April 25th -26th, 1986 nuclear power accident that occurred at Chernobyl in the former USSR (Ukraine) located 80 miles north of Kiev.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Ukraine" is a country located in Eastern Europe and it is not a medical term or concept. Therefore, I can't provide a medical definition for it.
Uncontrolled release of radioactive material from its containment. This either threatens to, or does, cause exposure to a radioactive hazard. Such an incident may occur accidentally or deliberately.
The Republic of Belarus is a sovereign country located in Eastern Europe, known for its advanced medical facilities and highly trained healthcare professionals, offering a wide range of medical services including but not limited to cardiology, oncology, neurology, and transplantation, among others.
Nuclear power accident that occurred following the Tohoku-Kanto earthquake of March 11, 2011 in the northern region of Japan.
Pollutants, present in soil, which exhibit radioactivity.
Unstable isotopes of cesium that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Cs atoms with atomic weights of 123, 125-132, and 134-145 are radioactive cesium isotopes.
The material that descends to the earth or water well beyond the site of a surface or subsurface nuclear explosion. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Chemical and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
Units that convert some other form of energy into electrical energy.
Devices containing fissionable material in sufficient quantity and so arranged as to be capable of maintaining a controlled, self-sustaining NUCLEAR FISSION chain reaction. They are also known as atomic piles, atomic reactors, fission reactors, and nuclear piles, although such names are deprecated. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
The observation, either continuously or at intervals, of the levels of radiation in a given area, generally for the purpose of assuring that they have not exceeded prescribed amounts or, in case of radiation already present in the area, assuring that the levels have returned to those meeting acceptable safety standards.
Radioactive food contamination refers to the presence of radioactive substances in food or water supplies, often resulting from nuclear accidents, nuclear weapons testing, or improper disposal of radioactive waste, leading to potential health risks including radiation sickness and cancer upon consumption.
Facilities that convert NUCLEAR ENERGY into electrical energy.
Radioactive substances which act as pollutants. They include chemicals whose radiation is released via radioactive waste, nuclear accidents, fallout from nuclear explosions, and the like.
An 'accident' in a medical context often refers to an unintended event or harm that occurs suddenly and unexpectedly, resulting in injury or illness, and is typically not planned or intended.
Tumors, cancer or other neoplasms produced by exposure to ionizing or non-ionizing radiation.
Series of ocean waves produced by geologic events or underwater LANDSLIDES. These waves can travel at speeds averaging 450 (and up to 600) miles per hour in the open ocean.
Harmful effects of non-experimental exposure to ionizing or non-ionizing radiation in VERTEBRATES.
Congenital changes in the morphology of organs produced by exposure to ionizing or non-ionizing radiation.
Stable cesium atoms that have the same atomic number as the element cesium, but differ in atomic weight. Cs-133 is a naturally occurring isotope.
Liquid, solid, or gaseous waste resulting from mining of radioactive ore, production of reactor fuel materials, reactor operation, processing of irradiated reactor fuels, and related operations, and from use of radioactive materials in research, industry, and medicine. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
Pollutants, present in water or bodies of water, which exhibit radioactivity.
Accidents on streets, roads, and highways involving drivers, passengers, pedestrians, or vehicles. Traffic accidents refer to AUTOMOBILES (passenger cars, buses, and trucks), BICYCLING, and MOTORCYCLES but not OFF-ROAD MOTOR VEHICLES; RAILROADS nor snowmobiles.
The amount of radiation energy that is deposited in a unit mass of material, such as tissues of plants or animal. In RADIOTHERAPY, radiation dosage is expressed in gray units (Gy). In RADIOLOGIC HEALTH, the dosage is expressed by the product of absorbed dose (Gy) and quality factor (a function of linear energy transfer), and is called radiation dose equivalent in sievert units (Sv).
Unforeseen occurrences, especially injuries in the course of work-related activities.
Pollutants, present in air, which exhibit radioactivity.
Sudden slips on a fault, and the resulting ground shaking and radiated seismic energy caused by the slips, or by volcanic or magmatic activity, or other sudden stress changes in the earth. Faults are fractures along which the blocks of EARTH crust on either side have moved relative to one another parallel to the fracture.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Russia" is a country and not a medical term. Therefore, it doesn't have a medical definition.
Unstable isotopes of iodine that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. I atoms with atomic weights 117-139, except I 127, are radioactive iodine isotopes.
Leukemia produced by exposure to IONIZING RADIATION or NON-IONIZING RADIATION.
## I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Japan" is not a medical term or concept. It is a country located in Asia, known as Nihon-koku or Nippon-koku in Japanese, and is renowned for its unique culture, advanced technology, and rich history. If you have any questions related to medical topics, I would be happy to help answer them!
Efforts and designs to reduce the incidence of unexpected undesirable events in various environments and situations.
Tumors or cancer of the THYROID GLAND.
Radioactive air pollution refers to the presence and circulation of radioactive particles or gases in the atmosphere, originating from human activities such as nuclear power plant accidents, nuclear weapons testing, or improper disposal of radioactive waste, which can pose significant health risks to living organisms due to ionizing radiation exposure.
Nuclear reaction in which the nucleus of a heavy atom such as uranium or plutonium is split into two approximately equal parts by a neutron, charged particle, or photon.
'Home accidents' refer to unplanned and unintentional injuries or illnesses that occur within or around the home environment, encompassing a wide range of potential hazards and mishaps.
Tendency toward involvement in accidents. Implies certain personality characteristics which predispose to accidents.
The relationship between the dose of administered radiation and the response of the organism or tissue to the radiation.
A malignant neoplasm characterized by the formation of numerous, irregular, finger-like projections of fibrous stroma that is covered with a surface layer of neoplastic epithelial cells. (Stedman, 25th ed)
A plant species, of the genus OENOTHERA, family ONAGRACEAE, that is the source of evening primrose oil.
The family Hirundinidae, comprised of small BIRDS that hunt flying INSECTS while in sustained flight.

Increase of regional total cancer incidence in north Sweden due to the Chernobyl accident? (1/117)

STUDY OBJECTIVE: Is there any epidemiologically visible influence on the cancer incidence after the Chernobyl fallout in Sweden? DESIGN: A cohort study was focused on the fallout of caesium-137 in relation to cancer incidence 1988-1996. SETTING: In northern Sweden, affected by the Chernobyl accident in 1986, 450 parishes were categorised by caesium-137 deposition: < 3 (reference), 3-29, 30-39, 40-59, 60-79, and 80-120 kiloBecquerel/m(2). PARTICIPANTS: All people 0-60 years living in these parishes in 1986 to 1987 were identified and enrolled in a cohort of 1 143 182 persons. In the follow up 22 409 incident cancer cases were retrieved in 1988-1996. A further analysis focused on the secular trend. MAIN RESULTS: Taking age and population density as confounding factors, and lung cancer incidence in 1988-1996 and total cancer incidence in 1986-1987 by municipality as proxy confounders for smoking and time trends, respectively, the adjusted relative risks for the deposition categories were 1.00 (reference < 3 kiloBecquerel/m(2)), 1.05, 1.03, 1.08, 1.10, and 1.21. The excess relative risk was 0.11 per 100 kiloBecquerel/m(2) (95% CI 0.03 to 0.20). Considering the secular trend, directly age standardised cancer incidence rate differences per 100 000 person years between 1988 to 1996 and the reference period 1986-1987, were 30.3 (indicating a time trend in the reference category), 36.8, 42.0, 45.8, 50.1, and 56.4. No clear excess occurred for leukaemia or thyroid cancer. CONCLUSIONS: Unless attributable to chance or remaining uncontrolled confounding, a slight exposure related increase in total cancer incidence has occurred in northern Sweden after the Chernobyl accident.  (+info)

Thyroid disease in northern Italian children born around the time of the Chernobyl nuclear accident. (2/117)

BACKGROUND: The Chernobyl nuclear accident of 1986 caused a dramatic increase in the incidence of thyroid cancers in exposed children in Belarus. Airborne radioactivity from the reactor spread over northern Italy, where rainout gave rise to low levels of radioactivity at ground level. PATIENTS AND METHODS: As the latency between exposure to ionising radiation and development of thyroid cancer is thought to be about 10 years, in 1996/1997 all children born in 1985 and 1986 and attending school in an area of Milan, Italy were examined for thyroid nodules. A total of 3949 children were examined by two physicians blinded to the examination and diagnosis of the other. The children were to be reassessed in 2001/2002. RESULTS: In total, 1% had palpable nodules. The nodule diagnoses were: Hurtle cell adenoma (one), thyroglossal duct cyst (one), thyroid cyst (four) and thyroiditis (four). The prevalence of thyroid disease in the cohort was indistinguishable from that of populations not exposed to radioactive pollution. Only 10 children re-presented for examination 5 years later; all were negative. The direct costs of the study were estimated at 21,200 Euros. CONCLUSION: The high cost of the study in relation to reassuring lack of increase in thyroid nodule prevalence suggests that further studies are not justified.  (+info)

National cancer registry to assess trends after the Chernobyl accident. (3/117)

The National Cancer Registry has been operational in the Republic of Belarus since 1973: information on all new cases of malignant tumours is registered. The data are kept in a computer database and used for assessing the oncological status of the population, and for epidemiological studies. We compared findings before the Chernobyl accident of April 26, 1986 (Chernobyl) and findings between 1990 and 2000. The overall comparison on the changes in the incidence of cancer morbidity in Belarus is presented. The increase is statistically significant for all regions, but significantly greater in the most chronically radiation-contaminated region: the Gomel oblast. The paper presents a comparative analysis of the incidence of cancer morbidity in the population of two regions of Belarus, selected for the greatest difference in their radioactive contamination following Chernobyl. The highest contamination occurred in the Gomel region and is mainly due to high levels of radiocaesium (137Cs) in the soil and in the alimentary chain, especially in rural areas. A relatively low radioactive fallout was noticed in the Vitebsk region, considered here as the "control" area. We compare the situation before and after Chernobyl in the two regions. The overall cancer morbidity rate in all organs including colon, urinary bladder and thyroid, was significantly higher in the Gomel region than in Vitebsk. In populations living in two areas with high 137Cs contamination (oblast of Gomel and Mogilev), the peak incidence rates of breast cancer were already reached between the ages of 45-49 years, 15 years earlier than in the Vitebsk region. Belarussian "liquidators" who were mobilised to clean up the most contaminated territory and build the sarcophagus around the destroyed atomic plant, received the highest radiation doses. They had a significant excess of incidence of cancers of colon, urinary bladder, and thyroid gland, when compared with a corresponding adult population of the Vitebsk region. The Relative Risk (RR) of lung cancer among "liquidators" in 1997-2000 significantly exceeded 1, while in the control population it remained stable.  (+info)

Longitudinal neurocognitive assessments of Ukrainians exposed to ionizing radiation after the Chernobyl nuclear accident. (4/117)

A 4-year longitudinal study of the cognitive effects of the Chernobyl nuclear accident was conducted from 1995 to 1998. The controls were healthy Ukrainians residing several hundred kilometers away from Chernobyl. The exposed groups included Eliminators, Forestry workers and Agricultural workers living within 150 km of Chernobyl. Accuracy and efficiency of cognitive performance were assessed using ANAMUKR, a specialized subset of the Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metrics (ANAM) battery of tests. Analyses of variance, followed by appropriate pairwise comparisons, indicated that the 4-year averaged levels of performance of the exposure groups (especially the Eliminators) were significantly lower than those of the controls on most measures; further, analyses of performance across time revealed significant declines in accuracy and efficiency, as well as psychomotor slowing, for all exposed groups over the 4-year period. These findings strongly indicate impairment of brain function resulting from both acute and chronic exposure to ionizing radiation.  (+info)

A new mechanism of BRAF activation in human thyroid papillary carcinomas. (5/117)

In this issue of the JCI, Ciampi et al. report the identification of a novel oncogene in patients affected by radiation-associated thyroid papillary carcinomas. This oncogene derives from a paracentric inversion of the long arm of chromosome 7, which results in an in-frame fusion of the N-terminus of the A-kinase anchor protein 9 (AKAP9) gene with the C-terminal catalytic domain (exons 9-18) of the serine-threonine kinase BRAF. The resulting AKAP9-BRAF fusion protein shows constitutive kinase activity, and it is able to transmit mitogenic signals to the MAPK pathways and to promote malignant transformation of NIH3T3 cells.  (+info)

Oncogenic AKAP9-BRAF fusion is a novel mechanism of MAPK pathway activation in thyroid cancer. (6/117)

Genes crucial for cancer development can be mutated via various mechanisms, which may reflect the nature of the mutagen. In thyroid papillary carcinomas, mutations of genes coding for effectors along the MAPK pathway are central for transformation. BRAF point mutation is most common in sporadic tumors. By contrast, radiation-induced tumors are associated with paracentric inversions activating the receptor tyrosine kinases RET and NTRK1. We report here a rearrangement of BRAF via paracentric inversion of chromosome 7q resulting in an in-frame fusion between exons 1-8 of the AKAP9 gene and exons 9-18 of BRAF. The fusion protein contains the protein kinase domain and lacks the autoinhibitory N-terminal portion of BRAF. It has elevated kinase activity and transforms NIH3T3 cells, which provides evidence, for the first time to our knowledge, of in vivo activation of an intracellular effector along the MAPK pathway by recombination. The AKAP9-BRAF fusion was preferentially found in radiation-induced papillary carcinomas developing after a short latency, whereas BRAF point mutations were absent in this group. These data indicate that in thyroid cancer, radiation activates components of the MAPK pathway primarily through chromosomal paracentric inversions, whereas in sporadic forms of the disease, effectors along the same pathway are activated predominantly by point mutations.  (+info)

Relationship between caesium (137Cs) load, cardiovascular symptoms, and source of food in 'Chernobyl' children -- preliminary observations after intake of oral apple pectin. (7/117)

Seventeen years after the nuclear power accident at Chernobyl, most of the radio-contamination among the population of Southern Belarus is caused by incorporation of long-lived radioisotopes. The varying levels of 137Cs observed among children in this area are explained by the source of their food, especially by the consumption of contaminated milk produced privately. We stratified children from rural areas of Belarus (caesium [137Cs] contamination >5 Ci/km(2)) by their 137Cs loads into three distinct groups (group 1, <5 Bq/kg body weight [BW]; group 2, 38.4 +/- 2.4 Bq/kg BW; group 3, 122 +/- 18.5 Bq/kg BW). We determined the relationship between the 137Cs load and the children's main source of food and recorded their cardiovascular symptoms. Cardiovascular symptoms, ECG alterations, and arterial hypertension were significantly more frequent in children with high 137Cs burden than in children with very low 137Cs burden. Children with moderate and high 137Cs loads (groups 2 and 3) received apple pectin, a food additive, for 16 days. Apple pectin significantly decreased 137Cs loads in these groups (39% and 28%, respectively). ECG alterations improved, while cardiovascular symptoms and hypertension did not change in any group.  (+info)

Sensitivity analysis for trend tests: application to the risk of radiation exposure. (8/117)

Trend tests are used to assess the relationship between multiple level treatment X and binary response R. In observational studies, however, there may be a confounder U that is associated with treatment X and causally related to response R. When the data for the confounder U are not observed, an approach for assessing the sensitivity of test results to U is provided. Its use is illustrated by examining data from a study of mutation rate after the Chernobyl accident.  (+info)

The Chernobyl nuclear accident, also known as the Chernobyl disaster, was a catastrophic nuclear meltdown that occurred on April 26, 1986, at the No. 4 reactor in the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant, near the city of Pripyat in the north of the Ukrainian SSR in the Soviet Union. It is considered the worst nuclear disaster in history and resulted in a significant release of radioactive material into the environment, which had serious health and environmental consequences both in the immediate vicinity of the reactor and in the wider region.

The accident occurred during a late-night safety test which simulated a station blackout power-failure, in order to test an emergency cooling feature of the reactor. The operators temporarily disabled several safety systems, including the automatic shutdown mechanisms. They also removed too many control rods from the reactor core, which made the reactor extremely unstable. When they performed a surprise test at low power, a sudden power surge occurred, which led to a reactor vessel rupture and a series of explosions. This event exposed the graphite moderator components of the reactor to air, causing them to ignite.

The resulting fire sent a plume of highly radioactive smoke into the atmosphere and over an extensive geographical area, including Pripyat. The plume drifted over large parts of the western Soviet Union and Europe. From 1986 to 2000, 350,000 people were evacuated and resettled from the most severely contaminated areas of Belarus, Russia, and Ukraine.

According to official post-Soviet data, about 60% of the fallout landed in Belarus. The battle to contain the contamination and prevent a subsequent disaster required about 500,000 workers and cost an estimated 18 billion rubles. During the accident itself, 31 people died, and long-term effects such as cancers and deformities are still being accounted for.

The Chernobyl Exclusion Zone was established around the power plant, and it is still in place today, with restricted access. The site of the reactor is now enclosed in a large steel and concrete structure, called the New Safe Confinement, to prevent further leakage of radiation.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Ukraine" is not a medical term. It is the name of a country located in Eastern Europe. If you have any questions about medical terminology or health-related topics, I would be happy to try and help answer those for you.

A "Radioactive Hazard Release" is defined in medical and environmental health terms as an uncontrolled or accidental release of radioactive material into the environment, which can pose significant risks to human health and the ecosystem. This can occur due to various reasons such as nuclear accidents, improper handling or disposal of radioactive sources, or failure of radiation-generating equipment.

The released radioactive materials can contaminate air, water, and soil, leading to both external and internal exposure pathways. External exposure occurs through direct contact with the skin or by inhaling radioactive particles, while internal exposure happens when radioactive substances are ingested or inhaled and become deposited within the body.

The health effects of radioactive hazard release depend on several factors, including the type and amount of radiation released, the duration and intensity of exposure, and the sensitivity of the exposed individuals. Potential health impacts range from mild radiation sickness to severe diseases such as cancer and genetic mutations, depending on the level and length of exposure.

Prompt identification, assessment, and management of radioactive hazard releases are crucial to minimize potential health risks and protect public health.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Republic of Belarus" is a country located in Eastern Europe, and it doesn't have a medical definition. If you have any questions related to medical topics or health care in Belarus, I would be happy to try to help with those!

The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident refers to the series of equipment failures, nuclear meltdowns, and releases of radioactive materials at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in Ōkuma, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan. It is considered the most significant nuclear incident since the Chernobyl disaster in 1986 and the second disaster (along with Chernobyl) to be given the Level 7 event classification of the International Nuclear Event Scale.

The accident was initiated by the tsunami following the Tōhoku earthquake on March 11, 2011. The tsunami disabled the power supply and cooling of three Fukushima Daiichi reactors, causing a nuclear meltdown that led to hydrogen-air explosions. Over 450,000 residents were evacuated from the surrounding area due to the high radioactive release.

The cleanup process is expected to take decades, with the plant's operator, Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO), estimating that the complete decommissioning of the power plant will take around 40 years. The accident has had significant social and economic impacts on the region, including contamination of land and water, loss of homes and businesses, and long-term health effects for those exposed to radiation.

Radioactive soil pollutants refer to radioactive substances that contaminate and negatively impact the chemical, physical, and biological properties of soil. These pollutants can arise from various sources such as nuclear accidents, industrial activities, agricultural practices, and military testing. They include radionuclides such as uranium, plutonium, cesium-137, and strontium-90, among others.

Exposure to radioactive soil pollutants can have serious health consequences for humans and other living organisms. Direct contact with contaminated soil can result in radiation exposure, while ingestion or inhalation of contaminated soil particles can lead to internal radiation exposure. This can increase the risk of cancer, genetic mutations, and other health problems.

Radioactive soil pollutants can also have negative impacts on the environment, such as reducing soil fertility, disrupting ecosystems, and contaminating water sources. Therefore, it is essential to monitor and regulate radioactive soil pollution to protect human health and the environment.

Cesium radioisotopes are different forms of the element cesium that have unstable nuclei and emit radiation. Some commonly used medical cesium radioisotopes include Cs-134 and Cs-137, which are produced from nuclear reactions in nuclear reactors or during nuclear weapons testing.

In medicine, cesium radioisotopes have been used in cancer treatment for the brachytherapy of certain types of tumors. Brachytherapy involves placing a small amount of radioactive material directly into or near the tumor to deliver a high dose of radiation to the cancer cells while minimizing exposure to healthy tissues.

Cesium-137, for example, has been used in the treatment of cervical, endometrial, and prostate cancers. However, due to concerns about potential long-term risks associated with the use of cesium radioisotopes, their use in cancer therapy is becoming less common.

It's important to note that handling and using radioactive materials requires specialized training and equipment to ensure safety and prevent radiation exposure.

Radioactive fallout refers to the radioactive material that falls to the Earth's surface following a nuclear explosion. It includes any solid, liquid or gaseous particles that contain radioactive isotopes produced by the explosion. These isotopes can have half-lives ranging from days to millions of years and can contaminate large areas, making them dangerous to human health and the environment.

The fallout can be local, affecting the area immediately surrounding the explosion, or it can be global, affecting regions far from the explosion site due to wind currents and atmospheric circulation patterns. Exposure to radioactive fallout can result in radiation sickness, genetic mutations, and an increased risk of cancer.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "power plants" is not a term used in medical definitions. It is a term commonly used to refer to industrial facilities that generate and distribute power, typically in the form of electricity. If you have any questions related to medicine or health, I would be happy to try to help answer those!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "nuclear reactors" are not a medical term. They are a type of equipment used in the field of nuclear engineering and physics. A nuclear reactor is a system that contains and controls sustained nuclear chain reactions. These can be found in power plants to generate electricity, or in research facilities for various purposes such as producing medical isotopes.

If you have any questions related to medical terminology, I'd be happy to help!

Radiation monitoring is the systematic and continuous measurement, assessment, and tracking of ionizing radiation levels in the environment or within the body to ensure safety and to take appropriate actions when limits are exceeded. It involves the use of specialized instruments and techniques to detect and quantify different types of radiation, such as alpha, beta, gamma, neutron, and x-rays. The data collected from radiation monitoring is used to evaluate radiation exposure, contamination levels, and potential health risks for individuals or communities. This process is crucial in various fields, including nuclear energy production, medical imaging and treatment, radiation therapy, and environmental protection.

Radioactive food contamination refers to the presence of radioactive substances in food or agricultural products. This can occur through various means such as nuclear accidents, improper disposal of radioactive waste, or use of phosphate fertilizers that contain low levels of radioactivity. The consumption of radioactively contaminated food can lead to internal exposure to radiation, which may pose risks to human health, including increased risk of cancer and other diseases. It's important to note that regulatory bodies set limits on the acceptable levels of radioactivity in food to minimize these risks.

I believe there might be some confusion in your question. "Nuclear power plants" and "medical definitions" are two separate concepts that don't typically intersect.

A nuclear power plant is a facility that utilizes the process of nuclear fission to generate electricity on a large scale. In a nuclear power plant, heat is produced when a neutron strikes the nucleus of a uranium-235 atom, causing it to split and release energy. This heat is used to produce steam, which drives a turbine connected to an electrical generator.

On the other hand, medical definitions pertain to terms related to medicine, healthcare, human health conditions, treatments, and procedures.

If you have any questions about nuclear medicine, which is a branch of medicine that uses small amounts of radioactive materials to diagnose and treat various diseases, I would be happy to help with that.

Radioactive pollutants are defined as any harmful radioactive substances that are discharged into the environment and pose risks to human health and the ecosystem. These pollutants can be in the form of gases, liquids, or solids and can contaminate air, water, and soil. They originate from various sources such as nuclear power plants, medical facilities, industrial operations, and military activities.

Radioactive pollutants emit ionizing radiation, which can cause damage to living cells and DNA, leading to genetic mutations, cancer, and other health problems. Exposure to high levels of radioactivity can result in acute radiation sickness, including symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and fever. Long-term exposure to low levels of radiation can increase the risk of developing cancer and other diseases over time.

Radioactive pollutants can also have negative impacts on the environment, contaminating soil and water and reducing biodiversity in affected areas. They can persist in the environment for long periods, making it difficult to clean up and remediate contaminated sites. Therefore, proper management and regulation of radioactive materials are essential to prevent their release into the environment and protect public health and the environment.

An "accident" is an unfortunate event that happens unexpectedly and unintentionally, typically resulting in damage or injury. In medical terms, an accident refers to an unplanned occurrence resulting in harm or injury to a person's body, which may require medical attention. Accidents can happen due to various reasons such as human error, mechanical failure, or environmental factors.

Examples of accidents that may require medical attention include:

1. Traffic accidents: These can result in injuries such as fractures, head trauma, and soft tissue injuries.
2. Workplace accidents: These can include falls, machinery malfunctions, or exposure to hazardous substances, resulting in injuries or illnesses.
3. Home accidents: These can include burns, cuts, falls, or poisoning, which may require medical treatment.
4. Sports accidents: These can result in injuries such as sprains, strains, fractures, or concussions.
5. Recreational accidents: These can occur during activities such as swimming, hiking, or biking and may result in injuries such as drowning, falls, or trauma.

Preventing accidents is crucial to maintaining good health and safety. This can be achieved through education, awareness, and the implementation of safety measures in various settings such as homes, workplaces, and roads.

Radiation-induced neoplasms are a type of cancer or tumor that develops as a result of exposure to ionizing radiation. Ionizing radiation is radiation with enough energy to remove tightly bound electrons from atoms or molecules, leading to the formation of ions. This type of radiation can damage DNA and other cellular structures, which can lead to mutations and uncontrolled cell growth, resulting in the development of a neoplasm.

Radiation-induced neoplasms can occur after exposure to high levels of ionizing radiation, such as that received during radiation therapy for cancer treatment or from nuclear accidents. The risk of developing a radiation-induced neoplasm depends on several factors, including the dose and duration of radiation exposure, the type of radiation, and the individual's genetic susceptibility to radiation-induced damage.

Radiation-induced neoplasms can take many years to develop after initial exposure to ionizing radiation, and they often occur at the site of previous radiation therapy. Common types of radiation-induced neoplasms include sarcomas, carcinomas, and thyroid cancer. It is important to note that while ionizing radiation can increase the risk of developing cancer, the overall risk is still relatively low, especially when compared to other well-established cancer risk factors such as smoking and exposure to certain chemicals.

I'm sorry for the confusion, but "tsunamis" is not a medical term. It is a natural disaster term used to describe a series of large ocean waves caused by events such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, or underwater landslides. These waves can reach heights of over 100 feet and cause extensive damage when they reach shore. If you have any questions about medical terms, I would be happy to help!

Radiation injuries refer to the damages that occur to living tissues as a result of exposure to ionizing radiation. These injuries can be acute, occurring soon after exposure to high levels of radiation, or chronic, developing over a longer period after exposure to lower levels of radiation. The severity and type of injury depend on the dose and duration of exposure, as well as the specific tissues affected.

Acute radiation syndrome (ARS), also known as radiation sickness, is the most severe form of acute radiation injury. It can cause symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, fatigue, fever, and skin burns. In more severe cases, it can lead to neurological damage, hemorrhage, infection, and death.

Chronic radiation injuries, on the other hand, may not appear until months or even years after exposure. They can cause a range of symptoms, including fatigue, weakness, skin changes, cataracts, reduced fertility, and an increased risk of cancer.

Radiation injuries can be treated with supportive care, such as fluids and electrolytes replacement, antibiotics, wound care, and blood transfusions. In some cases, surgery may be necessary to remove damaged tissue or control bleeding. Prevention is the best approach to radiation injuries, which includes limiting exposure through proper protective measures and monitoring radiation levels in the environment.

Radiation-induced abnormalities refer to changes in tissues, organs, or bodily functions that are caused by exposure to radiation. These abnormalities can occur as a result of therapeutic radiation used in cancer treatment or from exposure to high levels of ionizing radiation in diagnostic procedures or environmental settings.

The severity and type of radiation-induced abnormalities depend on several factors, including the dose and duration of radiation exposure, the part of the body that was exposed, and the individual's sensitivity to radiation. Some common radiation-induced abnormalities include:

1. Radiation sickness: This is a set of symptoms that occur after exposure to high levels of ionizing radiation. Symptoms can include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, fatigue, and fever.
2. Skin damage: Radiation can cause skin redness, blistering, and peeling, especially in areas where the radiation was focused.
3. Cataracts: Exposure to high levels of radiation can cause cataracts, which are cloudy areas that develop in the lens of the eye.
4. Infertility: Radiation exposure can damage the reproductive organs and lead to infertility in both men and women.
5. Increased risk of cancer: Exposure to radiation can increase the risk of developing certain types of cancer, such as leukemia and thyroid cancer.
6. Damage to the nervous system: High levels of radiation exposure can cause damage to the nervous system, leading to symptoms such as headaches, seizures, and confusion.
7. Genetic mutations: Radiation exposure can cause genetic mutations that can be passed down to future generations.

It is important to note that the risk of developing radiation-induced abnormalities depends on many factors, including the dose and duration of radiation exposure, the individual's sensitivity to radiation, and their overall health status. If you have concerns about radiation exposure or radiation-induced abnormalities, it is best to speak with a healthcare professional.

Cesium is a chemical element with the atomic number 55 and the symbol Cs. There are several isotopes of cesium, which are variants of the element that have different numbers of neutrons in their nuclei. The most stable and naturally occurring cesium isotope is cesium-133, which has 78 neutrons and a half-life of more than 3 x 10^20 years (effectively stable).

However, there are also radioactive isotopes of cesium, including cesium-134 and cesium-137. Cesium-134 has a half-life of about 2 years, while cesium-137 has a half-life of about 30 years. These isotopes are produced naturally in trace amounts by the decay of uranium and thorium in the Earth's crust, but they can also be produced artificially in nuclear reactors and nuclear weapons tests.

Cesium isotopes are commonly used in medical research and industrial applications. For example, cesium-137 is used as a radiation source in cancer therapy and industrial radiography. However, exposure to high levels of radioactive cesium can be harmful to human health, causing symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and potentially more serious effects such as damage to the central nervous system and an increased risk of cancer.

Radioactive waste is defined in the medical context as any material that contains radioactive nuclides in sufficient concentrations or for such durations that it is considered a threat to human health and the environment. It includes materials ranging from used hospital supplies, equipment, and substances contaminated with radionuclides, to liquids and gases released during the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel.

Radioactive waste can be classified into two main categories:

1. Exempt waste: Waste that does not require long-term management as a radioactive waste due to its low activity and short half-life.
2. Radioactive waste: Waste that requires long-term management as a radioactive waste due to its higher activity or longer half-life, which can pose a threat to human health and the environment for many years.

Radioactive waste management is a critical aspect of nuclear medicine and radiation safety, with regulations in place to ensure proper handling, storage, transportation, and disposal of such materials.

Radioactive water pollutants refer to contaminants in water sources that contain radioactive materials. These materials can include substances such as radium, uranium, and cesium, which emit ionizing radiation. This type of pollution can occur through various means, including the disposal of radioactive waste from nuclear power plants, hospitals, and research facilities; oil and gas drilling operations; and mining activities.

Exposure to radioactive water pollutants can have serious health consequences, as ionizing radiation has been linked to an increased risk of cancer, genetic mutations, and other harmful effects. Therefore, it is essential to regulate and monitor radioactive water pollution to protect public health and the environment.

Traffic accidents are incidents that occur when a vehicle collides with another vehicle, a pedestrian, an animal, or a stationary object, resulting in damage or injury. These accidents can be caused by various factors such as driver error, distracted driving, drunk driving, speeding, reckless driving, poor road conditions, and adverse weather conditions. Traffic accidents can range from minor fender benders to severe crashes that result in serious injuries or fatalities. They are a significant public health concern and cause a substantial burden on healthcare systems, emergency services, and society as a whole.

Radiation dosage, in the context of medical physics, refers to the amount of radiation energy that is absorbed by a material or tissue, usually measured in units of Gray (Gy), where 1 Gy equals an absorption of 1 Joule of radiation energy per kilogram of matter. In the clinical setting, radiation dosage is used to plan and assess the amount of radiation delivered to a patient during treatments such as radiotherapy. It's important to note that the biological impact of radiation also depends on other factors, including the type and energy level of the radiation, as well as the sensitivity of the irradiated tissues or organs.

Occupational accidents are defined as unexpected and unplanned events that occur in the context of work and lead to physical or mental harm. These accidents can be caused by a variety of factors, including unsafe working conditions, lack of proper training, or failure to use appropriate personal protective equipment. Occupational accidents can result in injuries, illnesses, or even death, and can have significant impacts on individuals, families, and communities. In many cases, occupational accidents are preventable through the implementation of effective safety measures and risk management strategies.

Radioactive air pollutants refer to radioactive particles or gases that are present in the atmosphere and can have harmful effects on human health and the environment. These pollutants can originate from a variety of sources, including nuclear power plants, nuclear weapons testing, industrial processes, and natural events such as volcanic eruptions.

Radioactive air pollutants emit ionizing radiation, which has the ability to damage living tissue and DNA. Exposure to high levels of ionizing radiation can increase the risk of cancer, genetic mutations, and other health problems. Even low levels of exposure over a long period of time can have harmful effects on human health.

Some common radioactive air pollutants include radon gas, which is produced by the decay of uranium in soil and rocks and can seep into buildings through cracks in the foundation; and cesium-137 and iodine-131, which were released into the atmosphere during nuclear weapons testing and accidents at nuclear power plants.

Efforts to reduce radioactive air pollution include stricter regulations on nuclear power plants and other industrial sources of radiation, as well as efforts to reduce emissions from nuclear weapons testing and cleanup of contaminated sites.

An earthquake is not a medical condition. It is a natural disaster that results from the sudden release of energy in the Earth's crust, causing the ground to shake and sometimes resulting in damage to structures and loss of life. The point where the earthquake originates is called the focus or hypocenter, and the epicenter is the point directly above it on the surface of the Earth.

Earthquakes can cause various medical conditions and injuries, such as:

* Cuts, bruises, and fractures from falling debris
* Head trauma and concussions
* Crush syndrome from being trapped under heavy objects
* Respiratory problems from dust inhalation
* Psychological distress, including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)

If you experience an earthquake, it is important to seek medical attention if you are injured or experiencing any symptoms. Additionally, it is crucial to follow safety guidelines during and after an earthquake to minimize the risk of injury and ensure your well-being.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Russia" is not a medical term or concept. Russia is the largest country in the world by land area, located primarily in Asia with a smaller portion extending into Europe. It is a nation rich in history and culture, known for its diverse landscapes, from tundra and forests to subtropical beaches.

If you have any medical questions or terms that you would like me to define, please feel free to ask!

Iodine radioisotopes are radioactive isotopes of the element iodine, which decays and emits radiation in the form of gamma rays. Some commonly used iodine radioisotopes include I-123, I-125, I-131. These radioisotopes have various medical applications such as in diagnostic imaging, therapy for thyroid disorders, and cancer treatment.

For example, I-131 is commonly used to treat hyperthyroidism and differentiated thyroid cancer due to its ability to destroy thyroid tissue. On the other hand, I-123 is often used in nuclear medicine scans of the thyroid gland because it emits gamma rays that can be detected by a gamma camera, allowing for detailed images of the gland's structure and function.

It is important to note that handling and administering radioisotopes require specialized training and safety precautions due to their radiation-emitting properties.

Radiation-induced leukemia is a type of cancer that affects the blood-forming tissues of the body, such as the bone marrow. It is caused by exposure to high levels of radiation, which can damage the DNA of cells and lead to their uncontrolled growth and division.

There are several types of radiation-induced leukemia, depending on the specific type of blood cell that becomes cancerous. The most common types are acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). These forms of leukemia tend to progress quickly and require prompt treatment.

Radiation-induced leukemia is a rare complication of radiation therapy, which is used to treat many types of cancer. The risk of developing this type of leukemia increases with the dose and duration of radiation exposure. It is important to note that the benefits of radiation therapy in treating cancer generally outweigh the small increased risk of developing radiation-induced leukemia.

Symptoms of radiation-induced leukemia may include fatigue, fever, frequent infections, easy bruising or bleeding, and weight loss. If you have been exposed to high levels of radiation and are experiencing these symptoms, it is important to seek medical attention promptly. A diagnosis of radiation-induced leukemia is typically made through a combination of physical exam, medical history, and laboratory tests, such as blood counts and bone marrow biopsy. Treatment may include chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and/or stem cell transplantation.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Japan" is not a medical term. Japan is the name of a country, officially known as Nippon-koku or Nihon-koku in Japanese, and is located in East Asia. It is an island nation in the Pacific Ocean with a population of about 126 million people.

If you have any medical questions or terms that you would like me to define, please let me know!

Accident prevention is the systematic process of identifying, evaluating, and controlling hazards and risks in order to prevent or reduce the occurrence of unplanned and unwanted events, also known as accidents. It involves implementing measures and practices to promote safety, minimize potential injuries, and protect individuals, property, and the environment from harm.

Accident prevention can be achieved through various strategies such as:

1. Hazard identification and risk assessment: Identifying potential hazards in the workplace or environment and evaluating the level of risk they pose.
2. Implementing controls: Putting in place measures to eliminate or reduce the risks associated with identified hazards, such as engineering controls, administrative controls, and personal protective equipment.
3. Training and education: Providing employees and individuals with the necessary knowledge and skills to work safely and prevent accidents.
4. Regular inspections and maintenance: Conducting regular inspections of equipment and facilities to ensure they are in good working order and identifying any potential hazards before they become a risk.
5. Incident reporting and investigation: Encouraging employees and individuals to report incidents and conducting thorough investigations to identify root causes and prevent future occurrences.
6. Continuous improvement: Regularly reviewing and updating accident prevention measures to ensure they remain effective and up-to-date with changing circumstances.

Thyroid neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the thyroid gland, which can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). These growths can vary in size and may cause a noticeable lump or nodule in the neck. Thyroid neoplasms can also affect the function of the thyroid gland, leading to hormonal imbalances and related symptoms. The exact causes of thyroid neoplasms are not fully understood, but risk factors include radiation exposure, family history, and certain genetic conditions. It is important to note that most thyroid nodules are benign, but a proper medical evaluation is necessary to determine the nature of the growth and develop an appropriate treatment plan.

Radioactive air pollution refers to the presence of radioactive particles or radionuclides in the air. These substances emit ionizing radiation, which can be harmful to human health and the environment. Radioactive air pollution can come from a variety of sources, including nuclear power plants, nuclear weapons testing, industrial activities, and natural processes such as the decay of radon gas.

Exposure to radioactive air pollution can increase the risk of developing cancer and other diseases, particularly in cases of prolonged or high-level exposure. It is important to monitor and regulate radioactive air pollution to protect public health and ensure compliance with safety standards.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "nuclear fission" is not a term typically used in medical definitions. It is a concept from nuclear physics. Nuclear fission is the process of splitting a heavy, unstable atomic nucleus (such as uranium-235 or plutonium-239) into two lighter nuclei, along with a few subatomic particles (like neutrons and photons) and a large release of energy. This process can occur naturally, but it is also used in nuclear power plants and atomic bombs.

"Home accidents" is a general term that refers to unplanned events or mishaps that occur in the home environment, which may result in injury or illness. These types of accidents can happen in various areas of the home, such as the kitchen, bathroom, living room, or bedroom, and can be caused by a range of factors, including:

* Slips, trips, and falls on wet floors, uneven surfaces, or cluttered walkways
* Burns or scalds from hot stoves, ovens, or water
* Cuts or lacerations from sharp objects like knives or broken glass
* Poisoning from ingesting harmful substances like cleaning products or medications
* Strains or sprains from lifting heavy objects or performing repetitive movements
* Drowning in bathtubs, swimming pools, or other bodies of water within the home

Preventing home accidents involves identifying potential hazards and taking steps to minimize or eliminate them. This may include keeping walkways clear, using non-slip mats, properly storing sharp objects and harmful substances, installing safety devices like grab bars and railings, and ensuring that the home is well-lit and ventilated. Regular safety inspections and maintenance can also help prevent home accidents and keep the living environment safe and healthy.

"Accident proneness" is a term used to describe the tendency of an individual to have a higher than average number of accidents or mishaps. It is based on the idea that some people are more prone to accidents due to their personality traits, behaviors, or habits. However, it's important to note that this concept has been debated in the scientific community and is not universally accepted as a valid construct.

According to the medical definition, "accident proneness" refers to the predisposition of certain individuals to have a higher frequency of accidents than others, even after controlling for environmental factors. This concept was first introduced in the early 20th century and gained popularity in the 1930s and 1940s. However, subsequent research has shown that the relationship between personality traits and accident involvement is complex and may be influenced by a variety of factors, including situational variables, environmental conditions, and individual differences.

Some studies have identified certain personality traits that may be associated with "accident proneness," such as impulsivity, sensation-seeking, risk-taking, and distractibility. However, these traits are not necessarily predictive of accident involvement, and their relationship to accidents is likely to be moderated by other factors, such as the type of activity being engaged in and the individual's level of experience and training.

Overall, while the concept of "accident proneness" may have some validity, it is important to recognize that it is a complex phenomenon that is influenced by a variety of factors, both personal and environmental. Therefore, a more comprehensive approach to accident prevention should take into account not only individual differences but also situational and environmental factors that may contribute to the risk of accidents.

A dose-response relationship in radiation refers to the correlation between the amount of radiation exposure (dose) and the biological response or adverse health effects observed in exposed individuals. As the level of radiation dose increases, the severity and frequency of the adverse health effects also tend to increase. This relationship is crucial in understanding the risks associated with various levels of radiation exposure and helps inform radiation protection standards and guidelines.

The effects of ionizing radiation can be categorized into two types: deterministic and stochastic. Deterministic effects have a threshold dose below which no effect is observed, and above this threshold, the severity of the effect increases with higher doses. Examples include radiation-induced cataracts or radiation dermatitis. Stochastic effects, on the other hand, do not have a clear threshold and are based on probability; as the dose increases, so does the likelihood of the adverse health effect occurring, such as an increased risk of cancer.

Understanding the dose-response relationship in radiation exposure is essential for setting limits on occupational and public exposure to ionizing radiation, optimizing radiation protection practices, and developing effective medical countermeasures in case of radiation emergencies.

Carcinoma, papillary is a type of cancer that begins in the cells that line the glandular structures or the lining of organs. In a papillary carcinoma, the cancerous cells grow and form small finger-like projections, called papillae, within the tumor. This type of cancer most commonly occurs in the thyroid gland, but can also be found in other organs such as the lung, breast, and kidney. Papillary carcinoma of the thyroid gland is usually slow-growing and has a good prognosis, especially when it is diagnosed at an early stage.

'Oenothera biennis' is not a medical term, but a scientific name for an plant species also known as Evening Primrose. It is a wildflower native to North America and its seeds are used in the production of evening primrose oil, which is sometimes used as a complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) supplement for various conditions such as eczema, rheumatoid arthritis, and premenstrual syndrome (PMS). The oil contains gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), an omega-6 fatty acid that is thought to have anti-inflammatory properties. However, it's important to note that the effectiveness of evening primrose oil for these uses is not conclusively established and more research is needed. As with any supplement, it should be used under the guidance of a healthcare provider.

In medical terms, "swallowing" refers to the process by which food or liquids are transported from the mouth to the stomach through a series of coordinated muscle movements. This complex neuromuscular activity involves several structures including the tongue, soft palate, pharynx, and esophagus.

Dysphagia is a term used to describe difficulty in swallowing, which can be caused by various medical conditions such as neurological disorders, head and neck cancers, or gastrointestinal motility disorders. If not managed properly, dysphagia can lead to complications like malnutrition, dehydration, aspiration pneumonia, and decreased quality of life.

... are the only INES level 7 nuclear accidents. The following table compares the Chernobyl and Fukushima nuclear accidents. ... "Chernobyl Accident And Its Consequences - Nuclear Energy Institute". www.nei.org. Nuclear Energy Institute. Retrieved 9 April ... To date, the nuclear accidents at the Chernobyl (1986) and Fukushima Daiichi (2011) nuclear power plants, ... Chernobyl Accident. World Nuclear Association. Archived 1 March 2013 at the Wayback Machine Fukushima Nuclear Crisis Unwrapped ...
"The 1986 Chornobyl nuclear power plant accident". International Atomic Energy Agency. Retrieved 29 July 2023. Marples, David R ... The Chernobyl disaster in 1986 released large quantities of radioactive material from the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant into ... "the condition of the former Chernobyl nuclear power plant, confinement, and nuclear waste storage facilities is unknown". The ... "Chernobyl nuclear plant targeted as Russia invades Ukraine". Al Jazeera. 24 February 2022. Archived from the original on 24 ...
ISBN 978-0-393-30814-3. "Backgrounder on Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Accident". US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Archived ... List of Chernobyl-related articles List of nuclear reactors "PRIS - Reactor Details". "Chernobyl nuclear power plant site to be ... "Draining the pond of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant". CHORNOBYL TOUR 2020 - trips to the Chornobyl exclusion zone, to the ... Chernobyl disaster, Chernobyl Exclusion Zone, Nuclear power stations built in the Soviet Union, Nuclear power stations using ...
"Book on Chernobyl nuclear accident wins $5,000 prize". ABC News. April 20, 2020. Retrieved November 13, 2020. v t e v t e ( ... The Untold Story of the World's Greatest Nuclear Disaster (2019) by Adam Higginbotham is a history of the Chernobyl nuclear ... Jennifer Szalai (February 6, 2019). "An Enthralling and Terrifying History of the Nuclear Meltdown at Chernobyl". The New York ... Nuclear topic book stubs, Nuclear weapon stubs, History of science book stubs). ...
The Chernobyl disaster is the world's worst nuclear accident to date. The name "Chernobyl" has become synonymous with the ... Chernobyl Nuclear Disaster (2006), a BBC docudrama about the events at the Chernobyl plant during the accident and its ... Chernobyl is mentioned along with other places of nuclear incidents and accidents, such as Harrisburg, Sellafield and Hiroshima ... In the home computer game Maniac Mansion (1987), the player can find a hidden nuclear reactor described as "made in Chernobyl ...
Nuclear Energy Agency. 2002 "Chernobyl , Chernobyl Accident , Chernobyl Disaster - World Nuclear Association". world-nuclear. ... Chornobyl not Chernobyl, for the site of the nuclear disaster in Ukraine "The ABC Style Guide". About the ABC. Retrieved 14 ... Chernobyl: Facts About the Nuclear Disaster Archived 19 April 2019 at the Wayback Machine. Live Science. 20 June 2019 Chernobyl ... "Russian invaders leaving Chornobyl NPP - Energoatom". 31 March 2022. "Ukrainian flag raised over Chernobyl, nuclear operator ...
Medvedev worked at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant and witnessed the accident). Visit Sunny Chernobyl (2012) by Andrew ... This is an incomplete list of books about the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. Soon after the events of Chernobyl on April 26, 1986 ... Voices from Chernobyl (1997) by Svetlana Alexievich (relates the psychological and personal tragedy of the Chernobyl accident, ... The Lost Child of Chernobyl: A Graphic Novel by Helen Bate. List of Chernobyl-related articles List of books about nuclear ...
"Chernobyl has become a refuge for wildlife 33 years after the nuclear accident". The Conversation. Retrieved 22 April 2020. " ... "Mission reviews Chernobyl waste management : Waste & Recycling - World Nuclear News". www.world-nuclear-news.org. Retrieved 22 ... 2020 Chernobyl Exclusion Zone wildfires Effects of the Chernobyl disaster List of Chernobyl-related articles Polesie State ... a giant metal dome sealing the remains of the 1986 Chernobyl accident, the worst nuclear disaster in the world.[...][the ...
... the Chernobyl disaster (1986), the Three Mile Island accident (1979), and the SL-1 accident (1961). Nuclear power accidents can ... Nuclear accidents and incidents, Nuclear safety and security, Non-combat military accidents, Radiation accidents and incidents) ... the Chernobyl disaster at Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant, Ukraine, USSR, in 1986. the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster ... such as in the Chernobyl disaster in 1986 and Fukushima nuclear disaster in 2011. The impact of nuclear accidents has been a ...
... the Chernobyl disaster was the only level 7 accident on record, while the Three Mile Island accident was a level 5 accident. ... The severity of the nuclear accident is provisionally rated 7 on the International Nuclear Event Scale (INES). This scale runs ... incidents Timeline of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster Comparison of Fukushima and Chernobyl nuclear accidents Negishi, ... Saint-Laurent Nuclear Power Plant (France, 1980, INES level 4), and Chernobyl. On 11 April, the Japanese Nuclear and Industrial ...
This resulted in the most serious nuclear accident since the Chernobyl disaster. The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident ... These anti-nuclear concerns related to nuclear accidents, nuclear proliferation, nuclear terrorism and radioactive waste ... "Chernobyl Nuclear Accident". www.iaea.org. 14 May 2014. Black, Richard (12 April 2011). "Fukushima: As Bad as Chernobyl?". BBC ... see 1996 interview with Mikhail Gorbachev) "Backgrounder on Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Accident". Nuclear Regulatory ...
"Health Impacts, Chernobyl Accident, Appendix 2". World Nuclear Association. 2009. Archived from the original on 17 June 2014. ... The Chernobyl disaster, considered the worst nuclear disaster in history, occurred on 26 April 1986 at the Chernobyl Nuclear ... Initially, the Soviet Union's toll of deaths directly caused by the Chernobyl disaster included only the two Chernobyl Nuclear ... surviving Chernobyl liquidators; evacuees of Chernobyl, Pripyat, and other areas now included in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone ...
Condon, Judith (1999). Chernobyl and Other Nuclear Accidents. Raintree Steck-Vaughn. p. 53. ISBN 978-0-8172-5018-8. Captain ... Sunken nuclear submarines, Foreign relations of the Soviet Union, Soviet Union-United States relations, Nuclear accidents and ... In a nuclear safe condition, and with sufficient stability to allow it to surface, Captain Britanov surfaced K-219 on battery ... The captain declared an accident alert. It took the crew no more than one minute to carry out initial damage control measures, ...
He went on to direct Chernobyl 4 ever in 2011, in response to his realisation that the post-nuclear disaster situation was far ... Ahn, Joonhong; Guarnieri, Franck; Furuta, Kazuo (August 15, 2017). "What Cultural Objects Say About Nuclear Accidents and Their ... From Accident Mitigation to Resilient Society Facing Extreme Situations. Springer. p. 151. ISBN 978-3-319-58768-4. "Chernobyl ( ... His 2008 film, R.A.S nucléaire rien à signaler, looked at the effects of outsourcing nuclear plant maintenance on our safety ...
The Chernobyl Nuclear Accident (Document Collection). The Wilson Center Digital Archive. The Collapse of the Soviet Union and ... Thompson, N. (2011). Nuclear War and Nuclear Fear in the 1970s and 1980s. Journal of Contemporary History, 46(1), 136-149. ... Schrag, P. G. (1992). Global Action: Nuclear Test Ban Diplomacy at the End of the Cold War. New York: Routledge. Schwebel, S. ( ... The Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, 1965-68 (Document Collection). The Wilson Center Digital Archive. Documents related to ...
Church Rock uranium mill spill Comparison of Fukushima and Chernobyl nuclear accidents Effects of the Chernobyl disaster ... Aftermath of the Chernobyl disaster, Environmental impact of nuclear power, Civilian nuclear power accidents, Scientific ... A comparison of the gamma dose rates due to the Chernobyl accident and the hypothetical nuclear weapon. The graph of dose rate ... Similar to Chernobyl, operator error played a role but did not directly cause the accident. Both accidents had grueling and ...
... hot particles can be present in case of fires during nuclear accidents (e.g. Chernobyl disaster) or nuclear war. Smoke ... the Zone of alienation containing contaminants from the Chernobyl disaster. Polymers are a significant source of smoke. ...
"Fukushima is not the worst nuclear accident ever but it is the most complicated and the most dramatic...This was a crisis that ... Chernobyl did not." "The key question is whether we have correctly predicted the risk that a reactor could be hit by a disaster ... In the context of the Fukushima I nuclear accidents, Acton was able to distill a succinct analysis which was widely reported. " ... Deep Nuclear Reductions and International Security, and Low Numbers: A Practical Path to Deep Nuclear Reductions (2011) Library ...
... the Chernobyl accident and the Fukushima accident, are ranked at level 7. The first major nuclear accidents were the Kyshtym ... These anti-nuclear concerns related to nuclear accidents, nuclear proliferation, nuclear terrorism and radioactive waste ... Prospects of a nuclear renaissance were delayed by another nuclear accident. The 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident was ... This resulted in the most serious nuclear accident since the Chernobyl disaster. The accident prompted a re-examination of ...
Criticality accident International Nuclear Events Scale List of Chernobyl-related articles List of civilian nuclear incidents ... of nuclear disasters and radioactive incidents Nuclear and radiation accidents Nuclear reactor technology Nuclear power Nuclear ... Civilian nuclear power accidents, Nuclear safety and security, Lists of nuclear disasters, Nuclear technology-related lists). ... Military accidents are listed at List of military nuclear accidents. Civil radiation accidents not involving fissile material ...
"Book on Chernobyl nuclear accident wins $5,000 prize". ABC News. Retrieved 8 June 2021. (Articles with short description, Short ... "Midnight in Chernobyl The Untold Story of the World's Greatest Nuclear Disaster By Adam Higginbotham". Simon and Schuster. ... Higginbotham is the author of Midnight in Chernobyl: The Untold Story of the World's Greatest Nuclear Disaster, published in ... "An Enthralling and Terrifying History of the Nuclear Meltdown at Chernobyl". The New York Times. Retrieved 8 June 2021. The ...
"Chernobyl , Chernobyl Accident , Chernobyl Disaster - World Nuclear Association". www.world-nuclear.org. Retrieved 2019-04-18 ... Aftermath of the Chernobyl disaster, Environmental impact of nuclear power, Nuclear chemistry, Nuclear weapons, Radiation ... Moller, A. P.; Mousseau, T. A. (2011). "Conservation consequences of Chernobyl and other nuclear accidents". Biological ... This article uses Chernobyl as a case study of nuclear fallout effects on an ecosystem. Officials used hydrometeorological data ...
"Book on Chernobyl nuclear accident wins $5,000 prize". ABC News. April 20, 2020. Retrieved November 13, 2020. "War veteran Paul ... Midnight in Chernobyl: The Untold Story of the World's Greatest Nuclear Disaster 2019 Paul Scharre, Army of None, 2018 Steven E ...
Johnson, Reuben (15 August 2019). "How Russia Is Tempting Fate-And the Next Chernobyl". The Bulwark. Retrieved 2019-08-16. ... Nuclear technology portal 1983 Soviet nuclear false alarm incident International Nuclear Event Scale List of accidents and ... Nuclear safety and security, Lists of nuclear disasters, Non-combat military accidents, Nuclear technology-related lists). ... Civilian accidents are listed at List of civilian nuclear accidents. For a general discussion of both civilian and military ...
While at The New York Times, Diamond also covered the nuclear accident at Chernobyl and India's Bhopal gas leak. Diamond has ... He also covered the Chernobyl nuclear accident in Ukraine. Beginning in 1998, Diamond persuaded approximately 3,000 farmers in ... "Chernobyl Causing Big Revisions In Global Nuclear Power Policies". The New York Times. Union Of Soviet Socialist Republics; ... 1 billion in the construction of a nuclear plant in Shoreham, New York. This led to a New York State investigation and the ...
If a Loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) (e.g. Three Mile Island) or a Reactivity Initiated Accident (RIA) (e.g. Chernobyl or SL-1 ... Nuclear chemistry, Nuclear fuels, Nuclear reprocessing, Nuclear safety and security, Nuclear technology, Uranium). ... S.V. Ushakov; B.E. Burakov; S.I. Shabalev; E.B. Anderson (1997). "Interaction of UO2 and Zircaloy During the Chernobyl Accident ... When a nuclear fuel assembly is prepared for onsite storage, it is dried and moved to a spent nuclear fuel shipping cask with ...
The world's worst nuclear accident has been the 1986 Chernobyl disaster in the Soviet Union, one of two accidents that has been ... Chernobyl: the true scale of the accident 5 September 2005. "Info withheld on nuclear accident, papers show". The Index-Journal ... Lists of nuclear disasters, Nuclear history, Nuclear safety and security, Nuclear power by country, Nuclear technology-related ... The accident occurred at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant after an unsafe systems test led to a series of steam explosions ...
"Chemist, investigator of Chernobyl nuclear accident dies at 51". AP News Archive. The Associated Press. April 30, 1988. ... chief of the commission investigating the Chernobyl disaster (d. 1988) 1938 - Alan Dershowitz, American lawyer and author 1938 ... contribution in the working out and realization of immediate measures aimed at liquidating the consequences of the accident." " ...
The most severe nuclear accident is probably the Chernobyl disaster. In addition to conventional fatalities and acute radiation ... The 1997 accident was far less fatal than the 1999 accident. The 1999 nuclear accident was caused by two faulty technicians who ... Health Effects of the Chernobyl Accident and Special Health Care Programmes: Report of the UN Chernobyl Forum Health Expert ... a key step in the establishment of nuclear medicine as a field of study. With the development of nuclear reactors and nuclear ...
Post-accident clean-up participant in Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. People's Deputy of Ukraine of the IIIrd convocation since ... Chernobyl liquidators, Colonel Generals of Ukraine, Recipients of the Order For Courage, 3rd class, Laureates of the Honorary ...
... are the only INES level 7 nuclear accidents. The following table compares the Chernobyl and Fukushima nuclear accidents. ... "Chernobyl Accident And Its Consequences - Nuclear Energy Institute". www.nei.org. Nuclear Energy Institute. Retrieved 9 April ... To date, the nuclear accidents at the Chernobyl (1986) and Fukushima Daiichi (2011) nuclear power plants, ... Chernobyl Accident. World Nuclear Association. Archived 1 March 2013 at the Wayback Machine Fukushima Nuclear Crisis Unwrapped ...
... the enemy still resorts to nuclear terror, seizing and placing military equipment at the nuclear power plant and declaring t ... After the terrible accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, which destroyed the lives of thousands of people and became ... After the terrible accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, which destroyed the lives of thousands of people and became ... 37 years ago the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant occurred ...
Large radiation accidents: consequences and protective countermeasures. Moscow: IzdAT Publisher; 2004. [Google Scholar] ... Radiation accidents - contribution to radioecological science and ecological lessons Radioprotection 2009, Vol. 44, n° 5, pages ... Estimation of possible ecological effects of Chernobyl NPP to the environment as a result of shutting-down of CHNPP ...
... by Rylan Santos March 17, 2024, 4:29 am. 472 Views ... The Future of Nuclear Power. The Chernobyl disaster reignited the debate around the safety and viability of nuclear power. ... On April 26, 1986, the world witnessed one of the most catastrophic nuclear accidents in history - the Chernobyl disaster. ... This event, which occurred at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine (then part of the Soviet Union), has become a ...
Accidents Animals Chernobyl Nuclear Accident Food Contamination, Radioactive Health Services Needs And Demand Humans Morbidity ... Nuclear power plant accidents Cite CITE. Title : Nuclear power plant accidents Corporate Authors(s) : Centers for Disease ... Consequences Of The Nuclear Power Plant Accident At Chernobyl. 106(1). Ginzburg, H M and Reis, E "Consequences Of The Nuclear ... Nuclear power plant accidents. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.) "Nuclear power plant accidents" (2014). ...
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More than 30 years after nuclear accident, fires pose environmental risks and stir fears over illegal logging. ... More than 30 years after nuclear accident, fires pose environmental risks and stir fears over illegal logging. ... Chernobyl, Ukraine - The site of the worlds worst nuclear disaster is not a barren, lifeless wasteland. ... A dense, primordial forest dominates the "Alienation Zone" around the shutdown Chernobyl nuclear power plant where Reactor Four ...
Information on Ukraine conflict and nuclear energy from World Nuclear Association ... Chernobyl Accident. The Chernobyl accident in 1986 was the result of a flawed reactor design that was operated with ... Global Nuclear Community backs IAEA call for safety zone at Zaporizhzhia Nuclear Power Plant (8 September 2022). A nuclear ... Two Chernobyl plant workers died on the night of the accident, and a further 28 people died within a few weeks as a result of ...
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  • To date, the nuclear accidents at the Chernobyl (1986) and Fukushima Daiichi (2011) nuclear power plants, are the only INES level 7 nuclear accidents. (wikipedia.org)
  • On April 26, 1986, the world witnessed one of the most catastrophic nuclear accidents in history - the Chernobyl disaster. (clips2click.com)
  • Whether you support or oppose nuclear power, the events of April 26, 1986, will forever be etched in history as a sobering example of the consequences of human error and the importance of prioritizing safety in all aspects of nuclear technology. (clips2click.com)
  • On April 26, 1986, the biggest nuclear disaster in human history occurred at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in the Ukrainian Soviet Republic. (rt.com)
  • A dense, primordial forest dominates the "Alienation Zone" around the shutdown Chernobyl nuclear power plant where Reactor Four exploded in 1986. (aljazeera.com)
  • The Chernobyl accident in 1986 was the result of a flawed reactor design that was operated with inadequately trained personnel. (world-nuclear.org)
  • This term is analogous to the Chernobyl nuclear disaster in 1986, implying the calamitous and widespread impact the packet can have on the affected system. (devx.com)
  • The Chernobyl disaster was a catastrophic nuclear accident that occurred on April 26, 1986, at the No. 4 reactor in the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine. (devx.com)
  • The name "Chernobyl Packet" is derived from the infamous Chernobyl disaster, which was a catastrophic nuclear accident that occurred in 1986. (devx.com)
  • Following the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear accident, shifting winds blew a radioactive cloud over Europe. (disabled-world.com)
  • Entitled simply 'Chernobyl', the hard-hitting five-part HBO and Sky series received the thumbs-up from critics when it was broadcast in the United States and Britain starting from last month for its graphic recreation of the 1986 nuclear disaster in Soviet-era Ukraine. (deccanherald.com)
  • The world's worst nuclear accident happened on April 26, 1986. (deccanherald.com)
  • The 1986 meltdown of just one nuclear reactor left a radioactively contaminated "dead zone" of more than 1,000 square miles from which evacuation was compulsory (although some 200, mostly elderly "samosely," are allowed to remain). (envirosagainstwar.org)
  • The Chernobyl explosion, which occurred in 1986, was the worst nuclear accident in history - affecting tens of thousands of square kilometres of land. (futuretimeline.net)
  • I recommend the series "Chernobyl" about the nuclear accident in Ukraine in 1986. (lu.se)
  • Three Mile Island, Chernobyl, and Fukushima, A comparison of three nuclear reactor calamities reveals some key differences. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Chernobyl disaster unfolded during a poorly designed experiment conducted by technicians at reactor Unit 4. (clips2click.com)
  • Twenty-five years ago, Reactor 4 at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in the Ukraine, exploded, sending a cloud of poison into the atmosphere. (dailymaverick.co.za)
  • The cause of the accident, once thought to be gross human error, has now been attributed to the design of the reactor. (dailymaverick.co.za)
  • Twenty-five years later, Chernobyl remains mothballed, Reactor 4 contained in a sarcophagus that already desperately needs a makeover. (dailymaverick.co.za)
  • Starring British actor Jared Harris as deputy head of the USSR's main nuclear research centre and directed by Sweden's Johan Renck, 'Chernobyl' delivers a hard-hitting account of the accident at the fourth reactor of the nuclear station that sent radioactive fallout over much of Europe. (deccanherald.com)
  • The reactor had to be shut down and the full radioactive core of the Unit 1 reactor, which held thousands of rods, was removed and then dumped into the spent fuel pool-a blatant violation of Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) safety requirements. (thenation.com)
  • In your first post you said the current fleet of nuclear reactors has an accident rate of 1 per 10,000 reactor-years. (skepticalscience.com)
  • Abbott claims 11 accidents (before Fukushima) in 14,000 commercial reactor years so his rate is about ten times yours. (skepticalscience.com)
  • If you built out 50,000 modular reactors with an accident rate of 1 in 100,000 reactor years, you would have a big accident every other year somewhere. (skepticalscience.com)
  • Tomohiko Suzuki, author of the book The Yakuza and the Nuclear Industry , claims that several members of the Fukushima 50, workers who stayed behind to work on the Fukushima dai-ichi nuclear reactor post 3/11 when others fled, were Yakuza members . (stackexchange.com)
  • The Chernobyl explosion, still the world's worst nuclear accident 25 years on, exemplifies the unknowable legacy of such a calamity. (dailymaverick.co.za)
  • The opposition called the march to protest against the government's handling of the consequences of Chornobyl disaster, the world's worst nuclear accident. (rferl.org)
  • Chernobyl and the safety of nuclear reactors in OECD countries : report by an NEA group of experts. (who.int)
  • Ukraine is heavily dependent on nuclear energy - it has 15 reactors generating about half of its electricity. (world-nuclear.org)
  • Arnie Gundersen, a nuclear engineer with many years of experience at US nuclear reactors, describes this kind of accident as "Chernobyl on steroids. (thenation.com)
  • By this time, the corporations that owned the nation's nuclear reactors were stuffing about four times more spent fuel into storage pools than the pools were designed to accommodate, with the NRC's blessing. (thenation.com)
  • Japan's response to the needs of its own people has been spotty and ineffective, except for the robust insistence on re-starting all its nuclear reactors. (envirosagainstwar.org)
  • Man-made sources of radioactive materials are found in consumer products, industrial equipment, atom bomb fallout, and to a smaller extent from hospital waste, medical devices, and nuclear reactors. (cdc.gov)
  • The Fukushima Daiichi Accident: Technical Volume 2/5 - Safety Assessment" (PDF). (wikipedia.org)
  • The Fukushima Daiichi Accident: Technical Volume 1/5 - Description and Context of the Accident" (PDF). (wikipedia.org)
  • Fukushima is unique in the world in having suffered the March 11, 2011, earthquake/tsunami/triple meltdown at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station. (envirosagainstwar.org)
  • Is a giant wolffish the result of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident? (stackexchange.com)
  • Health effects due to radiation from the Chernobyl accident (Annex D of the 2008 UNSCEAR Report)" (PDF). (wikipedia.org)
  • Large radiation accidents: consequences and protective countermeasures. (radioprotection.org)
  • Chernobyl ten years on : radiological and health impact, an appraisal by the NEA Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health , November 1995. (who.int)
  • External exposure to gamma-photon irradiation from soil contamination due to nuclear power plant (NPP) accidents has significant contribution to human radiation exposure in the proximity of the NPP. (bvsalud.org)
  • The absorbed doses by gamma-photon radiation were from cesium -137 (137Cs) in soil contaminated by the two major NPP accidents . (bvsalud.org)
  • Two Chernobyl plant workers died on the night of the accident, and a further 28 people died within a few weeks as a result of acute radiation poisoning. (world-nuclear.org)
  • In September 2005 in Vienna the Chernobyl Forum released a report which estimated that around 4,000 people could have died or could die in the future as a result of exposure to radiation from the Chernobyl accident. (cnic.jp)
  • The report only considers 600,000 of the people exposed to radiation from Chernobyl. (cnic.jp)
  • What does nuclear radiation do to the human body? (abc.net.au)
  • Radiation sickness Atomic weapons and nuclear accidents like those at Chernobyl and Fukushima have made sure we all know that nuclear radiation is dangerous. (abc.net.au)
  • Nuclear technology and the use of radiation sources have been extensively adopted in the modern world. (lu.se)
  • The mapping and positioning of gamma emitting radionuclides can be done more precisely and provide more information about the radiation in the environment during radiological accident scenarios. (lu.se)
  • Chernobyl radiation hotspots. (futuretimeline.net)
  • This event, which occurred at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine (then part of the Soviet Union), has become a chilling reminder of the potential dangers of nuclear power and the importance of strict safety protocols. (clips2click.com)
  • More serious and wide-spread impacts of the Chernobyl NPP accident on soil contamination in Ukraine , Belarus , Russia and countries as far as Sweden and Greece were due to the inland location , radiative plume transport pathway and high 137Cs emission strength (9 times the Fukushima emission). (bvsalud.org)
  • Chernobyl, Ukraine - The site of the world's worst nuclear disaster is not a barren, lifeless wasteland. (aljazeera.com)
  • Russia's invasion of Ukraine has impacted the country's nuclear power facilities. (world-nuclear.org)
  • Europe's largest nuclear power plant, Zaporizhzhia, is relying on emergency diesel generators to provide power essential to safety functions after it lost all off-site power on Thursday morning following missile strikes on Ukraine. (world-nuclear.org)
  • The Chernobyl Forum is an initiative of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), in cooperation with seven other UN agencies and the governments of Belarus, the Russian Federation and the Ukraine. (cnic.jp)
  • Filmed both in Ukraine and at a decommissioned nuclear power station in ex-Soviet Lithuania that resembles the doomed plant, the TV series was, for many of its Russian viewers, an emotional experience. (deccanherald.com)
  • Fukushima is the worst nuclear accident since Chernobyl (which just happens to be in Ukraine). (envirosagainstwar.org)
  • In fact, Ukraine, which experienced the Chernobyl nuclear power plant leakage accident, should be wary of depleted uranium. (globaltimes.cn)
  • There is at least one other, 834 square mile "dead zone" in Belarus, which received an estimated 72% of the early heavy fallout from Chernobyl, contaminating 25% of the country. (envirosagainstwar.org)
  • However, exposure to fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear accident was asssociated with increases in papillary rather than follicular thyroid carcinoma. (medscape.com)
  • Just as the nuclear disaster led to widespread destruction and long-lasting impacts, the Chernobyl Packet also seeks to cause significant damage to its targeted systems, disrupting normal operations and potentially causing irreversible consequences. (devx.com)
  • The NEA in collaboration with the Ontario Power Generation (OPG) will organise a multi-sector workshop on 18-20 September 2024 on Local Intense Precipitation and its Impacts on Nuclear Installations. (oecd-nea.org)
  • Follow the link to learn more about the chronicles of the Chornobyl disaster and overcoming its consequences. (kpi.ua)
  • The International Chernobyl Project : an overview, assessment of radiological consequences and evaluation of protective measures, report / by an international advisory committee. (who.int)
  • The International Chernobyl Project : proceedings of an international conference held in Vienna, 21-24 May 1991 for presentation and discussion of the technical report, assessment of radiological consequences and evaluation of protective measures. (who.int)
  • This metaphor is often used to describe a piece of data or an information packet that, when processed, can cause catastrophic consequences in a network or computer system, similar to how the Chernobyl disaster caused massive damage.Given that it is a metaphor, it is hard to provide real-world examples of the term "Chernobyl Packet" itself. (devx.com)
  • The disaster sparked international outrage and criticism over the Soviet Union's nuclear safety protocols, ultimately leading to the creation of the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone, a vast area with a radius of about 18.6 miles (30 km) centered on the power plant. (clips2click.com)
  • In the event of a terrorist attack involving nuclear or radiological agents, it is one of CDC's missions to insure that our nation is well prepared to respond. (cdc.gov)
  • Rather, the focus is on unique aspects of a nuclear or radiological event involving mass casualties for which the hospital's emergency department may not be adequately prepared or equipped. (cdc.gov)
  • From the discussions of this roundtable and other available literature, CDC has developed a basic set of practical strategies to provide guidance to hospitals, health care providers, emergency departments, and state and local health departments to aid in managing casualties from a nuclear or radiological incident for the purpose of ameliorating injuries and loss of life. (cdc.gov)
  • Rather, the guidelines focus on the unique aspects of a nuclear or radiological event involving mass casualties for which the hospital may not be generally trained, equipped or prepared. (cdc.gov)
  • Despite that, a number of radiological accidents, significantly affecting population and the environment, has happened. (lu.se)
  • In the first hours of the Chornobyl accident, Oleksandr was called to the station, where he organized urgent work to prevent the explosion of the second stage turbine generator and personally shut off the hydrogen supply, preventing a powerful explosion. (kpi.ua)
  • The Chernobyl explosion was, however, the starkest example of the crumbling of the USSR, its infrastructure in as poor repair as its ideology. (dailymaverick.co.za)
  • The majority of nuclear accidents release radioactive iodine into the atmosphere and may be absorbed into a person's body. (disabled-world.com)
  • Health authorities can determine which radioactive isotopes are released during a nuclear event. (disabled-world.com)
  • Of all the ghastly stories that emerged slowly like seeping radioactive sludge from the Chernobyl disaster, none is more disquieting than that of the Bridge of Death. (dailymaverick.co.za)
  • The Belarus and French governments, together with the United Nations and nuclear industry interests (including the IAEA), run a program (secret before 2004) to resettle people into radioactive areas. (envirosagainstwar.org)
  • Radioactive forms of cesium are produced by the fission of uranium in fuel elements (fuel rods) during the normal operation of nuclear power plants, or when nuclear weapons are exploded. (cdc.gov)
  • Ukraine's state nuclear energy giant says all employees of the country's nuclear plants will stage a massive protest over its frozen assets in Kiev on Tuesday, as the world will be marking the 30th anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster. (rt.com)
  • While some argue that the lessons learned from this catastrophe have led to improved safety measures and that nuclear energy remains a crucial component of a sustainable energy mix, others advocate for a complete shift towards safer and renewable alternatives. (clips2click.com)
  • On April 16th a symposium will be held entitled "20 years after the Chernobyl Catastrophe - What happened and what continues now? (cnic.jp)
  • More than 100,000 people were evacuated from the city of Chernobyl and the nearby company town of Pripyat, and some 2,600sq kilometres (about 1,004sq miles) were cordoned off and fenced with barbed wire. (aljazeera.com)
  • Other danger zones, from which the government compels or assists resettlement, exist outside the "dead zone" and have yielded more than 100,000 nuclear refugees. (envirosagainstwar.org)
  • A nuclear safety and security protection zone should be established immediately around ZaporizhzhIa Nuclear Power Plant, as recommended by the IAEA. (world-nuclear.org)
  • The changeover of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) staff at the Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant has taken place, following a month-long delay, with the experts having to make part of the journey across the frontline by foot. (world-nuclear.org)
  • International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) director general Rafael Mariano Grossi said the agency will do all it can to ensure nuclear safety, as it publishes a report covering the events of the past year. (world-nuclear.org)
  • External Cesium-137 doses to humans from soil influenced by the Fukushima and Chernobyl nuclear power plants accidents: a comparative study. (bvsalud.org)
  • Authorities say it will only be safe for humans to live in Chernobyl again in 24,000 years. (deccanherald.com)
  • Two years ago, KPI immortalized the feat of the hero-liquidator of the Chornobyl accident, KPI graduate Oleksandr Lelechenko. (kpi.ua)
  • More than 30 years after nuclear accident, fires pose environmental risks and stir fears over illegal logging. (aljazeera.com)
  • The purpose was to convey the message that, 20 years on, the health effects of the Chernobyl accident are not that great after all. (cnic.jp)
  • Along with researchers from the regions most affected by the Chernobyl accident, for many years he has been doing research into the nature of the accident and its effects on human beings. (cnic.jp)
  • Within this paper, IDOCAL's plans to advance this line of research in the coming years, by extending it from the nuclear power sector to other high-risk industries, are also outlined. (bvsalud.org)
  • Poland distributed KI to greater than 95% of children within 3 days of the accident and does not seem to have had an increase in thyroid cancer. (disabled-world.com)
  • FTC and other thyroid neoplasms arising from follicular cells (adenomas, papillary/follicular carcinoma, and noninvasive follicular thyroid neoplasm with papillary-like nuclear features [NIFTP]) show a broad range of overlapping clinical and cytologic features. (medscape.com)
  • The calculated annual effective doses at areas near the Fukushima and Chernobyl NPPs exceeded the ICRP recommendation of 1 mSv yr-1. (bvsalud.org)
  • The show has prompted soul-searching over why Russia has never made any comparable series of its own, although several shows and films have touched on the nuclear disaster. (deccanherald.com)
  • President Vladimir Putin warned on the same day that the weapons will be treated by Moscow as containing "nuclear components," and Russia will be forced to react. (globaltimes.cn)
  • Russian Defence Minister Sergei Shoigu said the British decision left fewer and fewer steps before a potential "nuclear collision" between Russia and the West. (globaltimes.cn)
  • Energoatom, the operator of Ukraine's four functioning nuclear plants, said on its website on Monday that its workers resorted to such "extreme measure" because of the "inaction" of the state in addressing the issue of "unjustified seizure" of the company's assets. (rt.com)
  • As the world grapples with the challenges of climate change and energy security, the Chernobyl disaster serves as a stark reminder of the need for rigorous safety protocols, transparency, and a thoughtful approach to energy production. (clips2click.com)
  • In fact the report was an international publicity stunt by the proponents of nuclear energy. (cnic.jp)
  • We have repeatedly asked for nuclear proponents to provide an article for this site which puts the case based on published science but so far we haven't had a taker. (skepticalscience.com)
  • JPRS Report: Soviet Union Economic Affairs Chernobyl Notebook" (Republished by the Foreign Broadcast Information Service ed. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nuclear Notebook: How many nuclear weapons does the UK have? (thebulletin.org)
  • The expectation is that an article would provide a balanced review of all aspects of nuclear energy as a practical, affordable, realistic source of low-carbon energy. (skepticalscience.com)
  • To this day, it remains overly dependent on nuclear industry self-reporting of problems. (thenation.com)
  • After the terrible accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, which destroyed the lives of thousands of people and became an environmental disaster for the whole world, the enemy still resorts to nuclear terror, seizing and placing military equipment at the nuclear power plant and declaring the possibility of using nuclear weapons. (kpi.ua)
  • World Nuclear Association calls on parties to cease hostilities in the vicinity of the plant. (world-nuclear.org)
  • Group Intro: "Decommission the Shika Nuclear Power Plant! (cnic.jp)
  • As the world hunkers down under the continued threat of a meltdown at Japan's damaged Fukushima nuclear plant, the result of the devastating earthquake and tsunami that ripped through that country a month ago, a chilling anniversary is being commemorated elsewhere. (dailymaverick.co.za)
  • There is a small nuclear plant in Siberia that is completely air cooled. (skepticalscience.com)
  • If you think that criticism of your position represents an "anti-nuclear bias", then writing a balanced article will be difficult for you. (skepticalscience.com)
  • The region of excess risk extended up to a 200 mile radius from Chernobyl. (disabled-world.com)
  • Understanding and addressing Chernobyl Packets is crucial in order to protect computer systems and networks, maintain the security and stability of digital environments, and ensure the ongoing reliability of technology in various applications. (devx.com)
  • Results of search for 'su:{Chernobyl nuclear accident. (who.int)
  • Named after the infamous Chernobyl nuclear disaster, these packets can cause significant damage akin to a meltdown in computing infrastructure. (devx.com)
  • The Chernobyl disaster reignited the debate around the safety and viability of nuclear power. (clips2click.com)
  • Summary report on the post-accident review meeting on the Chernobyl accident : report / by the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group. (who.int)
  • While many NRC requirements had questionable impact on safety," Domenici said, "their impact on the price of nuclear energy was far more obvious. (thenation.com)
  • Nuclear Energy Institute. (wikipedia.org)
  • by OECD Nuclear Energy Agency. (who.int)
  • Energoatom operates Zaporizhzhya, Rivne, South Ukrainian and Khmelnitsky nuclear power plants, providing for over a half of Ukraine's total energy demand. (rt.com)
  • Ukraine's state-owned nuclear energy utility Energoatom and Cameco Corporation have agreed commercial terms for a major supply contract that would see Cameco meeting Ukraine's needs for natural uranium for nuclear fuel until 2035. (world-nuclear.org)
  • Future energy How close are we to having nuclear plants that fit the clean, green bill? (abc.net.au)
  • Since its inception, the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) has served as a flexible and powerful platform for multinational research co-operation, particularly in areas related to n. (oecd-nea.org)
  • Is Nuclear Energy the Answer? (skepticalscience.com)
  • Nuclear energy is quite commonly proposed as the solution to reducing GHG emissions. (skepticalscience.com)
  • If you think that you are the only one that truly understands nuclear energy, then you are probably wrong. (skepticalscience.com)
  • I have encountered many bogus claims about nuclear energy - I wouldn't be surprised if some sections of the media biased against nuclear energy decided not to scrutinize these claims too closely. (stackexchange.com)
  • ANNEX J. Exposures and effects of the Chernobyl accident" (PDF). (wikipedia.org)
  • The Chernobyl disaster had far-reaching and long-lasting effects on the environment and public health. (clips2click.com)
  • Users, companies, and network administrators must also be diligent in maintaining robust cybersecurity measures, keeping software up-to-date, and employing best practices to avoid the damaging effects caused by Chernobyl Packets. (devx.com)
  • The International Chernobyl project : surface contamination maps. (who.int)
  • The project investigates the Chernobyl accident from the perspective of victims, journalists, NGOs, scientists and social scientists. (cnic.jp)
  • Due to the risks posed to a developing fetus, women who are pregnant should also take KI in the event of a nuclear accident. (disabled-world.com)
  • Has public faith in nuclear power decreased significantly after the Fukushima accident? (stackexchange.com)
  • The Chernobyl Packet is a term in the world of computing and cybersecurity, referring to a specific type of malicious data. (devx.com)
  • Chernobyl Packets are intentionally crafted by malicious hackers, seeking either to infiltrate and take control of a system, overload networks, or simply destroy valuable data. (devx.com)
  • The Stuxnet Worm (2010): Stuxnet was a malicious computer worm that targeted Iran's nuclear program. (devx.com)
  • A US-made television series on the Chernobyl nuclear disaster was well-received by Russian audiences, even if some critics accused the makers of distorting the facts to show the Soviet-era authorities in a particularly bad light. (deccanherald.com)
  • But some Russian media described the series as 'propaganda' that exaggerated the callousness of the authorities at the time, their slowness in reacting and the long time they took to officially acknowledge the accident and evacuate the area. (deccanherald.com)
  • In 2014, youth channel TNT aired a teen drama series called 'Chernobyl. (deccanherald.com)
  • Cybersecurity specialists are always on the lookout for Chernobyl Packets and continually work on creating protective measures and updates to mitigate the risks they pose. (devx.com)
  • During a nuclear emergency, the benefits of KI far outweigh any potential risks. (disabled-world.com)
  • In March 1992 George Galatis, a nuclear engineer at the Millstone nuclear power station in Waterford, Connecticut, became alarmed during a refueling. (thenation.com)
  • Alyaksandr Milinkevich (left) leads an April 26 march to mark the anniversary of the Chornobyl disaster (RFE/RL) MINSK, April 27, 2006 (RFE/RL) -- A court in Minsk today sentenced Belarus's main opposition leader to 15 days in jail on charges of organizing an unsanctioned protest rally. (rferl.org)
  • "The payment arrears may result in the delay in the supply of nuclear fuel to Ukrainian nuclear power plants and therefore stoppage nuclear power units," the company warned. (rt.com)
  • Greenpeace insists 200,000 have died as a result of the accident. (dailymaverick.co.za)
  • Although depleted uranium is not classified as a nuclear weapon, it isn't an ordinary conventional weapon either. (globaltimes.cn)