A highly contagious infectious disease caused by the varicella-zoster virus (HERPESVIRUS 3, HUMAN). It usually affects children, is spread by direct contact or respiratory route via droplet nuclei, and is characterized by the appearance on the skin and mucous membranes of successive crops of typical pruritic vesicular lesions that are easily broken and become scabbed. Chickenpox is relatively benign in children, but may be complicated by pneumonia and encephalitis in adults. (From Dorland, 27th ed)
A live, attenuated varicella virus vaccine used for immunization against chickenpox. It is recommended for children between the ages of 12 months and 13 years.
The type species of VARICELLOVIRUS causing CHICKENPOX (varicella) and HERPES ZOSTER (shingles) in humans.
An acute infectious, usually self-limited, disease believed to represent activation of latent varicella-zoster virus (HERPESVIRUS 3, HUMAN) in those who have been rendered partially immune after a previous attack of CHICKENPOX. It involves the SENSORY GANGLIA and their areas of innervation and is characterized by severe neuralgic pain along the distribution of the affected nerve and crops of clustered vesicles over the area. (From Dorland, 27th ed)
Skin diseases caused by viruses.
An attenuated vaccine used to prevent and/or treat HERPES ZOSTER, a disease caused by HUMAN HERPESVIRUS 3.
Inflammation of the lung parenchyma that is caused by a viral infection.
A genus of the family HERPESVIRIDAE, subfamily ALPHAHERPESVIRINAE. Its species include those causing CHICKENPOX and HERPES ZOSTER in humans (HERPESVIRUS 3, HUMAN), as well as several animal viruses.
An acute, highly contagious, often fatal infectious disease caused by an orthopoxvirus characterized by a biphasic febrile course and distinctive progressive skin eruptions. Vaccination has succeeded in eradicating smallpox worldwide. (Dorland, 28th ed)
A GUANOSINE analog that acts as an antimetabolite. Viruses are especially susceptible. Used especially against herpes.
A fulminating bacterial infection of the deep layers of the skin and FASCIA. It can be caused by many different organisms, with STREPTOCOCCUS PYOGENES being the most common.
Administration of a vaccine to large populations in order to elicit IMMUNITY.
Administration of vaccines to stimulate the host's immune response. This includes any preparation intended for active immunological prophylaxis.
The transmission of infectious disease or pathogens from patients to health professionals or health care workers. It includes transmission via direct or indirect exposure to bacterial, fungal, parasitic, or viral agents.
The non-susceptibility to infection of a large group of individuals in a population. A variety of factors can be responsible for herd immunity and this gives rise to the different definitions used in the literature. Most commonly, herd immunity refers to the case when, if most of the population is immune, infection of a single individual will not cause an epidemic. Also, in such immunized populations, susceptible individuals are not likely to become infected. Herd immunity can also refer to the case when unprotected individuals fail to contract a disease because the infecting organism has been banished from the population.
An acute infectious disease caused by RUBULAVIRUS, spread by direct contact, airborne droplet nuclei, fomites contaminated by infectious saliva, and perhaps urine, and usually seen in children under the age of 15, although adults may also be affected. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
Immunoglobulins produced in response to VIRAL ANTIGENS.
The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Israel" is a country in the Middle East and does not have a medical definition. If you have any medical questions or terms you would like me to define, I'd be happy to help!
Skin diseases caused by bacteria.
Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)
The sudden, forceful, involuntary expulsion of air from the NOSE and MOUTH caused by irritation to the MUCOUS MEMBRANES of the upper RESPIRATORY TRACT.

Chickenpox pneumonia: case report and literature review. (1/662)

The incidence of primary chickenpox infection in young adults appears to be rising in the UK and other developed countries. The infection is more severe in adults than in children and complications, including pneumonia, are more frequent. An illustrative case of severe chickenpox pneumonia in an immunocompetent, non-pregnant adult smoker is presented. The epidemiology and pathology of the disease is discussed and a review of current management in the emergency department and the intensive care unit is presented. Strategies for the prevention of chickenpox pneumonia are also discussed.  (+info)

Complications of varicella in a defined central European population. (2/662)

AIMS: To describe complications of varicella requiring hospitalisation in a defined population (canton of Bern) and to compare the hospitalisation rates for varicella with published data. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of hospital records of patients less than 16 years of age admitted with complications of varicella to the hospitals serving this population (University Children's Hospital of Bern and the Wildermeth Children's Hospital of Biel, Switzerland), and calculation of hospitalisation rates for varicella and its complications based on birth rates and varicella antibody prevalence rates. RESULTS: From 1986 to 1996, 113 cases (median age, 5.6 years) were identified. Younger siblings were overrepresented (odds ratio (OR), 1.42; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.09 to 1.84). Central nervous system (CNS) complications (26 patients; 23%) were found predominantly in previously healthy children (relative risk, 7.1; 95% CI, 1.01 to 49.86). Group A beta haemolytic streptococci were recovered from only one of 35 patients with bacterial complications. The hospitalisation rates for primary varicella (9.2/10(4) cases; 95% CI, 7.4 to 11/10(4), skin infections (2.0/10(4) cases; 95% CI, 1.2 to 2.9/10(4), and pneumonia (0.8/10(4) cases; 95% CI, 0.3 to 1.3/10(4)) were significantly lower than reported previously. The CNS complication rate (2.2/10(4) cases; 95% CI, 1.3 to 3.1/10(4) was among the highest rates reported. CONCLUSIONS: The low hospitalisation rate in comparison with studies from elsewhere indicates that there is a large regional variability in complications associated with varicella. Such data should be taken into consideration when local varicella immunisation strategies are developed.  (+info)

Risk factors for breakthrough varicella in healthy children. (3/662)

AIM: To evaluate the risk factors for breakthrough varicella in a follow up study of a cohort of 181 healthy children immunised when aged 9-24 months with a reformulated Oka strain varicella vaccine (SmithKline Beecham Biologicals/Oka). DESIGN: The children were randomised in a double blind manner into one of four groups to receive one of two production lot vaccine batches, at two different titres (high titre, 10(3.9) and 10(4.0) plaque forming units (pfu); low titre (heat exposed), 10(2.7) and 10(2.8) pfu). The overall seroconversion rate after immunisation was 99%. RESULTS: One hundred and sixty-eight patients were available for review after a mean (SD) follow up of 35 (9) months after vaccination. Multivariate analysis indicated that risk factors for breakthrough varicella were household contact with varicella (adjusted odds ratio (OR), 19.89; 95% confidence interval (CI), 18.39 to 21.39), vaccination age of < or = 14 months (adjusted OR, 2.30; 95% CI, 1.69 to 2.90), and receiving low titre (10(2.7) pfu) vaccine (adjusted OR, 2.13; 95% CI, 1.54 to 2.73). All children who developed breakthrough varicella, had a modified varicella illness, except for three, all of whom had received low titre vaccine. CONCLUSION: The identification of young immunisation age (< or = 14 months) and low titre vaccine as risk factors for breakthrough varicella have important implications for the implementation of varicella vaccination programmes in healthy children.  (+info)

Prevention of varicella. Update recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP). (4/662)

In February 1999, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) expanded recommendations for varicella (chickenpox) vaccine to promote wider use of the vaccine for susceptible children and adults. The updated recommendations include establishing child care and school entry requirements, use of the vaccine following exposure and for outbreak control, use of the vaccine for some children infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and vaccination of adults and adolescents at high risk for exposure. These recommendations also provide new information on varicella vaccine postlicensure safety data.  (+info)

Varicella-related deaths--Florida, 1998. (5/662)

During 1998, the Florida Department of Health (FDH) reported to CDC six fatal cases of varicella (chickenpox). FDH investigated all death certificates for 1998 with any mention of varicella as a contributory or underlying cause. Eight deaths were identified; two were reclassified as disseminated herpes zoster and six were related to varicella, for an annual varicella death rate of 0.4 deaths per million population. Two deaths occurred in children and four in adults; none had received varicella vaccine. The infection source was identified for three cases; two adults acquired varicella from children in the home, and one child acquired varicella from a classmate. One infection source was known to be unvaccinated; the other two were presumed to be unvaccinated. This report summarizes these varicella deaths and recommends prevention strategies.  (+info)

Neonatal varicella: varicella zoster immunoglobulin (VZIG) does not prevent disease. (6/662)

Two infants with severe varicella are reported. They received varicella zoster immunoglobulin (VZIG) without concurrent information to parents or carers regarding further care. In both these cases there was a three day delay between the onset of symptoms and initiation of aciclovir. This delay was due to lack of awareness of the high risk of varicella in these infants. Infants born to mothers with onset of chickenpox 4 days before to 2 days after delivery are at risk of fatal varicella, despite the use of VZIG prophylaxis.  (+info)

Varicella-zoster virus-specific cellular immunity in subjects given acyclovir after household chickenpox exposure. (7/662)

The time course of primary cell-mediated immune responses to varicella-zoster virus (VZV) among persons receiving acyclovir prophylaxis after exposure to chickenpox has not been well defined. Fifteen children who had household exposure to varicella received prophylactic acyclovir (40 mg/kg/day for 7-14 days after exposure) and were studied for development of both antibody and cell-mediated immunity (CMI) to VZV. Twelve developed antibodies and/or CMI; 10 had no symptoms and 2 manifested mild varicella. Two were already immune to varicella and had booster immune responses. One was not infected and subsequently developed full-blown varicella. Although acyclovir given after exposure to VZV is highly effective and does not appear to attenuate the immune response, it remains necessary to confirm whether, in the absence of clinical varicella, persons acquire specific immunity.  (+info)

Quantitation of latent varicella-zoster virus and herpes simplex virus genomes in human trigeminal ganglia. (8/662)

Using real-time fluorescence PCR, we quantitated the numbers of copies of latent varicella-zoster virus (VZV) and herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and type 2 (HSV-2) genomes in 15 human trigeminal ganglia. Eight (53%) and 1 (7%) of 15 ganglia were PCR positive for HSV-1 or -2 glycoprotein G genes, with means of 2,902 +/- 1,082 (standard error of the mean) or 109 genomes/10(5) cells, respectively. Eleven of 14 (79%) to 13 of 15 (87%) of the ganglia were PCR positive for VZV gene 29, 31, or 62. Pooling of the results for the three VZV genes yielded a mean of 258 +/- 38 genomes/10(5) ganglion cells. These levels of latent viral genome loads have implications for virus distribution in and reactivation from human sensory ganglia.  (+info)

Chickenpox is a highly contagious viral infection caused by the varicella-zoster virus. It is characterized by an itchy, blister-like rash that typically covers the body and can also affect the mouth, eyes, and scalp. The rash progresses through various stages, from red bumps to fluid-filled blisters to scabs, before ultimately healing.

Chickenpox is usually a mild disease in children but can be more severe in adults, pregnant women, and individuals with weakened immune systems. Common symptoms include fever, fatigue, headache, and loss of appetite, which often precede the onset of the rash. The infection typically lasts about 1-2 weeks, and once a person has had chickenpox, they usually develop immunity to future infections.

A vaccine is available to prevent chickenpox, and it is routinely administered to children as part of their childhood vaccination schedule. In some cases, the vaccine may be recommended for adults who have not had chickenpox or been vaccinated previously.

The chickenpox vaccine, also known as varicella vaccine, is a preventive measure against the highly contagious viral infection caused by the varicella-zoster virus. The vaccine contains a live but weakened form of the virus, which stimulates the immune system to produce a response without causing the disease itself.

The chickenpox vaccine is typically given in two doses, with the first dose administered between 12 and 15 months of age and the second dose between 4 and 6 years of age. In some cases, the vaccine may be given to older children, adolescents, or adults who have not previously been vaccinated or who have never had chickenpox.

The chickenpox vaccine is highly effective at preventing severe cases of the disease and reducing the risk of complications such as bacterial infections, pneumonia, and encephalitis. It is also effective at preventing transmission of the virus to others.

Like any vaccine, the chickenpox vaccine can cause mild side effects such as soreness at the injection site, fever, or a mild rash. However, these side effects are generally mild and short-lived. Serious side effects are rare but may include allergic reactions or severe immune responses.

Overall, the chickenpox vaccine is a safe and effective way to prevent this common childhood disease and its potential complications.

Also known as Varicella-zoster virus (VZV), Herpesvirus 3, Human is a species-specific alphaherpesvirus that causes two distinct diseases: chickenpox (varicella) during primary infection and herpes zoster (shingles) upon reactivation of latent infection.

Chickenpox is typically a self-limiting disease characterized by a generalized, pruritic vesicular rash, fever, and malaise. After resolution of the primary infection, VZV remains latent in the sensory ganglia and can reactivate later in life to cause herpes zoster, which is characterized by a unilateral, dermatomal vesicular rash and pain.

Herpesvirus 3, Human is highly contagious and spreads through respiratory droplets or direct contact with the chickenpox rash. Vaccination is available to prevent primary infection and reduce the risk of complications associated with chickenpox and herpes zoster.

Herpes zoster, also known as shingles, is a viral infection that causes a painful rash. It's caused by the varicella-zoster virus, which also causes chickenpox. After you recover from chickenpox, the virus lies dormant in your nerve cells and can reactivate later in life as herpes zoster.

The hallmark symptom of herpes zoster is a unilateral, vesicular rash that occurs in a dermatomal distribution, which means it follows the path of a specific nerve. The rash usually affects one side of the body and can wrap around either the left or right side of your torso.

Before the rash appears, you may experience symptoms such as pain, tingling, or itching in the area where the rash will develop. Other possible symptoms include fever, headache, fatigue, and muscle weakness. The rash typically scabs over and heals within two to four weeks, but some people may continue to experience pain in the affected area for months or even years after the rash has healed. This is known as postherpetic neuralgia (PHN).

Herpes zoster is most common in older adults and people with weakened immune systems, although anyone who has had chickenpox can develop the condition. It's important to seek medical attention if you suspect you have herpes zoster, as early treatment with antiviral medications can help reduce the severity and duration of the rash and lower your risk of developing complications such as PHN.

Skin diseases of viral origin are conditions that affect the skin caused by viral infections. These infections can lead to various symptoms such as rashes, blisters, papules, and skin lesions. Some common examples of viral skin diseases include:

1. Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) infection: This causes cold sores or genital herpes, which are characterized by small, painful blisters on the skin.
2. Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infection: This causes chickenpox and shingles, which are characterized by itchy, fluid-filled blisters on the skin.
3. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection: This causes warts, which are small, rough growths on the skin.
4. Molluscum contagiosum: This is a viral infection that causes small, raised, and pearly white bumps on the skin.
5. Measles: This is a highly contagious viral disease characterized by fever, cough, runny nose, and a rash that spreads all over the body.
6. Rubella: Also known as German measles, this viral infection causes a red rash on the face and neck that spreads to the rest of the body.

Viral skin diseases can be spread through direct contact with an infected person or contaminated objects, such as towels or bedding. Some viral skin diseases can be prevented through vaccination, while others can be treated with antiviral medications or other therapies.

The Herpes Zoster vaccine, also known as the shingles vaccine, is a preventive measure against the reactivation of the varicella-zoster virus (VZV) in individuals who have previously had chickenpox. The vaccine contains a live but weakened form of VZV that boosts the immune system's ability to recognize and fight off the virus, thereby reducing the risk of developing shingles and its complications. It is typically administered as a single dose for people aged 50 and older, or as a two-dose series for those aged 19 and older who have weakened immune systems.

Viral pneumonia is a type of pneumonia caused by viral infection. It primarily affects the upper and lower respiratory tract, leading to inflammation of the alveoli (air sacs) in the lungs. This results in symptoms such as cough, difficulty breathing, fever, fatigue, and chest pain. Common viruses that can cause pneumonia include influenza virus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), and adenovirus. Viral pneumonia is often milder than bacterial pneumonia but can still be serious, especially in young children, older adults, and people with weakened immune systems. Treatment typically involves supportive care, such as rest, hydration, and fever reduction, while the body fights off the virus. In some cases, antiviral medications may be used to help manage symptoms and prevent complications.

Varicellovirus is a genus of viruses in the family Herpesviridae, subfamily Alphaherpesvirinae. This genus includes several human and animal viruses that are closely related to each other. The most well-known member of this genus is the Varicella-zoster virus (VZV), which causes two distinct diseases: chickenpox (varicella) and shingles (zoster).

The Varicellovirus genus includes the following species:

1. Human alphaherpesvirus 3 (Varicella-zoster virus)
2. Simian varicella virus
3. Bovine herpesvirus 1
4. Bovine herpesvirus 5
5. Pseudorabies virus
6. Equid herpesvirus 1
7. Equid herpesvirus 3
8. Equid herpesvirus 4
9. Equid herpesvirus 8
10. Equid herpesvirus 9
11. Cercopithecine herpesvirus 1 (Herpes B virus)
12. Cercopithecine herpesvirus 2
13. Suid herpesvirus 1 (Aujeszky's disease virus)
14. Canid herpesvirus 1
15. Felid herpesvirus 1

These viruses are characterized by their ability to establish latency in the nervous system of their hosts and reactivate later in life, causing recurrent disease. They typically have a broad host range and can infect multiple species within a family or genus.

Smallpox is a severe, contagious, and fatal infectious disease caused by the variola virus. It's characterized by fever, malaise, prostration, headache, and backache; followed by a distinctive rash with flat, red spots that turn into small blisters filled with clear fluid, then pus, and finally crust, scab, and fall off after about two weeks, leaving permanent scarring. There are two clinical forms of smallpox: variola major and variola minor. Variola major is the severe and most common form, with a mortality rate of 30% or higher. Variola minor is a less common presentation with milder symptoms and a lower mortality rate of about 1%.

Smallpox was declared eradicated by the World Health Organization (WHO) in 1980 following a successful global vaccination campaign, and routine smallpox vaccination has since been discontinued. However, due to concerns about bioterrorism, military personnel and some healthcare workers may still receive smallpox vaccinations as a precautionary measure.

Acyclovir is an antiviral medication used for the treatment of infections caused by herpes simplex viruses (HSV) including genital herpes, cold sores, and shingles (varicella-zoster virus). It works by interfering with the replication of the virus's DNA, thereby preventing the virus from multiplying further. Acyclovir is available in various forms such as oral tablets, capsules, creams, and intravenous solutions.

The medical definition of 'Acyclovir' is:

Acyclovir (brand name Zovirax) is a synthetic nucleoside analogue that functions as an antiviral agent, specifically against herpes simplex viruses (HSV) types 1 and 2, varicella-zoster virus (VZV), and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Acyclovir is converted to its active form, acyclovir triphosphate, by viral thymidine kinase. This activated form then inhibits viral DNA polymerase, preventing further replication of the virus's DNA.

Acyclovir has a relatively low toxicity profile and is generally well-tolerated, although side effects such as nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and headache can occur. In rare cases, more serious side effects such as kidney damage, seizures, or neurological problems may occur. It is important to take acyclovir exactly as directed by a healthcare provider and to report any unusual symptoms promptly.

Necrotizing fasciitis is a serious bacterial infection that affects the fascia, which is the tissue that surrounds muscles, nerves, and blood vessels. The infection can also spread to the muscle and skin. It is often caused by a combination of different types of bacteria, including group A Streptococcus and Staphylococcus aureus.

The infection causes extensive tissue damage and necrosis (death) of the fascia and surrounding tissues. It can progress rapidly and can be fatal if not treated promptly with aggressive surgical debridement (removal of dead tissue) and antibiotics.

Symptoms of necrotizing fasciitis include severe pain, swelling, redness, and warmth in the affected area; fever; chills; and general weakness. It is important to seek medical attention immediately if these symptoms occur, as early diagnosis and treatment can significantly improve outcomes.

Mass vaccination is a coordinated effort to administer vaccine doses to a large portion of a population in a short amount of time. This strategy is often used during outbreaks of infectious diseases, such as influenza or measles, to quickly build up community immunity (herd immunity) and reduce the spread of the disease. Mass vaccination campaigns can also be implemented as part of public health initiatives to control or eliminate vaccine-preventable diseases in a population. These campaigns typically involve mobilizing healthcare workers, volunteers, and resources to reach and vaccinate as many people as possible, often through mobile clinics, community centers, and other accessible locations.

Vaccination is a simple, safe, and effective way to protect people against harmful diseases, before they come into contact with them. It uses your body's natural defenses to build protection to specific infections and makes your immune system stronger.

A vaccination usually contains a small, harmless piece of a virus or bacteria (or toxins produced by these germs) that has been made inactive or weakened so it won't cause the disease itself. This piece of the germ is known as an antigen. When the vaccine is introduced into the body, the immune system recognizes the antigen as foreign and produces antibodies to fight it.

If a person then comes into contact with the actual disease-causing germ, their immune system will recognize it and immediately produce antibodies to destroy it. The person is therefore protected against that disease. This is known as active immunity.

Vaccinations are important for both individual and public health. They prevent the spread of contagious diseases and protect vulnerable members of the population, such as young children, the elderly, and people with weakened immune systems who cannot be vaccinated or for whom vaccination is not effective.

Patient-to-professional transmission of infectious diseases refers to the spread of an infectious agent or disease from a patient to a healthcare professional. This can occur through various routes, including:

1. Contact transmission: This includes direct contact, such as touching or shaking hands with an infected patient, or indirect contact, such as touching a contaminated surface or object.
2. Droplet transmission: This occurs when an infected person coughs, sneezes, talks, or breathes out droplets containing the infectious agent, which can then be inhaled by a nearby healthcare professional.
3. Airborne transmission: This involves the spread of infectious agents through the air over long distances, usually requiring specialized medical procedures or equipment.

Healthcare professionals are at risk of patient-to-professional transmission of infectious diseases due to their close contact with patients and the potential for exposure to various pathogens. It is essential for healthcare professionals to follow standard precautions, including hand hygiene, personal protective equipment (PPE), and respiratory protection, to minimize the risk of transmission. Additionally, proper vaccination and education on infection prevention and control measures can further reduce the risk of patient-to-professional transmission of infectious diseases.

Herd immunity, also known as community immunity or population immunity, is a form of indirect protection from infectious diseases that occurs when a large percentage of a population has become immune to an infection, either through vaccination or previous illness. This reduces the likelihood of infection for individuals who are not immune, especially those who cannot receive vaccines due to medical reasons. The more people in a community who are immune, the less likely the disease will spread and the entire community is protected, not just those who are immune.

Mumps is a viral infection that primarily affects the parotid salivary glands, causing them to swell and become painful. The medical definition of mumps is: "An acute infectious disease, caused by the mumps virus, characterized by painful enlargement of one or more of the salivary glands, especially the parotids."

The infection spreads easily through respiratory droplets or direct contact with an infected person's saliva. Symptoms typically appear 16-18 days after exposure and include fever, headache, muscle aches, tiredness, and swollen, tender salivary glands. Complications of mumps are rare but can be serious and include meningitis, encephalitis, deafness, and inflammation of the reproductive organs in males.

Prevention is through vaccination with the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine, which is part of routine childhood immunization schedules in many countries.

Antibodies, viral are proteins produced by the immune system in response to an infection with a virus. These antibodies are capable of recognizing and binding to specific antigens on the surface of the virus, which helps to neutralize or destroy the virus and prevent its replication. Once produced, these antibodies can provide immunity against future infections with the same virus.

Viral antibodies are typically composed of four polypeptide chains - two heavy chains and two light chains - that are held together by disulfide bonds. The binding site for the antigen is located at the tip of the Y-shaped structure, formed by the variable regions of the heavy and light chains.

There are five classes of antibodies in humans: IgA, IgD, IgE, IgG, and IgM. Each class has a different function and is distributed differently throughout the body. For example, IgG is the most common type of antibody found in the bloodstream and provides long-term immunity against viruses, while IgA is found primarily in mucous membranes and helps to protect against respiratory and gastrointestinal infections.

In addition to their role in the immune response, viral antibodies can also be used as diagnostic tools to detect the presence of a specific virus in a patient's blood or other bodily fluids.

In epidemiology, the incidence of a disease is defined as the number of new cases of that disease within a specific population over a certain period of time. It is typically expressed as a rate, with the number of new cases in the numerator and the size of the population at risk in the denominator. Incidence provides information about the risk of developing a disease during a given time period and can be used to compare disease rates between different populations or to monitor trends in disease occurrence over time.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Israel" is not a medical term. It is a country located in the Middle East. If you have any medical questions or terms you would like defined, I would be happy to help!

Bacterial skin diseases are a type of infectious skin condition caused by various species of bacteria. These bacteria can multiply rapidly on the skin's surface when given the right conditions, leading to infection and inflammation. Some common bacterial skin diseases include:

1. Impetigo: A highly contagious superficial skin infection that typically affects exposed areas such as the face, hands, and feet. It is commonly caused by Staphylococcus aureus or Streptococcus pyogenes bacteria.
2. Cellulitis: A deep-skin infection that can spread rapidly and involves the inner layers of the skin and underlying tissue. It is often caused by Group A Streptococcus or Staphylococcus aureus bacteria.
3. Folliculitis: An inflammation of hair follicles, usually caused by an infection with Staphylococcus aureus or other bacteria.
4. Furuncles (boils) and carbuncles: Deep infections that develop from folliculitis when the infection spreads to surrounding tissue. A furuncle is a single boil, while a carbuncle is a cluster of boils.
5. Erysipelas: A superficial skin infection characterized by redness, swelling, and warmth in the affected area. It is typically caused by Group A Streptococcus bacteria.
6. MRSA (Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) infections: Skin infections caused by a strain of Staphylococcus aureus that has developed resistance to many antibiotics, making it more difficult to treat.
7. Leptospirosis: A bacterial infection transmitted through contact with contaminated water or soil and characterized by flu-like symptoms and skin rashes.

Treatment for bacterial skin diseases usually involves the use of topical or oral antibiotics, depending on the severity and location of the infection. In some cases, drainage of pus-filled abscesses may be necessary to promote healing. Proper hygiene and wound care can help prevent the spread of these infections.

An encyclopedia is a comprehensive reference work containing articles on various topics, usually arranged in alphabetical order. In the context of medicine, a medical encyclopedia is a collection of articles that provide information about a wide range of medical topics, including diseases and conditions, treatments, tests, procedures, and anatomy and physiology. Medical encyclopedias may be published in print or electronic formats and are often used as a starting point for researching medical topics. They can provide reliable and accurate information on medical subjects, making them useful resources for healthcare professionals, students, and patients alike. Some well-known examples of medical encyclopedias include the Merck Manual and the Stedman's Medical Dictionary.

Sneezing is an involuntary, forceful expulsion of air through the nose and mouth, often triggered by irritation or inflammation in the nasal passages. It is a protective reflex that helps to clear the upper respiratory tract of irritants such as dust, pollen, or foreign particles. The sneeze begins with a deep inspiration of air, followed by closure of the glottis (the opening between the vocal cords) and contraction of the chest and abdominal muscles. This builds up pressure in the lungs, which is then suddenly released through the nose and mouth as the glottis opens and the velum (the soft tissue at the back of the roof of the mouth) rises to block the nasal passage. The result is a powerful burst of air that can travel at speeds of up to 100 miles per hour, expelling mucus and any trapped irritants along with it.

... girl with a chickenpox rash on her torso Lower leg of a child with chickenpox A child with chickenpox A child with chickenpox ... Chickenpox occurs in all parts of the world. In 2013, there were 140 million cases of chickenpox and shingles worldwide. Before ... A child with chickenpox Chickenpox blister closeup, day 7 after start of fever During pregnancy the dangers to the fetus ... Chickenpox, or chicken pox, also known as varicella, is a highly contagious, vaccine-preventable disease caused by the initial ...
Chickenpox may also refer to: Chickenpox (South Park), an episode of the American television series South Park Chickenpox (band ... a Swedish ska band "Chicken Pox", a song from the album Melting Pot by Booker T. & the MGs "Chicken Pox", a song from the album ... Chickenpox is a highly contagious illness caused by primary infection with varicella zoster virus. ... My Friends by the band I'm From Barcelona This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Chickenpox. If an ...
Chickenpox was a Swedish ska band signed to Burning Heart Records. They existed from 1994 until they broke up in 2002. At ... Chickenpox at AllMusic Band bio @ Burning Heart v t e (Articles with short description, Short description matches Wikidata, ... Approved by the Chickenpox (2001, Burning Heart) Dinnerdance and Latenightmusic EP (1994, Burning Heart) "Anything You Say" ( ...
Wikiquote has quotations related to Chickenpox. "Chickenpox" Full Episode at South Park Studios "Chickenpox" at IMDb (Articles ... In the episode, the parents of South Park intentionally expose their children to the chickenpox disease. Chickenpox infects ... Stan's chickenpox gets so bad he has to be brought to the hospital with Shelley. Sheila Broflovski tries sending Kyle over to ... "Chickenpox" is the tenth episode of the second season of the American animated television series South Park. The 23rd episode ...
Chickenpox. The Family Disruption Measure for Chickenpox was developed in 1994 by Galen Research. It has been used in a study ... McKenna SP, Hunt SM (March 1994). "A measure of family disruption for use in chickenpox and other childhood illnesses". Social ...
Trey Parker and Matt Stone (August 26, 1998). "Chickenpox". South Park. Season 2. Episode 210. Comedy Central. Trey Parker, ...
"Chickenpox (Varicella)". Center for Disease Control and Prevention. 1 July 2016. Osterholm, Michael T; Kelley, Nicholas S; ... "Chickenpox , Clinical Overview , Varicella , CDC". www.cdc.gov. Retrieved 2017-02-24. "Use of Antivirals , Health Professionals ... The varicella vaccine is 85% effective at preventing varicella (chickenpox) infection. However, 75% of individuals that are ... Chickenpox), influenza, and COVID-19. The characteristics of the breakthrough infection are dependent on the virus itself. ...
Examples include the episode "Chicken Pox" where it is revealed that he used to be close with Stuart McCormick when they were ... Trey Parker and Matt Stone (1998-08-26). "Chickenpox". South Park. Season 2. Episode 210. Comedy Central. In South Park: Bigger ...
"About Chickenpox , CDC". www.cdc.gov. 2022-03-23. Retrieved 2022-04-24. Wutzler P, Bonanni P, Burgess M, Gershon A, Sáfadi MA, ... Chickenpox, is a highly contagious skin disease caused by the varicella-zoster virus (VZV). It is characterized by pruritic ... Rates of chickenpox are higher in countries which lack adequate immunization programs. In 2014, it has been estimated that ... global incidence of serious chickenpox infections requiring hospitalizations was 4.2 million. Hand, foot, and mouth disease ( ...
Chickenpox-like rashes were recognized and described by ancient civilizations; the relationship between zoster and chickenpox ... It causes chickenpox (varicella) commonly affecting children and young adults, and shingles (herpes zoster) in adults but ... Within the human body it can be treated by a number of drugs and therapeutic agents including acyclovir for chickenpox, ... Thomas Huckle Weller also isolated the virus and found evidence that the same virus was responsible for both chickenpox and ...
Chicken Pox Mania • 55) Changing Names • 56) Vir's Movie • 57) Boyfriend Rumours • 58) The Camping Trip • 59) Paresh Bhai in ...
Prior to that date, he had not missed a game of hockey since the age of 10, when he contracted chickenpox and stayed home so as ... Fish, Wayne (1 December 2019). "Ivan Provorov's last missed game? Age 10, chicken pox". The Morning Call. Archived from the ...
"Varicella-Zoster Virus/Chickenpox". The Lecturio Medical Concept Library. Retrieved 27 August 2021. Yu, Jialin; Wu, Shixiao; Li ... chickenpox and shingles H - hepatitis, C (D), E E - enteroviruses A - AIDS (HIV infection) P - parvovirus B19 (produces hydrops ... Parvovirus B19 Coxsackievirus Chickenpox (caused by varicella zoster virus) Chlamydia HIV Human T-lymphotropic virus Syphilis ...
Preferential airborne infections, such as chicken pox, can be obtained through different routes, but mainly by aerosols. ... Common infections that spread by airborne transmission include SARS-CoV-2; measles morbillivirus, chickenpox virus; ...
It is sometimes also called the chickenpox skin test and the herpes skin test. It is a simple, low-cost, and rapid office based ...
Kollmeyer, Barbara (30 July 2020). "'As transmissible as chickenpox.' Here's the CDC report on the delta variant that led to ... and chickenpox (10-12). Due to Delta's high transmissibility even those that are vaccinated are vulnerable, albeit to a lesser ...
"Chickenpox (Varicella) Vaccination - CDC". www.cdc.gov. 7 July 2017. Archived from the original on 12 December 2018. Retrieved ... On 19 November 2018, the BBC reported there was an outbreak of chickenpox affecting 36 students at the Asheville Waldorf School ... Out of 152 students at the school, 110 had not received the Varicella vaccine that protects against chickenpox. The United ... Anti-vaxxers' in US chickenpox outbreak". BBC News. 19 November 2018. Archived from the original on 20 November 2018. Retrieved ...
variculata came from the Spanish word "varicela". Varicela means "chicken pox". Peperomia variculata is native to Peru. ...
Adam Cadre: why chickenpox? Baf's Guide game entry Fine Art Online: Vol. 17 No. 8 English in Australia: Issue 139 Avventure ... Varicella is the technical name for chicken pox, while "Primo" means cousin as he is the eldest brother) War Minister Klaus ...
"Bill Proposes Mandatory Chickenpox Vaccine." The Columbus Dispatch. February 16, 2000. 6B. ^ . James C. Benton. "Senator ... introducing legislation in 2000 to require all children twelve and under to be vaccinated against chicken pox.[12] Johnson ...
"Chickenpox: Practice Essentials, Background, Pathophysiology". March 22, 2020 - via eMedicine. {{cite journal}}: Cite journal ...
For more detailed discussion of the chickenpox theory, as developed by Carmody and G. E. Ford, and by the archaeologist Barry ... See Wikipedia's article on The History Wars.) "Chickenpox blamed for Aboriginal deaths". 2013-08-07. "Welcome to CAEPR". ... a professor of physiology John Carmody argued that the epidemic was an outbreak of chickenpox which took a drastic toll on an ... Warren argued against the chickenpox theory at endnote 3 of Smallpox at Sydney Cove - Who, When, Why?. However, in a 2014 joint ...
e.g., tuberculosis, chickenpox, measles.[citation needed] A common form of transmission is by way of respiratory droplets, ...
"Chickenpox blamed for Aboriginal deaths". Canberra Times. Retrieved 17 October 2015. "The 'myth' of smallpox at Sydney Cove in ... that the 1789 epidemic was not smallpox but chickenpox - to which indigenous Australians also had no inherited resistance - ...
A fourth theory is that the epidemic was of chickenpox, not smallpox, carried by members of the First Fleet, and to which the ... "Chickenpox blamed for Aboriginal deaths". The Canberra Times. Retrieved 17 October 2015. McIlroy, Tom (19 April 2015). "The ...
Cholera and chicken pox were common. By 1962, Kaoh Chbar's population had grown to 38 households. With little space on the ...
On the same token, chickenpox and shingles are not mutually exclusive in that shingles may arise from the reactivation of the ... Herpes zoster can be contracted from a virus called varicella-zoster (VZV); identically to the one that induces chickenpox. ... It, however, does not prevent chickenpox. Although people cannot contract shingles from a shingle-positive person, it can ... VZV after having chickenpox. Shingrix contains a weakened and genetically modified form of the varicella-zoster virus. The risk ...
In November 2014, an epidemic of chickenpox broke out at Ashland Middle School. 20 students were reported to have chickenpox, ... Teresa, Thomas (December 16, 2014). "Chicken pox hits Ashland Middle School". Ashland Daily Tidings. "Count of homeless ...
Before the chickenpox vaccine became available, 100 to 150 children in the U.S. died from chickenpox annually. In the UK, ... While chickenpox parties are still held today, they are far less common than before the chickenpox vaccine was introduced.[ ... US CDC: Chickenpox (Varicella): Transmission US CDC: Chickenpox (Varicella): Vaccination US CDC: Measles The Return of the ... Chickenpox parties, at which children gather so they can all be infected by a child who has the pox, are often held by parents ...
Hope-Simpson studied chickenpox and shingles; the two conditions were known to be related, but the nature of the relationship ... He showed that shingles was caused by reactivation of the chickenpox virus. Hope-Simpson was born on 31 January 1908, the ... particularly on chickenpox and herpes zoster, in the 1940s and 1950s, which were published in The Lancet and the BMJ.[citation ... needed] His landmark paper, showing how immunity conferred by natural chicken-pox in childhood waned with age, published in ...
CDC website: Chickenpox. The following authors contributed to the previous version of this chapter: Mona Marin, Adriana S. ... Vaccinated people who get chickenpox might develop lesions that do not crust. These people are considered contagious until no ... After primary infection as varicella (chickenpox), VZV remains latent in the sensory-nerve ganglia and can reactivate later, ... For detailed information regarding the varicella vaccine, visit CDCs website, Chickenpox (Varicella) Vaccination. ...
Learn more about chickenpox signs and symptoms, complications, transmission, prevention and treatment, and more. ... View images of chickenpox in unvaccinated people and view images of chickenpox in vaccinated people (also called breakthrough ... Learn about how the chickenpox vaccine has been saving lives and preventing illness since 1995: U.S. Chickenpox Vaccination ... The best way to prevent chickenpox is to get the chickenpox vaccine. ...
Chickenpox is a contagious disease caused by the varicella-zoster virus. It causes an itchy rash with blisters. Learn about ... Chickenpox (Varicella) (VisualDX) * Chickenpox Vaccination: What Everyone Should Know (Centers for Disease Control and ... Once you catch chickenpox, the virus usually stays in your body. You probably will not get chickenpox again, but the virus can ... A chickenpox vaccine can help prevent most cases of chickenpox, or make it less severe if you do get it. ...
... is the etiologic agent of the clinical syndrome of chickenpox (varicella). Zoster, a different clinical entity, is caused by ... encoded search term (Chickenpox) and Chickenpox What to Read Next on Medscape ... Chickenpox is a common disease, with most cases occurring in the pediatric population. Varicella has neither a racial nor a ... Chickenpox is largely a childhood disease, with more than 90% of cases occurring in children younger than 10 years. The disease ...
... girl with a chickenpox rash on her torso Lower leg of a child with chickenpox A child with chickenpox A child with chickenpox ... Chickenpox occurs in all parts of the world. In 2013, there were 140 million cases of chickenpox and shingles worldwide. Before ... A child with chickenpox Chickenpox blister closeup, day 7 after start of fever During pregnancy the dangers to the fetus ... Chickenpox, or chicken pox, also known as varicella, is a highly contagious, vaccine-preventable disease caused by the initial ...
Chickenpox is caused by a virus that is transmitted through the air or by direct contact with an infected person. Once the ...
... due to the chickenpox vaccine, but it can easily spread from one person to another. ... Chickenpox (varicella) has become less common in the U.S. ... To help prevent chickenpox, kids should get the chickenpox ... Chickenpox (varicella) is much less common in the U.S. than it used to be, thanks to the chickenpox vaccine. If someone does ... But chickenpox spreads easily from person to person, so a child who has the virus should stay home until the rash is completely ...
Varicella, also known as chickenpox, is a very common and highly infectious childhood disease that is found worldwide. Symptoms ...
Chickenpox is a highly contagious disease characterized by little blisters all over the body. Learn more from Boston Childrens ... Chickenpox , Diagnosis & Treatments. How does a doctor diagnosis chickenpox?. The chickenpox rash is unique, and a diagnosis ... Chickenpox , Symptoms & Causes. What causes chickenpox?. Chickenpox is extremely contagious. It spreads from person to person ... Is chickenpox common?. More than 95 percent of American adults have had chickenpox and about 4,000,000 people get chickenpox ...
Chickenpox), by Age Group - National Health Interview Survey, 2007-2016 - Featured Topics from the National Center for Health ... Among younger children, the percentage of children who had ever had chickenpox declined by 73.9%, from 16.1% in 2007 to 4.2% in ... Among older children the percentage who had ever had chickenpox declined by 76.9%, from 61.4% in 2007 to 14.2% in 2016. ... During 2007-2016, the percentage of children aged 4-17 years who had ever had chickenpox decreased among both younger children ...
The 2006 book titled, "The Chickenpox Vaccine: A new epidemic of disease and corruption" by Mark Orrin and Dr. Gary S. Goldman ... Severe Breakthrough Varicella Occurring From Chickenpox Vaccination. A recent review published in the journal Expert Review of ...
Learn more about Chickenpox…. Chickenpox Vaccine. There are two live virus vaccines for chickenpox licensed for use in the U.S ... Chickenpox is transmitted through direct contact with chickenpox blisters, by inhaling particles from the chickenpox blisters, ... Chickenpox is transmitted through direct contact with chickenpox blisters, by inhaling particles from the chickenpox blisters, ... Can chickenpox cause injury and/or death?. For most people, chickenpox is a mild infection which lasts between 5 and 10 days.. ...
"A Life-Threatening Condition in A Child With Chicken Pox: Eczema Herpeticum" written by Coskun CELTIK, Yasemin KARAL, Asli ... Kaposi Varicelliform Eruption Associated With Chickenpox in a Liver Transplant Recipient. Experimental and Clinical ...
Get your vaccination to protect yourself and others in your family and community. This protection is especially important for people who cannot get vaccinated, such as those with weakened immune systems, or pregnant women ...
A chickenpox outbreak has LaVille school officials and parents on alert!. On Friday, the State notified LaVille Jr.-Sr. High ... LaVille schools experiencing a Chickenpox outbreak. By: ABC57 Staff Posted: Nov 22, 2011 2:03 PM EDT , Updated: Nov 6, 2014 1: ... A separate letter was sent to the homes of students who were not current on their Chickenpox immunizations. School officials ... Principle Farthing encourages parents who have questions about the Chickenpox to contact their family doctor or the school ...
And finally, the Independent reports that guidance on chicken pox in pregnant women has been updated in a bid to avoid ... NHS in critical condition, rethink unrealisitic exercise targets, and new guidance on chicken pox in pregnancy. ... and new guidance on chicken pox in pregnancy ...
Monkeypox FAQ: How contagious? Are kids at risk? If you had chickenpox are you safe? ... She says one is that if youve had chickenpox, youre protected against monkeypox. Thats not true, she says. ...
MMR and Chickenpox Vaccines and the Risk of Seizures. Keris Krennhrubec, Amelia Murphy, and Diana Zuckerman, PhD, National ... Unfortunately, the rate of seizures goes up to 9 per 10,000 children who get ProQuad (combined MMR/chickenpox vaccine). These ... The combination measles, mumps, rubella, and chickenpox (also called varicella) vaccine is convenient for parents and young ... chickenpox (varicella). Since children need to get all four of these vaccines, Merck (the company that makes both of them) ...
Varicella Virus (Chicken Pox) Titer. The Varicella Zoster Virus (VZV) Titer is a blood test that checks if you are immune to ... Some people have had the chickenpox and developed immunity to varicella that way. Other people have developed immunity through ... Varicella Zoster Virus, also known as Chickenpox and Shingles. It measures your antibody levels to get a sense for whether your ...
Ailment: Chicken pox. Remedy: Serum. Question posted by JeanTerhune of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada on 1 November 2011 at 3:14 520. ...
Find and book a nearby chickenpox shot appointment in Fort Worth. Same-day vision screenings with quality, local healthcare ... Chickenpox Vaccine FAQs. *. Where can I get a chickenpox vaccine in Brazil?. In general, allergy tests will be available at ... Who needs the chickenpox vaccine?. According to the CDC, children, teens, and adults should receive two doses of the chickenpox ... Two types of chickenpox vaccines. Two types of chickenpox vaccines are now approved for use in the United States. The vaccines ...
Adolescent Age Factors Chickenpox Chickenpox Vaccine Child Child, Preschool Cohort Studies Disease Susceptibility Drug Approval ... "Age-Specific Incidence Of Chickenpox" 109, no. 6 (1994). Finger, R et al. "Age-Specific Incidence Of Chickenpox" vol. 109, no. ... Two studies were conducted in Kentucky to assess age-specific incidence of chickenpox. The first assessed chickenpox occurrence ... Title : Age-Specific Incidence Of Chickenpox Personal Author(s) : Finger, R;Hughes, J P;Meade, B J;Pelletier, A R;Palmer, C T; ...
Chickenpox - Learn about the causes, symptoms, diagnosis & treatment from the MSD Manuals - Medical Consumer Version. ... Symptoms of Chickenpox Symptoms of chickenpox begin 7 to 21 days after infection occurs. They include ... Prognosis for Chickenpox Healthy children nearly always recover from chickenpox without problems. Before routine immunization, ... Chickenpox can also be transmitted to the fetus, especially if chickenpox develops during the first or early second trimester, ...
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More mumps and chickenpox cases hit Auroras ICE facility , CAIRCO Report - Concerned Americans, our Constitution, our ... The mumps cases were both in one pod, and the chickenpox in a second. All detainees have been given a measles and mumps vaccine ... Two cases of mumps and a case of chickenpox at Auroras immigration detention facility - the latest in a string of outbreaks at ... Auroras facility, which is operated by the private company GEO Group, recorded chickenpox outbreaks in October, January and ...
Chicken pox, she finds out. Is her vacation completely ruined? And now that she cant go to Paris, how will she be able to ...
Chickenpox is a highly contagious viral infection that is caused by the varicella-zoster virus. It is characterized by a rash ... Preventing Chickenpox: Vaccination, Hygiene, and Other Strategies for Avoiding Varicella Zoster Virus. Chickenpox is a highly ... While most people recover from chickenpox without complications, it can be a serious illness for certain populations, such as ... The good news is that there are steps you can take to prevent chickenpox and protect yourself and others ...
Chickenpox case definitions; uniform criteria used to define a disease for public health surveillance. ...
Chickenpox is a common childhood illness, with more than 90% of the UK population experiencing chickenpox by the age of 12 . ... The Boots Chickenpox Vaccination Service is available in 30 stores across the UK to those aged 1-65.The service costs £65 per ... Chickenpox is highly contagious and spreads through coughing, sneezing and direct contact, and there are an estimated 651,000 ... This then protects the person at risk of catching chickenpox through close contact. The Boots service is for people who may ...
Chickenpox and pregnancy By: Jenn McBride Its no mystery diagnosis when blistering red spots speckle the skin form head to toe ... And because the experience of someone ever having chickenpox is right up there with the memory of their first birthday, Moretti ... Women are at greater risk of developing Varicella pneumonia - a potentially life threatening aftereffect of the chickenpox ... its the chickenpox.. But for pregnant women who have sidestepped around early life infection, being exposed to the virus ...
  • Chickenpox is a highly contagious disease caused by the varicella-zoster virus (VZV). (cdc.gov)
  • Chickenpox is an infection caused by the varicella-zoster virus. (medlineplus.gov)
  • The varicella-zoster virus (VZV) (see the image below) is the etiologic agent of the clinical syndrome of chickenpox (varicella). (medscape.com)
  • Chickenpox, or chicken pox, also known as varicella, is a highly contagious, vaccine-preventable disease caused by the initial infection with varicella zoster virus (VZV), a member of the herpesvirus family. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chickenpox is a highly infectious childhood disease caused by the varicella-zoster virus (VZV) , a form of the herpes virus. (childrenshospital.org)
  • Chickenpox (varicella) is an illness caused by the varicella zoster virus, a DNA virus that is part of the herpes virus family and associated with shingles. (nvic.org)
  • The Varicella Zoster Virus (VZV) Titer is a blood test that checks if you are immune to Varicella Zoster Virus, also known as Chickenpox and Shingles. (anylabtestnow.com)
  • Varicella Vaccine The varicella vaccine helps protect against chickenpox (varicella), a very contagious infection caused by the varicella-zoster virus. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Shingles Shingles is a painful skin rash caused by a viral infection that results from reactivation of the varicella-zoster virus, the virus that causes chickenpox. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Chickenpox is a highly contagious viral infection that is caused by the varicella-zoster virus. (alliedacademies.org)
  • Varicella, commonly known in the United States as chickenpox, is caused by the varicella-zoster virus. (medscape.com)
  • Chickenpox: The varicella-zoster virus, which causes chickenpox, is a highly infectious viral illness. (daddydontblog.com)
  • Primary contact with the varicella-zoster virus occurs through varicella (chickenpox) and culminates with this virus entering the sensory nerves and remaining latent in the dorsal root ganglion. (bvsalud.org)
  • Before a vaccination was developed, almost every child got chickenpox, which is characterized by little blisters all over the body. (childrenshospital.org)
  • Mild side effects, such as redness, rash, or pain at the injection site, as well as fever, have been reported following chickenpox vaccination. (nvic.org)
  • NVIC encourages you to become fully informed about chickenpox and the chickenpox vaccine by reading all sections in the table of contents, which contain many links and resources such as the manufacturer product information inserts, and to speak with one or more trusted health care professionals before making a vaccination decision for yourself or your child. (nvic.org)
  • Children, adolescents, and adults who have never had chickenpox or been inoculated against it should get this vaccination. (solvhealth.com)
  • Routine vaccination can prevent chickenpox. (msdmanuals.com)
  • This is why Boots has introduced a new and convenient private Chickenpox Vaccination Service** in 30 of our stores across the UK, providing protection against the virus. (boots-uk.com)
  • Whilst the NHS does not offer a universal childhood vaccination service against chickenpox, they do vaccinate some individuals including non-immune healthcare workers and individuals who come into close contact with those with weakened immune systems. (boots-uk.com)
  • The Boots Chickenpox Vaccination Service is available in 30 stores across the UK to those aged 1-65.The service costs £65 per vaccination and the course consists of two vaccinations given six weeks apart, so the total cost for the course is £130. (boots-uk.com)
  • As the UK's leading pharmacy-led health and beauty retailer, we are delighted to be able to offer the Boots Chickenpox Vaccination Service in 30 of our stores. (boots-uk.com)
  • As well as offering a private pay service to customers who want to be vaccinated in order to avoid contracting the disease, the Boots Chickenpox Vaccination Service** will provide customers with self-management advice. (boots-uk.com)
  • Chickenpox can be prevented through vaccination. (healthhub.sg)
  • According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) about 15 to 20 percent of people who have received one dose of chickenpox vaccine do still get chickenpox, but experience a mild case. (childrenshospital.org)
  • According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, two doses of the chickenpox vaccine are around 90% effective in preventing chickenpox, which means you could still get the disease after being vaccinated. (solvhealth.com)
  • Those with shingles may spread chickenpox to those who are not immune through contact with the blisters. (wikipedia.org)
  • Because the rash comes in waves, all three stages of the chickenpox rash (red bumps, blisters, and scabs) appear on the body at the same time. (kidshealth.org)
  • It's important not to scratch chickenpox blisters. (childrenshospital.org)
  • Chickenpox is contagious for one to two days before the appearance of the rash and until the blisters have dried and become scabs. (childrenshospital.org)
  • Chickenpox is transmitted through direct contact with chickenpox blisters, by inhaling particles from the chickenpox blisters, and possibly from contact with respiratory secretions infected with the virus. (nvic.org)
  • Chickenpox is transmitted through direct contact with, or by inhaling particles from chickenpox blisters. (nvic.org)
  • A person with chickenpox is contagious from 2 days before the rash appears and remains contagious until the last blisters have crusted. (msdmanuals.com)
  • The virus spreads through the air when an infected person coughs or sneezes, or through direct contact with fluid from chickenpox blisters. (daddydontblog.com)
  • After primary infection as varicella (chickenpox), VZV remains latent in the sensory-nerve ganglia and can reactivate later, causing herpes zoster (shingles). (cdc.gov)
  • You probably will not get chickenpox again, but the virus can cause shingles in adults. (medlineplus.gov)
  • In 2013, there were 140 million cases of chickenpox and shingles worldwide. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, there is a chance of developing shingles later in life, or even a secondary case of chickenpox. (childrenshospital.org)
  • Re-exposure to chickenpox has been found to boost immunity and reduce the risk of shingles infection in older children and adults. (nvic.org)
  • Shingles Vaccine The herpes zoster virus that causes shingles is the same virus that causes chickenpox. (msdmanuals.com)
  • The CDC recommends children receive a first dose of chickenpox vaccine between 12 and 15 months and a second dose between 4 and 6 years. (nvic.org)
  • These symptoms of chickenpox appear 10 to 21 days after exposure to a contagious person. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chickenpox is extremely contagious. (childrenshospital.org)
  • Chickenpox is highly contagious and spreads through coughing, sneezing and direct contact, and there are an estimated 651,000 cases in the UK each year [i] . (boots-uk.com)
  • The classic symptom of chickenpox is an uncomfortable, itchy rash. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Chickenpox is usually diagnosed clinically on the basis of the characteristic rash and successive crops of lesions. (medscape.com)
  • If someone does get chickenpox, the infection and the rash it causes will go away without treatment. (kidshealth.org)
  • But chickenpox spreads easily from person to person, so a child who has the virus should stay home until the rash is completely crusted over. (kidshealth.org)
  • The classic chickenpox rash begins as many small red bumps that look like pimples or insect bites. (kidshealth.org)
  • The chickenpox rash is unique, and a diagnosis can usually be made from a physical examination. (childrenshospital.org)
  • Chickenpox is characterized by an itchy, blister-like rash that appears first on the chest, back, and face before spreading to the rest of the body, according to the CDC. (solvhealth.com)
  • she was diagnosed with chickenpox on 11 august 2016, german measles on 19 september 2017 and now 11 september 2018 she has a rash again, not yet diagnosed. (healthtap.com)
  • The CDC also recommends two doses of chickenpox vaccine be administered 4 to 8 weeks apart to all school-aged students, post-secondary aged students, and all healthy adults who lack immunity to chickenpox. (nvic.org)
  • Recovery from chickenpox confers long lasting natural immunity and immunocompetent individuals rarely experience a second attack. (nvic.org)
  • Some people have had the chickenpox and developed immunity to varicella that way. (anylabtestnow.com)
  • You don't need the vaccine if you show evidence of immunity against chickenpox, according to the CDC. (solvhealth.com)
  • Immunity is demonstrated, among other things, by being born in the United States before 1980 and having a confirmed diagnosis of chickenpox. (solvhealth.com)
  • A person who has had chickenpox develops immunity and cannot contract it again. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Reexposure and subclinical infections may serve to boost the immunity acquired after an episode of chickenpox. (medscape.com)
  • Most adults would benefit from them if taken early enough, especially those who have impaired immunity as they are more susceptible to severe chickenpox. (healthhub.sg)
  • Two cases of mumps and a case of chickenpox at Aurora's immigration detention facility - the latest in a string of outbreaks at the center - have forced 142 detainees into isolation. (cairco.org)
  • What are the symptoms of chickenpox? (childrenshospital.org)
  • Symptoms of chickenpox generally begin between 10 and 21 days following exposure to the virus and the illness typically lasts between 5 and 10 days. (nvic.org)
  • MMR does not protect against chickenpox, although a vaccine is available. (healthtap.com)
  • Go to Pediatric Chickenpox for more complete information on this topic. (medscape.com)
  • Complications from chickenpox can occur in infants, adults and people with weak immune systems . (childrenshospital.org)
  • Infants, adults and people with weak immune systems who get chickenpox are at risk for serious complications. (childrenshospital.org)
  • While most people recover from chickenpox without complications, it can be a serious illness for certain populations, such as infants, pregnant women, and individuals with weakened immune systems. (alliedacademies.org)
  • Chickenpox is an airborne disease which easily spreads via human-to-human transmission, typically through the coughs and sneezes of an infected person. (wikipedia.org)
  • The virus first presents as a chickenpox infection, however, as the virus is able to remain in the sensory nerve ganglia of the body after the first infection, it has the potential to reactivate. (nvic.org)
  • Chickenpox is an infection that mostly affects children. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Repeat subclinical infection can occur in these persons, but second attacks of chickenpox are extremely rare in immunocompetent persons. (medscape.com)
  • Chickenpox can be serious, especially during pregnancy, in babies, adolescents, adults, and people with weakened immune systems (lowered ability to fight germs and sickness). (cdc.gov)
  • More than 95 percent of American adults have had chickenpox and about 4,000,000 people get chickenpox every year. (childrenshospital.org)
  • According to the CDC, children, teens, and adults should receive two doses of the chickenpox vaccine. (solvhealth.com)
  • A chickenpox vaccine can help prevent most cases of chickenpox, or make it less severe if you do get it. (medlineplus.gov)
  • medical citation needed] Chickenpox is rarely fatal, although it is generally more severe in adult men than in women or children. (wikipedia.org)
  • The vaccine has proven very effective in preventing severe chickenpox. (childrenshospital.org)
  • Chickenpox vaccine is reported to be between 80 and 85 percent effective at preventing chickenpox and more than 95 percent effective at preventing severe illness. (nvic.org)
  • chickenpox is rarely severe. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Chickenpox can also give rise to more severe problems in pregnant women, causing stillbirths or birth defects, and can spread to their babies during childbirth. (healthhub.sg)
  • Those aged 13 and up who have never had chickenpox or been vaccinated should get two doses spaced by at least 28 days. (solvhealth.com)
  • a live virus vaccine containing measles, mumps, rubella and varicella (chickenpox), also manufactured by Merck. (nvic.org)
  • The combination measles, mumps, rubella, and chickenpox (also called varicella) vaccine is convenient for parents and young children: four vaccines in only one shot. (center4research.org)
  • The mumps cases were both in one pod, and the chickenpox in a second. (cairco.org)
  • Aurora's facility, which is operated by the private company GEO Group, recorded chickenpox outbreaks in October, January and February, along with mumps cases in March. (cairco.org)
  • Chickenpox is largely a childhood disease, with more than 90% of cases occurring in children younger than 10 years. (medscape.com)
  • Varicella, also known as chickenpox, is a very common and highly infectious childhood disease that is found worldwide. (canada.ca)
  • These three diseases used to be common, but since this vaccine was developed they have been almost eradicated in the U.S. [1] In 1995, a vaccine was developed for another routine childhood disease: chickenpox (varicella). (center4research.org)
  • Chickenpox is a common childhood disease. (healthhub.sg)
  • These results were reported at the 2008 meeting of the CDC Authorization Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), based on a study of 43,000 children who got ProQuad and 315,000 children who got the MMR and separate chickenpox vaccine, by Dr. Nicola Klein at the Kaiser Permanente Vaccine Study Center. (center4research.org)
  • Those who are moderately or severely ill when their chickenpox immunization appointment is scheduled. (solvhealth.com)
  • But research shows that this combination vaccine may increase the risk of fever-related seizures in children compared to having the separate MMR and chickenpox vaccines at the same time. (center4research.org)
  • Now, these studies are showing that children ages 12-23 months who get this vaccine are twice as likely to have seizures caused by high fevers compared to toddlers of the same age who get the MMR and chickenpox vaccines separately but at the same doctor visit. (center4research.org)
  • Among those vaccinated with MMRV, 5.8 out of 10,000 participants experienced seizures, whereas among those vaccinated with the MMR and chickenpox vaccines separately, 2.2 out of 10,000 participants experienced seizures. (center4research.org)
  • Two types of chickenpox vaccines are now approved for use in the United States. (solvhealth.com)
  • Since the chickenpox vaccine was introduced in 1995, less and less children are getting the disease. (childrenshospital.org)
  • Since 1995, a chickenpox vaccine has been available for children 12 months of age and older. (childrenshospital.org)
  • Chickenpox is a highly infectious viral illness that is caused by a herpes virus called varicella-zoster. (healthhub.sg)
  • Children with chickenpox should not receive aspirin because of the possibility of causing a complication called Reye's syndrome, which is a very serious illness that can cause liver and brain damage. (healthhub.sg)
  • During this time, his son developed a serious bout of chickenpox, leading him to turn his expertise toward combating the highly transmissible illness. (techgenyz.com)
  • Chickenpox occurs in all parts of the world. (wikipedia.org)
  • Transmission of chickenpox occurs from person to person by direct contact or through the air. (childrenshospital.org)
  • A separate letter was sent to the homes of students who were not current on their Chickenpox immunizations. (abc57.com)
  • There are also antiviral medications that can be used to treat chickenpox. (healthhub.sg)
  • Most individuals who have had chickenpox will be immune to the disease for the rest of their lives. (childrenshospital.org)
  • The 2006 book titled, "The Chickenpox Vaccine: A new epidemic of disease and corruption" by Mark Orrin and Dr. Gary S. Goldman tells of the all-to-common issue in vaccine research including the omission of data, misled health officials, censoring results showing the varicella vaccine's deleterious outcomes and other questionable events. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • The varicella vaccine, sometimes known as the chickenpox vaccine, can help you avoid contracting the disease. (solvhealth.com)
  • Chickenpox is usually a benign disease in children, and almost all children recover uneventfully. (medscape.com)
  • Once you have had chickenpox, you are immune to the disease and are very unlikely to catch it again. (healthhub.sg)
  • In healthy children, chickenpox is usually a mild disease. (healthhub.sg)
  • Once you catch chickenpox, the virus usually stays in your body. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Chickenpox is caused by a virus that is transmitted through the air or by direct contact with an infected person. (faqs.org)
  • For the most part, the chickenpox virus needs to run its course, but there are several things you can do to help reduce the symptoms and prevent other infections. (childrenshospital.org)
  • On Friday, the State notified LaVille Jr.-Sr. High School that there are eight confirmed cases of Chickenpox (Vericella Zoster Virus) in the School Corporation. (abc57.com)
  • Women are at greater risk of developing Varicella pneumonia - a potentially life threatening aftereffect of the chickenpox virus. (ohbabymagazine.com)
  • Unfortunately, the rate of seizures goes up to 9 per 10,000 children who get ProQuad (combined MMR/chickenpox vaccine). (center4research.org)
  • However, a substantial number of polyclinic attendances due to febrile infections such as dengue fever and chickenpox appear to be recorded as URTI in the polyclinic database. (who.int)
  • Chickenpox is usually acquired through inhalation of airborne respiratory droplets from an infected host. (medscape.com)
  • Most people with chickenpox simply have sores on the skin and in the mouth. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Influenza, dengue fever and chickenpox (varicella) were positively associated with acute URTI polyclinic attendances. (who.int)
  • During 2007-2016, the percentage of children aged 4-17 years who had ever had chickenpox decreased among both younger children (aged 4-11 years) and older children (aged 12-17 years). (cdc.gov)
  • Among younger children, the percentage of children who had ever had chickenpox declined by 73.9%, from 16.1% in 2007 to 4.2% in 2016. (cdc.gov)
  • Among older children the percentage who had ever had chickenpox declined by 76.9%, from 61.4% in 2007 to 14.2% in 2016. (cdc.gov)
  • During 2007-2016, older children were more likely than younger children to have ever had chickenpox. (cdc.gov)
  • Approximately 3 in 10,000 children will have seizures after getting the MMR vaccine, [1] and that increases to about 4 in 10,000 if they get the separate chickenpox vaccine at the same doctor visit. (center4research.org)
  • Children between the ages of 12 and 15 should receive the first dose of the chickenpox vaccine, and children between the ages of four and six should receive the second dose. (solvhealth.com)
  • Chickenpox most often affects children, but the vaccine has greatly decreased the number of cases. (msdmanuals.com)
  • While chickenpox is common and harmless to most people, it may have an adverse impact on those whose immune systems are impaired such as newborn infants, those undergoing chemotherapy for cancer, people with AIDS, as well as those taking steroids like cortisone or prednisone. (healthhub.sg)
  • Chickenpox is usually mild and lasts 5 to 10 days. (medlineplus.gov)
  • 4 year old got chickenpox vaccine 2 days ago and MMR vaccine a 30 days ago. (healthtap.com)
  • One can get chickenpox within 10-21 days after contact with an infected person. (healthhub.sg)
  • Vaccinated people who get chickenpox might develop lesions that do not crust. (cdc.gov)
  • People usually only get chickenpox once. (wikipedia.org)
  • The best way to prevent chickenpox is to get the chickenpox vaccine. (cdc.gov)
  • To help prevent chickenpox, kids should get the chickenpox vaccine when they're 12 to 15 months old , and a booster shot when they're 4 to 6 years old. (kidshealth.org)
  • The chickenpox vaccine is very good at preventing most cases and reduces the severity in those it doesn't prevent. (childrenshospital.org)
  • Nowadays, the availability of an effective vaccine has radically reduced the number of chickenpox cases. (childrenshospital.org)
  • In the beginning of the year, the Ministry of National Health Services, Regulations and Coordination of Pakistan reported 76 suspected cases of chickenpox (varicella) including 15 deaths (case-fatality rate 19.7%) and these cases were reported from Faisalabad city, a highly populous city in Punjab province in the eastern part of the country. (who.int)
  • This then protects the person at risk of catching chickenpox through close contact. (boots-uk.com)
  • [3] This risk is increased slightly after receiving either the MMR vaccine or the chickenpox vaccine. (center4research.org)
  • Takahashi returned to Japan in 1965 and began culturing live but weakened chickenpox viruses in animal and human tissue. (techgenyz.com)