child who has lost both parents through death or desertion.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "India" is not a medical term that can be defined in a medical context. It is a geographical location, referring to the Republic of India, a country in South Asia. If you have any questions related to medical topics or definitions, I would be happy to help with those!
Countries in the process of change with economic growth, that is, an increase in production, per capita consumption, and income. The process of economic growth involves better utilization of natural and human resources, which results in a change in the social, political, and economic structures.
A province of eastern Canada. Its capital is Quebec. The region belonged to France from 1627 to 1763 when it was lost to the British. The name is from the Algonquian quilibek meaning the place where waters narrow, referring to the gradually narrowing channel of the St. Lawrence or to the narrows of the river at Cape Diamond. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p993 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p440)
Standardized tests designed to measure abilities, as in intelligence, aptitude, and achievement tests, or to evaluate personality traits.
Disorders related to substance abuse.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Anxiety disorders in which the essential feature is persistent and irrational fear of a specific object, activity, or situation that the individual feels compelled to avoid. The individual recognizes the fear as excessive or unreasonable.
Tests designed to assess neurological function associated with certain behaviors. They are used in diagnosing brain dysfunction or damage and central nervous system disorders or injury.
State of the body in relation to the consumption and utilization of nutrients.
City, urban, rural, or suburban areas which are characterized by severe economic deprivation and by accompanying physical and social decay.
Interaction between the father and the child.
The nursing of an infant at the breast.
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.
Disorders in which there is a loss of ego boundaries or a gross impairment in reality testing with delusions or prominent hallucinations. (From DSM-IV, 1994)
The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.
The state wherein the person is well adjusted.
Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.
Revenues or receipts accruing from business enterprise, labor, or invested capital.
The reciprocal interaction of two or more persons.
Educational institutions.
The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.
The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.
Gradual increase in the number, the size, and the complexity of cells of an individual. Growth generally results in increase in ORGAN WEIGHT; BODY WEIGHT; and BODY HEIGHT.
Any behavior caused by or affecting another individual, usually of the same species.
Anemia characterized by decreased or absent iron stores, low serum iron concentration, low transferrin saturation, and low hemoglobin concentration or hematocrit value. The erythrocytes are hypochromic and microcytic and the iron binding capacity is increased.
A repetitive and persistent pattern of behavior in which the basic rights of others or major age-appropriate societal norms or rules are violated. These behaviors include aggressive conduct that causes or threatens physical harm to other people or animals, nonaggressive conduct that causes property loss or damage, deceitfulness or theft, and serious violations of rules. The onset is before age 18. (From DSM-IV, 1994)
Those affective states which can be experienced and have arousing and motivational properties.
Great Britain is not a medical term, but a geographical name for the largest island in the British Isles, which comprises England, Scotland, and Wales, forming the major part of the United Kingdom.
Performance of complex motor acts.
Feeling or emotion of dread, apprehension, and impending disaster but not disabling as with ANXIETY DISORDERS.
Abuse of children in a family, institutional, or other setting. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)
Statistical models in which the value of a parameter for a given value of a factor is assumed to be equal to a + bx, where a and b are constants. The models predict a linear regression.
The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals.
Standardized procedures utilizing rating scales or interview schedules carried out by health personnel for evaluating the degree of mental illness.
Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.
Disorders characterized by recurrent TICS that may interfere with speech and other activities. Tics are sudden, rapid, nonrhythmic, stereotyped motor movements or vocalizations which may be exacerbated by stress and are generally attenuated during absorbing activities. Tic disorders are distinguished from conditions which feature other types of abnormal movements that may accompany another another condition. (From DSM-IV, 1994)
Number of deaths of children between one year of age to 12 years of age in a given population.
A group of cold-blooded, aquatic vertebrates having gills, fins, a cartilaginous or bony endoskeleton, and elongated bodies covered with scales.
Disturbances in mental processes related to learning, thinking, reasoning, and judgment.
Substances or energies, for example heat or light, which when introduced into the air, water, or land threaten life or health of individuals or ECOSYSTEMS.
Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.
Conditions characterized by disturbances of usual sleep patterns or behaviors. Sleep disorders may be divided into three major categories: DYSSOMNIAS (i.e. disorders characterized by insomnia or hypersomnia), PARASOMNIAS (abnormal sleep behaviors), and sleep disorders secondary to medical or psychiatric disorders. (From Thorpy, Sleep Disorders Medicine, 1994, p187)
Countries that have reached a level of economic achievement through an increase of production, per capita income and consumption, and utilization of natural and human resources.
The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual at BIRTH. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.
A systematic statement of policy rules or principles. Guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by convening expert panels. The text may be cursive or in outline form but is generally a comprehensive guide to problems and approaches in any field of activity. For guidelines in the field of health care and clinical medicine, PRACTICE GUIDELINES AS TOPIC is available.
Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.
Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
Disorders having the presence of physical symptoms that suggest a general medical condition but that are not fully explained by a another medical condition, by the direct effects of a substance, or by another mental disorder. The symptoms must cause clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other areas of functioning. In contrast to FACTITIOUS DISORDERS and MALINGERING, the physical symptoms are not under voluntary control. (APA, DSM-V)
The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.
The coordination of a sensory or ideational (cognitive) process and a motor activity.
Acquired or developmental conditions marked by an impaired ability to comprehend or generate spoken forms of language.
A personality disorder marked by a pattern of instability of interpersonal relationships, self-image, and affects, and marked impulsivity beginning by early adulthood and present in a variety of contexts. (DSM-IV)
Includes two similar disorders: oppositional defiant disorder and CONDUCT DISORDERS. Symptoms occurring in children with these disorders include: defiance of authority figures, angry outbursts, and other antisocial behaviors.
Conditions characterized by a significant discrepancy between an individual's perceived level of intellect and their ability to acquire new language and other cognitive skills. These disorders may result from organic or psychological conditions. Relatively common subtypes include DYSLEXIA, DYSCALCULIA, and DYSGRAPHIA.
Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.
Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.
Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).
Syndromes which feature DYSKINESIAS as a cardinal manifestation of the disease process. Included in this category are degenerative, hereditary, post-infectious, medication-induced, post-inflammatory, and post-traumatic conditions.
Disorders characterized by proliferation of lymphoid tissue, general or unspecified.
Deviations from the average values for a specific age and sex in any or all of the following: height, weight, skeletal proportions, osseous development, or maturation of features. Included here are both acceleration and retardation of growth.
Disorders related to or resulting from abuse or mis-use of alcohol.
The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.
The formally authorized guardianship or care of a CHILD.
A directed conversation aimed at eliciting information for psychiatric diagnosis, evaluation, treatment planning, etc. The interview may be conducted by a social worker or psychologist.
The exchange or transmission of ideas, attitudes, or beliefs between individuals or groups.
A form of bronchial disorder with three distinct components: airway hyper-responsiveness (RESPIRATORY HYPERSENSITIVITY), airway INFLAMMATION, and intermittent AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION. It is characterized by spasmodic contraction of airway smooth muscle, WHEEZING, and dyspnea (DYSPNEA, PAROXYSMAL).
Neurotic reactions to unusual, severe, or overwhelming military stress.
Disorders whose essential features are the failure to resist an impulse, drive, or temptation to perform an act that is harmful to the individual or to others. Individuals experience an increased sense of tension prior to the act and pleasure, gratification or release of tension at the time of committing the act.
A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.
A human infant born before 37 weeks of GESTATION.
Conditions characterized by deficiencies of comprehension or expression of written and spoken forms of language. These include acquired and developmental disorders.
A severe emotional disorder of psychotic depth characteristically marked by a retreat from reality with delusion formation, HALLUCINATIONS, emotional disharmony, and regressive behavior.
The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.
Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.
Marked impairments in the development of motor coordination such that the impairment interferes with activities of daily living. (From DSM-V)
A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.
Diseases of the central and peripheral nervous system. This includes disorders of the brain, spinal cord, cranial nerves, peripheral nerves, nerve roots, autonomic nervous system, neuromuscular junction, and muscle.
A characteristic symptom complex.
Assessment of psychological variables by the application of mathematical procedures.
Chronically depressed mood that occurs for most of the day more days than not for at least 2 years. The required minimum duration in children to make this diagnosis is 1 year. During periods of depressed mood, at least 2 of the following additional symptoms are present: poor appetite or overeating, insomnia or hypersomnia, low energy or fatigue, low self esteem, poor concentration or difficulty making decisions, and feelings of hopelessness. (DSM-IV)
Sudden temporary alterations in the normally integrative functions of consciousness.
A personality disorder whose essential feature is a pervasive pattern of disregard for, and violation of, the rights of others that begins in childhood or early adolescence and continues into adulthood. The individual must be at least age 18 and must have a history of some symptoms of CONDUCT DISORDER before age 15. (From DSM-IV, 1994)
The health status of the family as a unit including the impact of the health of one member of the family on the family as a unit and on individual family members; also, the impact of family organization or disorganization on the health status of its members.
The age, developmental stage, or period of life at which a disease or the initial symptoms or manifestations of a disease appear in an individual.
Special hospitals which provide care for ill children.
A disorder associated with three or more of the following: eating until feeling uncomfortably full; eating large amounts of food when not physically hungry; eating much more rapidly than normal; eating alone due to embarrassment; feeling of disgust, DEPRESSION, or guilt after overeating. Criteria includes occurrence on average, at least 2 days a week for 6 months. The binge eating is not associated with the regular use of inappropriate compensatory behavior (i.e. purging, excessive exercise, etc.) and does not co-occur exclusively with BULIMIA NERVOSA or ANOREXIA NERVOSA. (From DSM-IV, 1994)
A child or adolescent who is deserted by parents or parent substitutes without regard for its future care.
A variety of conditions affecting the anatomic and functional characteristics of the temporomandibular joint. Factors contributing to the complexity of temporomandibular diseases are its relation to dentition and mastication and the symptomatic effects in other areas which account for referred pain to the joint and the difficulties in applying traditional diagnostic procedures to temporomandibular joint pathology where tissue is rarely obtained and x-rays are often inadequate or nonspecific. Common diseases are developmental abnormalities, trauma, subluxation, luxation, arthritis, and neoplasia. (From Thoma's Oral Pathology, 6th ed, pp577-600)
Conditions which cause proliferation of hemopoietically active tissue or of tissue which has embryonic hemopoietic potential. They all involve dysregulation of multipotent MYELOID PROGENITOR CELLS, most often caused by a mutation in the JAK2 PROTEIN TYROSINE KINASE.
A status with BODY WEIGHT that is grossly above the acceptable or desirable weight, usually due to accumulation of excess FATS in the body. The standards may vary with age, sex, genetic or cultural background. In the BODY MASS INDEX, a BMI greater than 30.0 kg/m2 is considered obese, and a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2 is considered morbidly obese (MORBID OBESITY).
An umbrella term used to describe a pattern of disabilities and abnormalities that result from fetal exposure to ETHANOL during pregnancy. It encompasses a phenotypic range that can vary greatly between individuals, but reliably includes one or more of the following: characteristic facial dysmorphism, FETAL GROWTH RETARDATION, central nervous system abnormalities, cognitive and/or behavioral dysfunction, BIRTH DEFECTS. The level of maternal alcohol consumption does not necessarily correlate directly with disease severity.
The record of descent or ancestry, particularly of a particular condition or trait, indicating individual family members, their relationships, and their status with respect to the trait or condition.
The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.
The range or frequency distribution of a measurement in a population (of organisms, organs or things) that has not been selected for the presence of disease or abnormality.
Subnormal intellectual functioning which originates during the developmental period. This has multiple potential etiologies, including genetic defects and perinatal insults. Intelligence quotient (IQ) scores are commonly used to determine whether an individual has an intellectual disability. IQ scores between 70 and 79 are in the borderline range. Scores below 67 are in the disabled range. (from Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1992, Ch55, p28)
The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.
Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)
A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)
Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Brazil" is not a medical term or concept, it is a country located in South America, known officially as the Federative Republic of Brazil. If you have any questions related to health, medicine, or science, I'd be happy to help answer those!
An increased liquidity or decreased consistency of FECES, such as running stool. Fecal consistency is related to the ratio of water-holding capacity of insoluble solids to total water, rather than the amount of water present. Diarrhea is not hyperdefecation or increased fecal weight.
The study of NUTRITION PROCESSES as well as the components of food, their actions, interaction, and balance in relation to health and disease of children, infants or adolescents.
Disorders in which the symptoms are distressing to the individual and recognized by him or her as being unacceptable. Social relationships may be greatly affected but usually remain within acceptable limits. The disturbance is relatively enduring or recurrent without treatment.
Maladaptive reactions to identifiable psychosocial stressors occurring within a short time after onset of the stressor. They are manifested by either impairment in social or occupational functioning or by symptoms (depression, anxiety, etc.) that are in excess of a normal and expected reaction to the stressor.
A disorder whose predominant feature is a loss or alteration in physical functioning that suggests a physical disorder but that is actually a direct expression of a psychological conflict or need.

Reduction of stimulus overselectivity with nonverbal differential observing responses. (1/993)

Three individuals with mental retardation exhibited stimulus overselectivity in a delayed matching-to-sample task in which two sample stimuli were displayed on each trial. Intermediate accuracy scores indicated that participants could match one of the samples but not both of them. Accuracy in a baseline condition was compared to accuracy with a differential observing response procedure. This procedure prompted participants to make simultaneous identity-matching responses that required observation and discrimination of both sample stimuli. These observing responses were never followed by differential consequences. When observing responses were prompted, participants' accuracy scores improved. In a return to the baseline condition, when differential observing responses were no longer prompted, accuracy returned to intermediate levels. The results show that stimulus overselectivity can be greatly reduced by a behavioral intervention that controls observing behavior and verifies discrimination, but that exposure to such procedures alone may be insufficient for lasting benefits.  (+info)

Lack of benefit of a single dose of synthetic human secretin in the treatment of autism and pervasive developmental disorder. (2/993)

BACKGROUND: Secretin is a peptide hormone that stimulates pancreatic secretion. After recent publicity about a child with autism whose condition markedly improved after a single dose of secretin, thousands of children with autistic disorders may have received secretin injections. METHODS: We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of a single intravenous dose of synthetic human secretin in 60 children (age, 3 to 14 years) with autism or pervasive developmental disorder. The children were randomly assigned to treatment with an intravenous infusion of synthetic human secretin (0.4 microg per kilogram of body weight) or saline placebo. We used standardized behavioral measures of the primary and secondary features of autism, including the Autism Behavior Checklist, to assess the degree of impairment at base line and over the course of a four-week period after treatment. RESULTS: Of the 60 children, 4 could not be evaluated - 2 received secretin outside the study, and 2 did not return for follow-up. Thus, 56 children (28 in each group) completed the study. As compared with placebo, secretin treatment was not associated with significant improvements in any of the outcome measures. Among the children in the secretin group, the mean total score on the Autism Behavior Checklist at base line was 59.0 (range of possible values, 0 to 158, with a larger value corresponding to greater impairment), and among those in the placebo group it was 63.2. The mean decreases in scores over the four-week period were 8.9 in the secretin group and 17.8 in the placebo group (mean difference, -8.9; 95 percent confidence interval, -19.4 to 1.6; P=0.11). None of the children had treatment-limiting adverse effects. After they were told the results, 69 percent of the parents of the children in this study said they remained interested in secretin as a treatment for their children. CONCLUSIONS: A single dose of synthetic human secretin is not an effective treatment for autism or pervasive developmental disorder.  (+info)

Effects of a fixed-time schedule on aberrant and adaptive behavior. (3/993)

Fixed-time (FT) schedules of reinforcement have been used to decrease destructive behavior. However, the effects of FT schedules on acquisition and maintenance of appropriate behavior remain unclear. In this study, we present a case in which an FT schedule produced an increase in adaptive behavior and resulted in a significant decrease in destructive behavior.  (+info)

A population-based study of measles, mumps, and rubella vaccination and autism. (4/993)

BACKGROUND: It has been suggested that vaccination against measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) is a cause of autism. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of all children born in Denmark from January 1991 through December 1998. The cohort was selected on the basis of data from the Danish Civil Registration System, which assigns a unique identification number to every live-born infant and new resident in Denmark. MMR-vaccination status was obtained from the Danish National Board of Health. Information on the children's autism status was obtained from the Danish Psychiatric Central Register, which contains information on all diagnoses received by patients in psychiatric hospitals and outpatient clinics in Denmark. We obtained information on potential confounders from the Danish Medical Birth Registry, the National Hospital Registry, and Statistics Denmark. RESULTS: Of the 537,303 children in the cohort (representing 2,129,864 person-years), 440,655 (82.0 percent) had received the MMR vaccine. We identified 316 children with a diagnosis of autistic disorder and 422 with a diagnosis of other autistic-spectrum disorders. After adjustment for potential confounders, the relative risk of autistic disorder in the group of vaccinated children, as compared with the unvaccinated group, was 0.92 (95 percent confidence interval, 0.68 to 1.24), and the relative risk of another autistic-spectrum disorder was 0.83 (95 percent confidence interval, 0.65 to 1.07). There was no association between the age at the time of vaccination, the time since vaccination, or the date of vaccination and the development of autistic disorder. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides strong evidence against the hypothesis that MMR vaccination causes autism.  (+info)

Autism: a medical primer. (5/993)

Autistic disorder, a pervasive developmental disorder resulting in social, language, or sensorimotor deficits, occurs in approximately seven of 10,000 persons. Early detection and intervention significantly improve outcome, with about one third of autistic persons achieving some degree of independent living. Indications for developmental evaluation include no babbling, pointing, or use of other gestures by 12 months of age, no single words by 16 months of age, no two-word spontaneous phrases by 24 months of age, and loss of previously learned language or social skills at any age. The differential diagnosis includes other psychiatric and pervasive developmental disorders, deafness, and profound hearing loss. Autism is frequently associated with fragile X syndrome and tuberous sclerosis, and may be caused by lead poisoning and metabolic disorders. Common comorbidities include mental retardation, seizure disorder, and psychiatric disorders such as depression and anxiety. Behavior modification programs are helpful and are usually administered by multidisciplinary teams, targeted medication is used to address behavior concerns. Many different treatment approaches can be used, some of which are unproven and have little scientific support. Parents may be encouraged to investigate national resources and local support networks.  (+info)

Sleep patterns of children with pervasive developmental disorders. (6/993)

Data on sleep behavior were gathered on 100 children with pervasive developmental disorders (PDD), ages 2-11 years, using sleep diaries, the Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire (CSHQ), and the Parenting Events Questionnaire. Two time periods were sampled to assess short-term stability of sleep-wake patterns. Before data collection, slightly more than half of the parents, when queried, reported a sleep problem in their child. Subsequent diary and CSHQ reports confirmed more fragmented sleep in those children who were described by their parents as having a sleep problem compared to those without a designated problem. Interestingly, regardless of parental perception of problematic sleep, all children with PDD exhibited longer sleep onset times and greater fragmentation of sleep than that reported for age-matched community norms. The results demonstrate that sleep problems identified by the parent, as well as fragmentation of sleep patterns obtained from sleep diary and CSHQ data, exist in a significant proportion of children with PDD.  (+info)

Pathological demand avoidance syndrome: a necessary distinction within the pervasive developmental disorders. (7/993)

A proposal is made to recognise pathological demand avoidance syndrome (PDA) as a separate entity within the pervasive developmental disorders, instead of being classed under "pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified" (PDDnos, DSM-IV). Discriminant functions analysis shows PDA to be significantly different on many counts from classic autism and Asperger's syndrome, both separately and together, including an equal sex ratio (150 cases). Demand avoidance using social manipulation is seen in all children, which strongly contrasts with the features of autistic spectrum disorders. A criterial structure is described, supported by statistical data from a random sample of 50 children diagnosed with PDA, together with a follow up sample of 18 young adults.  (+info)

Is fever suppression involved in the etiology of autism and neurodevelopmental disorders? (8/993)

BACKGROUND: There appears to be a significant increase in the prevalence rate of autism. Reasons for the increase are unknown, however, there is a substantial body of evidence that suggests the etiology involves infections of the pregnant mother or of a young child. Most infections result in fever that is routinely controlled with antipyretics such as acetaminophen. The blocking of fever inhibits processes that evolved over millions of years to protect against microbial attack. Immune mechanisms in the central nervous system are part of this protective process. HYPOTHESIS: The blockage of fever with antipyretics interferes with normal immunological development in the brain leading to neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism in certain genetically and immunologically disposed individuals. TESTING THE HYPOTHESIS: Epidemiological studies to determine associations between the use of antipyretics and neurodevelopmental disorders should be undertaken. Biochemical tests will involve the examination of fluids/serum by mass spectrometry and the determination of cytokine/chemokine levels in serum and cell culture fluids after stimulation with fever-inducing molecules from bacteria, viruses and yeast. Postmortem brain can be examined by immunohistochemistry or other methods such as fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) to determine altered expression levels of chemokines/cytokines and other molecules. IMPLICATIONS OF THE HYPOTHESIS: 1) The use of antipyretics during pregnancy or in young children may be reserved for more severe fevers. 2) The perplexing genetic findings in autism may be better understood by categorizing genes along functional pathways. 3) New treatments based on immune, cell, pharmacological or even heat therapies may be developed.  (+info)

Pervasive developmental disorders (PDD) are a group of conditions that affect the development and functioning of the brain, leading to delays in many areas of development. The American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) has replaced the term "pervasive developmental disorders" with "autism spectrum disorder" and "other neurodevelopmental disorders."

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by persistent deficits in social communication and interaction across multiple contexts, as well as restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior, interests, or activities. The symptoms of ASD can range from mild to severe, and the condition affects approximately 1 in 54 children in the United States.

Other neurodevelopmental disorders that were previously classified as PDDs include:

1. Intellectual disability (ID): a condition characterized by significant limitations in intellectual functioning and adaptive behavior, which covers many everyday social and practical skills. This disorder used to be referred to as "mental retardation."
2. Communication disorders: these are disorders that affect an individual's ability to communicate, including language disorders, speech sound disorders, and stuttering.
3. Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD): a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by symptoms of inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity.
4. Specific learning disorder: a neurodevelopmental disorder that affects an individual's ability to learn and use specific academic skills, such as reading, writing, or mathematics.
5. Motor disorders: these are disorders that affect an individual's movement and coordination, including developmental coordination disorder, stereotypic movement disorder, and tic disorders.

The medical definition of 'Child Development Disorders, Pervasive' has been replaced with more specific diagnoses in the DSM-5 to better reflect the diverse nature of these conditions and improve diagnostic accuracy and treatment planning.

Child development is a multidisciplinary field that examines the biological, psychological, emotional, and social growth and changes that occur in human beings between birth and the onset of adulthood. It involves a complex interaction of genetics, environment, culture, and experiences that shape a child's growth and development over time.

Child development is typically divided into several domains, including:

1. Physical Development: This refers to the growth and changes in a child's body, including their motor skills, sensory abilities, and overall health.
2. Cognitive Development: This involves the development of a child's thinking, learning, problem-solving, memory, language, and other mental processes.
3. Emotional Development: This refers to the development of a child's emotional awareness, expression, understanding, and regulation.
4. Social Development: This involves the development of a child's ability to interact with others, form relationships, communicate effectively, and understand social norms and expectations.

Child development is an ongoing process that occurs at different rates and in different ways for each child. Understanding typical patterns of child development can help parents, educators, and healthcare providers support children's growth and identify any potential delays or concerns.

Language development disorders, also known as language impairments or communication disorders, refer to a group of conditions that affect an individual's ability to understand and/or use spoken or written language in a typical manner. These disorders can manifest as difficulties with grammar, vocabulary, sentence structure, word finding, following directions, and/or conversational skills.

Language development disorders can be receptive (difficulty understanding language), expressive (difficulty using language to communicate), or mixed (a combination of both). They can occur in isolation or as part of a broader neurodevelopmental disorder, such as autism spectrum disorder or intellectual disability.

The causes of language development disorders are varied and may include genetic factors, environmental influences, neurological conditions, hearing loss, or other medical conditions. It is important to note that language development disorders are not the result of low intelligence or lack of motivation; rather, they reflect a specific impairment in the brain's language processing systems.

Early identification and intervention for language development disorders can significantly improve outcomes and help individuals develop effective communication skills. Treatment typically involves speech-language therapy, which may be provided individually or in a group setting, and may involve strategies such as modeling correct language use, practicing targeted language skills, and using visual aids to support comprehension.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Seychelles" is not a medical term. It is the name of a country, an archipelago nation located in the Indian Ocean, northeast of Madagascar and about 1,600 kilometers (994 miles) east of Kenya. The Seychelles consists of around 115 islands, many of which are uninhabited, and is known for its beautiful beaches, coral reefs, and rich biodiversity. If you have any questions about medical terms or concepts, I'd be happy to help answer those for you!

Child rearing, also known as child care or child raising, refers to the process of caring for and raising children from infancy through adolescence. This includes providing for their physical needs such as food, clothing, and shelter, as well as their emotional, social, and intellectual development. Child rearing involves a range of activities such as feeding, bathing, dressing, educating, disciplining, and providing love and support. It is typically the responsibility of parents or guardians, but may also involve other family members, teachers, caregivers, and community institutions. Effective child rearing requires knowledge, skills, patience, and a commitment to meeting the needs of the child in a loving and supportive environment.

Developmental disabilities are a group of conditions that arise in childhood and are characterized by significant impairments in cognitive functioning, physical development, or both. These disabilities can affect various areas of an individual's life, including their ability to learn, communicate, socialize, and take care of themselves.

Examples of developmental disabilities include intellectual disabilities, cerebral palsy, autism spectrum disorder, Down syndrome, and fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. These conditions are typically diagnosed in childhood and can persist throughout an individual's life.

The causes of developmental disabilities are varied and can include genetic factors, environmental influences, and complications during pregnancy or childbirth. In some cases, the exact cause may be unknown.

It is important to note that individuals with developmental disabilities have unique strengths and abilities, as well as challenges. With appropriate support and services, they can lead fulfilling lives and participate actively in their communities.

Child welfare is a broad term that refers to the overall well-being and protection of children. It encompasses a range of services and interventions aimed at promoting the physical, emotional, social, and educational development of children, while also protecting them from harm, abuse, and neglect. The medical definition of child welfare may include:

1. Preventive Services: Programs and interventions designed to strengthen families and prevent child maltreatment, such as home visiting programs, parent education classes, and family support services.
2. Protective Services: Interventions that aim to protect children from harm, abuse, or neglect, including investigations of reports of maltreatment, removal of children from dangerous situations, and provision of alternative care arrangements.
3. Family Reunification Services: Efforts to reunite children with their families when it is safe and in the best interest of the child, such as family therapy, parent-child visitation, and case management services.
4. Permanency Planning: The development of long-term plans for children who cannot safely return to their families, including adoption, guardianship, or other permanent living arrangements.
5. Foster Care Services: Provision of temporary care for children who cannot safely remain in their own homes, including placement with foster families, group homes, or residential treatment facilities.
6. Child Health and Development Services: Programs that promote the physical, emotional, and developmental well-being of children, such as health screenings, immunizations, mental health services, and early intervention programs for children with special needs.
7. Advocacy and Policy Development: Efforts to promote policies and practices that support the well-being and protection of children, including advocating for laws and regulations that protect children's rights and ensure their safety and well-being.

Child care, also known as daycare, refers to the supervision and care of children usually outside of their home, provided by a professional or licensed facility. This can include early education, meals, and activities for children while their parents are at work or otherwise unable to care for them. Child care may be provided in a variety of settings such as child care centers, family child care homes, and in-home care. It is an essential service for many families with young children, allowing parents to maintain employment and providing children with socialization and learning opportunities.

Methylmercury compounds are organic forms of mercury, created when methyl groups (CH3) bind to a mercury ion (Hg+). These compounds can be highly toxic and bioaccumulate in living organisms, including humans. They are primarily formed in the environment through the action of bacteria on inorganic mercury, but can also be produced synthetically.

Methylmercury is particularly dangerous because it easily passes through biological membranes, allowing it to enter the brain and other tissues where it can cause significant damage. Exposure to high levels of methylmercury can lead to neurological problems, developmental issues in children, and even death. It's commonly found in contaminated fish and seafood, making these a significant source of human exposure.

I could not find a specific medical definition for "Mother-Child Relations," as it is more commonly studied in fields such as psychology, sociology, and social work. However, I can provide you with some related medical or psychological terms that might help you understand the concept better:

1. Attachment Theory: Developed by John Bowlby and Mary Ainsworth, attachment theory describes the emotional bond between an infant and their primary caregiver (usually the mother). Secure attachment is crucial for healthy emotional and social development in children.
2. Mother-Infant Interaction: This refers to the reciprocal communication and interaction between a mother and her infant, which includes verbal and non-verbal cues, such as facial expressions, gestures, touch, and vocalizations. Positive and responsive interactions contribute to healthy emotional development and secure attachment.
3. Parent-Child Relationship: A broader term that encompasses the emotional bond, communication patterns, and behaviors between a parent (in this case, the mother) and their child. This relationship significantly influences a child's cognitive, social, and emotional development.
4. Maternal Depression: A mental health condition in which a mother experiences depressive symptoms, such as sadness, hopelessness, or loss of interest in activities, after giving birth (postpartum depression) or at any point during the first year after childbirth (major depressive disorder with peripartum onset). Maternal depression can negatively impact mother-child relations and a child's development.
5. Parenting Styles: Different approaches to raising children, characterized by the degree of demandingness and responsiveness. Four main parenting styles include authoritative (high demandingness, high responsiveness), authoritarian (high demandingness, low responsiveness), permissive (low demandingness, high responsiveness), and neglectful/uninvolved (low demandingness, low responsiveness). These styles can influence mother-child relations and child development.

While not a direct medical definition, these terms highlight the significance of mother-child relations in various aspects of child development and mental health.

Child behavior refers to the actions, reactions, and interactions exhibited by children in response to their environment, experiences, and developmental stage. It is a broad term that encompasses various aspects, including emotional, social, cognitive, and physical development.

Child behavior can be categorized into two main types:

1. Desirable or positive behaviors - These are behaviors that promote healthy development, social interactions, and learning. Examples include sharing toys, following rules, expressing emotions appropriately, and demonstrating empathy towards others.
2. Challenging or negative behaviors - These are behaviors that hinder healthy development, social interactions, and learning. Examples include aggression, defiance, tantrums, anxiety, and withdrawal.

Understanding child behavior is crucial for parents, caregivers, educators, and healthcare professionals to provide appropriate support, guidance, and interventions to promote positive developmental outcomes in children. Factors influencing child behavior include genetics, temperament, environment, parenting style, and life experiences.

I believe there may be a misunderstanding in your question. "Mothers" is a term that refers to individuals who have given birth to and raised children. It is not a medical term with a specific definition. If you are referring to a different word or term, please clarify so I can provide a more accurate response.

I am not a medical professional, but I can provide you with some general information about parenting from a psychological and sociological perspective. Parenting is the process of promoting and supporting the physical, emotional, social, and intellectual development of a child or children. It involves caring for their daily needs, providing a safe and nurturing environment, setting boundaries and expectations, modeling appropriate behavior, and fostering healthy relationships and communication skills. Parents also help their children develop coping strategies, resilience, and self-esteem by encouraging them to explore their interests, express their feelings, and learn from their mistakes. Effective parenting often requires patience, consistency, empathy, and adaptability, as the needs and developmental stages of children can vary widely.

"Prenatal exposure delayed effects" refer to the adverse health outcomes or symptoms that become apparent in an individual during their development or later in life, which are caused by exposure to certain environmental factors or substances while they were still in the womb. These effects may not be immediately observable at birth and can take weeks, months, years, or even decades to manifest. They can result from maternal exposure to various agents such as infectious diseases, medications, illicit drugs, tobacco smoke, alcohol, or environmental pollutants during pregnancy. The delayed effects can impact multiple organ systems and may include physical, cognitive, behavioral, and developmental abnormalities. It is important to note that the risk and severity of these effects can depend on several factors, including the timing, duration, and intensity of the exposure, as well as the individual's genetic susceptibility.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Parent-Child Relations" is not a medical term per se. It falls more under the purview of psychology, social work, and sociology. However, I can provide you with a general definition:

Parent-Child Relations refers to the nature and quality of the emotional, behavioral, and social relationships between parents (or primary caregivers) and their children. This relationship significantly influences a child's development, including their cognitive, emotional, social, and behavioral growth. Positive parent-child relations typically involve warmth, support, communication, consistency, and appropriate expectations, which contribute to healthy child development outcomes. On the other hand, negative or dysfunctional parent-child relations can lead to various developmental and psychological issues for the child.

Childhood behavior disorders are a group of disruptive behaviors that are more frequent or severe than is typical for the child's age and development. These behaviors can cause significant impairment in the child's life, including their relationships with family, friends, and at school. Common examples of childhood behavior disorders include:

1. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): A chronic condition characterized by difficulty paying attention, impulsivity, and hyperactivity.
2. Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD): A pattern of negative, hostile, and defiant behavior towards authority figures.
3. Conduct Disorder: A repetitive and persistent pattern of behavior that violates the rights of others or major age-appropriate societal norms or rules.
4. Intermittent Explosive Disorder (IED): A disorder characterized by recurrent impulsive aggressive behavior disproportionate to the situation.
5. Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD): A neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by difficulties in social interaction, communication, and repetitive behaviors.
6. Tourette Syndrome: A neurological disorder characterized by repetitive, involuntary movements and vocalizations called tics.

It's important to note that children with behavior disorders often have other conditions such as learning disabilities, mood disorders, or anxiety disorders. Early identification and treatment of these disorders can significantly improve the child's outcome.

Paternal deprivation is not a formal medical diagnosis, but it is a term used in psychology and psychiatry to describe the emotional and psychological impact on a child who has been separated from their father or lacks a positive, involved father figure. This can occur due to various reasons such as death, divorce, incarceration, abandonment, or neglect.

The consequences of paternal deprivation may include:

1. Emotional and behavioral problems: Children who experience paternal deprivation are at risk for developing emotional issues like anxiety, depression, and low self-esteem. They might also exhibit behavioral problems such as aggression, delinquency, and difficulty forming healthy relationships.
2. Attachment difficulties: Secure attachment to a father figure is essential for a child's social and emotional development. Paternal deprivation can lead to insecure attachment styles, which may negatively affect the child's ability to form healthy relationships throughout their life.
3. Cognitive and academic performance: Children who experience paternal deprivation might struggle academically due to cognitive delays or difficulties concentrating on tasks. They are also more likely to have lower educational attainment compared to children with involved fathers.
4. Social development: Paternal deprivation can impact a child's social skills and peer relationships, making them more susceptible to social isolation and loneliness.
5. Vulnerability to mental health issues: Children who experience paternal deprivation are at increased risk for developing mental health disorders later in life, including mood disorders, anxiety disorders, and personality disorders.

It is important to note that the impact of paternal deprivation can vary depending on factors such as the child's age, gender, resilience, and the quality of alternative caregiving relationships. Interventions like therapy, support groups, and family counseling can help mitigate some of the negative effects of paternal deprivation.

Child psychology is a branch of psychology that deals with the mental, emotional, and social development of children from birth to adolescence. It involves the study of children's behavior, thoughts, feelings, and relationships with others, including their families, peers, and teachers. Child psychologists use various research methods, such as observation, interviews, and testing, to understand how children develop and learn. They also work with children who have emotional, social, or behavioral problems, providing assessments, therapy, and counseling services to help them overcome these challenges. Additionally, child psychologists may provide consultation and training to parents, teachers, and other professionals who work with children.

A mental disorder is a syndrome characterized by clinically significant disturbance in an individual's cognition, emotion regulation, or behavior. It's associated with distress and/or impaired functioning in social, occupational, or other important areas of life, often leading to a decrease in quality of life. These disorders are typically persistent and can be severe and disabling. They may be related to factors such as genetics, early childhood experiences, or trauma. Examples include depression, anxiety disorders, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and personality disorders. It's important to note that a diagnosis should be made by a qualified mental health professional.

Bipolar disorder, also known as manic-depressive illness, is a mental health condition that causes extreme mood swings that include emotional highs (mania or hypomania) and lows (depression). When you become depressed, you may feel sad or hopeless and lose interest or pleasure in most activities. When your mood shifts to mania or hypomania (a less severe form of mania), you may feel euphoric, full of energy, or unusually irritable. These mood swings can significantly affect your job, school, relationships, and overall quality of life.

Bipolar disorder is typically characterized by the presence of one or more manic or hypomanic episodes, often accompanied by depressive episodes. The episodes may be separated by periods of normal mood, but in some cases, a person may experience rapid cycling between mania and depression.

There are several types of bipolar disorder, including:

* Bipolar I Disorder: This type is characterized by the occurrence of at least one manic episode, which may be preceded or followed by hypomanic or major depressive episodes.
* Bipolar II Disorder: This type involves the presence of at least one major depressive episode and at least one hypomanic episode, but no manic episodes.
* Cyclothymic Disorder: This type is characterized by numerous periods of hypomania and depression that are not severe enough to meet the criteria for a full manic or depressive episode.
* Other Specified and Unspecified Bipolar and Related Disorders: These categories include bipolar disorders that do not fit the criteria for any of the other types.

The exact cause of bipolar disorder is unknown, but it appears to be related to a combination of genetic, environmental, and neurochemical factors. Treatment typically involves a combination of medication, psychotherapy, and lifestyle changes to help manage symptoms and prevent relapses.

Child health services refer to a range of medical and supportive services designed to promote the physical, mental, and social well-being of children from birth up to adolescence. These services aim to prevent or identify health problems early, provide treatment and management for existing conditions, and support healthy growth and development.

Examples of child health services include:

1. Well-child visits: Regular checkups with a pediatrician or other healthcare provider to monitor growth, development, and overall health.
2. Immunizations: Vaccinations to protect against infectious diseases such as measles, mumps, rubella, polio, and hepatitis B.
3. Screening tests: Blood tests, hearing and vision screenings, and other diagnostic tests to identify potential health issues early.
4. Developmental assessments: Evaluations of a child's cognitive, emotional, social, and physical development to ensure they are meeting age-appropriate milestones.
5. Dental care: Preventive dental services such as cleanings, fluoride treatments, and sealants, as well as restorative care for cavities or other dental problems.
6. Mental health services: Counseling, therapy, and medication management for children experiencing emotional or behavioral challenges.
7. Nutrition counseling: Education and support to help families make healthy food choices and promote good nutrition.
8. Chronic disease management: Coordinated care for children with ongoing medical conditions such as asthma, diabetes, or cerebral palsy.
9. Injury prevention: Programs that teach parents and children about safety measures to reduce the risk of accidents and injuries.
10. Public health initiatives: Community-based programs that promote healthy lifestyles, provide access to healthcare services, and address social determinants of health such as poverty, housing, and education.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Play" and "Playthings" are not medical terms. "Play" is a fundamental aspect of child development, encompassing all types of activities that children engage in for enjoyment and recreation. These activities can include physical play (such as running, climbing, or riding a bike), social play (interacting with others), creative play (drawing, building, or pretending), and quiet play (reading, puzzles, or listening to music).

"Playthings," on the other hand, refer to objects or toys used during play. These can range from traditional toys like dolls, cars, and balls to more open-ended items like blocks, art supplies, or natural materials.

While there is no medical definition for "play" or "playthings," it's important to note that play has a significant role in children's physical, emotional, social, and cognitive development. Play allows children to explore their environment, learn new skills, develop problem-solving abilities, build relationships, and express themselves creatively. Access to diverse playthings can support and enhance these developmental processes.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "parents" is not a term that has a medical definition. In general usage, parents are the two people (typically) who bring up and care for a child, or who have given birth to or adopted a child. They are responsible for the child's housing, food, clothing, education, and medical care. Is there a specific medical or healthcare-related context you had in mind? I would be happy to help further if I can.

Mercury poisoning, specifically affecting the nervous system, is also known as erethism or cerebral mercurialism. It is a condition that results from prolonged exposure to mercury or its compounds, which can lead to serious neurological and psychiatric symptoms. The central nervous system is particularly sensitive to mercury's toxic effects.

The symptoms of mercury poisoning affecting the nervous system may include:

1. Personality changes: This might include increased irritability, excitability, or emotional lability.
2. Cognitive impairment: There can be issues with memory, attention, and concentration, leading to difficulties in learning and performing complex tasks.
3. Neuromuscular symptoms: These may include tremors, fine motor coordination problems, and muscle weakness. In severe cases, it might lead to ataxia (loss of balance and coordination) or even paralysis.
4. Sensory impairment: Mercury poisoning can cause sensory disturbances such as numbness, tingling, or pain in the extremities (peripheral neuropathy). Additionally, visual and auditory disturbances might occur.
5. Speech and hearing problems: Changes in speech patterns, including slurred speech, or difficulties with hearing may also be present.
6. Mood disorders: Depression, anxiety, and other psychiatric symptoms can develop as a result of mercury poisoning.
7. Insomnia: Sleep disturbances are common in individuals exposed to mercury.

It is important to note that these symptoms might not appear immediately after exposure to mercury but could take months or even years to develop, depending on the severity and duration of exposure. If you suspect mercury poisoning, seek medical attention promptly for proper diagnosis and treatment.

Language development refers to the process by which children acquire the ability to understand and communicate through spoken, written, or signed language. This complex process involves various components including phonology (sound system), semantics (meaning of words and sentences), syntax (sentence structure), and pragmatics (social use of language). Language development begins in infancy with cooing and babbling and continues through early childhood and beyond, with most children developing basic conversational skills by the age of 4-5 years. However, language development can continue into adolescence and even adulthood as individuals learn new languages or acquire more advanced linguistic skills. Factors that can influence language development include genetics, environment, cognition, and social interactions.

Child nutrition disorders refer to a range of conditions that are caused by an improper or imbalanced diet during childhood. These disorders can have long-term effects on a child's growth, development, and overall health. Some common examples of child nutrition disorders include:

1. Malnutrition: This occurs when a child does not get enough nutrients for proper growth and development. It can result from inadequate food intake, digestive problems, or certain medical conditions that affect nutrient absorption.
2. Obesity: This is a condition characterized by excessive body fat accumulation to the point where it negatively affects a child's health. Obesity can lead to a range of health problems, including diabetes, heart disease, and orthopedic issues.
3. Vitamin deficiencies: Children who do not get enough vitamins in their diet may develop deficiencies that can lead to a range of health problems. For example, a lack of vitamin D can lead to rickets, while a lack of vitamin C can cause scurvy.
4. Food allergies and intolerances: Some children have allergic reactions or intolerances to certain foods, which can cause a range of symptoms, including digestive problems, skin rashes, and respiratory difficulties.
5. Eating disorders: Children may develop eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, or binge eating disorder, which can have serious consequences for their physical and mental health.

Preventing child nutrition disorders involves providing children with a balanced diet that includes a variety of foods from all the major food groups, encouraging regular exercise, and promoting healthy eating habits. Regular medical check-ups can also help identify any nutritional deficiencies or other health problems early on, allowing for prompt treatment.

Pregnancy is a physiological state or condition where a fertilized egg (zygote) successfully implants and grows in the uterus of a woman, leading to the development of an embryo and finally a fetus. This process typically spans approximately 40 weeks, divided into three trimesters, and culminates in childbirth. Throughout this period, numerous hormonal and physical changes occur to support the growing offspring, including uterine enlargement, breast development, and various maternal adaptations to ensure the fetus's optimal growth and well-being.

Medical definitions typically do not include general food items like seafood. However, I can provide you with a general definition:

Seafood is a category of food that comes from aquatic animals (both saltwater and freshwater) including fish, shellfish, crustaceans, and echinoderms. It is an essential source of protein, vitamins, and minerals in many diets around the world. Some common examples of seafood are salmon, shrimp, lobster, clams, oysters, and squid.

If you're looking for a medical aspect related to seafood, it is worth noting that some people may have allergies to certain types of seafood, which can cause mild to severe reactions. In such cases, avoiding the specific allergen is crucial to prevent adverse health effects.

A newborn infant is a baby who is within the first 28 days of life. This period is also referred to as the neonatal period. Newborns require specialized care and attention due to their immature bodily systems and increased vulnerability to various health issues. They are closely monitored for signs of well-being, growth, and development during this critical time.

I must clarify that I cannot provide a "medical definition" of intelligence, as intelligence is not a concept that is typically defined within the field of medicine. Intelligence is a term used to describe the ability to learn, understand, and make judgments or decisions based on reason, experience, and information. It is often measured through various cognitive abilities such as problem-solving, critical thinking, creativity, and knowledge acquisition.

The concept of intelligence is studied in many fields, including psychology, neuroscience, and education. In medicine, healthcare professionals may assess a person's cognitive abilities to better understand their health status or develop treatment plans. However, there is no specific "medical definition" for intelligence. Instead, it is a multifaceted concept that can be influenced by various genetic, environmental, and experiential factors.

A disabled child is a child who has a physical, cognitive, or developmental condition that limits their ability to perform everyday tasks and activities. This limitation can be temporary or permanent and may range from mild to severe. According to the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), a person with a disability is someone who has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities, has a record of such an impairment, or is regarded as having such an impairment.

Disabled children may face challenges in various areas of their lives, including mobility, communication, self-care, learning, and socialization. Some common examples of disabilities that affect children include cerebral palsy, Down syndrome, autism spectrum disorder, intellectual disability, hearing or vision loss, and spina bifida.

It is important to note that disabled children have the same rights and entitlements as other children, and they should be given equal opportunities to participate in all aspects of society. This includes access to education, healthcare, social services, and community activities. With appropriate support and accommodations, many disabled children can lead fulfilling lives and reach their full potential.

There is no formal medical definition for "child of impaired parents." However, it generally refers to a child who has at least one parent with physical, mental, or psychological challenges that impact their ability to care for themselves and/or their children. These impairments may include substance abuse disorders, mental illnesses, chronic medical conditions, or developmental disabilities.

Children of impaired parents often face unique challenges and stressors in their lives, which can affect their emotional, social, and cognitive development. They may have to take on additional responsibilities at home, experience neglect or abuse, or witness disturbing behaviors related to their parent's impairment. As a result, these children are at higher risk for developing mental health issues, behavioral problems, and academic difficulties.

Support services and interventions, such as family therapy, counseling, and community resources, can help mitigate the negative effects of growing up with impaired parents and improve outcomes for these children.

Anxiety disorders are a category of mental health disorders characterized by feelings of excessive and persistent worry, fear, or anxiety that interfere with daily activities. They include several different types of disorders, such as:

1. Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD): This is characterized by chronic and exaggerated worry and tension, even when there is little or nothing to provoke it.
2. Panic Disorder: This is characterized by recurring unexpected panic attacks and fear of experiencing more panic attacks.
3. Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD): Also known as social phobia, this is characterized by excessive fear, anxiety, or avoidance of social situations due to feelings of embarrassment, self-consciousness, and concern about being judged or viewed negatively by others.
4. Phobias: These are intense, irrational fears of certain objects, places, or situations. When a person with a phobia encounters the object or situation they fear, they may experience panic attacks or other severe anxiety responses.
5. Agoraphobia: This is a fear of being in places where it may be difficult to escape or get help if one has a panic attack or other embarrassing or incapacitating symptoms.
6. Separation Anxiety Disorder (SAD): This is characterized by excessive anxiety about separation from home or from people to whom the individual has a strong emotional attachment (such as a parent, sibling, or partner).
7. Selective Mutism: This is a disorder where a child becomes mute in certain situations, such as at school, but can speak normally at home or with close family members.

These disorders are treatable with a combination of medication and psychotherapy (cognitive-behavioral therapy, exposure therapy). It's important to seek professional help if you suspect that you or someone you know may have an anxiety disorder.

Longitudinal studies are a type of research design where data is collected from the same subjects repeatedly over a period of time, often years or even decades. These studies are used to establish patterns of changes and events over time, and can help researchers identify causal relationships between variables. They are particularly useful in fields such as epidemiology, psychology, and sociology, where the focus is on understanding developmental trends and the long-term effects of various factors on health and behavior.

In medical research, longitudinal studies can be used to track the progression of diseases over time, identify risk factors for certain conditions, and evaluate the effectiveness of treatments or interventions. For example, a longitudinal study might follow a group of individuals over several decades to assess their exposure to certain environmental factors and their subsequent development of chronic diseases such as cancer or heart disease. By comparing data collected at multiple time points, researchers can identify trends and correlations that may not be apparent in shorter-term studies.

Longitudinal studies have several advantages over other research designs, including their ability to establish temporal relationships between variables, track changes over time, and reduce the impact of confounding factors. However, they also have some limitations, such as the potential for attrition (loss of participants over time), which can introduce bias and affect the validity of the results. Additionally, longitudinal studies can be expensive and time-consuming to conduct, requiring significant resources and a long-term commitment from both researchers and study participants.

Mood disorders are a category of mental health disorders characterized by significant and persistent changes in mood, affect, and emotional state. These disorders can cause disturbances in normal functioning and significantly impair an individual's ability to carry out their daily activities. The two primary types of mood disorders are depressive disorders (such as major depressive disorder or persistent depressive disorder) and bipolar disorders (which include bipolar I disorder, bipolar II disorder, and cyclothymic disorder).

Depressive disorders involve prolonged periods of low mood, sadness, hopelessness, and a lack of interest in activities. Individuals with these disorders may also experience changes in sleep patterns, appetite, energy levels, concentration, and self-esteem. In severe cases, they might have thoughts of death or suicide.

Bipolar disorders involve alternating episodes of mania (or hypomania) and depression. During a manic episode, individuals may feel extremely elated, energetic, or irritable, with racing thoughts, rapid speech, and impulsive behavior. They might engage in risky activities, have decreased sleep needs, and display poor judgment. In contrast, depressive episodes involve the same symptoms as depressive disorders.

Mood disorders can be caused by a combination of genetic, biological, environmental, and psychological factors. Proper diagnosis and treatment, which may include psychotherapy, medication, or a combination of both, are essential for managing these conditions and improving quality of life.

Child language refers to the development of linguistic abilities in children, including both receptive and expressive communication. This includes the acquisition of various components of language such as phonology (sound system), morphology (word structure), syntax (sentence structure), semantics (meaning), and pragmatics (social use of language).

Child language development typically follows a predictable sequence, beginning with cooing and babbling in infancy, followed by the use of single words and simple phrases in early childhood. Over time, children acquire more complex linguistic structures and expand their vocabulary to communicate more effectively. However, individual differences in the rate and pace of language development are common.

Clinical professionals such as speech-language pathologists may assess and diagnose children with language disorders or delays in order to provide appropriate interventions and support for typical language development.

Intelligence tests are standardized procedures used to assess various aspects of an individual's cognitive abilities, such as their problem-solving skills, logical reasoning, verbal comprehension, and spatial relations. These tests provide a quantitative measurement of intelligence, often reported as an Intelligence Quotient (IQ) score. It is important to note that intelligence is a multifaceted concept, and intelligence tests measure only certain aspects of it. They should not be considered the sole determinant of an individual's overall intellectual capabilities or potential.

"Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena" is a broad term that refers to various physical and biological processes related to nutrition in children. While I couldn't find a precise medical definition for this specific phrase, I can provide you with some key physiological phenomena associated with child nutrition. These include:

1. Growth and Development: Proper nutrition is crucial for normal growth and development in children. Adequate intake of essential nutrients, vitamins, and minerals supports physical growth, brain development, and overall well-being.
2. Digestion and Absorption: The gastrointestinal tract undergoes significant changes during childhood, affecting the ability to digest and absorb various nutrients. For example, lactase production decreases in some children after weaning, leading to lactose intolerance.
3. Energy Metabolism: Children have higher energy requirements per unit of body weight compared to adults due to their rapid growth and development. Proper nutrition ensures efficient energy metabolism and prevents issues like obesity or undernutrition.
4. Immune Function: Nutrition plays a vital role in supporting the immune system. Adequate intake of nutrients like vitamin C, vitamin D, iron, zinc, and protein helps maintain immune function and resistance to infections.
5. Micronutrient Deficiencies: Inadequate nutrition can lead to micronutrient deficiencies, which may impair children's growth, cognitive development, and overall health. Examples include iron deficiency anemia, vitamin A deficiency, and iodine deficiency disorders.
6. Overnutrition and Obesity: Excessive energy intake, coupled with reduced physical activity, can lead to overweight and obesity in children. This increases the risk of developing non-communicable diseases like diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and certain types of cancer later in life.
7. Food Allergies and Intolerances: Children are more prone to food allergies and intolerances than adults. These can manifest as various symptoms, such as skin rashes, digestive issues, or respiratory problems, and may require dietary modifications.
8. Eating Behaviors and Preferences: Childhood is a critical period for shaping eating behaviors and food preferences. Exposure to a variety of healthy foods during this stage can help establish lifelong healthy eating habits.

Pediatrics is a branch of medicine that deals with the medical care and treatment of infants, children, and adolescents, typically up to the age of 18 or sometimes up to 21 years. It covers a wide range of health services including preventive healthcare, diagnosis and treatment of physical, mental, and emotional illnesses, and promotion of healthy lifestyles and behaviors in children.

Pediatricians are medical doctors who specialize in this field and have extensive training in the unique needs and developmental stages of children. They provide comprehensive care for children from birth to young adulthood, addressing various health issues such as infectious diseases, injuries, genetic disorders, developmental delays, behavioral problems, and chronic conditions like asthma, diabetes, and cancer.

In addition to medical expertise, pediatricians also need excellent communication skills to build trust with their young patients and their families, and to provide education and guidance on various aspects of child health and well-being.

'Infant behavior' is not a medical term per se, but it does fall under the purview of child development and pediatrics. It generally refers to the actions or reactions of an infant (a child between birth and 12 months) in response to internal states (e.g., hunger, discomfort, fatigue) and external stimuli (e.g., people, objects, events).

Infant behavior can encompass a wide range of aspects including:

1. Reflexes: Automatic responses to certain stimuli, such as the rooting reflex (turning head towards touch on cheek) or startle reflex (abrupt muscle contraction).
2. Motor skills: Control and coordination of movements, from simple ones like lifting the head to complex ones like crawling.
3. Social-emotional development: Responses to social interactions, forming attachments, expressing emotions.
4. Communication: Using cries, coos, gestures, and later, words to communicate needs and feelings.
5. Cognitive development: Problem-solving skills, memory, attention, and perception.

Understanding typical infant behavior is crucial for parental education, childcare, early intervention when there are concerns, and overall child development research.

"Maternal exposure" is a medical term that refers to the contact or interaction of a pregnant woman with various environmental factors, such as chemicals, radiation, infectious agents, or physical environments, which could potentially have an impact on the developing fetus. This exposure can occur through different routes, including inhalation, ingestion, dermal contact, or even transplacentally. The effects of maternal exposure on the fetus can vary widely depending on the type, duration, and intensity of the exposure, as well as the stage of pregnancy at which it occurs. It is important to monitor and minimize maternal exposure to potentially harmful substances or environments during pregnancy to ensure the best possible outcomes for both the mother and developing fetus.

The term "Fathers" is a general term used to describe male parents or parental figures. It does not have a specific medical definition. In the context of genetics and reproduction, the father is the biological male who contributes his sperm to fertilize an egg, resulting in conception and pregnancy. However, it's important to note that there are many different types of families and parental relationships, and not all fathers are biological parents or male.

Cognition refers to the mental processes involved in acquiring, processing, and utilizing information. These processes include perception, attention, memory, language, problem-solving, and decision-making. Cognitive functions allow us to interact with our environment, understand and respond to stimuli, learn new skills, and remember experiences.

In a medical context, cognitive function is often assessed as part of a neurological or psychiatric evaluation. Impairments in cognition can be caused by various factors, such as brain injury, neurodegenerative diseases (e.g., Alzheimer's disease), infections, toxins, and mental health conditions. Assessing cognitive function helps healthcare professionals diagnose conditions, monitor disease progression, and develop treatment plans.

Artificial insemination, heterologous (also known as donor insemination) is a medical procedure that involves the introduction of sperm from a donor into a woman's reproductive tract with the aim of achieving pregnancy. The sperm used in this procedure comes from a donor who is not the woman's sexual partner. This method may be used when the male partner has severe fertility problems, such as azoospermia (absence of sperm in the ejaculate), or when the couple has a high risk of passing on genetic disorders to their offspring. The donor sperm can be injected into the woman's uterus through intrauterine insemination (IUI) or placed directly into the cervix through intracervical insemination (ICI).

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) is a publication of the American Psychiatric Association (APA) that provides diagnostic criteria for mental disorders. It is widely used by mental health professionals in the United States and around the world to diagnose and classify mental health conditions.

The DSM includes detailed descriptions of symptoms, clinical examples, and specific criteria for each disorder, which are intended to facilitate accurate diagnosis and improve communication among mental health professionals. The manual is regularly updated to reflect current research and clinical practice, with the most recent edition being the DSM-5, published in 2013.

It's important to note that while the DSM is a valuable tool for mental health professionals, it is not without controversy. Some critics argue that the manual medicalizes normal human experiences and that its categories may be too broad or overlapping. Nonetheless, it remains an essential resource for clinicians, researchers, and policymakers in the field of mental health.

A questionnaire in the medical context is a standardized, systematic, and structured tool used to gather information from individuals regarding their symptoms, medical history, lifestyle, or other health-related factors. It typically consists of a series of written questions that can be either self-administered or administered by an interviewer. Questionnaires are widely used in various areas of healthcare, including clinical research, epidemiological studies, patient care, and health services evaluation to collect data that can inform diagnosis, treatment planning, and population health management. They provide a consistent and organized method for obtaining information from large groups or individual patients, helping to ensure accurate and comprehensive data collection while minimizing bias and variability in the information gathered.

In the context of medicine and public health, "socialization" typically refers to the process by which individuals learn and internalize the norms, values, attitudes, and behaviors that are considered appropriate within their particular cultural, social, or community group. This process is critical for developing a sense of identity, fostering social connections, and promoting mental and emotional well-being.

Socialization can have important implications for health outcomes, as individuals who are able to effectively navigate social norms and relationships may be better equipped to access resources, seek support, and make healthy choices. On the other hand, inadequate socialization or social isolation can contribute to a range of negative health outcomes, including depression, anxiety, substance abuse, and poor physical health.

Healthcare providers may play an important role in promoting socialization and addressing social isolation among their patients, for example by connecting them with community resources, support groups, or other opportunities for social engagement.

Socioeconomic factors are a range of interconnected conditions and influences that affect the opportunities and resources a person or group has to maintain and improve their health and well-being. These factors include:

1. Economic stability: This includes employment status, job security, income level, and poverty status. Lower income and lack of employment are associated with poorer health outcomes.
2. Education: Higher levels of education are generally associated with better health outcomes. Education can affect a person's ability to access and understand health information, as well as their ability to navigate the healthcare system.
3. Social and community context: This includes factors such as social support networks, discrimination, and community safety. Strong social supports and positive community connections are associated with better health outcomes, while discrimination and lack of safety can negatively impact health.
4. Healthcare access and quality: Access to affordable, high-quality healthcare is an important socioeconomic factor that can significantly impact a person's health. Factors such as insurance status, availability of providers, and cultural competency of healthcare systems can all affect healthcare access and quality.
5. Neighborhood and built environment: The physical conditions in which people live, work, and play can also impact their health. Factors such as housing quality, transportation options, availability of healthy foods, and exposure to environmental hazards can all influence health outcomes.

Socioeconomic factors are often interrelated and can have a cumulative effect on health outcomes. For example, someone who lives in a low-income neighborhood with limited access to healthy foods and safe parks may also face challenges related to employment, education, and healthcare access that further impact their health. Addressing socioeconomic factors is an important part of promoting health equity and reducing health disparities.

Medical Definition:

"Risk factors" are any attribute, characteristic or exposure of an individual that increases the likelihood of developing a disease or injury. They can be divided into modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors. Modifiable risk factors are those that can be changed through lifestyle choices or medical treatment, while non-modifiable risk factors are inherent traits such as age, gender, or genetic predisposition. Examples of modifiable risk factors include smoking, alcohol consumption, physical inactivity, and unhealthy diet, while non-modifiable risk factors include age, sex, and family history. It is important to note that having a risk factor does not guarantee that a person will develop the disease, but rather indicates an increased susceptibility.

Postpartum depression is a type of depressive disorder that occurs in a woman after giving birth (the postpartum period). The symptoms are similar to those of other forms of depression, such as low mood, loss of interest or pleasure in activities, changes in appetite and sleep patterns, feelings of guilt or worthlessness, difficulty thinking, concentrating or making decisions, and thoughts of death or suicide. However, in postpartum depression, these symptoms are more severe and last longer than those typically experienced after childbirth. Postpartum depression can make it difficult for a woman to care for herself or her baby and can affect the bonding between mother and child. It is important to seek medical help if you think you may be experiencing postpartum depression. Treatment may include counseling, medication, or a combination of both.

Food contamination is the presence of harmful microorganisms, chemicals, or foreign substances in food or water that can cause illness or injury to individuals who consume it. This can occur at any stage during production, processing, storage, or preparation of food, and can result from various sources such as:

1. Biological contamination: This includes the presence of harmful bacteria, viruses, parasites, or fungi that can cause foodborne illnesses. Examples include Salmonella, E. coli, Listeria, and norovirus.

2. Chemical contamination: This involves the introduction of hazardous chemicals into food, which may occur due to poor handling practices, improper storage, or exposure to environmental pollutants. Common sources of chemical contamination include pesticides, cleaning solvents, heavy metals, and natural toxins produced by certain plants or fungi.

3. Physical contamination: This refers to the presence of foreign objects in food, such as glass, plastic, hair, or insects, which can pose a choking hazard or introduce harmful substances into the body.

Preventing food contamination is crucial for ensuring food safety and protecting public health. Proper hygiene practices, temperature control, separation of raw and cooked foods, and regular inspections are essential measures to minimize the risk of food contamination.

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) with hyperactivity is a neurodevelopmental disorder that affects both children and adults. The condition is characterized by symptoms including:

1. Difficulty paying attention or staying focused on a single task
2. Impulsivity, or acting without thinking
3. Hyperactivity, or excessive fidgeting, restlessness, or talking

In order to be diagnosed with ADHD with hyperactivity, an individual must exhibit these symptoms to a degree that is developmentally inappropriate and interferes with their daily functioning. Additionally, the symptoms must have been present for at least six months and be present in multiple settings (e.g., at home, school, work).

It's important to note that ADHD can manifest differently in different people, and some individuals may experience predominantly inattentive or impulsive symptoms rather than hyperactive ones. However, when the hyperactive component is prominent, it is referred to as ADHD with hyperactivity.

Effective treatments for ADHD with hyperactivity include a combination of medication (such as stimulants) and behavioral therapy. With appropriate treatment, individuals with ADHD can learn to manage their symptoms and lead successful, fulfilling lives.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "poverty" is not a medical condition or term. It is a social condition defined by the World Bank as "pronounced deprivation in well-being," and measured through indicators such as income, consumption, and access to basic services. Poverty can have significant impacts on health outcomes and healthcare access, but it is not considered a medical diagnosis. If you have any questions related to health or medicine, I'd be happy to try my best to help answer them!

Maternal behavior refers to the nurturing and protective behaviors exhibited by a female animal towards its offspring. In humans, this term is often used to describe the natural instincts and actions of a woman during pregnancy, childbirth, and early child-rearing. It encompasses a broad range of activities such as feeding, grooming, protecting, and teaching the young.

In the context of medical and psychological research, maternal behavior is often studied to understand the factors that influence its development, expression, and outcomes for both the mother and offspring. Factors that can affect maternal behavior include hormonal changes during pregnancy and childbirth, as well as social, cultural, and environmental influences.

Abnormal or atypical maternal behavior may indicate underlying mental health issues, such as postpartum depression or anxiety, and can have negative consequences for both the mother and the child's development and well-being. Therefore, it is important to monitor and support healthy maternal behaviors in new mothers to promote positive outcomes for both parties.

"Age factors" refer to the effects, changes, or differences that age can have on various aspects of health, disease, and medical care. These factors can encompass a wide range of issues, including:

1. Physiological changes: As people age, their bodies undergo numerous physical changes that can affect how they respond to medications, illnesses, and medical procedures. For example, older adults may be more sensitive to certain drugs or have weaker immune systems, making them more susceptible to infections.
2. Chronic conditions: Age is a significant risk factor for many chronic diseases, such as heart disease, diabetes, cancer, and arthritis. As a result, age-related medical issues are common and can impact treatment decisions and outcomes.
3. Cognitive decline: Aging can also lead to cognitive changes, including memory loss and decreased decision-making abilities. These changes can affect a person's ability to understand and comply with medical instructions, leading to potential complications in their care.
4. Functional limitations: Older adults may experience physical limitations that impact their mobility, strength, and balance, increasing the risk of falls and other injuries. These limitations can also make it more challenging for them to perform daily activities, such as bathing, dressing, or cooking.
5. Social determinants: Age-related factors, such as social isolation, poverty, and lack of access to transportation, can impact a person's ability to obtain necessary medical care and affect their overall health outcomes.

Understanding age factors is critical for healthcare providers to deliver high-quality, patient-centered care that addresses the unique needs and challenges of older adults. By taking these factors into account, healthcare providers can develop personalized treatment plans that consider a person's age, physical condition, cognitive abilities, and social circumstances.

Adoption is a legal process in which the rights and responsibilities of being a parent are transferred from one person or couple to another. It permanently gives adoptive parents custody of the child and makes them legally responsible for the child's care and well-being. The birth parents' legal rights and responsibilities are typically terminated as part of the adoption process, although in some cases they may retain certain rights or have ongoing contact with the child. Adoption can involve infants, older children, or siblings, and can be arranged through private agencies, foster care systems, or international channels.

A personality assessment is a systematic process used by healthcare professionals to evaluate and understand an individual's characteristic patterns of thought, emotion, and behavior. It typically involves the use of standardized measures, such as self-report questionnaires, interviews, and observational techniques, to gather information about an individual's personality traits, attitudes, values, and behaviors.

The goal of a personality assessment is to provide a comprehensive and integrated understanding of an individual's unique personality style, including their strengths, weaknesses, and potential vulnerabilities. This information can be useful in a variety of contexts, including clinical treatment planning, vocational counseling, and forensic evaluation.

It is important to note that personality assessments should always be conducted by qualified professionals with appropriate training and expertise in the use of these measures. Additionally, while personality assessments can provide valuable insights into an individual's personality style, they are not infallible and should always be considered alongside other sources of information when making important decisions about treatment or management.

Autistic Disorder, also known as Autism or Classic Autism, is a neurodevelopmental disorder that affects communication and behavior. It is characterized by:

1. Persistent deficits in social communication and social interaction across multiple contexts, including:
* Deficits in social-emotional reciprocity;
* Deficits in nonverbal communicative behaviors used for social interaction;
* Deficits in developing, maintaining, and understanding relationships.
2. Restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior, interests, or activities, as manifested by at least two of the following:
* Stereotyped or repetitive motor movements, use of objects, or speech;
* Insistence on sameness, inflexible adherence to routines, or ritualized patterns of verbal or nonverbal behavior;
* Highly restricted, fixated interests that are abnormal in intensity or focus;
* Hyper- or hyporeactivity to sensory input or unusual interest in sensory aspects of the environment.
3. Symptoms must be present in the early developmental period (but may not become fully manifest until social demands exceed limited capacities) and limit or impair everyday functioning.
4. Symptoms do not occur exclusively during the course of a schizophrenia spectrum disorder or other psychotic disorders.

Autistic Disorder is part of the autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), which also include Asperger's Syndrome and Pervasive Developmental Disorder Not Otherwise Specified (PDD-NOS). The current diagnostic term for this category of conditions, according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5), is Autism Spectrum Disorder.

A cohort study is a type of observational study in which a group of individuals who share a common characteristic or exposure are followed up over time to determine the incidence of a specific outcome or outcomes. The cohort, or group, is defined based on the exposure status (e.g., exposed vs. unexposed) and then monitored prospectively to assess for the development of new health events or conditions.

Cohort studies can be either prospective or retrospective in design. In a prospective cohort study, participants are enrolled and followed forward in time from the beginning of the study. In contrast, in a retrospective cohort study, researchers identify a cohort that has already been assembled through medical records, insurance claims, or other sources and then look back in time to assess exposure status and health outcomes.

Cohort studies are useful for establishing causality between an exposure and an outcome because they allow researchers to observe the temporal relationship between the two. They can also provide information on the incidence of a disease or condition in different populations, which can be used to inform public health policy and interventions. However, cohort studies can be expensive and time-consuming to conduct, and they may be subject to bias if participants are not representative of the population or if there is loss to follow-up.

Social adjustment, in the context of mental health and psychology, refers to an individual's ability to adapt and function effectively within their social environment. It involves developing and maintaining positive relationships with others, fulfilling various social roles (such as being a family member, friend, or employee), and meeting the expectations and demands of one's social group.

Social adjustment can be affected by various factors, including an individual's personality traits, coping skills, mental and physical health status, and life experiences. Poor social adjustment can lead to feelings of isolation, loneliness, and dissatisfaction with life, as well as increased risk for mental health problems such as depression and anxiety.

Assessing social adjustment is an important aspect of mental health care, as it can provide valuable insights into an individual's overall functioning and quality of life. Treatments such as psychotherapy and social skills training may be used to help improve social adjustment in individuals who are struggling in this area.

Prevalence, in medical terms, refers to the total number of people in a given population who have a particular disease or condition at a specific point in time, or over a specified period. It is typically expressed as a percentage or a ratio of the number of cases to the size of the population. Prevalence differs from incidence, which measures the number of new cases that develop during a certain period.

A cross-sectional study is a type of observational research design that examines the relationship between variables at one point in time. It provides a snapshot or a "cross-section" of the population at a particular moment, allowing researchers to estimate the prevalence of a disease or condition and identify potential risk factors or associations.

In a cross-sectional study, data is collected from a sample of participants at a single time point, and the variables of interest are measured simultaneously. This design can be used to investigate the association between exposure and outcome, but it cannot establish causality because it does not follow changes over time.

Cross-sectional studies can be conducted using various data collection methods, such as surveys, interviews, or medical examinations. They are often used in epidemiology to estimate the prevalence of a disease or condition in a population and to identify potential risk factors that may contribute to its development. However, because cross-sectional studies only provide a snapshot of the population at one point in time, they cannot account for changes over time or determine whether exposure preceded the outcome.

Therefore, while cross-sectional studies can be useful for generating hypotheses and identifying potential associations between variables, further research using other study designs, such as cohort or case-control studies, is necessary to establish causality and confirm any findings.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "United States" is a geopolitical entity, specifically the name of the country consisting of 50 states, and it is not a medical term or concept. Therefore, I can't provide a medical definition for it. If you have any questions related to health, medicine, or biology, I would be happy to try to help answer those!

Major Depressive Disorder (MDD), also simply referred to as depression, is a serious mental health condition characterized by the presence of one or more major depressive episodes. A major depressive episode is a period of at least two weeks during which an individual experiences a severely depressed mood and/or loss of interest or pleasure in nearly all activities, accompanied by at least four additional symptoms such as significant changes in appetite or weight, sleep disturbances, psychomotor agitation or retardation, fatigue or loss of energy, feelings of worthlessness or excessive guilt, difficulty thinking, concentrating, or making decisions, and recurrent thoughts of death or suicide.

MDD can significantly impair an individual's ability to function in daily life, and it is associated with increased risks of suicide, substance abuse, and other mental health disorders. The exact cause of MDD is not fully understood, but it is believed to result from a complex interplay of genetic, biological, environmental, and psychological factors. Treatment typically involves a combination of psychotherapy (such as cognitive-behavioral therapy) and medication (such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or tricyclic antidepressants).

"Body height" is a measure of the vertical length of a person's body from the top of their head to the bottom of their feet. It is typically measured in units such as centimeters (cm) or inches (in). In medical settings, body height is often used as a basic anthropometric measurement to assess overall health status, growth and development, nutritional status, and aging-related changes.

There are different methods for measuring body height, but the most common one involves having the person stand upright against a vertical surface (such as a wall or a stadiometer) with their heels, buttocks, shoulders, and head touching the surface. The measurement is taken at the point where the top of the person's head meets the surface.

Body height can be influenced by various factors, including genetics, nutrition, health status, and environmental conditions. Changes in body height over time can provide important insights into a person's health trajectory and potential health risks. For example, a significant decrease in body height may indicate bone loss or spinal compression, while a rapid increase in height during childhood or adolescence may suggest optimal growth and development.

A "social environment" is not a term that has a specific medical definition, but it is often used in the context of public health and social sciences to refer to the physical and social conditions, relationships, and organized institutions that influence the health and well-being of individuals and communities.

The social environment includes factors such as:

* Social support networks (family, friends, community)
* Cultural norms and values
* Socioeconomic status (income, education, occupation)
* Housing and neighborhood conditions
* Access to resources (food, healthcare, transportation)
* Exposure to discrimination, violence, and other stressors

These factors can have a significant impact on health outcomes, as they can influence behaviors related to health (such as diet, exercise, and substance use), as well as exposure to disease and access to healthcare. Understanding the social environment is essential for developing effective public health interventions and policies that promote health equity and reduce health disparities.

The term "institutionalized child" is used to describe a minor (a person who has not yet reached the age of legal majority) who resides in an institution such as a group home, foster care facility, residential treatment center, or other similar setting on a long-term basis. Institutionalization may occur for various reasons, including but not limited to:

1. Abuse or neglect in their biological family
2. Parental absence or inability to provide care
3. Behavioral or emotional challenges that require specialized treatment and support
4. Disabilities that necessitate around-the-clock care
5. Legal reasons, such as being a ward of the state

Institutionalized children typically receive care, supervision, education, and other services from trained staff members in these facilities. The goal of institutionalization is often to provide a safe, structured environment where the child can receive the necessary support and resources to help them thrive and eventually transition back into a family or community setting when possible.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Bangladesh" is a country located in South Asia, rather than a medical term or condition. It is bordered by India to the west, north, and east, and by Myanmar (Burma) to the southeast, with the Bay of Bengal to the south. The official name of the country is the People's Republic of Bangladesh.

If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health-related topics, I would be happy to help answer them for you!

Community health nursing, also known as public health nursing, is a specialized area of nursing practice that focuses on improving the health and well-being of communities and populations. It involves the assessment, diagnosis, intervention, and evaluation of the health needs of communities, and the development and implementation of programs and interventions to address those needs.

Community health nurses work in a variety of settings, including community health centers, public health departments, schools, and home health agencies. They may provide direct care to individuals and families, as well as coordinate and deliver population-based services such as immunization clinics, health education programs, and screenings.

The goal of community health nursing is to promote and protect the health of communities and populations, particularly those who are most vulnerable or at risk. This may include addressing issues such as infectious disease prevention and control, chronic disease management, maternal and child health, environmental health, and access to care. Community health nurses also play an important role in advocating for policies and practices that support the health and well-being of communities and populations.

Follow-up studies are a type of longitudinal research that involve repeated observations or measurements of the same variables over a period of time, in order to understand their long-term effects or outcomes. In medical context, follow-up studies are often used to evaluate the safety and efficacy of medical treatments, interventions, or procedures.

In a typical follow-up study, a group of individuals (called a cohort) who have received a particular treatment or intervention are identified and then followed over time through periodic assessments or data collection. The data collected may include information on clinical outcomes, adverse events, changes in symptoms or functional status, and other relevant measures.

The results of follow-up studies can provide important insights into the long-term benefits and risks of medical interventions, as well as help to identify factors that may influence treatment effectiveness or patient outcomes. However, it is important to note that follow-up studies can be subject to various biases and limitations, such as loss to follow-up, recall bias, and changes in clinical practice over time, which must be carefully considered when interpreting the results.

A depressive disorder is a mental health condition characterized by persistent feelings of sadness, hopelessness, and loss of interest or pleasure in activities. It can also include changes in sleep, appetite, energy levels, concentration, and self-esteem, as well as thoughts of death or suicide. Depressive disorders can vary in severity and duration, with some people experiencing mild and occasional symptoms, while others may have severe and chronic symptoms that interfere with their ability to function in daily life.

There are several types of depressive disorders, including major depressive disorder (MDD), persistent depressive disorder (PDD), and postpartum depression. MDD is characterized by symptoms that interfere significantly with a person's ability to function and last for at least two weeks, while PDD involves chronic low-grade depression that lasts for two years or more. Postpartum depression occurs in women after childbirth and can range from mild to severe.

Depressive disorders are thought to be caused by a combination of genetic, biological, environmental, and psychological factors. Treatment typically involves a combination of medication, psychotherapy (talk therapy), and lifestyle changes.

Prospective studies, also known as longitudinal studies, are a type of cohort study in which data is collected forward in time, following a group of individuals who share a common characteristic or exposure over a period of time. The researchers clearly define the study population and exposure of interest at the beginning of the study and follow up with the participants to determine the outcomes that develop over time. This type of study design allows for the investigation of causal relationships between exposures and outcomes, as well as the identification of risk factors and the estimation of disease incidence rates. Prospective studies are particularly useful in epidemiology and medical research when studying diseases with long latency periods or rare outcomes.

Medically, hair is defined as a threadlike structure that grows from the follicles found in the skin of mammals. It is primarily made up of a protein called keratin and consists of three parts: the medulla (the innermost part or core), the cortex (middle layer containing keratin filaments) and the cuticle (outer layer of overlapping scales).

Hair growth occurs in cycles, with each cycle consisting of a growth phase (anagen), a transitional phase (catagen), and a resting phase (telogen). The length of hair is determined by the duration of the anagen phase.

While hair plays a crucial role in protecting the skin from external factors like UV radiation, temperature changes, and physical damage, it also serves as an essential aspect of human aesthetics and identity.

In the context of medicine and psychology, "temperament" refers to a person's natural disposition or character, which is often thought to be inherited and relatively stable throughout their life. It is the foundation on which personality develops, and it influences how individuals react to their environment, handle emotions, and approach various situations.

Temperament is composed of several traits, including:

1. Activity level: The degree of physical and mental energy a person exhibits.
2. Emotional intensity: The depth or strength of emotional responses.
3. Regularity: The consistency in biological functions like sleep, hunger, and elimination.
4. Approach/withdrawal: The tendency to approach or avoid new situations or people.
5. Adaptability: The ease with which a person adapts to changes in their environment.
6. Mood: The general emotional tone or baseline mood of an individual.
7. Persistence: The ability to maintain focus and effort on a task despite challenges or distractions.
8. Distractibility: The susceptibility to being diverted from a task by external stimuli.
9. Sensitivity: The degree of responsiveness to sensory input, such as touch, taste, sound, and light.
10. Attention span: The length of time a person can concentrate on a single task or activity.

These traits combine to create an individual's unique temperamental profile, which can influence their mental and physical health, social relationships, and overall well-being. Understanding temperament can help healthcare professionals tailor interventions and treatments to meet the specific needs of each patient.

"Sex factors" is a term used in medicine and epidemiology to refer to the differences in disease incidence, prevalence, or response to treatment that are observed between males and females. These differences can be attributed to biological differences such as genetics, hormones, and anatomy, as well as social and cultural factors related to gender.

For example, some conditions such as autoimmune diseases, depression, and osteoporosis are more common in women, while others such as cardiovascular disease and certain types of cancer are more prevalent in men. Additionally, sex differences have been observed in the effectiveness and side effects of various medications and treatments.

It is important to consider sex factors in medical research and clinical practice to ensure that patients receive appropriate and effective care.

I am not aware of a medical definition for "Internal-External Control." However, the term "locus of control" is commonly used in psychology and medicine to describe an individual's belief about the degree to which they have control over events and outcomes in their life.

Locus of control can be categorized as either internal or external:

* Internal locus of control refers to the belief that one has control over their own life outcomes, and that these outcomes are determined by their own efforts, abilities, and choices.
* External locus of control, on the other hand, refers to the belief that events and outcomes in one's life are controlled by external factors such as luck, chance, or powerful others.

Both internal and external locus of control can have implications for health behaviors and medical outcomes. For example, individuals with an internal locus of control may be more likely to engage in healthy behaviors such as exercise and healthy eating, while those with an external locus of control may be more likely to engage in risky behaviors such as smoking or substance abuse. Similarly, a strong internal locus of control has been associated with better medical outcomes, including improved mental health and reduced symptoms of chronic illness.

"Family characteristics" is a broad term that can refer to various attributes, dynamics, and structures of a family unit. These characteristics can include:

1. Family structure: This refers to the composition of the family, such as whether it is a nuclear family (two parents and their children), single-parent family, extended family, blended family, or same-sex parent family.
2. Family roles: The responsibilities and expectations assigned to each family member, such as caregiver, provider, or decision-maker.
3. Communication patterns: How family members communicate with one another, including frequency, tone, and level of openness.
4. Problem-solving styles: How the family approaches and resolves conflicts and challenges.
5. Cultural and religious practices: The values, traditions, and beliefs that shape the family's identity and worldview.
6. Family functioning: The overall health and effectiveness of the family system, including its ability to adapt to change and support individual members' needs.
7. Attachment styles: The quality and nature of the emotional bonds between family members, which can impact attachment security and relationships throughout life.
8. Parenting style: The approach that parents take in raising their children, such as authoritative, authoritarian, permissive, or uninvolved.
9. Family history: Past experiences and events that have shaped the family's development and dynamics.
10. Genetic factors: Inherited traits and predispositions that can influence family members' health, behavior, and personality.

Understanding family characteristics is essential in fields such as medicine, psychology, social work, and counseling, as these factors can significantly impact individual and family well-being.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "social class" is not a term that has a medical definition. It is a sociological concept that refers to the grouping of individuals in a society based on their shared economic and social positions. This can include factors such as income, education, occupation, and wealth.

However, social class can have an impact on health outcomes and access to healthcare. For example, people in lower socioeconomic groups are more likely to experience chronic diseases, mental health disorders, and have limited access to quality healthcare services compared to those in higher socioeconomic groups. This relationship is often referred to as the "social determinants of health."

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a psychiatric condition that can occur in people who have experienced or witnessed a traumatic event such as a natural disaster, serious accident, war combat, rape, or violent personal assault. According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th Edition (DSM-5), PTSD is characterized by the following symptoms, which must last for more than one month:

1. Intrusion symptoms: These include distressing memories, nightmares, flashbacks, or intense psychological distress or reactivity to internal or external cues that symbolize or resemble an aspect of the traumatic event.
2. Avoidance symptoms: Persistent avoidance of stimuli associated with the traumatic event, including thoughts, feelings, conversations, activities, places, or people.
3. Negative alterations in cognitions and mood: This includes negative beliefs about oneself, others, or the world; distorted blame of self or others for causing the trauma; persistent negative emotional state; decreased interest in significant activities; and feelings of detachment or estrangement from others.
4. Alterations in arousal and reactivity: This includes irritable behavior and angry outbursts, reckless or self-destructive behavior, hypervigilance, exaggerated startle response, problems with concentration, and sleep disturbance.
5. Duration of symptoms: The symptoms must last for more than one month.
6. Functional significance: The symptoms cause clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning.

It is essential to note that PTSD can occur at any age and can be accompanied by various physical and mental health problems, such as depression, substance abuse, memory problems, and other difficulties in cognition. Appropriate treatment, which may include psychotherapy, medication, or a combination of both, can significantly improve the symptoms and overall quality of life for individuals with PTSD.

The term "family" in a medical context often refers to a group of individuals who are related by blood, marriage, or adoption and who consider themselves to be a single household. This can include spouses, parents, children, siblings, grandparents, and other extended family members. In some cases, the term may also be used more broadly to refer to any close-knit group of people who provide emotional and social support for one another, regardless of their biological or legal relationship.

In healthcare settings, understanding a patient's family dynamics can be important for providing effective care. Family members may be involved in decision-making about medical treatments, providing care and support at home, and communicating with healthcare providers. Additionally, cultural beliefs and values within families can influence health behaviors and attitudes towards medical care, making it essential for healthcare professionals to take a culturally sensitive approach when working with patients and their families.

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is a mental health disorder characterized by the presence of obsessions and compulsions. Obsessions are recurrent and persistent thoughts, urges, or images that are intrusive, unwanted, and often distressing. Compulsions are repetitive behaviors or mental acts that an individual feels driven to perform in response to an obsession or according to rigid rules, and which are aimed at preventing or reducing anxiety or distress, or preventing some dreaded event or situation. These obsessions and/or compulsions cause significant distress, take up a lot of time (an hour or more a day), and interfere with the individual's daily life, including social activities, relationships, and work or school performance. OCD is considered a type of anxiety disorder and can also co-occur with other mental health conditions.

Pregnancy complications refer to any health problems that arise during pregnancy which can put both the mother and the baby at risk. These complications may occur at any point during the pregnancy, from conception until childbirth. Some common pregnancy complications include:

1. Gestational diabetes: a type of diabetes that develops during pregnancy in women who did not have diabetes before becoming pregnant.
2. Preeclampsia: a pregnancy complication characterized by high blood pressure and damage to organs such as the liver or kidneys.
3. Placenta previa: a condition where the placenta covers the cervix, which can cause bleeding and may require delivery via cesarean section.
4. Preterm labor: when labor begins before 37 weeks of gestation, which can lead to premature birth and other complications.
5. Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR): a condition where the fetus does not grow at a normal rate inside the womb.
6. Multiple pregnancies: carrying more than one baby, such as twins or triplets, which can increase the risk of premature labor and other complications.
7. Rh incompatibility: a condition where the mother's blood type is different from the baby's, which can cause anemia and jaundice in the newborn.
8. Pregnancy loss: including miscarriage, stillbirth, or ectopic pregnancy, which can be emotionally devastating for the parents.

It is important to monitor pregnancy closely and seek medical attention promptly if any concerning symptoms arise. With proper care and management, many pregnancy complications can be treated effectively, reducing the risk of harm to both the mother and the baby.

Dental care for children, also known as pediatric dentistry, is a branch of dentistry that focuses on the oral health of children from infancy through adolescence. The medical definition of dental care for children includes:

1. Preventive Dentistry: This involves regular dental check-ups, professional cleaning, fluoride treatments, and sealants to prevent tooth decay and other dental diseases. Parents are also educated on proper oral hygiene practices for their children, including brushing, flossing, and dietary habits.
2. Restorative Dentistry: If a child develops cavities or other dental problems, restorative treatments such as fillings, crowns, or pulpotomies (baby root canals) may be necessary to restore the health and function of their teeth.
3. Orthodontic Treatment: Many children require orthodontic treatment to correct misaligned teeth or jaws. Early intervention can help guide proper jaw development and prevent more severe issues from developing later on.
4. Habit Counseling: Dental care for children may also involve habit counseling, such as helping a child stop thumb sucking or pacifier use, which can negatively impact their oral health.
5. Sedation and Anesthesia: For children who are anxious about dental procedures or have special needs, sedation or anesthesia may be used to ensure their comfort and safety during treatment.
6. Emergency Care: Dental care for children also includes emergency care for injuries such as knocked-out teeth, broken teeth, or severe toothaches. Prompt attention is necessary to prevent further damage and alleviate pain.
7. Education and Prevention: Finally, dental care for children involves educating parents and children about the importance of good oral hygiene practices and regular dental check-ups to maintain optimal oral health throughout their lives.

Psychological stress is the response of an individual's mind and body to challenging or demanding situations. It can be defined as a state of emotional and physical tension resulting from adversity, demand, or change. This response can involve a variety of symptoms, including emotional, cognitive, behavioral, and physiological components.

Emotional responses may include feelings of anxiety, fear, anger, sadness, or frustration. Cognitive responses might involve difficulty concentrating, racing thoughts, or negative thinking patterns. Behaviorally, psychological stress can lead to changes in appetite, sleep patterns, social interactions, and substance use. Physiologically, the body's "fight-or-flight" response is activated, leading to increased heart rate, blood pressure, muscle tension, and other symptoms.

Psychological stress can be caused by a wide range of factors, including work or school demands, financial problems, relationship issues, traumatic events, chronic illness, and major life changes. It's important to note that what causes stress in one person may not cause stress in another, as individual perceptions and coping mechanisms play a significant role.

Chronic psychological stress can have negative effects on both mental and physical health, increasing the risk of conditions such as anxiety disorders, depression, heart disease, diabetes, and autoimmune diseases. Therefore, it's essential to identify sources of stress and develop effective coping strategies to manage and reduce its impact.

A child who has lost one or both parents due to death is considered an orphan. According to the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, a child who has lost only one parent and is not receiving care from the surviving parent is also considered an orphan. This type of orphan is sometimes referred to as a "single orphan."

The term "double orphan" is used to describe a child who has lost both parents. The death of a parent can have significant emotional, social, and economic impacts on a child, making it important for societies to provide support and resources to help them cope and thrive.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "India" is not a medical term or concept. It is a country in South Asia, the second-most populous country in the world, known for its rich history, diverse culture, and numerous contributions to various fields including medicine. If you have any questions related to medical topics, I would be happy to help answer them!

The term "developing countries" is a socio-economic classification used to describe nations that are in the process of industrialization and modernization. This term is often used interchangeably with "low and middle-income countries" or "Global South." The World Bank defines developing countries as those with a gross national income (GNI) per capita of less than US $12,695.

In the context of healthcare, developing countries face unique challenges including limited access to quality medical care, lack of resources and infrastructure, high burden of infectious diseases, and a shortage of trained healthcare professionals. These factors contribute to significant disparities in health outcomes between developing and developed nations.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Quebec" is not a medical term. It is a place name, referring to the Canadian province of Quebec. If you have any questions about medical terms or concepts, I would be happy to help answer those!

Psychological tests are standardized procedures or measures used to assess various aspects of an individual's cognitive functioning, personality traits, emotional status, and behavior. These tests are designed to be reliable and valid tools for evaluating specific psychological constructs such as intelligence, memory, attention, achievement, aptitude, interests, and values. They can be in the form of questionnaires, interviews, observational scales, or performance-based tasks. The results obtained from these tests help mental health professionals make informed decisions about diagnosis, treatment planning, and educational or vocational guidance for their clients. It is important to note that psychological tests should only be administered, scored, and interpreted by trained and qualified professionals to ensure accurate and meaningful results.

Substance-related disorders, as defined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), refer to a group of conditions caused by the use of substances such as alcohol, drugs, or medicines. These disorders are characterized by a problematic pattern of using a substance that leads to clinically significant impairment or distress. They can be divided into two main categories: substance use disorders and substance-induced disorders. Substance use disorders involve a pattern of compulsive use despite negative consequences, while substance-induced disorders include conditions such as intoxication, withdrawal, and substance/medication-induced mental disorders. The specific diagnosis depends on the type of substance involved, the patterns of use, and the presence or absence of physiological dependence.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

A phobic disorder is a type of anxiety disorder characterized by an excessive and irrational fear or avoidance of specific objects, situations, or activities. This fear can cause significant distress and interfere with a person's daily life. Phobic disorders are typically classified into three main categories: specific phobias (such as fear of heights, spiders, or needles), social phobia (or social anxiety disorder), and agoraphobia (fear of open spaces or situations where escape might be difficult).

People with phobic disorders often recognize that their fear is excessive or unreasonable, but they are unable to control it. When exposed to the feared object or situation, they may experience symptoms such as rapid heartbeat, sweating, trembling, and difficulty breathing. These symptoms can be so distressing that individuals with phobic disorders go to great lengths to avoid the feared situation, which can have a significant impact on their quality of life.

Treatment for phobic disorders typically involves cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), which helps individuals identify and challenge their irrational thoughts and fears, as well as exposure therapy, which gradually exposes them to the feared object or situation in a safe and controlled environment. In some cases, medication may also be recommended to help manage symptoms of anxiety.

Neuropsychological tests are a type of psychological assessment that measures cognitive functions, such as attention, memory, language, problem-solving, and perception. These tests are used to help diagnose and understand the cognitive impact of neurological conditions, including dementia, traumatic brain injury, stroke, Parkinson's disease, and other disorders that affect the brain.

The tests are typically administered by a trained neuropsychologist and can take several hours to complete. They may involve paper-and-pencil tasks, computerized tasks, or interactive activities. The results of the tests are compared to normative data to help identify any areas of cognitive weakness or strength.

Neuropsychological testing can provide valuable information for treatment planning, rehabilitation, and assessing response to treatment. It can also be used in research to better understand the neural basis of cognition and the impact of neurological conditions on cognitive function.

Nutritional status is a concept that refers to the condition of an individual in relation to their nutrient intake, absorption, metabolism, and excretion. It encompasses various aspects such as body weight, muscle mass, fat distribution, presence of any deficiencies or excesses of specific nutrients, and overall health status.

A comprehensive assessment of nutritional status typically includes a review of dietary intake, anthropometric measurements (such as height, weight, waist circumference, blood pressure), laboratory tests (such as serum albumin, total protein, cholesterol levels, vitamin and mineral levels), and clinical evaluation for signs of malnutrition or overnutrition.

Malnutrition can result from inadequate intake or absorption of nutrients, increased nutrient requirements due to illness or injury, or excessive loss of nutrients due to medical conditions. On the other hand, overnutrition can lead to obesity and related health problems such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and certain types of cancer.

Therefore, maintaining a good nutritional status is essential for overall health and well-being, and it is an important consideration in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of various medical conditions.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Poverty Areas" is not a standard medical term or classification. However, in a broader social determinants of health context, poverty is recognized as a significant factor that can impact an individual's health outcomes and access to healthcare.

The World Health Organization (WHO) defines poverty as "pronounced deprivation in well-being," which includes but is not limited to lack of income and economic opportunities. The WHO also acknowledges that poverty is a major cause of ill-health and premature death around the world.

If you are referring to a specific term or concept that goes by a different name, please provide more context so I can give a more accurate response.

I'm not a medical professional, but I can tell you that the term "Father-Child Relations" is a social science or psychological concept rather than a medical one. It generally refers to the nature and quality of the emotional, social, and behavioral relationship between a father and his child. This relationship can have significant impacts on a child's development, including their cognitive, emotional, and social growth. Factors such as involvement, communication, support, and attachment are often considered when examining father-child relations.

Breastfeeding is the process of providing nutrition to an infant or young child by feeding them breast milk directly from the mother's breast. It is also known as nursing. Breast milk is the natural food for newborns and infants, and it provides all the nutrients they need to grow and develop during the first six months of life.

Breastfeeding has many benefits for both the mother and the baby. For the baby, breast milk contains antibodies that help protect against infections and diseases, and it can also reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), allergies, and obesity. For the mother, breastfeeding can help her lose weight after pregnancy, reduce the risk of certain types of cancer, and promote bonding with her baby.

Breastfeeding is recommended exclusively for the first six months of an infant's life, and then continued along with appropriate complementary foods until the child is at least two years old or beyond. However, it is important to note that every mother and baby pair is unique, and what works best for one may not work as well for another. It is recommended that mothers consult with their healthcare provider to determine the best feeding plan for themselves and their baby.

Retrospective studies, also known as retrospective research or looking back studies, are a type of observational study that examines data from the past to draw conclusions about possible causal relationships between risk factors and outcomes. In these studies, researchers analyze existing records, medical charts, or previously collected data to test a hypothesis or answer a specific research question.

Retrospective studies can be useful for generating hypotheses and identifying trends, but they have limitations compared to prospective studies, which follow participants forward in time from exposure to outcome. Retrospective studies are subject to biases such as recall bias, selection bias, and information bias, which can affect the validity of the results. Therefore, retrospective studies should be interpreted with caution and used primarily to generate hypotheses for further testing in prospective studies.

Educational status refers to the level or stage of education that a person has reached. It can be used to describe an individual's educational background, achievements, and qualifications. Educational status can be categorized in various ways, including by level (e.g., elementary school, high school, college, graduate school), years of schooling completed, or type of degree earned (e.g., bachelor's, master's, doctoral).

In medical settings, educational status may be used as a demographic variable to describe the characteristics of a patient population or to identify potential disparities in health outcomes based on education level. Research has shown that higher levels of education are often associated with better health outcomes, including lower rates of chronic diseases and improved mental health. Therefore, understanding a patient's educational status can help healthcare providers tailor their care and education strategies to meet the unique needs and challenges of each individual.

Psychotic disorders are a group of severe mental health conditions characterized by distorted perceptions, thoughts, and emotions that lead to an inability to recognize reality. The two most common symptoms of psychotic disorders are hallucinations and delusions. Hallucinations are when a person sees, hears, or feels things that aren't there, while delusions are fixed, false beliefs that are not based on reality.

Other symptoms may include disorganized speech, disorganized behavior, catatonic behavior, and negative symptoms such as apathy and lack of emotional expression. Schizophrenia is the most well-known psychotic disorder, but other types include schizoaffective disorder, delusional disorder, brief psychotic disorder, shared psychotic disorder, and substance-induced psychotic disorder.

Psychotic disorders can be caused by a variety of factors, including genetics, brain chemistry imbalances, trauma, and substance abuse. Treatment typically involves a combination of medication, therapy, and support services to help manage symptoms and improve quality of life.

A rural population refers to people who live in areas that are outside of urban areas, typically defined as having fewer than 2,000 residents and lacking certain infrastructure and services such as running water, sewage systems, and paved roads. Rural populations often have less access to healthcare services, education, and economic opportunities compared to their urban counterparts. This population group can face unique health challenges, including higher rates of poverty, limited access to specialized medical care, and a greater exposure to environmental hazards such as agricultural chemicals and industrial pollutants.

Mental health is a state of well-being in which an individual realizes his or her own abilities, can cope with the normal stresses of life, can work productively and fruitfully, and is able to make a contribution to his or her community. It involves the emotional, psychological, and social aspects of an individual's health. Mental health is not just the absence of mental illness, it also includes positive characteristics such as resilience, happiness, and having a sense of purpose in life.

It is important to note that mental health can change over time, and it is possible for an individual to experience periods of good mental health as well as periods of poor mental health. Factors such as genetics, trauma, stress, and physical illness can all contribute to the development of mental health problems. Additionally, cultural and societal factors, such as discrimination and poverty, can also impact an individual's mental health.

Mental Health professionals like psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers and other mental health counselors use different tools and techniques to evaluate, diagnose and treat mental health conditions. These include therapy or counseling, medication, and self-help strategies.

Regression analysis is a statistical technique used in medicine, as well as in other fields, to examine the relationship between one or more independent variables (predictors) and a dependent variable (outcome). It allows for the estimation of the average change in the outcome variable associated with a one-unit change in an independent variable, while controlling for the effects of other independent variables. This technique is often used to identify risk factors for diseases or to evaluate the effectiveness of medical interventions. In medical research, regression analysis can be used to adjust for potential confounding variables and to quantify the relationship between exposures and health outcomes. It can also be used in predictive modeling to estimate the probability of a particular outcome based on multiple predictors.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "income" is not a medical term. Income is an economic term that refers to the inflow of monetary resources or earnings that an individual or household receives from various sources, such as employment, investments, or government benefits. It is typically used in financial and economic contexts rather than medical ones. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or concepts, I would be happy to help with those!

Interpersonal relations, in the context of medicine and healthcare, refer to the interactions and relationships between patients and healthcare professionals, as well as among healthcare professionals themselves. These relationships are crucial in the delivery of care and can significantly impact patient outcomes. Positive interpersonal relations can lead to improved communication, increased trust, greater patient satisfaction, and better adherence to treatment plans. On the other hand, negative or strained interpersonal relations can result in poor communication, mistrust, dissatisfaction, and non-adherence.

Healthcare professionals are trained to develop effective interpersonal skills, including active listening, empathy, respect, and cultural sensitivity, to build positive relationships with their patients. Effective interpersonal relations also involve clear and concise communication, setting appropriate boundaries, and managing conflicts in a constructive manner. In addition, positive interpersonal relations among healthcare professionals can promote collaboration, teamwork, and knowledge sharing, leading to improved patient care and safety.

I believe there may be some confusion in your question. "Schools" is not a medical term. It generally refers to educational institutions where children or adults receive instruction in various subjects. If you are asking about a medical condition that might be associated with the word "school," it's possible you could mean "psychological disorders that first present or become evident during the school-aged period (approximately 5-18 years of age)." These disorders can include, but are not limited to, ADHD, learning disabilities, anxiety disorders, and mood disorders. However, without more context, it's difficult for me to provide a more specific answer.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Urban Population" is not a medical term. It is a demographic term used to describe the portion of a country's population that lives in areas classified as urban. The United Nations defines an urban area as a city, town, or other agglomeration with a population of 20,000 or more. However, the specific definition can vary by country and organization.

In contrast, medical terms typically refer to conditions, diseases, symptoms, treatments, or healthcare-related concepts. If you have any questions related to health or medicine, I'd be happy to help if I can!

Reproducibility of results in a medical context refers to the ability to obtain consistent and comparable findings when a particular experiment or study is repeated, either by the same researcher or by different researchers, following the same experimental protocol. It is an essential principle in scientific research that helps to ensure the validity and reliability of research findings.

In medical research, reproducibility of results is crucial for establishing the effectiveness and safety of new treatments, interventions, or diagnostic tools. It involves conducting well-designed studies with adequate sample sizes, appropriate statistical analyses, and transparent reporting of methods and findings to allow other researchers to replicate the study and confirm or refute the results.

The lack of reproducibility in medical research has become a significant concern in recent years, as several high-profile studies have failed to produce consistent findings when replicated by other researchers. This has led to increased scrutiny of research practices and a call for greater transparency, rigor, and standardization in the conduct and reporting of medical research.

In the context of medicine, growth generally refers to the increase in size or mass of an organism or a specific part of the body over time. This can be quantified through various methods such as measuring height, weight, or the dimensions of particular organs or tissues. In children, normal growth is typically assessed using growth charts that plot measurements like height and weight against age to determine whether a child's growth is following a typical pattern.

Growth can be influenced by a variety of factors, including genetics, nutrition, hormonal regulation, and overall health status. Abnormalities in growth patterns may indicate underlying medical conditions or developmental disorders that require further evaluation and treatment.

Social behavior, in the context of medicine and psychology, refers to the ways in which individuals interact and engage with others within their social environment. It involves various actions, communications, and responses that are influenced by cultural norms, personal values, emotional states, and cognitive processes. These behaviors can include but are not limited to communication, cooperation, competition, empathy, altruism, aggression, and conformity.

Abnormalities in social behavior may indicate underlying mental health conditions such as autism spectrum disorder, schizophrenia, or personality disorders. Therefore, understanding and analyzing social behavior is an essential aspect of diagnosing and treating various psychological and psychiatric conditions.

Iron-deficiency anemia is a condition characterized by a decrease in the total amount of hemoglobin or red blood cells in the blood, caused by insufficient iron levels in the body. Hemoglobin is a protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body. When iron levels are low, the body cannot produce enough hemoglobin, leading to the production of smaller and fewer red blood cells, known as microcytic hypochromic anemia.

Iron is essential for the production of hemoglobin, and a deficiency in iron can result from inadequate dietary intake, chronic blood loss, or impaired absorption. In addition to fatigue and weakness, symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia may include shortness of breath, headaches, dizziness, pale skin, and brittle nails. Treatment typically involves iron supplementation and addressing the underlying cause of the iron deficiency.

Conduct Disorder is a mental health disorder that typically begins in childhood or adolescence and is characterized by a repetitive pattern of behavior that violates the rights of others or major age-appropriate societal norms and rules. The behaviors fall into four main categories: aggression to people and animals, destruction of property, deceitfulness or theft, and serious violation of rules.

The specific symptoms of Conduct Disorder can vary widely among individuals, but they generally include:

1. Aggression to people and animals: This may include physical fights, bullying, threatening others, cruelty to animals, and use of weapons.
2. Destruction of property: This may include deliberate destruction of others' property, arson, and vandalism.
3. Deceitfulness or theft: This may include lying, shoplifting, stealing, and breaking into homes, buildings, or cars.
4. Serious violation of rules: This may include running away from home, truancy, staying out late without permission, and frequent violations of school rules.

Conduct Disorder can have serious consequences for individuals who suffer from it, including academic failure, substance abuse, depression, anxiety, and difficulties in interpersonal relationships. It is important to note that Conduct Disorder should be diagnosed by a qualified mental health professional based on a comprehensive evaluation.

Emotions are complex psychological states that involve three distinct components: a subjective experience, a physiological response, and a behavioral or expressive response. Emotions can be short-lived, such as a flash of anger, or more long-lasting, such as enduring sadness. They can also vary in intensity, from mild irritation to intense joy or fear.

Emotions are often distinguished from other psychological states, such as moods and temperament, which may be less specific and more enduring. Emotions are typically thought to have a clear cause or object, such as feeling happy when you receive good news or feeling anxious before a job interview.

There are many different emotions that people can experience, including happiness, sadness, anger, fear, surprise, disgust, and shame. These emotions are often thought to serve important adaptive functions, helping individuals respond to challenges and opportunities in their environment.

In medical contexts, emotions may be relevant to the diagnosis and treatment of various mental health conditions, such as depression, anxiety disorders, and bipolar disorder. Abnormalities in emotional processing and regulation have been implicated in many psychiatric illnesses, and therapies that target these processes may be effective in treating these conditions.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but the term "Great Britain" is not a medical concept or condition. It is a geographical and political term referring to the largest island in the British Isles, on which the majority of England, Scotland, and Wales are located. It's also used to refer to the political union of these three countries, which is called the United Kingdom. Therefore, it doesn't have a medical definition.

Motor skills are defined as the abilities required to plan, control and execute physical movements. They involve a complex interplay between the brain, nerves, muscles, and the environment. Motor skills can be broadly categorized into two types: fine motor skills, which involve small, precise movements (such as writing or picking up small objects), and gross motor skills, which involve larger movements using the arms, legs, and torso (such as crawling, walking, or running).

Motor skills development is an essential aspect of child growth and development, and it continues to evolve throughout adulthood. Difficulties with motor skills can impact a person's ability to perform daily activities and can be associated with various neurological and musculoskeletal conditions.

Anxiety: A feeling of worry, nervousness, or unease, typically about an imminent event or something with an uncertain outcome. In a medical context, anxiety refers to a mental health disorder characterized by feelings of excessive and persistent worry, fear, or panic that interfere with daily activities. It can also be a symptom of other medical conditions, such as heart disease, diabetes, or substance abuse disorders. Anxiety disorders include generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, and phobias.

Child abuse is a broad term that refers to any form of physical, emotional, or sexual mistreatment or neglect that causes harm to a child's health, development, or dignity. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), child abuse includes:

1. Physical abuse: Non-accidental injuries caused by hitting, kicking, shaking, burning, or otherwise harming a child's body.
2. Sexual abuse: Any sexual activity involving a child, such as touching or non-touching behaviors, exploitation, or exposure to pornographic material.
3. Emotional abuse: Behaviors that harm a child's emotional well-being and self-esteem, such as constant criticism, humiliation, threats, or rejection.
4. Neglect: Failure to provide for a child's basic needs, including food, clothing, shelter, medical care, education, and emotional support.

Child abuse can have serious short-term and long-term consequences for the physical, emotional, and psychological well-being of children. It is a violation of their fundamental human rights and a public health concern that requires prevention, early detection, and intervention.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Linear Models" is actually a term from the field of statistics and machine learning, rather than medicine. A linear model is a type of statistical model that is used to analyze the relationship between two or more variables. In a linear model, the relationship between the dependent variable (the outcome or result) and the independent variable(s) (the factors being studied) is assumed to be linear, meaning that it can be described by a straight line on a graph.

The equation for a simple linear model with one independent variable (x) and one dependent variable (y) looks like this:

y = β0 + β1*x + ε

In this equation, β0 is the y-intercept or the value of y when x equals zero, β1 is the slope or the change in y for each unit increase in x, and ε is the error term or the difference between the actual values of y and the predicted values of y based on the linear model.

Linear models are widely used in medical research to study the relationship between various factors (such as exposure to a risk factor or treatment) and health outcomes (such as disease incidence or mortality). They can also be used to adjust for confounding variables, which are factors that may influence both the independent variable and the dependent variable, and thus affect the observed relationship between them.

Environmental exposure refers to the contact of an individual with any chemical, physical, or biological agent in the environment that can cause a harmful effect on health. These exposures can occur through various pathways such as inhalation, ingestion, or skin contact. Examples of environmental exposures include air pollution, water contamination, occupational chemicals, and allergens. The duration and level of exposure, as well as the susceptibility of the individual, can all contribute to the risk of developing an adverse health effect.

Psychiatric Status Rating Scales are standardized assessment tools used by mental health professionals to evaluate and rate the severity of a person's psychiatric symptoms and functioning. These scales provide a systematic and structured approach to measuring various aspects of an individual's mental health, such as mood, anxiety, psychosis, behavior, and cognitive abilities.

The purpose of using Psychiatric Status Rating Scales is to:

1. Assess the severity and improvement of psychiatric symptoms over time.
2. Aid in diagnostic decision-making and treatment planning.
3. Monitor treatment response and adjust interventions accordingly.
4. Facilitate communication among mental health professionals about a patient's status.
5. Provide an objective basis for research and epidemiological studies.

Examples of Psychiatric Status Rating Scales include:

1. Clinical Global Impression (CGI): A brief, subjective rating scale that measures overall illness severity, treatment response, and improvement.
2. Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS): A comprehensive scale used to assess the symptoms of psychosis, including positive, negative, and general psychopathology domains.
3. Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD) or Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS): Scales used to evaluate the severity of depressive symptoms.
4. Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS): A scale used to assess the severity of manic or hypomanic symptoms.
5. Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) or Symptom Checklist-90 Revised (SCL-90-R): Scales that measure a broad range of psychiatric symptoms and psychopathology.
6. Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF): A scale used to rate an individual's overall psychological, social, and occupational functioning on a hypothetical continuum of mental health-illness.

It is important to note that Psychiatric Status Rating Scales should be administered by trained mental health professionals to ensure accurate and reliable results.

Logistic models, specifically logistic regression models, are a type of statistical analysis used in medical and epidemiological research to identify the relationship between the risk of a certain health outcome or disease (dependent variable) and one or more independent variables, such as demographic factors, exposure variables, or other clinical measurements.

In contrast to linear regression models, logistic regression models are used when the dependent variable is binary or dichotomous in nature, meaning it can only take on two values, such as "disease present" or "disease absent." The model uses a logistic function to estimate the probability of the outcome based on the independent variables.

Logistic regression models are useful for identifying risk factors and estimating the strength of associations between exposures and health outcomes, adjusting for potential confounders, and predicting the probability of an outcome given certain values of the independent variables. They can also be used to develop clinical prediction rules or scores that can aid in decision-making and patient care.

Tic disorders are a group of conditions characterized by the presence of repetitive, involuntary movements or sounds, known as tics. These movements or sounds can vary in complexity and severity, and they may be worsened by stress or strong emotions.

There are several different types of tic disorders, including:

1. Tourette's disorder: This is a neurological condition characterized by the presence of both motor (movement-related) and vocal tics that have been present for at least one year. The tics may wax and wane in severity over time, but they do not disappear for more than three consecutive months.
2. Persistent (chronic) motor or vocal tic disorder: This type of tic disorder is characterized by the presence of either motor or vocal tics (but not both), which have been present for at least one year. The tics may wax and wane in severity over time, but they do not disappear for more than three consecutive months.
3. Provisional tic disorder: This type of tic disorder is characterized by the presence of motor or vocal tics (or both) that have been present for less than one year. The tics may wax and wane in severity over time, but they do not disappear for more than three consecutive months.
4. Tic disorder not otherwise specified: This category is used to describe tic disorders that do not meet the criteria for any of the other types of tic disorders.

Tic disorders are thought to be caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors, and they often co-occur with other conditions such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Treatment for tic disorders may include behavioral therapy, medication, or a combination of both.

Child mortality refers to the death of children under a specific age, typically under 5 years old. It is usually expressed as the number of deaths per 1,000 live births in a given population during a specified period. High child mortality rates are often indicative of underlying issues related to health care access, nutrition, sanitation, and socioeconomic factors. The United Nations Millennium Development Goals set a target to reduce under-five child mortality by two-thirds between 1990 and 2015, and this goal has been continued in the Sustainable Development Goals with a new target of ending preventable deaths of newborns and children under 5 years of age by 2030.

I believe there may be a misunderstanding in your question. The term "fishes" is not typically used in a medical context. "Fish" or "fishes" refers to any aquatic organism belonging to the taxonomic class Actinopterygii (bony fish), Chondrichthyes (sharks and rays), or Agnatha (jawless fish).

However, if you are referring to a condition related to fish or consuming fish, there is a medical issue called scombroid fish poisoning. It's a foodborne illness caused by eating spoiled or improperly stored fish from the Scombridae family, which includes tuna, mackerel, and bonito, among others. The bacteria present in these fish can produce histamine, which can cause symptoms like skin flushing, headache, diarrhea, and itchy rash. But again, this is not related to the term "fishes" itself but rather a condition associated with consuming certain types of fish.

Cognitive disorders are a category of mental health disorders that primarily affect cognitive abilities including learning, memory, perception, and problem-solving. These disorders can be caused by various factors such as brain injury, degenerative diseases, infection, substance abuse, or developmental disabilities. Examples of cognitive disorders include dementia, amnesia, delirium, and intellectual disability. It's important to note that the specific definition and diagnostic criteria for cognitive disorders may vary depending on the medical source or classification system being used.

Environmental pollutants are defined as any substances or energy (such as noise, heat, or light) that are present in the environment and can cause harm or discomfort to humans or other living organisms, or damage the natural ecosystems. These pollutants can come from a variety of sources, including industrial processes, transportation, agriculture, and household activities. They can be in the form of gases, liquids, solids, or radioactive materials, and can contaminate air, water, and soil. Examples include heavy metals, pesticides, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), particulate matter, and greenhouse gases.

It is important to note that the impact of environmental pollutants on human health and the environment can be acute (short-term) or chronic (long-term) and it depends on the type, concentration, duration and frequency of exposure. Some common effects of environmental pollutants include respiratory problems, cancer, neurological disorders, reproductive issues, and developmental delays in children.

It is important to monitor, control and reduce the emissions of these pollutants through regulations, technology advancements, and sustainable practices to protect human health and the environment.

Depression is a mood disorder that is characterized by persistent feelings of sadness, hopelessness, and loss of interest in activities. It can also cause significant changes in sleep, appetite, energy level, concentration, and behavior. Depression can interfere with daily life and normal functioning, and it can increase the risk of suicide and other mental health disorders. The exact cause of depression is not known, but it is believed to be related to a combination of genetic, biological, environmental, and psychological factors. There are several types of depression, including major depressive disorder, persistent depressive disorder, postpartum depression, and seasonal affective disorder. Treatment for depression typically involves a combination of medication and psychotherapy.

Sleep disorders are a group of conditions that affect the ability to sleep well on a regular basis. They can include problems with falling asleep, staying asleep, or waking up too early in the morning. These disorders can be caused by various factors such as stress, anxiety, depression, medical conditions, or substance abuse.

The American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) recognizes over 80 distinct sleep disorders, which are categorized into the following major groups:

1. Insomnia - difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep.
2. Sleep-related breathing disorders - abnormal breathing during sleep such as obstructive sleep apnea.
3. Central disorders of hypersomnolence - excessive daytime sleepiness, including narcolepsy.
4. Circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders - disruption of the internal body clock that regulates the sleep-wake cycle.
5. Parasomnias - abnormal behaviors during sleep such as sleepwalking or night terrors.
6. Sleep-related movement disorders - repetitive movements during sleep such as restless legs syndrome.
7. Isolated symptoms and normal variants - brief and occasional symptoms that do not warrant a specific diagnosis.

Sleep disorders can have significant impacts on an individual's quality of life, productivity, and overall health. If you suspect that you may have a sleep disorder, it is recommended to consult with a healthcare professional or a sleep specialist for proper evaluation and treatment.

Developed countries, also known as high-income countries or industrialized nations, are sovereign states that have advanced economies and highly developed infrastructure. These countries typically have high levels of industrialization, urbanization, and technological development, along with a high standard of living and access to quality healthcare, education, and social services.

The World Bank defines developed countries as those with a gross national income (GNI) per capita of $12,695 or more in 2020. Examples of developed countries include the United States, Canada, Germany, France, Japan, Australia, and many others in Western Europe and Asia.

It's important to note that the term "developed" is relative and can change over time as a country's economy and infrastructure advance or decline. Additionally, there are significant disparities within developed countries, with some regions or populations experiencing poverty, inequality, and lack of access to basic needs and services.

Birth weight refers to the first weight of a newborn infant, usually taken immediately after birth. It is a critical vital sign that indicates the baby's health status and is used as a predictor for various short-term and long-term health outcomes.

Typically, a full-term newborn's weight ranges from 5.5 to 8.8 pounds (2.5 to 4 kg), although normal birth weights can vary significantly based on factors such as gestational age, genetics, maternal health, and nutrition. Low birth weight is defined as less than 5.5 pounds (2.5 kg), while high birth weight is greater than 8.8 pounds (4 kg).

Low birth weight babies are at a higher risk for various medical complications, including respiratory distress syndrome, jaundice, infections, and developmental delays. High birth weight babies may face challenges with delivery, increased risk of obesity, and potential metabolic issues later in life. Regular prenatal care is essential to monitor fetal growth and ensure a healthy pregnancy and optimal birth weight for the baby.

'Guidelines' in the medical context are systematically developed statements or sets of recommendations designed to assist healthcare professionals and patients in making informed decisions about appropriate health care for specific clinical circumstances. They are based on a thorough evaluation of the available evidence, including scientific studies, expert opinions, and patient values. Guidelines may cover a wide range of topics, such as diagnosis, treatment, prevention, screening, and management of various diseases and conditions. They aim to standardize care, improve patient outcomes, reduce unnecessary variations in practice, and promote efficient use of healthcare resources.

A Severity of Illness Index is a measurement tool used in healthcare to assess the severity of a patient's condition and the risk of mortality or other adverse outcomes. These indices typically take into account various physiological and clinical variables, such as vital signs, laboratory values, and co-morbidities, to generate a score that reflects the patient's overall illness severity.

Examples of Severity of Illness Indices include the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) system, the Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS), and the Mortality Probability Model (MPM). These indices are often used in critical care settings to guide clinical decision-making, inform prognosis, and compare outcomes across different patient populations.

It is important to note that while these indices can provide valuable information about a patient's condition, they should not be used as the sole basis for clinical decision-making. Rather, they should be considered in conjunction with other factors, such as the patient's overall clinical presentation, treatment preferences, and goals of care.

A case-control study is an observational research design used to identify risk factors or causes of a disease or health outcome. In this type of study, individuals with the disease or condition (cases) are compared with similar individuals who do not have the disease or condition (controls). The exposure history or other characteristics of interest are then compared between the two groups to determine if there is an association between the exposure and the disease.

Case-control studies are often used when it is not feasible or ethical to conduct a randomized controlled trial, as they can provide valuable insights into potential causes of diseases or health outcomes in a relatively short period of time and at a lower cost than other study designs. However, because case-control studies rely on retrospective data collection, they are subject to biases such as recall bias and selection bias, which can affect the validity of the results. Therefore, it is important to carefully design and conduct case-control studies to minimize these potential sources of bias.

Treatment outcome is a term used to describe the result or effect of medical treatment on a patient's health status. It can be measured in various ways, such as through symptoms improvement, disease remission, reduced disability, improved quality of life, or survival rates. The treatment outcome helps healthcare providers evaluate the effectiveness of a particular treatment plan and make informed decisions about future care. It is also used in clinical research to compare the efficacy of different treatments and improve patient care.

Somatoform disorders are a group of psychological disorders characterized by the presence of physical symptoms that cannot be fully explained by a medical condition or substance abuse. These symptoms cause significant distress and impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning. The individual's belief about the symptoms is not consistent with the medical evaluation and often leads to excessive or repeated medical evaluations.

Examples of somatoform disorders include:

1. Somatization disorder: characterized by multiple physical symptoms that cannot be explained medically, affecting several parts of the body.
2. Conversion disorder: characterized by the presence of one or more neurological symptoms (such as blindness, paralysis, or difficulty swallowing) that cannot be explained medically and appear to have a psychological origin.
3. Pain disorder: characterized by chronic pain that is not fully explained by a medical condition.
4. Hypochondriasis: characterized by an excessive preoccupation with having a serious illness, despite reassurance from medical professionals.
5. Body dysmorphic disorder: characterized by the obsessive idea that some aspect of one's own body part or appearance is severely flawed and warrants exceptional measures to hide or fix it.

It's important to note that these disorders are not caused by intentional deceit or malingering, but rather reflect a genuine belief in the presence of physical symptoms and distress related to them.

Comorbidity is the presence of one or more additional health conditions or diseases alongside a primary illness or condition. These co-occurring health issues can have an impact on the treatment plan, prognosis, and overall healthcare management of an individual. Comorbidities often interact with each other and the primary condition, leading to more complex clinical situations and increased healthcare needs. It is essential for healthcare professionals to consider and address comorbidities to provide comprehensive care and improve patient outcomes.

Psychomotor performance refers to the integration and coordination of mental processes (cognitive functions) with physical movements. It involves the ability to perform complex tasks that require both cognitive skills, such as thinking, remembering, and perceiving, and motor skills, such as gross and fine motor movements. Examples of psychomotor performances include driving a car, playing a musical instrument, or performing surgical procedures.

In a medical context, psychomotor performance is often used to assess an individual's ability to perform activities of daily living (ADLs) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs), such as bathing, dressing, cooking, cleaning, and managing medications. Deficits in psychomotor performance can be a sign of neurological or psychiatric disorders, such as dementia, Parkinson's disease, or depression.

Assessment of psychomotor performance may involve tests that measure reaction time, coordination, speed, precision, and accuracy of movements, as well as cognitive functions such as attention, memory, and problem-solving skills. These assessments can help healthcare professionals develop appropriate treatment plans and monitor the progression of diseases or the effectiveness of interventions.

Speech disorders refer to a group of conditions in which a person has difficulty producing or articulating sounds, words, or sentences in a way that is understandable to others. These disorders can be caused by various factors such as developmental delays, neurological conditions, hearing loss, structural abnormalities, or emotional issues.

Speech disorders may include difficulties with:

* Articulation: the ability to produce sounds correctly and clearly.
* Phonology: the sound system of language, including the rules that govern how sounds are combined and used in words.
* Fluency: the smoothness and flow of speech, including issues such as stuttering or cluttering.
* Voice: the quality, pitch, and volume of the spoken voice.
* Resonance: the way sound is produced and carried through the vocal tract, which can affect the clarity and quality of speech.

Speech disorders can impact a person's ability to communicate effectively, leading to difficulties in social situations, academic performance, and even employment opportunities. Speech-language pathologists are trained to evaluate and treat speech disorders using various evidence-based techniques and interventions.

Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) is a mental health disorder characterized by a pervasive pattern of instability in interpersonal relationships, self-image, affect, and mood, as well as marked impulsivity that begins by early adulthood and is present in various contexts.

Individuals with BPD often experience intense and fluctuating emotions, ranging from profound sadness, anxiety, and anger to feelings of happiness or calm. They may have difficulty managing these emotions, leading to impulsive behavior, self-harm, or suicidal ideation.

People with BPD also tend to have an unstable sense of self, which can lead to rapid changes in their goals, values, and career choices. They often struggle with feelings of emptiness and boredom, and may engage in risky behaviors such as substance abuse, reckless driving, or binge eating to alleviate these feelings.

Interpersonal relationships are often strained due to the individual's fear of abandonment, intense emotional reactions, and difficulty regulating their emotions. They may experience idealization and devaluation of others, leading to rapid shifts in how they view and treat people close to them.

Diagnosis of BPD is typically made by a mental health professional using criteria outlined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), which is published by the American Psychiatric Association. Treatment for BPD may include psychotherapy, medication, and support groups to help individuals manage their symptoms and improve their quality of life.

Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders (ADDBDs) are a group of childhood-onset disorders characterized by persistent patterns of behavior that are difficult for the individual to control. These disorders include Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD), and Conduct Disorder (CD).

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is characterized by symptoms of inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity that interfere with daily functioning. These symptoms must be present for at least six months and occur in multiple settings, such as school, home, and social situations.

Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD) is characterized by a pattern of negative, hostile, and defiant behavior towards authority figures, which includes arguing with adults, losing temper, actively defying rules, and deliberately annoying others. These symptoms must be present for at least six months and occur more frequently than in other children of the same age and developmental level.

Conduct Disorder (CD) is characterized by a repetitive and persistent pattern of behavior that violates the rights of others or major age-appropriate societal norms and rules. These behaviors include aggression towards people and animals, destruction of property, deceitfulness or theft, and serious violation of rules.

It's important to note that these disorders can co-occur with other mental health conditions, such as mood disorders, anxiety disorders, and learning disabilities. Proper diagnosis and treatment are essential for managing the symptoms and improving the individual's quality of life.

A learning disorder is a neurodevelopmental disorder that affects an individual's ability to acquire, process, and use information in one or more academic areas despite normal intelligence and adequate instruction. It can manifest as difficulties with reading (dyslexia), writing (dysgraphia), mathematics (dyscalculia), or other academic skills. Learning disorders are not the result of low intelligence, lack of motivation, or environmental factors alone, but rather reflect a significant discrepancy between an individual's cognitive abilities and their academic achievement. They can significantly impact a person's ability to perform in school, at work, and in daily life, making it important to diagnose and manage these disorders effectively.

Social support in a medical context refers to the resources and assistance provided by an individual's social network, including family, friends, peers, and community groups. These resources can include emotional, informational, and instrumental support, which help individuals cope with stress, manage health conditions, and maintain their overall well-being.

Emotional support involves providing empathy, care, and encouragement to help an individual feel valued, understood, and cared for. Informational support refers to the provision of advice, guidance, and knowledge that can help an individual make informed decisions about their health or other aspects of their life. Instrumental support includes practical assistance such as help with daily tasks, financial aid, or access to resources.

Social support has been shown to have a positive impact on physical and mental health outcomes, including reduced stress levels, improved immune function, better coping skills, and increased resilience. It can also play a critical role in promoting healthy behaviors, such as adherence to medical treatments and lifestyle changes.

A diet, in medical terms, refers to the planned and regular consumption of food and drinks. It is a balanced selection of nutrient-rich foods that an individual eats on a daily or periodic basis to meet their energy needs and maintain good health. A well-balanced diet typically includes a variety of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean proteins, and low-fat dairy products.

A diet may also be prescribed for therapeutic purposes, such as in the management of certain medical conditions like diabetes, hypertension, or obesity. In these cases, a healthcare professional may recommend specific restrictions or modifications to an individual's regular diet to help manage their condition and improve their overall health.

It is important to note that a healthy and balanced diet should be tailored to an individual's age, gender, body size, activity level, and any underlying medical conditions. Consulting with a healthcare professional, such as a registered dietitian or nutritionist, can help ensure that an individual's dietary needs are being met in a safe and effective way.

"Health Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices" (HKAP) is a term used in public health to refer to the knowledge, beliefs, assumptions, and behaviors that individuals possess or engage in that are related to health. Here's a brief definition of each component:

1. Health Knowledge: Refers to the factual information and understanding that individuals have about various health-related topics, such as anatomy, physiology, disease processes, and healthy behaviors.
2. Attitudes: Represent the positive or negative evaluations, feelings, or dispositions that people hold towards certain health issues, practices, or services. These attitudes can influence their willingness to adopt and maintain healthy behaviors.
3. Practices: Encompass the specific actions or habits that individuals engage in related to their health, such as dietary choices, exercise routines, hygiene practices, and use of healthcare services.

HKAP is a multidimensional concept that helps public health professionals understand and address various factors influencing individual and community health outcomes. By assessing and addressing knowledge gaps, negative attitudes, or unhealthy practices, interventions can be designed to promote positive behavior change and improve overall health status.

Movement disorders are a group of neurological conditions that affect the control and coordination of voluntary movements. These disorders can result from damage to or dysfunction of the cerebellum, basal ganglia, or other parts of the brain that regulate movement. Symptoms may include tremors, rigidity, bradykinesia (slowness of movement), akathisia (restlessness and inability to remain still), dystonia (sustained muscle contractions leading to abnormal postures), chorea (rapid, unpredictable movements), tics, and gait disturbances. Examples of movement disorders include Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, Tourette syndrome, and dystonic disorders.

Lymphoproliferative disorders (LPDs) are a group of diseases characterized by the excessive proliferation of lymphoid cells, which are crucial components of the immune system. These disorders can arise from both B-cells and T-cells, leading to various clinical manifestations ranging from benign to malignant conditions.

LPDs can be broadly classified into reactive and neoplastic categories:

1. Reactive Lymphoproliferative Disorders: These are typically triggered by infections, autoimmune diseases, or immunodeficiency states. They involve an exaggerated response of the immune system leading to the excessive proliferation of lymphoid cells. Examples include:
* Infectious mononucleosis (IM) caused by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)
* Lymph node enlargement due to various infections or autoimmune disorders
* Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD), which occurs in the context of immunosuppression following organ transplantation
2. Neoplastic Lymphoproliferative Disorders: These are malignant conditions characterized by uncontrolled growth and accumulation of abnormal lymphoid cells, leading to the formation of tumors. They can be further classified into Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Examples include:
* Hodgkin lymphoma (HL): Classical HL and nodular lymphocyte-predominant HL
* Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL): Various subtypes, such as diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, follicular lymphoma, mantle cell lymphoma, and Burkitt lymphoma

It is important to note that the distinction between reactive and neoplastic LPDs can sometimes be challenging, requiring careful clinical, histopathological, immunophenotypic, and molecular evaluations. Proper diagnosis and classification of LPDs are crucial for determining appropriate treatment strategies and predicting patient outcomes.

Growth disorders are medical conditions that affect a person's growth and development, leading to shorter or taller stature than expected for their age, sex, and ethnic group. These disorders can be caused by various factors, including genetic abnormalities, hormonal imbalances, chronic illnesses, malnutrition, and psychosocial issues.

There are two main types of growth disorders:

1. Short stature: This refers to a height that is significantly below average for a person's age, sex, and ethnic group. Short stature can be caused by various factors, including genetic conditions such as Turner syndrome or dwarfism, hormonal deficiencies, chronic illnesses, malnutrition, and psychosocial issues.
2. Tall stature: This refers to a height that is significantly above average for a person's age, sex, and ethnic group. Tall stature can be caused by various factors, including genetic conditions such as Marfan syndrome or Klinefelter syndrome, hormonal imbalances, and certain medical conditions like acromegaly.

Growth disorders can have significant impacts on a person's physical, emotional, and social well-being. Therefore, it is essential to diagnose and manage these conditions early to optimize growth and development and improve overall quality of life. Treatment options for growth disorders may include medication, nutrition therapy, surgery, or a combination of these approaches.

According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5), alcohol-related disorders are a category of mental disorders defined by a problematic pattern of alcohol use that leads to clinically significant impairment or distress. The disorders include:

1. Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD): A chronic relapsing brain disorder characterized by an impaired ability to stop or control alcohol use despite adverse social, occupational, or health consequences. AUD can be mild, moderate, or severe, and recovery is possible regardless of severity. The symptoms include problems controlling intake of alcohol, continued use despite problems resulting from drinking, development of a tolerance, drinking that leads to risky situations, or withdrawal symptoms when not drinking.
2. Alcohol Intoxication: A state of acute impairment in mental and motor function caused by the recent consumption of alcohol. The symptoms include slurred speech, unsteady gait, nystagmus, impaired attention or memory, stupor, or coma. In severe cases, it can lead to respiratory depression, hypothermia, or even death.
3. Alcohol Withdrawal: A syndrome that occurs when alcohol use is heavily reduced or stopped after prolonged and heavy use. The symptoms include autonomic hyperactivity, increased hand tremor, insomnia, nausea or vomiting, transient visual, tactile, or auditory hallucinations or illusions, psychomotor agitation, anxiety, and grand mal seizures.
4. Other Alcohol-Induced Disorders: These include alcohol-induced sleep disorder, alcohol-induced sexual dysfunction, and alcohol-induced major neurocognitive disorder.

It is important to note that alcohol use disorders are complex conditions that can be influenced by a variety of factors, including genetics, environment, and personal behavior. If you or someone you know is struggling with alcohol use, it is recommended to seek professional help.

The brain is the central organ of the nervous system, responsible for receiving and processing sensory information, regulating vital functions, and controlling behavior, movement, and cognition. It is divided into several distinct regions, each with specific functions:

1. Cerebrum: The largest part of the brain, responsible for higher cognitive functions such as thinking, learning, memory, language, and perception. It is divided into two hemispheres, each controlling the opposite side of the body.
2. Cerebellum: Located at the back of the brain, it is responsible for coordinating muscle movements, maintaining balance, and fine-tuning motor skills.
3. Brainstem: Connects the cerebrum and cerebellum to the spinal cord, controlling vital functions such as breathing, heart rate, and blood pressure. It also serves as a relay center for sensory information and motor commands between the brain and the rest of the body.
4. Diencephalon: A region that includes the thalamus (a major sensory relay station) and hypothalamus (regulates hormones, temperature, hunger, thirst, and sleep).
5. Limbic system: A group of structures involved in emotional processing, memory formation, and motivation, including the hippocampus, amygdala, and cingulate gyrus.

The brain is composed of billions of interconnected neurons that communicate through electrical and chemical signals. It is protected by the skull and surrounded by three layers of membranes called meninges, as well as cerebrospinal fluid that provides cushioning and nutrients.

Child custody is a legal term used in family law to describe the legal and practical relationship between a parent and his/her child such as the right of the parent to make decisions for the child's welfare and/or the right and duty to physically care for the child. In cases of divorce or separation, child custody arrangements can be made either through an agreement between the parents or by court order.

There are two main types of child custody: legal custody and physical custody. Legal custody refers to the parent's right to make important decisions about the child's upbringing, such as education, healthcare, and religious training. Physical custody refers to where the child will live and which parent will be responsible for the child's daily care.

Custody may be awarded to one parent exclusively (sole custody) or shared by both parents (joint custody). In some cases, grandparents or other relatives may also seek custody of a child. The primary consideration in any child custody case is the best interests of the child.

A psychological interview is a clinical assessment tool used by mental health professionals to gather information about a person's cognitive, emotional, and behavioral status. It is a structured or unstructured conversation between the clinician and the client aimed at understanding the client's symptoms, concerns, personal history, current life situation, and any other relevant factors that contribute to their psychological state.

The interview may cover various topics such as the individual's mental health history, family background, social relationships, education, occupation, coping mechanisms, and substance use. The clinician will also assess the person's cognitive abilities, emotional expression, thought processes, and behavior during the interview to help form a diagnosis or treatment plan.

The psychological interview is an essential component of a comprehensive mental health evaluation, as it provides valuable insights into the individual's subjective experiences and helps establish a therapeutic relationship between the clinician and the client. It can be conducted in various settings, including hospitals, clinics, private practices, or community centers.

In the medical context, communication refers to the process of exchanging information, ideas, or feelings between two or more individuals in order to facilitate understanding, cooperation, and decision-making. Effective communication is critical in healthcare settings to ensure that patients receive accurate diagnoses, treatment plans, and follow-up care. It involves not only verbal and written communication but also nonverbal cues such as body language and facial expressions.

Healthcare providers must communicate clearly and empathetically with their patients to build trust, address concerns, and ensure that they understand their medical condition and treatment options. Similarly, healthcare teams must communicate effectively with each other to coordinate care, avoid errors, and provide the best possible outcomes for their patients. Communication skills are essential for all healthcare professionals, including physicians, nurses, therapists, and social workers.

Asthma is a chronic respiratory disease characterized by inflammation and narrowing of the airways, leading to symptoms such as wheezing, coughing, shortness of breath, and chest tightness. The airway obstruction in asthma is usually reversible, either spontaneously or with treatment.

The underlying cause of asthma involves a combination of genetic and environmental factors that result in hypersensitivity of the airways to certain triggers, such as allergens, irritants, viruses, exercise, and emotional stress. When these triggers are encountered, the airways constrict due to smooth muscle spasm, swell due to inflammation, and produce excess mucus, leading to the characteristic symptoms of asthma.

Asthma is typically managed with a combination of medications that include bronchodilators to relax the airway muscles, corticosteroids to reduce inflammation, and leukotriene modifiers or mast cell stabilizers to prevent allergic reactions. Avoiding triggers and monitoring symptoms are also important components of asthma management.

There are several types of asthma, including allergic asthma, non-allergic asthma, exercise-induced asthma, occupational asthma, and nocturnal asthma, each with its own set of triggers and treatment approaches. Proper diagnosis and management of asthma can help prevent exacerbations, improve quality of life, and reduce the risk of long-term complications.

Combat disorders are a category of mental health conditions that can occur in military personnel as a result of their experiences during combat. These disorders can include post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), acute stress disorder, and adjustment disorders, among others. Combat disorders may be caused by exposure to traumatic events, such as experiencing or witnessing combat, the threat of death or serious injury, or the loss of fellow soldiers. Symptoms can include flashbacks, nightmares, avoidance of reminders of the trauma, difficulty sleeping, irritability, and feelings of detachment or numbness. Treatment for combat disorders typically involves a combination of medication and therapy.

Impulse Control Disorders (ICDs) are a group of psychiatric conditions characterized by the failure to resist an impulse, drive, or temptation to perform an act that is harmful to oneself or others. This leads to negative consequences such as distress, anxiety, or disruption in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning.

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th Edition (DSM-5) recognizes several specific ICDs, including:

1. Kleptomania - the recurrent failure to resist impulses to steal items, even though they are not needed for personal use or financial gain.
2. Pyromania - the deliberate and purposeful fire-setting on more than one occasion.
3. Intermittent Explosive Disorder - recurrent behavioral outbursts representing a failure to control aggressive impulses, resulting in serious assaultive acts or destruction of property.
4. Pathological Gambling - persistent and recurrent maladaptive gambling behavior that disrupts personal, family, or vocational pursuits.
5. Internet Gaming Disorder - the excessive and prolonged use of the internet for gaming, which leads to clinically significant impairment or distress.

These disorders are typically associated with a range of emotional, cognitive, and behavioral symptoms that can vary depending on the specific disorder and individual presentation. Treatment often involves a combination of psychotherapy, medication, and self-help strategies to manage symptoms and improve overall functioning.

Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) is a statistical technique used to compare the means of two or more groups and determine whether there are any significant differences between them. It is a way to analyze the variance in a dataset to determine whether the variability between groups is greater than the variability within groups, which can indicate that the groups are significantly different from one another.

ANOVA is based on the concept of partitioning the total variance in a dataset into two components: variance due to differences between group means (also known as "between-group variance") and variance due to differences within each group (also known as "within-group variance"). By comparing these two sources of variance, ANOVA can help researchers determine whether any observed differences between groups are statistically significant, or whether they could have occurred by chance.

ANOVA is a widely used technique in many areas of research, including biology, psychology, engineering, and business. It is often used to compare the means of two or more experimental groups, such as a treatment group and a control group, to determine whether the treatment had a significant effect. ANOVA can also be used to compare the means of different populations or subgroups within a population, to identify any differences that may exist between them.

A premature infant is a baby born before 37 weeks of gestation. They may face various health challenges because their organs are not fully developed. The earlier a baby is born, the higher the risk of complications. Prematurity can lead to short-term and long-term health issues, such as respiratory distress syndrome, jaundice, anemia, infections, hearing problems, vision problems, developmental delays, and cerebral palsy. Intensive medical care and support are often necessary for premature infants to ensure their survival and optimal growth and development.

Language disorders, also known as communication disorders, refer to a group of conditions that affect an individual's ability to understand or produce spoken, written, or other symbolic language. These disorders can be receptive (difficulty understanding language), expressive (difficulty producing language), or mixed (a combination of both).

Language disorders can manifest as difficulties with grammar, vocabulary, sentence structure, and coherence in communication. They can also affect social communication skills such as taking turns in conversation, understanding nonverbal cues, and interpreting tone of voice.

Language disorders can be developmental, meaning they are present from birth or early childhood, or acquired, meaning they develop later in life due to injury, illness, or trauma. Examples of acquired language disorders include aphasia, which can result from stroke or brain injury, and dysarthria, which can result from neurological conditions affecting speech muscles.

Language disorders can have significant impacts on an individual's academic, social, and vocational functioning, making it important to diagnose and treat them as early as possible. Treatment typically involves speech-language therapy to help individuals develop and improve their language skills.

Schizophrenia is a severe mental disorder characterized by disturbances in thought, perception, emotion, and behavior. It often includes hallucinations (usually hearing voices), delusions, paranoia, and disorganized speech and behavior. The onset of symptoms typically occurs in late adolescence or early adulthood. Schizophrenia is a complex, chronic condition that requires ongoing treatment and management. It significantly impairs social and occupational functioning, and it's often associated with reduced life expectancy due to comorbid medical conditions. The exact causes of schizophrenia are not fully understood, but research suggests that genetic, environmental, and neurodevelopmental factors play a role in its development.

In epidemiology, the incidence of a disease is defined as the number of new cases of that disease within a specific population over a certain period of time. It is typically expressed as a rate, with the number of new cases in the numerator and the size of the population at risk in the denominator. Incidence provides information about the risk of developing a disease during a given time period and can be used to compare disease rates between different populations or to monitor trends in disease occurrence over time.

Medical Definition:

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive diagnostic imaging technique that uses a strong magnetic field and radio waves to create detailed cross-sectional or three-dimensional images of the internal structures of the body. The patient lies within a large, cylindrical magnet, and the scanner detects changes in the direction of the magnetic field caused by protons in the body. These changes are then converted into detailed images that help medical professionals to diagnose and monitor various medical conditions, such as tumors, injuries, or diseases affecting the brain, spinal cord, heart, blood vessels, joints, and other internal organs. MRI does not use radiation like computed tomography (CT) scans.

Motor skills disorders are conditions that affect a person's ability to perform coordinated movements. These movements can be simple, such as buttoning a shirt, or complex, such as playing a musical instrument. Motor skills disorders can make it difficult for a person to perform everyday activities and can impact their quality of life.

There are two main types of motor skills: fine motor skills and gross motor skills. Fine motor skills involve the small movements of the hands, fingers, and wrists, such as writing or using utensils. Gross motor skills involve larger movements of the arms, legs, and torso, such as crawling, walking, or running.

Motor skills disorders can affect either fine or gross motor skills, or both. Some common types of motor skills disorders include:

* Developmental coordination disorder (DCD): a condition that affects a child's ability to perform coordinated movements and is often diagnosed in early childhood. Children with DCD may have difficulty with tasks such as tying their shoes, buttoning their clothes, or using scissors.
* Cerebral palsy: a group of disorders that affect movement and muscle tone, caused by damage to the brain before, during, or after birth. Cerebral palsy can cause stiff or floppy muscles, uncontrolled movements, and difficulty with balance and coordination.
* Dyspraxia: a condition that affects a person's ability to plan and perform coordinated movements. People with dyspraxia may have difficulty with tasks such as writing, buttoning their clothes, or playing sports.
* Ataxia: a group of disorders that affect coordination and balance, caused by damage to the cerebellum (the part of the brain that controls movement). Ataxia can cause unsteady gait, poor coordination, and difficulty with fine motor tasks.

Motor skills disorders can be caused by a variety of factors, including genetics, injury, illness, or developmental delays. Treatment for motor skills disorders may include physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy, and medication. In some cases, surgery may also be necessary to treat the underlying cause of the disorder.

Health surveys are research studies that collect data from a sample population to describe the current health status, health behaviors, and healthcare utilization of a particular group or community. These surveys may include questions about various aspects of health such as physical health, mental health, chronic conditions, lifestyle habits, access to healthcare services, and demographic information. The data collected from health surveys can be used to monitor trends in health over time, identify disparities in health outcomes, develop and evaluate public health programs and policies, and inform resource allocation decisions. Examples of national health surveys include the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) and the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS).

Nervous system diseases, also known as neurological disorders, refer to a group of conditions that affect the nervous system, which includes the brain, spinal cord, nerves, and muscles. These diseases can affect various functions of the body, such as movement, sensation, cognition, and behavior. They can be caused by genetics, infections, injuries, degeneration, or tumors. Examples of nervous system diseases include Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, migraine, stroke, and neuroinfections like meningitis and encephalitis. The symptoms and severity of these disorders can vary widely, ranging from mild to severe and debilitating.

A syndrome, in medical terms, is a set of symptoms that collectively indicate or characterize a disease, disorder, or underlying pathological process. It's essentially a collection of signs and/or symptoms that frequently occur together and can suggest a particular cause or condition, even though the exact physiological mechanisms might not be fully understood.

For example, Down syndrome is characterized by specific physical features, cognitive delays, and other developmental issues resulting from an extra copy of chromosome 21. Similarly, metabolic syndromes like diabetes mellitus type 2 involve a group of risk factors such as obesity, high blood pressure, high blood sugar, and abnormal cholesterol or triglyceride levels that collectively increase the risk of heart disease, stroke, and diabetes.

It's important to note that a syndrome is not a specific diagnosis; rather, it's a pattern of symptoms that can help guide further diagnostic evaluation and management.

Psychometrics is a branch of psychology that deals with the theory and technique of psychological measurement, such as the development and standardization of tests used to measure intelligence, aptitude, personality, attitudes, and other mental abilities or traits. It involves the construction and validation of measurement instruments, including the determination of their reliability and validity, and the application of statistical methods to analyze test data and interpret results. The ultimate goal of psychometrics is to provide accurate, objective, and meaningful measurements that can be used to understand individual differences and make informed decisions in educational, clinical, and organizational settings.

Dysthymic disorder, also known as persistent depressive disorder, is a chronic type of depression where a person's moods are regularly low. It is characterized by depressed mood that occurs for most of the day, for at least two years, and is accompanied by at least two other symptoms such as appetite or sleep changes, low energy, low self-esteem, difficulty making decisions, or feelings of hopelessness.

To meet the diagnostic criteria, the symptoms cannot be explained by substance abuse or a medical condition, and they must cause significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning. Dysthymic disorder typically has a chronic course, but it may respond to treatment, including psychotherapy and medication.

Dissociative disorders are a group of mental health conditions characterized by disruptions or dysfunctions in memory, consciousness, identity, or perception. These disturbances can be sudden or ongoing and can interfere significantly with a person's ability to function in daily life. The main types of dissociative disorders include:

1. Dissociative Amnesia: This disorder is characterized by an inability to recall important personal information, usually due to trauma or stress.
2. Dissociative Identity Disorder (formerly known as Multiple Personality Disorder): In this disorder, a person exhibits two or more distinct identities or personalities that recurrently take control of their behavior.
3. Depersonalization/Derealization Disorder: This disorder involves persistent or recurring feelings of detachment from one's self (depersonalization) or the environment (derealization).
4. Other Specified Dissociative Disorder and Unspecified Dissociative Disorder: These categories are used for disorders that do not meet the criteria for any of the specific dissociative disorders but still cause significant distress or impairment.

Dissociative disorders often develop as a way to cope with trauma, stress, or other overwhelming life experiences. Treatment typically involves psychotherapy, including cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and dialectical behavior therapy (DBT), as well as medication for co-occurring conditions such as anxiety or depression.

Antisocial Personality Disorder (ASPD) is a mental health condition characterized by a pervasive pattern of disregard for the rights of others, lack of empathy, and manipulative behaviors. It is defined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5), as follows:

A. A consistent pattern of behavior that violates the basic rights of others and major age-appropriate societal norms and rules, as indicated by the presence of at least three of the following:

1. Failure to conform to social norms and laws, indicated by repeatedly performing acts that are grounds for arrest.
2. Deceitfulness, as indicated by repeated lying, use of aliases, or conning others for personal profit or pleasure.
3. Impulsivity or failure to plan ahead; indication of this symptom may include promiscuity.
4. Irritability and aggressiveness, as indicated by repeated physical fights or assaults.
5. Reckless disregard for safety of self or others.
6. Consistent irresponsibility, as indicated by repeated failure to sustain consistent work behavior or honor financial obligations.
7. Lack of remorse, as indicated by being indifferent to or rationalizing having hurt, mistreated, or stolen from another.

B. The individual is at least 18 years of age.

C. There is evidence of conduct disorder with onset before the age of 15 years.

D. The occurrence of antisocial behavior is not exclusively during the course of schizophrenia or bipolar disorder.

E. The individual's criminal behavior has not been better explained by a conduct disorder diagnosis or antisocial behavior that began before the age of 15 years.

It's important to note that ASPD can be challenging to diagnose, and it often requires a comprehensive evaluation from a mental health professional with experience in personality disorders.

"Family Health" is not a term that has a single, widely accepted medical definition. However, in the context of healthcare and public health, "family health" often refers to the physical, mental, and social well-being of all members of a family unit. It includes the assessment, promotion, and prevention of health conditions that affect individual family members as well as the family as a whole.

Family health may also encompass interventions and programs that aim to strengthen family relationships, communication, and functioning, as these factors can have a significant impact on overall health outcomes. Additionally, family health may involve addressing social determinants of health, such as poverty, housing, and access to healthcare, which can affect the health of families and communities.

Overall, family health is a holistic approach to healthcare that recognizes the importance of considering the needs and experiences of all family members in promoting and maintaining good health.

The "age of onset" is a medical term that refers to the age at which an individual first develops or displays symptoms of a particular disease, disorder, or condition. It can be used to describe various medical conditions, including both physical and mental health disorders. The age of onset can have implications for prognosis, treatment approaches, and potential causes of the condition. In some cases, early onset may indicate a more severe or progressive course of the disease, while late-onset symptoms might be associated with different underlying factors or etiologies. It is essential to provide accurate and precise information regarding the age of onset when discussing a patient's medical history and treatment plan.

A pediatric hospital is a specialized medical facility that provides comprehensive healthcare services for infants, children, adolescents, and young adults up to the age of 21. These hospitals employ medical professionals with expertise in treating various childhood illnesses, injuries, and developmental disorders. The facilities are designed to cater to the unique needs of children, including child-friendly environments, specialized equipment, and age-appropriate care.

Pediatric hospitals offer a wide range of services such as inpatient and outpatient care, emergency services, surgical procedures, diagnostic testing, rehabilitation, and mental health services. They also focus on preventive healthcare, family-centered care, and education to support the overall well-being of their young patients. Some pediatric hospitals may specialize further, focusing on specific areas such as cancer treatment, cardiology, neurology, or orthopedics.

Binge-Eating Disorder (BED) is a type of eating disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of consuming large amounts of food in a short period of time, often to the point of discomfort or pain. These episodes are accompanied by a loss of control over eating and are not followed by compensatory behaviors such as purging or excessive exercise.

To be diagnosed with BED, an individual must experience these binge-eating episodes at least once a week for three months or more, along with feelings of distress, shame, or guilt about their eating habits. Additionally, the binge eating must occur on average at least once a week for three months.

BED is different from overeating and can cause significant emotional and physical problems, including depression, anxiety, obesity, and other health issues related to weight gain. It is important to seek professional help if you suspect that you or someone you know may have BED.

An abandoned child is a child who has been abandoned or deserted by their parent or caregiver and lacks proper care and supervision. This can occur in various situations, such as when a parent leaves a newborn at a hospital or fire station without providing any identifying information, or when a parent or caregiver fails to return for a child after leaving them in the care of another person.

Abandoned children may face significant risks to their physical and emotional well-being, including neglect, abuse, and trauma. They may also experience developmental delays, behavioral problems, and other negative outcomes as a result of their experiences. In many cases, abandoned children become wards of the state and are placed in foster care or other temporary living arrangements until a permanent home can be found for them.

It is important to note that each jurisdiction has its own legal definition of child abandonment, which may vary depending on factors such as the age of the child, the length of time they have been abandoned, and the specific circumstances surrounding their situation. If you suspect that a child has been abandoned, it is important to contact local child welfare authorities or law enforcement agencies immediately to ensure their safety and well-being.

Temporomandibular Joint Disorders (TMD) refer to a group of conditions that cause pain and dysfunction in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and the muscles that control jaw movement. The TMJ is the hinge joint that connects the lower jaw (mandible) to the skull (temporal bone) in front of the ear. It allows for movements required for activities such as eating, speaking, and yawning.

TMD can result from various causes, including:

1. Muscle tension or spasm due to clenching or grinding teeth (bruxism), stress, or jaw misalignment
2. Dislocation or injury of the TMJ disc, which is a small piece of cartilage that acts as a cushion between the bones in the joint
3. Arthritis or other degenerative conditions affecting the TMJ
4. Bite problems (malocclusion) leading to abnormal stress on the TMJ and its surrounding muscles
5. Stress, which can exacerbate existing TMD symptoms by causing muscle tension

Symptoms of Temporomandibular Joint Disorders may include:
- Pain or tenderness in the jaw, face, neck, or shoulders
- Limited jaw movement or locking of the jaw
- Clicking, popping, or grating sounds when moving the jaw
- Headaches, earaches, or dizziness
- Difficulty chewing or biting
- Swelling on the side of the face

Treatment for TMD varies depending on the severity and cause of the condition. It may include self-care measures (like eating soft foods, avoiding extreme jaw movements, and applying heat or cold packs), physical therapy, medications (such as muscle relaxants, pain relievers, or anti-inflammatory drugs), dental work (including bite adjustments or orthodontic treatment), or even surgery in severe cases.

Myeloproliferative disorders (MPDs) are a group of rare, chronic blood cancers that originate from the abnormal proliferation or growth of one or more types of blood-forming cells in the bone marrow. These disorders result in an overproduction of mature but dysfunctional blood cells, which can lead to serious complications such as blood clots, bleeding, and organ damage.

There are several subtypes of MPDs, including:

1. Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML): A disorder characterized by the overproduction of mature granulocytes (a type of white blood cell) in the bone marrow, leading to an increased number of these cells in the blood. CML is caused by a genetic mutation that results in the formation of the BCR-ABL fusion protein, which drives uncontrolled cell growth and division.
2. Polycythemia Vera (PV): A disorder characterized by the overproduction of all three types of blood cells - red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets - in the bone marrow. This can lead to an increased risk of blood clots, bleeding, and enlargement of the spleen.
3. Essential Thrombocythemia (ET): A disorder characterized by the overproduction of platelets in the bone marrow, leading to an increased risk of blood clots and bleeding.
4. Primary Myelofibrosis (PMF): A disorder characterized by the replacement of normal bone marrow tissue with scar tissue, leading to impaired blood cell production and anemia, enlargement of the spleen, and increased risk of infections and bleeding.
5. Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia (CNL): A rare disorder characterized by the overproduction of neutrophils (a type of white blood cell) in the bone marrow, leading to an increased number of these cells in the blood. CNL can lead to an increased risk of infections and organ damage.

MPDs are typically treated with a combination of therapies, including chemotherapy, targeted therapy, immunotherapy, and stem cell transplantation. The choice of treatment depends on several factors, including the subtype of MPD, the patient's age and overall health, and the presence of any comorbidities.

Obesity is a complex disease characterized by an excess accumulation of body fat to the extent that it negatively impacts health. It's typically defined using Body Mass Index (BMI), a measure calculated from a person's weight and height. A BMI of 30 or higher is indicative of obesity. However, it's important to note that while BMI can be a useful tool for identifying obesity in populations, it does not directly measure body fat and may not accurately reflect health status in individuals. Other factors such as waist circumference, blood pressure, cholesterol levels, and blood sugar levels should also be considered when assessing health risks associated with weight.

Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD) is a term used to describe a range of effects that can occur in an individual whose mother drank alcohol during pregnancy. These effects may include physical, mental, and behavioral abnormalities, and can vary in severity and combination from one individual to another.

The four diagnostic categories within FASD are:

1. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS): This is the most severe form of FASD and is characterized by a specific pattern of facial features, growth deficiencies, and central nervous system dysfunction.
2. Partial Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (pFAS): This category includes individuals who have some, but not all, of the features of FAS.
3. Alcohol-Related Neurodevelopmental Disorder (ARND): This category includes individuals who have functional or cognitive impairments due to prenatal alcohol exposure, but do not meet the criteria for FAS or pFAS.
4. Alcohol-Related Birth Defects (ARBD): This category includes individuals who have physical birth defects due to prenatal alcohol exposure.

It is important to note that FASD is a completely preventable condition, and there is no known safe amount or safe time to drink alcohol during pregnancy.

I must clarify that the term "pedigree" is not typically used in medical definitions. Instead, it is often employed in genetics and breeding, where it refers to the recorded ancestry of an individual or a family, tracing the inheritance of specific traits or diseases. In human genetics, a pedigree can help illustrate the pattern of genetic inheritance in families over multiple generations. However, it is not a medical term with a specific clinical definition.

A phenotype is the physical or biochemical expression of an organism's genes, or the observable traits and characteristics resulting from the interaction of its genetic constitution (genotype) with environmental factors. These characteristics can include appearance, development, behavior, and resistance to disease, among others. Phenotypes can vary widely, even among individuals with identical genotypes, due to differences in environmental influences, gene expression, and genetic interactions.

Reference values, also known as reference ranges or reference intervals, are the set of values that are considered normal or typical for a particular population or group of people. These values are often used in laboratory tests to help interpret test results and determine whether a patient's value falls within the expected range.

The process of establishing reference values typically involves measuring a particular biomarker or parameter in a large, healthy population and then calculating the mean and standard deviation of the measurements. Based on these statistics, a range is established that includes a certain percentage of the population (often 95%) and excludes extreme outliers.

It's important to note that reference values can vary depending on factors such as age, sex, race, and other demographic characteristics. Therefore, it's essential to use reference values that are specific to the relevant population when interpreting laboratory test results. Additionally, reference values may change over time due to advances in measurement technology or changes in the population being studied.

Intellectual disability (ID) is a term used when there are significant limitations in both intellectual functioning and adaptive behavior, which covers many everyday social and practical skills. This disability originates before the age of 18.

Intellectual functioning, also known as intelligence, refers to general mental capacity, such as learning, reasoning, problem-solving, and other cognitive skills. Adaptive behavior includes skills needed for day-to-day life, such as communication, self-care, social skills, safety judgement, and basic academic skills.

Intellectual disability is characterized by below-average intelligence or mental ability and a lack of skills necessary for day-to-day living. It can be mild, moderate, severe, or profound, depending on the degree of limitation in intellectual functioning and adaptive behavior.

It's important to note that people with intellectual disabilities have unique strengths and limitations, just like everyone else. With appropriate support and education, they can lead fulfilling lives and contribute to their communities in many ways.

"Age distribution" is a term used to describe the number of individuals within a population or sample that fall into different age categories. It is often presented in the form of a graph, table, or chart, and can provide important information about the demographic structure of a population.

The age distribution of a population can be influenced by a variety of factors, including birth rates, mortality rates, migration patterns, and aging. Public health officials and researchers use age distribution data to inform policies and programs related to healthcare, social services, and other areas that affect the well-being of populations.

For example, an age distribution graph might show a larger number of individuals in the younger age categories, indicating a population with a high birth rate. Alternatively, it might show a larger number of individuals in the older age categories, indicating a population with a high life expectancy or an aging population. Understanding the age distribution of a population can help policymakers plan for future needs and allocate resources more effectively.

A chronic disease is a long-term medical condition that often progresses slowly over a period of years and requires ongoing management and care. These diseases are typically not fully curable, but symptoms can be managed to improve quality of life. Common chronic diseases include heart disease, stroke, cancer, diabetes, arthritis, and COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). They are often associated with advanced age, although they can also affect children and younger adults. Chronic diseases can have significant impacts on individuals' physical, emotional, and social well-being, as well as on healthcare systems and society at large.

Psychological adaptation refers to the process by which individuals adjust and cope with stressors, challenges, or changes in their environment or circumstances. It involves modifying thoughts, feelings, behaviors, and copabilities to reduce the negative impact of these stressors and promote well-being. Psychological adaptation can occur at different levels, including intrapersonal (within the individual), interpersonal (between individuals), and cultural (within a group or society).

Examples of psychological adaptation include:

* Cognitive restructuring: changing negative thoughts and beliefs to more positive or adaptive ones
* Emotion regulation: managing and reducing intense or distressing emotions
* Problem-solving: finding solutions to practical challenges or obstacles
* Seeking social support: reaching out to others for help, advice, or comfort
* Developing coping strategies: using effective ways to deal with stressors or difficulties
* Cultivating resilience: bouncing back from adversity and learning from negative experiences.

Psychological adaptation is an important aspect of mental health and well-being, as it helps individuals adapt to new situations, overcome challenges, and maintain a sense of control and optimism in the face of stressors or changes.

A mutation is a permanent change in the DNA sequence of an organism's genome. Mutations can occur spontaneously or be caused by environmental factors such as exposure to radiation, chemicals, or viruses. They may have various effects on the organism, ranging from benign to harmful, depending on where they occur and whether they alter the function of essential proteins. In some cases, mutations can increase an individual's susceptibility to certain diseases or disorders, while in others, they may confer a survival advantage. Mutations are the driving force behind evolution, as they introduce new genetic variability into populations, which can then be acted upon by natural selection.

I apologize, but "Brazil" is not a medical term or condition. It is the largest country in both South America and Latin America by land area and population. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health concerns, please provide more information and I will do my best to help.

Diarrhea is a condition in which an individual experiences loose, watery stools frequently, often exceeding three times a day. It can be acute, lasting for several days, or chronic, persisting for weeks or even months. Diarrhea can result from various factors, including viral, bacterial, or parasitic infections, food intolerances, medications, and underlying medical conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease or irritable bowel syndrome. Dehydration is a potential complication of diarrhea, particularly in severe cases or in vulnerable populations like young children and the elderly.

Child Nutrition Sciences is a field of study focused on the nutritional needs and dietary habits of children from infancy through adolescence. This interdisciplinary field incorporates aspects of nutrition, pediatrics, psychology, sociology, and public health to promote optimal growth, development, and overall health in children.

The scope of Child Nutrition Sciences includes:

1. Understanding the unique nutritional requirements during various stages of childhood, including pregnancy, lactation, infancy, early childhood, school-age, and adolescence.
2. Examining how cultural, socioeconomic, and environmental factors influence children's dietary patterns and food choices.
3. Investigating the role of nutrition in preventing chronic diseases such as obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, which often originate in childhood.
4. Developing and implementing evidence-based interventions to improve children's diets, promote healthy eating behaviors, and reduce health disparities.
5. Assessing the effectiveness of nutrition education programs for children, families, and communities.
6. Collaborating with policymakers, educators, healthcare providers, and community organizations to create supportive environments that encourage healthy eating and physical activity.
7. Conducting research on the safety, efficacy, and quality of food products, supplements, and fortified foods marketed for children.
8. Advocating for policies and regulations that protect children from marketing tactics that promote unhealthy food choices and contribute to poor diet-related health outcomes.

Overall, Child Nutrition Sciences aims to improve the nutritional status of children, enhance their overall well-being, and reduce the burden of diet-related diseases throughout the lifespan.

According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5), neurotic disorders are not a recognized category. However, the term "neurosis" has been used historically in psychiatry and psychology to refer to a group of mental disorders characterized by anxiety, obsessions, depressive moods, phobias, or hypochondriacal fears. These symptoms are often considered to be the result of internal conflicts, typically related to stress, frustration, or interpersonal difficulties.

The DSM-5 has replaced the category of neurotic disorders with several specific mental disorders that were previously classified under this heading. These include:

1. Anxiety Disorders (e.g., panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder)
2. Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders (e.g., obsessive-compulsive disorder, body dysmorphic disorder, hoarding disorder)
3. Trauma- and Stressor-Related Disorders (e.g., post-traumatic stress disorder, acute stress disorder, adjustment disorders)
4. Mood Disorders (e.g., major depressive disorder, persistent depressive disorder)
5. Somatic Symptom and Related Disorders (e.g., illness anxiety disorder, conversion disorder)

These specific disorders are defined by their own unique diagnostic criteria and should be evaluated based on those guidelines.

According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th Edition (DSM-5), an Adjustment Disorder is a mental health condition that occurs as a reaction to a stressful life event or significant change. It is characterized by emotional or behavioral symptoms that cause distress and interfere with daily functioning, but do not meet the criteria for other more specific mental disorders.

The symptoms of an Adjustment Disorder typically develop within three months of the identified stressor and may include:

* Depressed mood
* Anxiety
* Irritability or anger
* Worrying
* Difficulty sleeping
* Loss of appetite
* Difficulty concentrating
* Physical symptoms, such as headaches or stomachaches

The symptoms must be out of proportion to the severity or intensity of the stressor and may lead to significant impairment in social, occupational, or academic functioning. The diagnosis is not given if the symptoms persist for more than six months after the stressor has ended.

There are several subtypes of Adjustment Disorders, including:

* Adjustment Disorder with Depressed Mood
* Adjustment Disorder with Anxiety
* Adjustment Disorder with Mixed Anxiety and Depressed Mood
* Adjustment Disorder with Disturbance of Conduct
* Adjustment Disorder with Emotional or Behavioral Symptoms Not Otherwise Specified

Treatment for Adjustment Disorders typically involves psychotherapy, such as cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) or solution-focused brief therapy, to help individuals develop coping skills and manage their symptoms. In some cases, medication may also be recommended to alleviate symptoms of anxiety or depression.

Conversion disorder is a mental health condition that is characterized by the presence of neurological symptoms, such as blindness, paralysis, or difficulty swallowing, that cannot be explained by a medical condition. These symptoms are thought to be caused by psychological factors, such as stress or trauma, and may be a way for the individual to express emotional distress or avoid certain situations.

The symptoms of conversion disorder are typically dramatic and can interfere significantly with a person's daily life. They may include:

* Loss of or alteration in physical senses (such as blindness, deafness, or loss of touch)
* Weakness or paralysis in a part or all of the body
* Difficulty swallowing or speaking
* Seizures or convulsions
* Inability to move certain parts of the body
* Tremors or shaking
* Loss of consciousness

It is important to note that conversion disorder is not a fake or intentional condition. Rather, it is a genuine medical condition that requires treatment. Treatment typically involves addressing any underlying psychological issues and helping the individual develop more effective ways of coping with stress and emotional distress.

... is under development for the treatment of agitation and pervasive child development disorders. As of May 2021, it ... and bipolar disorder; other uses include as an add-on treatment in major depressive disorder, tic disorders, and irritability ... Yang CS, Huang H, Zhang LL, Zhu CR, Guo Q (July 2015). "Aripiprazole for the treatment of tic disorders in children: a ... 1.1 Care for adults, children and young people across all phases of bipolar disorder Brown R, Taylor MJ, Geddes J (December ...
Pervasive developmental disorders, Neurological disorders in children, Learning disabilities, Autism spectrum disorders). ... A child affected with childhood disintegrative disorder shows normal development. Up until this point, the child has developed ... Many children are already somewhat delayed when the disorder becomes apparent, but these delays are not always obvious in young ... Many children are already somewhat delayed when the disorder becomes apparent, but these delays are not always obvious in young ...
Some of these effects include delayed mental development, Pervasive developmental disorder (PDD), morphological abnormalities ... Prenatal exposure has been linked to impaired fetal growth and development. The effects of OP exposure on infants and children ... "Children's Vaccine Song". Archived from the original on 2017-03-25. Retrieved 2017-03-24. Jaga, K. & Dharmani, C. Ocular ... "Children Are at Greater Risks from Pesticide Exposure". United States Environmental Protection Agency. January 2002. Archived ...
One way to identify pervasive developmental disorders is if infants fail to meet the development milestones in time or at all. ... Child development stages are the theoretical milestones of child development, some of which are asserted in nativist theories. ... Many children reach some or most of these milestones at different times from the norm. Holistic development sees the child in ... "Child Development Ages & Stages". Child Care Resource Center. Retrieved 5 August 2019. Doherty, J. and Hughes, M. (2009). ...
They had often been labelled as atypical autism or Pervasive Development Disorder-Not Otherwise Specified (PDD-NOS). Both of ... Newson first investigated PDA as a specific syndrome in the 1980s when certain children referred to the Child Development ... About 40% of autistic people suffer from an anxiety disorder. Children with PDA feel threatened when they are not in control of ... Consequently, an additional diagnosis of generalised anxiety disorder or another anxiety disorder may be made instead of PDA. ...
Child-parent psychotherapy has been demonstrated to reduce symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder in children with ... Developmental disabilities can be initially suspected when a child does not reach expected child development stages. ... formerly called Pervasive developmental disorders) that cause difficulties in communications. Autistic spectrum disorders ... Child-parent psychotherapy Child-parent psychotherapy is a relational treatment that focuses on improving child-parent ...
Oswald DP, Sonenklar NA (June 2007). "Medication use among children with autism spectrum disorders". Journal of Child and ... "What are the treatments for autism? , NICHD - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development ... "What is Autism, Asperger Syndrome, and Pervasive Developmental Disorders?". US Autism and Asperger Association. Archived from ... Ji N, Findling RL (March 2015). "An update on pharmacotherapy for autism spectrum disorder in children and adolescents". ...
Delayed Development and Resilience". Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development. 76 (4): 8-30. doi:10.1111/j. ... Some neurodevelopmental disorders, such as autism and other pervasive developmental disorders, are considered multifactorial ... and speech sound disorder. Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) Intellectual disabilities (IDs) or intellectual development disorder ... Neurodevelopmental disorders are a group of neurological disorders that affect the development of the nervous system, leading ...
Pervasive developmental disorders, Special education, Neurological disorders in children, Neurodevelopmental disorders, ... Information for parents on early childhood development and developmental disabilities NINFS Pervasive Developmental Disorders ... The pervasive developmental disorders were: Pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS), which includes ... The pervasive developmental disorders included autism, Asperger syndrome, pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise ...
Autism is recognized as one of the five pervasive developmental disorders, distinguished by problems with language, speech, ... the NICHD Study of Early Child Care. National Institute of Child Health and Human Development". Child Development. 73 (4): 1052 ... "Child development". U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 15 February 2022. "child development activities for ... Psychology portal Biology portal Attachment theory Birth order Child development stages Child life specialist Child prodigy ...
Lifeline serves seriously disturbed children with disabilities including Pervasive Developmental Disorder, Asperger's Syndrome ... The Lifeline Center for Child Development in Queens, NY, is a non-profit State Office of Mental Health (SOMH) licensed ... "Lifeline Center for Child Development". Lifelinecenter.org. Retrieved 2019-06-23. "Facts". Archived from the original on 2010- ... Oppositional Defiant Disorder and severe Adjustment disorder. Lifeline's campus consists of two buildings and a swimming pool ...
A personality development disorder is an inflexible and pervasive pattern of inner experience and behavior in children and ... Personality development disorder is considered to be a childhood risk factor or early stage of a later personality disorder in ... The term personality development disorder is used to emphasize the changes in personality development which might still take ... borderline personality disorder, histrionic personality disorder and narcissistic personality disorder. Cluster C : Disorders ...
Attachment & Human Development Vol 4 No 1 April 2002 107-124. Health Child, Human (1996). "Characteristics of infant child care ... although DIR is primarily directed to treatment of pervasive developmental disorders Some of these approaches, such as that ... Anxiety disorders, Mental disorders diagnosed in childhood, Stress-related disorders, Human development, Adoption, fostering, ... "Attachment Disorders & Reactive Attachment Disorder: Symptoms, Treatment & Hope for Children with Insecure Attachment". ...
HIV/AIDS and maternal and child health; and the development and evaluation of interventions for mental disorders integrated in ... seeking to integrate mental health care with more pervasive forms of health care treatments, such as those involving chronic ... He has recently become increasingly involved in researching mental disorders and developmental disabilities in children, ... an Indian NGO dedicated to research in the areas of child development, adolescent health and mental health. Since 2016 he has ...
Communication disorders, Disorders causing seizures, Learning disabilities, Neurological disorders in children, Pervasive ... Rett syndrome diagnosis involves close observation of the child's growth and development to observe any abnormalities in ... "Is Rett syndrome a subtype of pervasive developmental disorders?" (PDF). Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders. 22 (4 ... Prior to the discovery of a genetic cause, Rett syndrome had been designated as a pervasive developmental disorder by the ...
... into account how the developmental stages of children may affect their symptoms and how trauma can affect a child's development ... particularly the pervasive insecure, or disorganized-type attachment. DSM-IV (1994) dissociative disorders and PTSD do not ... Anxiety disorders, Post-traumatic stress disorder, Traumatology, Stress-related disorders). ... This developmental form of trauma places children at risk for developing psychiatric and medical disorders. Bessel van der Kolk ...
Handbook of Autism and Pervasive Developmental Disorders, Diagnosis, Development, Neurobiology, and Behavior (volume 1), ISBN ... the Children's Psychiatric Inpatient Service, the Harris-Provence Child Development Unit, and the Nelson and Irving Harris ... Cohen helped found the International Working Group on Children and War, and the Yale-New Haven Child Development Community ... ISBN 0300114664 The Yale Child Study Center Guide to Understanding Your Child: Healthy Development from Birth to Adolescence, ...
... pervasive child development disorders - MindMed [23] Midomafetamine (MDMA; "Ecstasy") - post-traumatic stress disorders, mood ... depressive disorders, major depressive disorder, somatoform disorders, post-traumatic stress disorders - COMPASS Pathways, ... anxiety disorders, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, cluster headache, major depressive disorder - MAPS, MindMed [2] [3 ... opioid-related disorders, substance-related disorders - MindMed [22] R(-)-Methylenedioxymetamfetamine (MM-402; R(-)-MDMA) - ...
He makes the case for the theory that some children develop unevenly (asynchronous development) for a period in childhood due ... frequently misdiagnosed with autism or pervasive developmental disorder. He includes the research of Stephen Camarata and ... Sowell wrote The Einstein Syndrome: Bright Children Who Talk Late, a follow-up to his Late-Talking Children, discussing a ... He has two children. 1982: the Mencken Award for Best Book, from the Free Press Association, for his Ethnic America: A History ...
... and behavioral feedback necessary for sufficient psychological development. Foster also stated the pervasive physical, sexual ... his trials by failing to place sufficient emphasis upon Bonin's bipolar disorder and the sexual abuse he had endured as a child ... "Kid's going to die. Kid's going to - this kid's going to die." Miley replied, stating, "Why don't you just let the kid go?" ... American murderers of children, American people convicted of child sexual abuse, American people convicted of robbery, American ...
Early development of the therapy in the 1960s involved use of shocks and the withholding of food. By the time children were ... 2011). Therapies for children with autism spectrum disorders (PDF). AHRQ Publication No. 11-EHC029-EF, Comparative ... Bottema-Beutel K, Crowley S (2021). "Pervasive Undisclosed Conflicts of Interest in Applied Behavior Analysis Autism Literature ... The child is reinforced by crawling, standing, taking a few steps, and then eventually walking. When a child is learning to ...
2 and 5 year old and pervasive developmental disorder in 2, 3 and 3+1⁄2 year olds. Endocrine disruptors are molecules that ... FAS disrupts normal development of the fetus, which may cause certain developmental stages to be delayed, skipped, or ... But it is known have developmental effects appear in fetuses and children even at very small doses. It has been shown to cause ... used in a variety of workplaces that are known to cause developmental disorders. Developmental disorders can include a wide ...
Disorder - Developmental disorder - occur at some stage in a child's development, often slowing the development. ... Pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified - (PDD-NOS) was a pervasive developmental disorder, and is also ... Neurodevelopmental disorder - or disorder of neural development, is an impairment of the growth and development of the brain or ... Childhood disintegrative disorder (CDD) - a condition in which a child experiences developmental regression. Pervasive ...
Gabriel- A young boy who has a type of autism, pervasive development disorder. He goes missing one day when he was supposed to ... She is sent to psychiatric care and gets to her child taken away from her. Ben- The father of missing boy Gabriel and married ... When Kate first adopted Gabriel, she was a very caring and loving mother, however, the novelty of having a child wore away and ... Meanwhile, young Ella watches and waits, following a child through its adoption process, then worming her way into the ...
Unlike with other pervasive development disorders, most autistic persons want to be social, but fail to socialize successfully ... An autistic child might be regarded by teachers as a "problem child" or a "poor performer". The child's extremely low tolerance ... Autistic children have also been described as being held hostage to a psychiatric disorder. Boyd Haley, an anti-vaccine ... Autism spectrum disorders; DSM-V; Diagnostic criteria-Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM ...
Children with pervasive developmental disorders may exhibit the following symptoms: Have trouble expressing or understanding ... The child's growth and development may be delayed due to the lack of necessary nutrients. The child will usually weigh much ... These disorders negatively impact the mental and social wellbeing of a child, and children with these disorders require support ... disintegrative disorder 299.80 Asperger Syndrome 299.80 Pervasive developmental disorder NOS Pervasive developmental disorders ...
... and pervasive developmental disorder in both the mother and the child. The outline and summary of this study is found below: "" ... Other experts believe that child temperament is a large factor in the development of child psychopathology. High susceptibility ... Child psychopathology can cause separation anxiety from parents, attention deficit disorders in children, sleep disorders in ... Only a small number of these children receive treatment for their disorder. Anxiety and depression disorders in children- ...
Wicks-Nelson R, Israel AC (2009). "Pervasive developmental disorders and schizophrenia". In Jewell L (ed.). Abnormal child and ... Some of the earliest signs that a young child may develop schizophrenia are lags in language and motor development. Some ... Individuals who experience disorders such as major depressive disorder, schizoaffective disorder, schizophreniform disorder, ... The three most common disorders that are difficult to distinguish are bipolar disorder (BD), autism spectrum disorder (ASD), ...
Attachment parenting Borderline personality disorder Child development Emotional dysregulation DSM-IV-TR (2000) American ... RAD can also be confused with neuropsychiatric disorders such as autism, pervasive developmental disorder, childhood ... Several other disorders, such as conduct disorders, oppositional defiant disorder, anxiety disorders, post traumatic stress ... Conduct disorders, oppositional defiant disorder, anxiety disorders, post-traumatic stress disorder and social phobia share ...
Unlike with other pervasive development disorders, most persons with AS want to be social, but fail to socialize successfully, ... A child with AS might be regarded by teachers as a "problem child" or a "poor performer". The child's extremely low tolerance ... such as borderline personality disorder, avoidant personality disorder and schizoid personality disorder. Autistic females are ... Madra, Moneek (2020). "Gastrointestinal Issues and Autism Spectrum Disorder". Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Clinics of North ...
... and other issues related to this developmental disorder. ... Find out about autism spectrum disorder symptoms, causes, ... ClinicalTrials.gov: Child Development Disorders, Pervasive (National Institutes of Health) Journal Articles References and ... At well-child checkups, the health care provider should check your childs development. If there are signs of ASD, your child ... Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) (Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development) Also in ...
Categories: Child Development Disorders, Pervasive Image Types: Photo, Illustrations, Video, Color, Black&White, PublicDomain, ...
Aripiprazole is under development for the treatment of agitation and pervasive child development disorders. As of May 2021, it ... and bipolar disorder; other uses include as an add-on treatment in major depressive disorder, tic disorders, and irritability ... Yang CS, Huang H, Zhang LL, Zhu CR, Guo Q (July 2015). "Aripiprazole for the treatment of tic disorders in children: a ... 1.1 Care for adults, children and young people across all phases of bipolar disorder Brown R, Taylor MJ, Geddes J (December ...
According to the latest research, the number of children being diagnosed... ... "Autism is a pervasive developmental disorder that involves abnormal development and function of the brain." (Autism Center of ... Autism Spectrum Disorder ( Autism ) Essay. Autism Spectrum Disorder affects various aspects of an autistic childs life. Many ... Autism spectrum disorder has become the most common neurological and developmental disorder diagnosed in children today. The ...
For example, a child previously able to speak in 2- or 3-word phrases gradually or abruptly loses the ability to communicate ... disorder, also known as Heller syndrome, is characterized by a loss of previously acquired language and social skills and ... affecting 2 per 100,000 children), much rarer than autistic disorder, which affects 20 per 10,000 children), or pervasive ... CDD occurs only after a period of at least 2 years of normal development, when the child is younger than 10 years. [28, 5] ...
CDC is working to find out how many children have ASDs, discover the risk factors, and raise awareness of the signs. ... Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) are a group of developmental disabilities that can cause significant social, communication and ... The doctor or nurse might ask you questions about your childs development or will talk and play with your child to see if they ... A diagnosis of ASD now includes several conditions that used to be diagnosed separately; autistic disorder, pervasive ...
Diagnosis of pervasive development disorders. Em: B. Lahey & A. Kazdin (Orgs.). Advances in clinical child psychology (pp. 249- ...
Mental Development (MDI) and Psychomotor Development (PDI) Indices] and mothers report on the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL ... but both prenatal and postnatal DAPs were associated with risk of pervasive developmental disorder [per 10-fold increase in ... CONCLUSIONS: We report adverse associations of prenatal DAPs with mental development and pervasive developmental problems at 24 ... OBJECTIVES: We investigated the relationship of prenatal and child OP urinary metabolite levels with childrens ...
Anxiety Disorders, Developmental Disabilities, Child Development Disorders, Pervasive, Autistic Disorder, Intellectual ... Child Abuse, 50301, Substance-Related Disorders, Psiquiatria da Infância e Adolescência ... Public Health, Adolescent Psychiatry, Child Psychiatry, Pediatrics, Psychoanalysis, Public Assistance, Attention Deficit ... Child Health, Virus Diseases, Mycoses, Vaccination, R Factors, Hepatopulmonary Syndrome, Hypertension, Pulmonary, Pulmonary ...
Child Development Disorders, Pervasive 1 0 Disease Susceptibility 1 0 Intelligence Tests 1 0 ... Content source: Public Health Genomics Branch in the Division of Blood Disorders and Public Health Genomics, National Center on ... in Genopedia reflects only the indexed disease term without children terms, but the number in the HuGE Literature Finder ... reflects all text searches of the disease term including the indexed term and corresponding children terms. ...
Child Development Disorders, Pervasive (3) * Computational Biology (3) * Mutation, Missense (3) *Show more... ... A cross-disorder dosage sensitivity map of the human genome. Collins, Ryan L; Glessner, Joseph T; Porcu, Eleonora; Lepamets, ... Patterns and rates of exonic de novo mutations in autism spectrum disorders. Neale, Benjamin M; Kou, Yan; Liu, Li; Maayan, Avi ... Autism spectrum disorder severity reflects the average contribution of de novo and familial influences. Robinson, Elise B; ...
... neurological disorders, pharmacogenomics, primary immmune deficiency, reproductive and child health, tier-classified guideline ... The Knowledge Base is curated by CDC staff and is regularly updated to reflect ongoing developments in the field. This ... and Sleep Disorders(S), rare dieseases, health equity, implementation science, ... No article was found for Child Development Disorders, Pervasive and GCHFR[original query]. ...
Anxiety Disorders, Developmental Disabilities, Child Development Disorders, Pervasive, Autistic Disorder, Intellectual ... Child Abuse, 50301, Substance-Related Disorders, Psiquiatria da Infância e Adolescência ... Public Health, Adolescent Psychiatry, Child Psychiatry, Pediatrics, Psychoanalysis, Public Assistance, Attention Deficit ... Disability, Dyslexia, Voice Quality, Speech-Language Pathology, Language Development, 33523, ...
Although positron emission tomography (PET) scanning has contributed to the knowledge about autism spectrum disorders (see the ... This article addresses the body of research concerning autism spectrum disorders and other pervasive developmental disorders. ... Rett syndrome is a pervasive developmental disorder presenting in early childhood primarily in girls. Children with Rett ... Children with Rett syndrome exhibit normal development in the first year of life. They typically fail to attain milestones ...
Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders. *Child Behavior Disorders. *Child Development Disorders, Pervasive ... The child may persistently fail to initiate and respond to social interactions in a developmentally appropriate way (inhibited ... "Reactive Attachment Disorder" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicines controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH ( ... This graph shows the total number of publications written about "Reactive Attachment Disorder" by people in this website by ...
i ,Methods,/i,. Adolescent boys with externalization problems referred to Vadaskert Child Psychiatry Hospital participated in ... that impaired emotion recognition is dimensionally related to conduct problems and might have importance in the development of ... i ,Background,/i,. In adults with antisocial personality disorder, marked alterations in the recognition of facial affect were ... pervasive developmental disorder (three adolescents), and thus their data were not used in the study. Past psychotropic ...
... using the Pervasive Developmental Disorder subscale of the Child Behavior Checklist in early childhood (M = 2.14 years; SD = ... Development of Multisensory Reweighting Is Impaired for Quiet Stance Control in Children with Developmental Coordination ... Clinical Characteristics of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Co-Occurring Epilepsy. Abstract Objectives. Common ... A randomized controlled trial of a group-based gaze training intervention for children with Developmental Coordination Disorder ...
Development of self-regulation and inhibition in children exhibiting attention deficit disorder with or without hyperactivity ( ... a severe affective disorder, a pervasive developmental disorder, a documented traumatic brain injury, or a treatment including ... Levy F. The development of sustained attention (vigilance) and inhibition in children: some normative data. J Child Psychol ... Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is one of the most common neurobehavioral disorders in children, causing ...
... therapy and related services to children with autism ... The DSM uses the term Pervasive Developmental Disorder to refer ... the familys strengths and needs related to enhancement of the childs development; goals for the child and the other family ... Communication disorders include problems with articulation, voice disorders, stuttering, language disorders and some learning ... Hyperactivity can occur with attention deficit disorder, mental retardation, seizure disorder, sensory deficit disorders or ...
Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a disorder of brain development that impairs childs ability to communicate and interact with ... childhood disintegrative disorder and pervasive developmental disorder. In some cases, the symptoms are subtle and severity is ... If your child has autism spectrum disorder, you can help improve your childs language and social skills so that your child can ... Genetic disorders: Children with some genetic disorders are at high risk.. *Others: Environmental factors like viral infection ...
A literature review in the area of interventions to address anxiety in young children with autism, by STELLA WAI-WAN CHOY, ... The effects of a theatrical play programme on social skills development for young children with autism spectrum disorders. ... Parent-rated anxiety symptoms in children with pervasive developmental disorders: Frequency and association with core autism ... are social anxiety disorder, selective mutism, and generalized anxiety disorder. Children with anxiety disorders are prone to ...
... and Pervasive Developmental Disorder in Children. The Lancet, 637-641. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6737(97)11096-0. 4. Rochman, B. (2011 ... This has a negative impact on child nutrition, which impacts future GDP by harming the human capital development of the ... one in five children lack access to immunizations that help keep children in the U.S. healthy. Every 20 seconds a child in the ... In urban areas, more children means more mouths to feed whereas in rural areas, more children means more hands to help produce ...
United Graduate School of Child Development, Osaka University, Kanazawa University, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, ... and the number of children with developmental disorders such as pervasive developmental disorders (PDD) or attention-deficit ... Outline of United Graduate School of Child Development. UGSCD. Mental Health of children is at a crisis point. The biggest ... "Research Center for Child Mental Development" in the latter. These efforts changed the child mental health from solely the ...
So to apply this logic to the question of whether a child has a "disorder" or a "delay," most children who talk late do not go ... If you have concerns about your childs development, it is important to have your child formally assessed by the appropriate ... auditory processing disorder, autism, pervasive developmental disorder, dyslexia), language delays, and behavioral difficulties ... Usually, when there is a developmental delay with a very young child, we do not automatically suspect a "disorder." A child may ...
... combined with pervasive, subjectively highly stressful events, mostly within the interpersonal context of the childs life. DTD ... The nature and manifestation of Developmental Trauma Disorder (DTD) in this population was discussed. ... He shared his expertise about complex childhood trauma and internationally adopted post-institutionalized children as an ... Gindis explained complex childhood trauma causes a neuropsychological condition - Developmental Trauma Disorder (DTD) - that ...
Pervasive development disorders: Pervasive development disorders (PDD) may not be a widely used, familiar term, but youve ... attention deficit disorder /attention deficit hyperactive disorder (ADD/ADHD). With these disorders, children tend to "act out ... anxiety disorders, including generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), social anxiety disorder (SAD), panic disorders , and several ... Eating disorders: The three main eating disorders are anorexia, bulimia and binge eating. Children (and adolescents) routinely ...
Prevalence and development of psychiatric disorders in childhood and adolescence. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2003;60(8):837-844.. 14 ... adverse childhood experiences framework to understand the pervasive mental health impact of racism on Black youth. J Child ... anxiety disorders (such as obsessive-compulsive disorder, acute stress disorder, and posttraumatic stress disorder) were not a ... One study of children and adolescents with social anxiety disorder provided data separately for children aged 8 to 12 years and ...
Autism Spectrum Disorders - Learn about the causes, symptoms, diagnosis & treatment from the MSD Manuals - Medical Consumer ... childhood disintegrative disorder, and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified. However, there was so much ... Educational programs for school-aged children with an ASD should address social skills development and speech and language ... Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are neurodevelopmental disorders Definition of Developmental Disorders Developmental disorders ...
  • Childhood disintegrative (or disintegration) disorder, also known as Heller syndrome, and now subsumed under the Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) category in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition ( DSM5 ), is characterized by a loss of previously acquired language and social skills and results in a persistent delay in these areas. (medscape.com)
  • Autism is a form of neurodevelopment disorder in the autism spectrum disorders. (bartleby.com)
  • This article addresses the body of research concerning autism spectrum disorders and other pervasive developmental disorders . (medscape.com)
  • Currently, PET scanning and other nuclear medical procedures are not indicated in the evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment of individuals who may have autism spectrum disorders and other pervasive developmental disorders. (medscape.com)
  • Thus, autism spectrum disorders include autism as well as conditions with some features of autism and without all criteria required for autism. (medscape.com)
  • A major concern in the interpretation of reports about PET scans in autism spectrum disorders is the accuracy and the precision of the diagnoses. (medscape.com)
  • Autism spectrum disorders are conditions in which people have difficulty developing normal social relationships, use language abnormally or not at all, and show restricted or repetitive behaviors. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Autism spectrum disorders are considered a spectrum (range) of disorders because the manifestations vary widely in type and severity. (msdmanuals.com)
  • The specific causes of autism spectrum disorders are not fully understood, although they are often related to genetic factors. (msdmanuals.com)
  • A Randomized Controlled Trial on The Beneficial Effects of Training Letter-Speech Sound Integration on Reading Fluency in Children with Dyslexia. (pearltrees.com)
  • Although most children with delays progress well and do not go on to have disorders, we have included here information on some developmental disorders (apraxia, articulation, auditory processing disorder, autism, pervasive developmental disorder, dyslexia), language delays, and behavioral difficulties. (upweegrow.com)
  • 2014) As research advances, experts have now grouped all variations which include Aspergers, PDD-NOS, autistic disorder and childhood disintegrative disorder have now been categorized under the umbrella term of ASD or Autism Spectrum Disorder. (bartleby.com)
  • However, many children do not receive a final diagnosis until much older. (cdc.gov)
  • A brief test using a screening tool does not provide a diagnosis, but it can indicate whether a child is on the right development track or if a specialist should take a closer look. (cdc.gov)
  • Diagnosis of pervasive development disorders. (bvsalud.org)
  • The ADHD diagnosis and assessment process requires a variety of methods, including taking the child's history, performing clinical observation, administering various scales, and considering the child's academic performance measures and intelligence, as well as examining the child on neuropsychological tasks and computerized performance tests. (psychiatryinvestigation.org)
  • Because Asperger's Disorder is a relatively new diagnosis and is so similar to autism, many people who have it may have been misdiagnosed as someone with high functioning autism. (itsamomsworld.com)
  • Identifying these early signs is crucial for prompt diagnosis and intervention to help children affected by CDD regain lost abilities and maximize their potential for development. (mentalhealthtraining.info)
  • For some families the diagnosis of Myotonic Dystrophy is made via their child who may have some learning disabilities. (myotonicdystrophy.com)
  • It is called a "spectrum" disorder because people with ASD can have a range of symptoms. (medlineplus.gov)
  • A case report of a patient with symptoms of childhood disintegrative disorder at age 4 years determined that the patient had a sialylation deficiency and an increase of asialo-core fucosylated bisected N-glycans, aberrant N-glycan structures of CSF even though there were no changes of total plasma N-glycan strucutres of CSF proteins. (medscape.com)
  • Additional symptoms of childhood disintegrative disorder may include the onset of difficulty in the transition to waking from sleep. (medscape.com)
  • Externalization symptoms are common in children and adolescents and indicate vulnerability for later antisocial behavior [ 4 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Children with ADHD present heterogeneous symptoms in addition to the cardinal symptoms of inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity. (psychiatryinvestigation.org)
  • The term "spectrum" refers to the wide variety of symptoms and severity and covers many types of conditions like autism, Asperger's syndrome, childhood disintegrative disorder and pervasive developmental disorder. (niroginepal.com)
  • The goal of treatment is to maximise your child's ability to function by reducing ASD symptoms and supporting development and learning. (niroginepal.com)
  • Once you suspect your child is having the ASD like symptoms, talk to the specialist as soon as possible. (niroginepal.com)
  • In many cases, the symptoms of autism becomes less pronounced as child gets older. (niroginepal.com)
  • ADHD - Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder - A group of symptoms believed to be caused by slight abnormalities in the brain. (kadiant.com)
  • This recommendation applies to children and adolescents 18 years or younger who do not have a diagnosed anxiety disorder and who are not showing recognized signs or symptoms of anxiety. (uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org)
  • Since autism symptoms often become apparent by a child's third birthday, and is marked by hindered development of social and communication skills, many parents become anxious if their child does not seem to be developing properly. (itsamomsworld.com)
  • Because autism is classified as a spectrum disorder, the range of autism symptoms can vary from mild to severe and can appear in any manner of combinations. (itsamomsworld.com)
  • However, it has also not been ruled out as a possible contributor to autism meaning that it is unknown whether the MMR shot can trigger symptoms of autism in people who were already predisposed to the disorder. (itsamomsworld.com)
  • Because children with autism can display a multitude of symptoms that may overlap with other disorders, there is no one particular diagnostic test to determine the likelihood of autism in children. (itsamomsworld.com)
  • The estimated number of people identified with an autism spectrum disorder has risen because doctors and caregivers have learned more about the symptoms of the disorder. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Rubella Rubella is a contagious viral infection that typically causes in children mild symptoms, such as joint pain and a rash. (msdmanuals.com)
  • In this article, we will delve into the causes, symptoms, and treatment options for Oppositional Defiant Disorder, providing a comprehensive understanding of this challenging condition. (parentingteach.com)
  • However, psychiatric disorders of childhood and adolescence, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), conduct disorder, learning disorders, mood disorders, and pervasive development disorders, were not included in the calculations of the DALYs ( 4,5 ). (who.int)
  • Be sure to let your doctor or nurse know about any conditions that your child's family members have , including ASD, learning disorders, intellectual disability, or attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). (cdc.gov)
  • Continuous performance tests (CPTs) are frequently used in clinical practice to assess the attentiveness of ADHD children. (psychiatryinvestigation.org)
  • This study aimed to determine if ADHD children with superior IQs would perform better than ADHD children with average IQs. (psychiatryinvestigation.org)
  • Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is one of the most common neurobehavioral disorders in children, causing sufferers significant problems in daily life, academic performance, and school adjustment. (psychiatryinvestigation.org)
  • Some studies have shown that ADHD children commit more omission errors and commission errors than normal children do and that the number of errors increases as symptom intensity increases in severity. (psychiatryinvestigation.org)
  • ADHD occurs in as many as three percent of children, with onset prior to four years of age in about 50 percent of cases. (kadiant.com)
  • Juvenile crimes caused by mental damage, suicidal cases after being bullied, and the number of children with developmental disorders such as pervasive developmental disorders (PDD) or attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are increasing. (ne.jp)
  • Falling in behind anxiety are disruptive disorders, including oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), conduct disorder and the related condition, attention deficit disorder / attention deficit hyperactive disorder (ADD/ADHD). (psychiatric-medicine.com)
  • Children with a family history of mental health disorders, such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder ( ADHD ) or conduct disorder, are at higher risk. (parentingteach.com)
  • Raising a child with ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder) can be challenging for parents and educators, but with the right strategies and support, you can help your child thrive. (parentingteach.com)
  • Individuals with antisocial personality disorder express failure to conform to social norms, deceitfulness, impulsivity, irritability and/or aggressiveness, reckless disregard for safety, consistent irresponsibility, lack of remorse, and "a pervasive disregard for and violation of the right of others" [ 1 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • However, current research has yet to reveal a clear-cut pathophysiology for childhood disintegrative disorder, and there remains considerable debate within the developmental disabilities field regarding the long-term outcomes of children with this condition. (medscape.com)
  • Title : A Snapshot of autism spectrum disorder in California Corporate Authors(s) : National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention). (cdc.gov)
  • Rett Syndrome Rett syndrome is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder caused by a genetic problem that occurs almost exclusively in girls and affects development after an initial 6-month period of normal development. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Childhood Disintegrative Disorder (CDD) is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder that typically manifests in the first few years of life. (mentalhealthtraining.info)
  • Down Syndrome (Trisomy 21) Down syndrome is a chromosome disorder caused by an extra chromosome 21 that results in intellectual disability and physical abnormalities. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD) is a behavioral disorder that commonly affects children and adolescents. (parentingteach.com)
  • This consistent and pervasive oppositional behavior can lead to strained relationships within the family, academic difficulties, and even isolation from peers. (parentingteach.com)
  • The exact causes of Oppositional Defiant Disorder are not fully understood. (parentingteach.com)
  • Managing Oppositional Defiant Disorder often involves a comprehensive approach that addresses the underlying factors contributing to the behavior. (parentingteach.com)
  • Anxiety disorders in childhood and adolescence are associated with an increased likelihood of a future anxiety disorder or depression. (uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org)
  • other uses include as an add-on treatment in major depressive disorder, tic disorders, and irritability associated with autism. (wikipedia.org)
  • As many as 1 in 100 persons in the general population is afflicted with an autism spectrum disorder. (medscape.com)
  • Definition of Developmental Disorders Developmental disorders are better called neurodevelopmental disorders. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Neurodevelopmental disorders are neurologically based conditions that can interfere with the acquisition, retention, or. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurological and developmental disorder that begins early in childhood and lasts throughout a person's life. (medlineplus.gov)
  • The aim of mhGAP is to reduce the gap between the resources available and those needed for reduction of the burden caused by mental, neurological and substance use disorders. (who.int)
  • Mental, neurological and substance use disorders contribute 14.4% of the global burden of disease. (who.int)
  • In women aged 15-44 years, the age group most relevant for reproductive health, and children and adolescents aged 0-14 years, mental, neurological and substance use disorders account for 27.6% and 5.8%, respectively, of disability-adjusted life years (DALYs). (who.int)
  • Autism is a neurological disorder that affects the normal development of social interactions and communication skills in the brain. (itsamomsworld.com)
  • It includes what used to be known as Asperger syndrome and pervasive developmental disorders. (medlineplus.gov)
  • [ 3 ] Asperger disorder , Rett disorder , childhood disintegrative disorder, and other pervasive developmental disorders (including pervasive developmental disorders not otherwise specified). (medscape.com)
  • There are cost-effective interventions available to prevent and manage the common mental disorders, and these can help children to achieve their full growth potential, mothers to provide sensitive care and adolescents to progress to a productive adulthood. (who.int)
  • While anxiety conditions in children often manifest early in life, frequently before the age of five, and there is evidence that autism spectrum conditions (ASC) co-occur in this population, there is limited availability of interventions designed to meet the unique needs of children with both anxiety conditions and ASC. (analytrics.org)
  • The current article examines non-pharmacological group/peer-mediated interventions for managing anxiety among children with ASC. (analytrics.org)
  • More specifically, it focuses on the effectiveness of group play-based interventions that can alleviate anxiety in children with ASC aged 2-12 years. (analytrics.org)
  • Effective interventions are identified to address the needs of children of this age group. (analytrics.org)
  • In this article, we delve into the mysterious world of Childhood Disintegrative Disorder, seeking to unravel its enigma and shed light on the underlying causes, diagnostic criteria, and potential interventions for this devastating disorder. (mentalhealthtraining.info)
  • Previous findings suggest that early interventions can reduce maltreatment by improving the quality of mother-child interaction, particularly maternal sensitivity. (springer.com)
  • It is possible that further scientific data and development of infrastructure and technology will result in a lowering of the blood lead level at which interventions are recommended at a future time. (cdc.gov)
  • We measured six nonspecific dialkylphosphate (DAP) metabolites in maternal and child urine as well as metabolites specific to malathion (MDA) and chlorpyrifos (TCPy) in maternal urine. (cdc.gov)
  • (https://platform.who.int/data/maternal-newborn-child-adolescent-ageing/global-strategy-data, accessed 8 March 202 3) and the Global Health Observatory (https://www.who.int/data/gho, accessed 8 March 2023). (who.int)
  • Maternal, child and adolescent mental disor ders constitute a public health problem. (who.int)
  • The estimated prevalences of 15%-36% for maternal mental disorders and 10%-36% for child and adolescent mental disorders in the Region are significantly higher than the estimates for developed countries. (who.int)
  • Maternal mental disorders are associated not only with adverse reproductive health outcomes but are also one of the modifiable risk factors for adverse child and adolescent development outcomes. (who.int)
  • The aim of the current study is to evaluate the effects of a mother-child intervention program using home visits and video-feedback regarding mother-child interaction (STEEP-b) plus psychiatric treatment of the mother in cases where mental illness is present compared with TAU (treatment as usual, that is, standardized support by the child welfare system) on enhancing maternal sensitivity and child responsiveness in adolescent, high-risk mothers. (springer.com)
  • The primary outcome hypothesis is that STEEP-b added to treatment as usual will improve maternal sensitivity and child responsiveness compared with treatment as usual alone in high-risk adolescent mothers. (springer.com)
  • Autism is a developmental disorder, which is characterized by a dyad of difficulties in a) communication and social interaction and b) restricted interests and imagination (American Psychiatric Association, 2013). (bartleby.com)
  • Psychiatric disorders like major depression and eating disorders are increasingly common among younger people, and elementary school cases with schizophrenia are reported at an extreme. (ne.jp)
  • The Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children (DISC-IV) is a fully structured diagnostic instrument that assesses thirty-four common psychiatric diagnoses of children and adolescents. (cdc.gov)
  • Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by impairments in social interaction and communication that begins at a young age, which commonly exhibits repetitive behaviours and restricted interests. (bartleby.com)
  • Diagnosing autism spectrum disorder (ASD) can be difficult because there is no medical test, like a blood test, to diagnose the disorder. (cdc.gov)
  • Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a disorder of brain development that impairs child's ability to communicate and interact with others. (niroginepal.com)
  • The number of children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder is rising. (niroginepal.com)
  • While there is no cure for autism spectrum disorder, intensive, early treatment can make a big difference in the lives of many children. (niroginepal.com)
  • If your child has autism spectrum disorder, you can help improve your child's language and social skills so that your child can adjust to the needs of his daily life. (niroginepal.com)
  • People with an autism spectrum disorder also have restricted patterns of behavior, interests, and/or activities and often follow rigid routines. (msdmanuals.com)
  • A: The Spectrum of mental development in children with CMD is quite different from that of the general population. (myotonicdystrophy.com)
  • We examined their association with children's performance at 6 (n = 396), 12 (n = 395), and 24 (n = 372) months of age on the Bayley Scales of Infant Development [Mental Development (MDI) and Psychomotor Development (PDI) Indices] and mother's report on the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) (n = 356). (cdc.gov)
  • Our results suggest that impaired emotion recognition is dimensionally related to conduct problems and might have importance in the development of antisocial behavior. (hindawi.com)
  • For example, the cumulative prevalence of conduct disorder in boys by the age of 16 years is about ten percent, often interrelated with other externalization problems [ 5 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • The presence of conduct disorder, psychopathic traits, and callous/unemotional traits has major importance in the development of antisocial personality disorder [ 4 , 6 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • A study on adolescent males with conduct disorder could confirm the alteration in the recognition of fear and sadness comparing individuals with high and low psychopathic traits and indicated subtle differences between adolescent boys with early-onset and adolescent-onset conduct disorder [ 10 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • In girls with conduct disorder, higher psychopathic traits were associated with impaired recognition of sadness [ 14 ] and even increased recognition of fear [ 15 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • In a mixed gender sample of children and adolescents with depression, the presence of conduct disorder did not modify emotion recognition [ 17 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • This is why Osaka University, Kanazawa University and Hamamatsu University School of Medicine have united and established the United Graduate School of Child Development where child specialists with diverse backgrounds and work experience learn and conduct research together. (ne.jp)
  • Children with a family history of conduct disorders, a history of neglect or abuse, or those exposed to maladaptive parenting styles may be at risk for ODD. (parentingteach.com)
  • 1 Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Department of Neuropsychiatry, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. (psychiatryinvestigation.org)
  • Aripiprazole is primarily used for the treatment of schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. (wikipedia.org)
  • Aripiprazole is effective for the treatment of acute manic episodes of bipolar disorder in adults, children, and adolescents. (wikipedia.org)
  • Provision of enriched environmental experiences during critical periods of development may restore brain plasticity and thus mitigate genetic predispositions. (medscape.com)
  • Genetic disorders: Children with some genetic disorders are at high risk. (niroginepal.com)
  • However, there was so much overlap that it was hard to make distinctions, so doctors currently do not use this terminology and consider these all as ASDs (except for Rett syndrome, which is a distinct genetic disorder). (msdmanuals.com)
  • The specialist may observe the child give the child a structured test, ask the parents or caregivers questions, or ask them to fill out questionnaires. (cdc.gov)
  • Determinants of Health to make available comprehensive packages for children, mothers and other caregivers for early child development. (who.int)
  • Therefore it is important that parents and caregivers are able to give accurate accounts of a child's behavioral development. (itsamomsworld.com)
  • Affected children have distinct qualitative impairments in social interaction and communication. (medscape.com)
  • Children can be diagnosed with autism by having different impairments such as social interaction, pattern of behavior, eye contact and speech impairment. (bartleby.com)
  • Children with reading impairments have long been associated with impaired perception for rapidly presented acoustic stimuli and recently have shown deficits for slower features. (jneurosci.org)
  • The USPSTF recommends screening for anxiety in children and adolescents aged 8 to 18 years. (uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org)
  • Certain groups are also at increased risk, including LGBTQ youth, transgender youth, and older adolescents aged 12 to 17 years. (uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org)
  • According to the 2018-2019 National Survey of Children's Health, 7.8% of children and adolescents aged 3 to 17 years had a current anxiety disorder. (uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org)
  • This indicator reflects the percentage of school-age children and adolescents aged 5-19 years who are classified as overweight, based on age- and sex-specific values for body mass index (BMI). (who.int)
  • Overweight in school-age children and adolescents aged 5-19 years is included as an intermediate outcome indicator in the core set of indicators for the Global nutrition monitoring framework . (who.int)
  • Myotonic Dystrophy affects learning and makes it more difficult for children to learn certain tasks. (myotonicdystrophy.com)
  • program has developed free materials, including CDC's Milestone Tracker app, to help parents and providers work together to monitor your child's development and know when there might be a concern and if more screening is needed. (cdc.gov)
  • If you notice that your child is not meeting milestones, talk with your doctor or nurse about your concerns and ask about developmental screening. (cdc.gov)
  • Developmental screening takes a closer look at how your child is developing. (cdc.gov)
  • Screening questionnaires and checklists are based on research that compares your child to other children of the same age. (cdc.gov)
  • Additional screening should also be done if a child is at high risk for ASD (for example, having a sibling or other family member with ASD) or if behaviors sometimes associated with ASD are present. (cdc.gov)
  • If your child's healthcare provider does not periodically check your child with a developmental screening test, you can ask that it be done. (cdc.gov)
  • The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for anxiety in children 7 years or younger. (uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org)
  • The DISC-IV was originally developed for use in large-scale epidemiological surveys of children and adolescents, but is now also being used in many clinical studies, screening projects, and service settings. (cdc.gov)
  • Second, CDC is aggressively pursuing research and development efforts in collaboration with several instrument manufacturers to develop a field-rugged, relatively inexpensive, and simple-to-operate blood lead instrument, which would markedly enhance blood lead screening efforts. (cdc.gov)
  • The review included studies concerning autistic children aged 2 to 12 years that aimed at reducing anxiety as their primary outcome. (analytrics.org)
  • 28 out of 35 studies that focused on cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) displayed efficacy in reducing anxiety among children. (analytrics.org)
  • One study employing Lego®-based therapy exhibited partial effectiveness in addressing childhood anxiety among autistic children. (analytrics.org)
  • Among the 44 studies, four specifically centred on children aged 4 to 6 years with both anxiety and autism, and showed that group CBT effectively reduced anxiety. (analytrics.org)
  • These, along with recommendations for future research to address anxiety in children with ASC, are analysed through the lens of an inclusive framework and early intervention theory. (analytrics.org)
  • Widely regarded as the most common mental issue facing children, anxiety disorders, including generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), social anxiety disorder (SAD), panic disorders , and several others, can stand in the way of a child's day-to-day life. (psychiatric-medicine.com)
  • Youth diagnosed with anxiety and their healthcare professional should decide together with the parents or guardians what treatment is right for them. (uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org)
  • Although all youth aged 8 to 18 years are at risk for anxiety and should be screened, there are factors that increase the risk. (uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org)
  • In the absence of evidence, healthcare professionals should use their judgement based on individual patient circumstances when determining whether to screen for anxiety in youth 7 years or younger. (uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org)
  • Anxiety disorder is a common mental health condition in the US. (uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org)
  • However, earlier disruption of psychosocial development can result in even more severe developmental consequences. (medscape.com)
  • The World Health Organization (WHO) indicates that parents themselves can give psychosocial and behavioral treatments to the child with autism. (niroginepal.com)
  • QET) that has been shown to improve the throwing and catching skill of children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD), within an approach (i.e., group therapy) that might alleviate the negative psychosocial impact of these motor skill deficits. (pearltrees.com)
  • It was long held, erroneously, that "refrigerator mothers" (a term coined on the basis of the presumed emotional frigidity of such mothers toward their children) caused ASDs in their children. (medscape.com)
  • Children with difficult temperaments, including impulsivity, irritability, and low frustration tolerance, may be more prone to developing ODD. (parentingteach.com)
  • Impairment in the recognition of facial effect might create, enlarge, and maintain behavioral problems during development. (hindawi.com)
  • The immediate consequences of overweight and obesity in school-age children and adolescents include a greater risk of asthma and cognitive impairment, in addition to the social and economic consequences for the child, for the child's family and for society. (who.int)
  • It is characterized by impaired development in social interactions and communication, both verbal and non-verbal. (bartleby.com)
  • Advances in clinical child psychology (pp. 249-284). (bvsalud.org)
  • Under these tough conditions, Kanazawa University and Osaka University / Hamamatsu University School of Medicine have created novel interdisciplinary fields which integrate medical science (including clinical medicine, neuroimaging, epidemiology and life science), developmental psychology, education and so forth, via the 21th-century COE programs, "Establishment of Revolutionary Neuroscience about Development, Learning, Memory and their Disturbances" in the former and "Research Center for Child Mental Development" in the latter. (ne.jp)
  • This formal evaluation is a more in-depth look at a child's development and is usually done by a trained specialist such as a developmental pediatrician, child psychologist, speech-language pathologist, occupational therapist, or other specialist. (cdc.gov)
  • childhood disintegrative disorder, and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Although we may have hunches or bits of predictive evidence, at very early ages, we often simply do not know how to predict which children will "turn the corner" and "blossom" on their own, which children will require formal intervention for a short time, and which children will have longer-term learning/social/behavioral problems. (upweegrow.com)
  • Request more information about treatment for child behavioral problems today. (psychiatric-medicine.com)
  • Parents will be provided by health providers different treatment, different placement in education and knowing about the different risk factor to make a difference for their autistic child now and in the future. (bartleby.com)
  • To meet the diagnostic criteria for CDD, individuals must experience a period of normal development before experiencing a marked regression in at least two areas of functioning. (mentalhealthtraining.info)
  • The instrument uses the diagnostic criteria as specified in DSM-IV (with DSM-III-R, and ICD-10 in development). (cdc.gov)
  • While these are five of the more common behavioral/psychological conditions involving children, many more exist. (psychiatric-medicine.com)
  • You can use a brief checklist of milestones to see how your child is developing. (cdc.gov)
  • The rise in prevalence is attributed to early detection and kids that are functioning at a higher level being diagnosed. (bartleby.com)
  • Early intervention is key for these children to have productive lives and to succeed. (bartleby.com)
  • [ 3 ] is a class of pervasive developmental disorders that presents in early childhood and is characterized by marked abnormalities in language, communication, and social interactions and by a restricted and peculiar range of interests and activities. (medscape.com)
  • Inequalities in early childhood development are widespread around the world. (who.int)
  • Some children show signs of ASD in early infancy but other children may develop normally in early childhood and suddenly becomes withdrawn, even lose language skills they have already acquired. (niroginepal.com)
  • Now apply that logic in a developmental example: some children begin talking early and some talk late, but most begin to talk somewhere within the average range. (upweegrow.com)
  • These early signs should not be ignored, as they suggest a potential developmental issue that requires further evaluation by medical professionals specializing in child development disorders. (mentalhealthtraining.info)
  • This is a randomized controlled trial that evaluates the effects of an early intervention program (STEEP-b) on the quality of mother-child interaction and child development in adolescent, high-risk mothers. (springer.com)
  • The priority areas for action include integration of mental health services into the health care system at all levels, intersectoral action to prevent mental disorders and promote well-being, and promotion of research, evaluation and monitoring. (who.int)
  • The World Health Report 2001 set out WHO's vision for the improvement of mental health systems to reduce the burden of mental disorders ( 2 ). (who.int)
  • WHA55.10 which called on Member States to provide support to WHO's global action programme for mental health and to strengthen action to protect children from and in armed conflict. (who.int)
  • These efforts changed the child mental health from solely the research subject for psychologists to one that is understandable from the medical perspective. (ne.jp)
  • With the efforts of these three institutes, it is without a doubt that mental health problems of children will be able to be elucidated by medical methods. (ne.jp)
  • However with all the mental health conditions out there it can be difficult or nearly impossible to determine if your child has a serious mental health/behavioral problem, or if it's just "kids being kids. (psychiatric-medicine.com)
  • If you feel your child may have a mental health condition, seek the help, guidance, and support of a trained mental health professional. (psychiatric-medicine.com)
  • In the long term, overweight and obesity in children increase the risk of health problems later in life, including obesity, diabetes, heart disease, some cancers, respiratory disease, mental health and reproductive disorders. (who.int)
  • METHODS: Participating children were from a longitudinal birth cohort of primarily Latino farm -worker families in California. (cdc.gov)
  • For these reasons, it does not cover diagnoses such as pervasive developmental disorders, speech and language disorders, or the organic brain syndromes. (cdc.gov)
  • Autism is a fairly common disorder, affecting one in 250 births. (itsamomsworld.com)
  • It is grouped with the pervasive developmental disorders (PDDs) and is related to the better known and more common disorder of autism. (mentalhealthtraining.info)
  • Parent-child relationship difficulties and a lack of positive social interactions can also contribute. (parentingteach.com)
  • A randomized controlled trial of a group-based gaze training intervention for children with Developmental Coordination Disorder. (pearltrees.com)