Cisplatin: An inorganic and water-soluble platinum complex. After undergoing hydrolysis, it reacts with DNA to produce both intra and interstrand crosslinks. These crosslinks appear to impair replication and transcription of DNA. The cytotoxicity of cisplatin correlates with cellular arrest in the G2 phase of the cell cycle.Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols: The use of two or more chemicals simultaneously or sequentially in the drug therapy of neoplasms. The drugs need not be in the same dosage form.Chemotherapy, Adjuvant: Drug therapy given to augment or stimulate some other form of treatment such as surgery or radiation therapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy is commonly used in the therapy of cancer and can be administered before or after the primary treatment.Antineoplastic Agents: Substances that inhibit or prevent the proliferation of NEOPLASMS.Combined Modality Therapy: The treatment of a disease or condition by several different means simultaneously or sequentially. Chemoimmunotherapy, RADIOIMMUNOTHERAPY, chemoradiotherapy, cryochemotherapy, and SALVAGE THERAPY are seen most frequently, but their combinations with each other and surgery are also used.Lung Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LUNG.Translating: Conversion from one language to another language.Ovarian Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the OVARY. These neoplasms can be benign or malignant. They are classified according to the tissue of origin, such as the surface EPITHELIUM, the stromal endocrine cells, and the totipotent GERM CELLS.Breast Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the human BREAST.Survival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.Drug Resistance, Neoplasm: Resistance or diminished response of a neoplasm to an antineoplastic agent in humans, animals, or cell or tissue cultures.Doxorubicin: Antineoplastic antibiotic obtained from Streptomyces peucetius. It is a hydroxy derivative of DAUNORUBICIN.Disease-Free Survival: Period after successful treatment in which there is no appearance of the symptoms or effects of the disease.Cyclophosphamide: Precursor of an alkylating nitrogen mustard antineoplastic and immunosuppressive agent that must be activated in the LIVER to form the active aldophosphamide. It has been used in the treatment of LYMPHOMA and LEUKEMIA. Its side effect, ALOPECIA, has been used for defleecing sheep. Cyclophosphamide may also cause sterility, birth defects, mutations, and cancer.Etoposide: A semisynthetic derivative of PODOPHYLLOTOXIN that exhibits antitumor activity. Etoposide inhibits DNA synthesis by forming a complex with topoisomerase II and DNA. This complex induces breaks in double stranded DNA and prevents repair by topoisomerase II binding. Accumulated breaks in DNA prevent entry into the mitotic phase of cell division, and lead to cell death. Etoposide acts primarily in the G2 and S phases of the cell cycle.Drug Administration Schedule: Time schedule for administration of a drug in order to achieve optimum effectiveness and convenience.Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.Neoplasm Staging: Methods which attempt to express in replicable terms the extent of the neoplasm in the patient.Paclitaxel: A cyclodecane isolated from the bark of the Pacific yew tree, TAXUS BREVIFOLIA. It stabilizes MICROTUBULES in their polymerized form leading to cell death.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.DeoxycytidineCarcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung: A heterogeneous aggregate of at least three distinct histological types of lung cancer, including SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA; ADENOCARCINOMA; and LARGE CELL CARCINOMA. They are dealt with collectively because of their shared treatment strategy.Vinblastine: Antitumor alkaloid isolated from Vinca rosea. (Merck, 11th ed.)Stomach Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the STOMACH.Carboplatin: An organoplatinum compound that possesses antineoplastic activity.Cell Line, Tumor: A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.Platinum: Platinum. A heavy, soft, whitish metal, resembling tin, atomic number 78, atomic weight 195.09, symbol Pt. (From Dorland, 28th ed) It is used in manufacturing equipment for laboratory and industrial use. It occurs as a black powder (platinum black) and as a spongy substance (spongy platinum) and may have been known in Pliny's time as "alutiae".Neoplasm Metastasis: The transfer of a neoplasm from one organ or part of the body to another remote from the primary site.Neoplasm Recurrence, Local: The local recurrence of a neoplasm following treatment. It arises from microscopic cells of the original neoplasm that have escaped therapeutic intervention and later become clinically visible at the original site.Taxoids: A group of diterpenoid CYCLODECANES named for the taxanes that were discovered in the TAXUS tree. The action on MICROTUBULES has made some of them useful as ANTINEOPLASTIC AGENTS.Neoadjuvant Therapy: Preliminary cancer therapy (chemotherapy, radiation therapy, hormone/endocrine therapy, immunotherapy, hyperthermia, etc.) that precedes a necessary second modality of treatment.Early Detection of Cancer: Methods to identify and characterize cancer in the early stages of disease and predict tumor behavior.Carcinoma, Squamous Cell: A carcinoma derived from stratified SQUAMOUS EPITHELIAL CELLS. It may also occur in sites where glandular or columnar epithelium is normally present. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Ifosfamide: Positional isomer of CYCLOPHOSPHAMIDE which is active as an alkylating agent and an immunosuppressive agent.Adenocarcinoma: A malignant epithelial tumor with a glandular organization.Methotrexate: An antineoplastic antimetabolite with immunosuppressant properties. It is an inhibitor of TETRAHYDROFOLATE DEHYDROGENASE and prevents the formation of tetrahydrofolate, necessary for synthesis of thymidylate, an essential component of DNA.Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic: Agents obtained from higher plants that have demonstrable cytostatic or antineoplastic activity.Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic: Antimetabolites that are useful in cancer chemotherapy.Head and Neck Neoplasms: Soft tissue tumors or cancer arising from the mucosal surfaces of the LIP; oral cavity; PHARYNX; LARYNX; and cervical esophagus. Other sites included are the NOSE and PARANASAL SINUSES; SALIVARY GLANDS; THYROID GLAND and PARATHYROID GLANDS; and MELANOMA and non-melanoma skin cancers of the head and neck. (from Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 4th ed, p1651)Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Colonic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the COLON.Testicular Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the TESTIS. Germ cell tumors (GERMINOMA) of the testis constitute 95% of all testicular neoplasms.Vomiting: The forcible expulsion of the contents of the STOMACH through the MOUTH.Carcinoma: A malignant neoplasm made up of epithelial cells tending to infiltrate the surrounding tissues and give rise to metastases. It is a histological type of neoplasm but is often wrongly used as a synonym for "cancer." (From Dorland, 27th ed)Mice, Nude: Mutant mice homozygous for the recessive gene "nude" which fail to develop a thymus. They are useful in tumor studies and studies on immune responses.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in neoplastic tissue.Bleomycin: A complex of related glycopeptide antibiotics from Streptomyces verticillus consisting of bleomycin A2 and B2. It inhibits DNA metabolism and is used as an antineoplastic, especially for solid tumors.Prostatic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PROSTATE.Angiofibroma: A benign neoplasm of fibrous tissue in which there are numerous small and large, frequently dilated, vascular channels. (Stedman, 25th ed)Induction Chemotherapy: Initial drug treatment designed to bring about REMISSION INDUCTION. It is typically a short-term and high-dose drug treatment that is followed by CONSOLIDATION CHEMOTHERAPY and then MAINTENANCE CHEMOTHERAPY.Pancreatic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PANCREAS. Depending on the types of ISLET CELLS present in the tumors, various hormones can be secreted: GLUCAGON from PANCREATIC ALPHA CELLS; INSULIN from PANCREATIC BETA CELLS; and SOMATOSTATIN from the SOMATOSTATIN-SECRETING CELLS. Most are malignant except the insulin-producing tumors (INSULINOMA).Disease Progression: The worsening of a disease over time. This concept is most often used for chronic and incurable diseases where the stage of the disease is an important determinant of therapy and prognosis.Drug Screening Assays, Antitumor: Methods of investigating the effectiveness of anticancer cytotoxic drugs and biologic inhibitors. These include in vitro cell-kill models and cytostatic dye exclusion tests as well as in vivo measurement of tumor growth parameters in laboratory animals.Colorectal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the COLON or the RECTUM or both. Risk factors for colorectal cancer include chronic ULCERATIVE COLITIS; FAMILIAL POLYPOSIS COLI; exposure to ASBESTOS; and irradiation of the CERVIX UTERI.Nausea: An unpleasant sensation in the stomach usually accompanied by the urge to vomit. Common causes are early pregnancy, sea and motion sickness, emotional stress, intense pain, food poisoning, and various enteroviruses.Camptothecin: An alkaloid isolated from the stem wood of the Chinese tree, Camptotheca acuminata. This compound selectively inhibits the nuclear enzyme DNA TOPOISOMERASES, TYPE I. Several semisynthetic analogs of camptothecin have demonstrated antitumor activity.Neutropenia: A decrease in the number of NEUTROPHILS found in the blood.Infusions, Intravenous: The long-term (minutes to hours) administration of a fluid into the vein through venipuncture, either by letting the fluid flow by gravity or by pumping it.Neoplasm Invasiveness: Ability of neoplasms to infiltrate and actively destroy surrounding tissue.Fluorouracil: A pyrimidine analog that is an antineoplastic antimetabolite. It interferes with DNA synthesis by blocking the THYMIDYLATE SYNTHETASE conversion of deoxyuridylic acid to thymidylic acid.Tumor Markers, Biological: Molecular products metabolized and secreted by neoplastic tissue and characterized biochemically in cells or body fluids. They are indicators of tumor stage and grade as well as useful for monitoring responses to treatment and predicting recurrence. Many chemical groups are represented including hormones, antigens, amino and nucleic acids, enzymes, polyamines, and specific cell membrane proteins and lipids.Cell Survival: The span of viability of a cell characterized by the capacity to perform certain functions such as metabolism, growth, reproduction, some form of responsiveness, and adaptability.Kaplan-Meier Estimate: A nonparametric method of compiling LIFE TABLES or survival tables. It combines calculated probabilities of survival and estimates to allow for observations occurring beyond a measurement threshold, which are assumed to occur randomly. Time intervals are defined as ending each time an event occurs and are therefore unequal. (From Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1995)Radiotherapy, Adjuvant: Radiotherapy given to augment some other form of treatment such as surgery or chemotherapy. Adjuvant radiotherapy is commonly used in the therapy of cancer and can be administered before or after the primary treatment.Radiotherapy: The use of IONIZING RADIATION to treat malignant NEOPLASMS and some benign conditions.Mitomycin: An antineoplastic antibiotic produced by Streptomyces caespitosus. It is one of the bi- or tri-functional ALKYLATING AGENTS causing cross-linking of DNA and inhibition of DNA synthesis.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Urinary Bladder Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the URINARY BLADDER.Uterine Cervical Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the UTERINE CERVIX.Tumor Cells, Cultured: Cells grown in vitro from neoplastic tissue. If they can be established as a TUMOR CELL LINE, they can be propagated in cell culture indefinitely.Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating: A class of drugs that differs from other alkylating agents used clinically in that they are monofunctional and thus unable to cross-link cellular macromolecules. Among their common properties are a requirement for metabolic activation to intermediates with antitumor efficacy and the presence in their chemical structures of N-methyl groups, that after metabolism, can covalently modify cellular DNA. The precise mechanisms by which each of these drugs acts to kill tumor cells are not completely understood. (From AMA, Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p2026)Esophageal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the ESOPHAGUS.Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays: In vivo methods of screening investigative anticancer drugs, biologic response modifiers or radiotherapies. Human tumor tissue or cells are transplanted into mice or rats followed by tumor treatment regimens. A variety of outcomes are monitored to assess antitumor effectiveness.Clinical Trials as Topic: Works about pre-planned studies of the safety, efficacy, or optimum dosage schedule (if appropriate) of one or more diagnostic, therapeutic, or prophylactic drugs, devices, or techniques selected according to predetermined criteria of eligibility and observed for predefined evidence of favorable and unfavorable effects. This concept includes clinical trials conducted both in the U.S. and in other countries.Liver Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LIVER.Organoplatinum Compounds: Organic compounds which contain platinum as an integral part of the molecule.Bone Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer located in bone tissue or specific BONES.Drug Synergism: The action of a drug in promoting or enhancing the effectiveness of another drug.Antibodies, Monoclonal: Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.Neoplasm Proteins: Proteins whose abnormal expression (gain or loss) are associated with the development, growth, or progression of NEOPLASMS. Some neoplasm proteins are tumor antigens (ANTIGENS, NEOPLASM), i.e. they induce an immune reaction to their tumor. Many neoplasm proteins have been characterized and are used as tumor markers (BIOMARKERS, TUMOR) when they are detectable in cells and body fluids as monitors for the presence or growth of tumors. Abnormal expression of ONCOGENE PROTEINS is involved in neoplastic transformation, whereas the loss of expression of TUMOR SUPPRESSOR PROTEINS is involved with the loss of growth control and progression of the neoplasm.DNA Adducts: The products of chemical reactions that result in the addition of extraneous chemical groups to DNA.Salvage Therapy: A therapeutic approach, involving chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or surgery, after initial regimens have failed to lead to improvement in a patient's condition. Salvage therapy is most often used for neoplastic diseases.Neoplasms, Germ Cell and Embryonal: Neoplasms composed of primordial GERM CELLS of embryonic GONADS or of elements of the germ layers of the EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in the gonads or present in an embryo or FETUS.Prostaglandins I: A class of cyclic prostaglandins that contain the 6,9-epoxy bond. Endogenous members of this family are biosynthesized enzymatically from PROSTAGLANDIN ENDOPEROXIDES.Tegafur: Congener of FLUOROURACIL with comparable antineoplastic action. It has been suggested especially for the treatment of breast neoplasms.Anthracyclines: Organic compounds that have a tetrahydronaphthacenedione ring structure attached by a glycosidic linkage to the amino sugar daunosamine.Antibiotics, Antineoplastic: Chemical substances, produced by microorganisms, inhibiting or preventing the proliferation of neoplasms.Tumor Suppressor Protein p53: Nuclear phosphoprotein encoded by the p53 gene (GENES, P53) whose normal function is to control CELL PROLIFERATION and APOPTOSIS. A mutant or absent p53 protein has been found in LEUKEMIA; OSTEOSARCOMA; LUNG CANCER; and COLORECTAL CANCER.Radiotherapy Dosage: The total amount of radiation absorbed by tissues as a result of radiotherapy.Receptor, erbB-2: A cell surface protein-tyrosine kinase receptor that is overexpressed in a variety of ADENOCARCINOMAS. It has extensive homology to and heterodimerizes with the EGF RECEPTOR, the ERBB-3 RECEPTOR, and the ERBB-4 RECEPTOR. Activation of the erbB-2 receptor occurs through heterodimer formation with a ligand-bound erbB receptor family member.Peritoneal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PERITONEUM.Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction: A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.Receptors, Estrogen: Cytoplasmic proteins that bind estrogens and migrate to the nucleus where they regulate DNA transcription. Evaluation of the state of estrogen receptors in breast cancer patients has become clinically important.Cancer Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines designed to prevent or treat cancer. Vaccines are produced using the patient's own whole tumor cells as the source of antigens, or using tumor-specific antigens, often recombinantly produced.Oxonic Acid: Antagonist of urate oxidase.Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized: Antibodies from non-human species whose protein sequences have been modified to make them nearly identical with human antibodies. If the constant region and part of the variable region are replaced, they are called humanized. If only the constant region is modified they are called chimeric. INN names for humanized antibodies end in -zumab.Chemotherapy, Cancer, Regional Perfusion: Neoplasm drug therapy involving an extracorporeal circuit with temporary exclusion of the tumor-bearing area from the general circulation during which high concentrations of the drug are perfused to the isolated part.Vindesine: Vinblastine derivative with antineoplastic activity against CANCER. Major side effects are myelosuppression and neurotoxicity. Vindesine is used extensively in chemotherapy protocols (ANTINEOPLASTIC COMBINED CHEMOTHERAPY PROTOCOLS).Antiemetics: Drugs used to prevent NAUSEA or VOMITING.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Germinoma: A malignant neoplasm of the germinal tissue of the GONADS; MEDIASTINUM; or pineal region. Germinomas are uniform in appearance, consisting of large, round cells with vesicular nuclei and clear or finely granular eosinophilic-staining cytoplasm. (Stedman, 265th ed; from DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, pp1642-3)Medical Oncology: A subspecialty of internal medicine concerned with the study of neoplasms.Palliative Care: Care alleviating symptoms without curing the underlying disease. (Stedman, 25th ed)Brain Neoplasms: Neoplasms of the intracranial components of the central nervous system, including the cerebral hemispheres, basal ganglia, hypothalamus, thalamus, brain stem, and cerebellum. Brain neoplasms are subdivided into primary (originating from brain tissue) and secondary (i.e., metastatic) forms. Primary neoplasms are subdivided into benign and malignant forms. In general, brain tumors may also be classified by age of onset, histologic type, or presenting location in the brain.Blotting, Western: Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.Cytarabine: A pyrimidine nucleoside analog that is used mainly in the treatment of leukemia, especially acute non-lymphoblastic leukemia. Cytarabine is an antimetabolite antineoplastic agent that inhibits the synthesis of DNA. Its actions are specific for the S phase of the cell cycle. It also has antiviral and immunosuppressant properties. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p472)Cell Proliferation: All of the processes involved in increasing CELL NUMBER including CELL DIVISION.Neoplasm Transplantation: Experimental transplantation of neoplasms in laboratory animals for research purposes.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Rectal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the RECTUM.DNA Damage: Injuries to DNA that introduce deviations from its normal, intact structure and which may, if left unrepaired, result in a MUTATION or a block of DNA REPLICATION. These deviations may be caused by physical or chemical agents and occur by natural or unnatural, introduced circumstances. They include the introduction of illegitimate bases during replication or by deamination or other modification of bases; the loss of a base from the DNA backbone leaving an abasic site; single-strand breaks; double strand breaks; and intrastrand (PYRIMIDINE DIMERS) or interstrand crosslinking. Damage can often be repaired (DNA REPAIR). If the damage is extensive, it can induce APOPTOSIS.DNA, Neoplasm: DNA present in neoplastic tissue.Carmustine: A cell-cycle phase nonspecific alkylating antineoplastic agent. It is used in the treatment of brain tumors and various other malignant neoplasms. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p462) This substance may reasonably be anticipated to be a carcinogen according to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP 85-002, 1985). (From Merck Index, 11th ed)Infusions, Intra-Arterial: Regional infusion of drugs via an arterial catheter. Often a pump is used to impel the drug through the catheter. Used in therapy of cancer, upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage, infection, and peripheral vascular disease.Gene Expression Profiling: The determination of the pattern of genes expressed at the level of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION, under specific circumstances or in a specific cell.Platinum Compounds: Inorganic compounds which contain platinum as the central atom.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Tamoxifen: One of the SELECTIVE ESTROGEN RECEPTOR MODULATORS with tissue-specific activities. Tamoxifen acts as an anti-estrogen (inhibiting agent) in the mammary tissue, but as an estrogen (stimulating agent) in cholesterol metabolism, bone density, and cell proliferation in the ENDOMETRIUM.GuanineGranulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor: A glycoprotein of MW 25 kDa containing internal disulfide bonds. It induces the survival, proliferation, and differentiation of neutrophilic granulocyte precursor cells and functionally activates mature blood neutrophils. Among the family of colony-stimulating factors, G-CSF is the most potent inducer of terminal differentiation to granulocytes and macrophages of leukemic myeloid cell lines.Carcinoma, Small Cell: An anaplastic, highly malignant, and usually bronchogenic carcinoma composed of small ovoid cells with scanty neoplasm. It is characterized by a dominant, deeply basophilic nucleus, and absent or indistinct nucleoli. (From Stedman, 25th ed; Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1286-7)Feasibility Studies: Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Dacarbazine: An antineoplastic agent. It has significant activity against melanomas. (from Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 31st ed, p564)Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin: Any of a group of malignant tumors of lymphoid tissue that differ from HODGKIN DISEASE, being more heterogeneous with respect to malignant cell lineage, clinical course, prognosis, and therapy. The only common feature among these tumors is the absence of giant REED-STERNBERG CELLS, a characteristic of Hodgkin's disease.Neoplasms, Glandular and Epithelial: Neoplasms composed of glandular tissue, an aggregation of epithelial cells that elaborate secretions, and of any type of epithelium itself. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in the various glands or in epithelial tissue.Thrombocytopenia: A subnormal level of BLOOD PLATELETS.Osteosarcoma: A sarcoma originating in bone-forming cells, affecting the ends of long bones. It is the most common and most malignant of sarcomas of the bones, and occurs chiefly among 10- to 25-year-old youths. (From Stedman, 25th ed)RNA, Small Interfering: Small double-stranded, non-protein coding RNAs (21-31 nucleotides) involved in GENE SILENCING functions, especially RNA INTERFERENCE (RNAi). Endogenously, siRNAs are generated from dsRNAs (RNA, DOUBLE-STRANDED) by the same ribonuclease, Dicer, that generates miRNAs (MICRORNAS). The perfect match of the siRNAs' antisense strand to their target RNAs mediates RNAi by siRNA-guided RNA cleavage. siRNAs fall into different classes including trans-acting siRNA (tasiRNA), repeat-associated RNA (rasiRNA), small-scan RNA (scnRNA), and Piwi protein-interacting RNA (piRNA) and have different specific gene silencing functions.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Risk: The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Survivors: Persons who have experienced a prolonged survival after serious disease or who continue to live with a usually life-threatening condition as well as family members, significant others, or individuals surviving traumatic life events.Tumor Burden: The total amount (cell number, weight, size or volume) of tumor cells or tissue in the body.Transplantation, Autologous: Transplantation of an individual's own tissue from one site to another site.Hodgkin Disease: A malignant disease characterized by progressive enlargement of the lymph nodes, spleen, and general lymphoid tissue. In the classical variant, giant usually multinucleate Hodgkin's and REED-STERNBERG CELLS are present; in the nodular lymphocyte predominant variant, lymphocytic and histiocytic cells are seen.Mesothelioma: A tumor derived from mesothelial tissue (peritoneum, pleura, pericardium). It appears as broad sheets of cells, with some regions containing spindle-shaped, sarcoma-like cells and other regions showing adenomatous patterns. Pleural mesotheliomas have been linked to exposure to asbestos. (Dorland, 27th ed)Drug Evaluation: Any process by which toxicity, metabolism, absorption, elimination, preferred route of administration, safe dosage range, etc., for a drug or group of drugs is determined through clinical assessment in humans or veterinary animals.Cell Cycle: The complex series of phenomena, occurring between the end of one CELL DIVISION and the end of the next, by which cellular material is duplicated and then divided between two daughter cells. The cell cycle includes INTERPHASE, which includes G0 PHASE; G1 PHASE; S PHASE; and G2 PHASE, and CELL DIVISION PHASE.Transplantation, Heterologous: Transplantation between animals of different species.Neoplasms, Second Primary: Abnormal growths of tissue that follow a previous neoplasm but are not metastases of the latter. The second neoplasm may have the same or different histological type and can occur in the same or different organs as the previous neoplasm but in all cases arises from an independent oncogenic event. The development of the second neoplasm may or may not be related to the treatment for the previous neoplasm since genetic risk or predisposing factors may actually be the cause.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.DNA Repair: The reconstruction of a continuous two-stranded DNA molecule without mismatch from a molecule which contained damaged regions. The major repair mechanisms are excision repair, in which defective regions in one strand are excised and resynthesized using the complementary base pairing information in the intact strand; photoreactivation repair, in which the lethal and mutagenic effects of ultraviolet light are eliminated; and post-replication repair, in which the primary lesions are not repaired, but the gaps in one daughter duplex are filled in by incorporation of portions of the other (undamaged) daughter duplex. Excision repair and post-replication repair are sometimes referred to as "dark repair" because they do not require light.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.United StatesGenetic Predisposition to Disease: A latent susceptibility to disease at the genetic level, which may be activated under certain conditions.Receptors, Progesterone: Specific proteins found in or on cells of progesterone target tissues that specifically combine with progesterone. The cytosol progesterone-receptor complex then associates with the nucleic acids to initiate protein synthesis. There are two kinds of progesterone receptors, A and B. Both are induced by estrogen and have short half-lives.Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal: Antineoplastic agents that are used to treat hormone-sensitive tumors. Hormone-sensitive tumors may be hormone-dependent, hormone-responsive, or both. A hormone-dependent tumor regresses on removal of the hormonal stimulus, by surgery or pharmacological block. Hormone-responsive tumors may regress when pharmacologic amounts of hormones are administered regardless of whether previous signs of hormone sensitivity were observed. The major hormone-responsive cancers include carcinomas of the breast, prostate, and endometrium; lymphomas; and certain leukemias. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual 1994, p2079)Carcinoma, Transitional Cell: A malignant neoplasm derived from TRANSITIONAL EPITHELIAL CELLS, occurring chiefly in the URINARY BLADDER; URETERS; or RENAL PELVIS.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Neoplastic Stem Cells: Highly proliferative, self-renewing, and colony-forming stem cells which give rise to NEOPLASMS.Melphalan: An alkylating nitrogen mustard that is used as an antineoplastic in the form of the levo isomer - MELPHALAN, the racemic mixture - MERPHALAN, and the dextro isomer - MEDPHALAN; toxic to bone marrow, but little vesicant action; potential carcinogen.Endometrial Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of ENDOMETRIUM, the mucous lining of the UTERUS. These neoplasms can be benign or malignant. Their classification and grading are based on the various cell types and the percent of undifferentiated cells.Registries: The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.Hyperthermia, Induced: Abnormally high temperature intentionally induced in living things regionally or whole body. It is most often induced by radiation (heat waves, infra-red), ultrasound, or drugs.Lomustine: An alkylating agent of value against both hematologic malignancies and solid tumors.National Cancer Institute (U.S.): Component of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH. Through basic and clinical biomedical research and training, it conducts and supports research with the objective of cancer prevention, early stage identification and elimination. This Institute was established in 1937.Flow Cytometry: Technique using an instrument system for making, processing, and displaying one or more measurements on individual cells obtained from a cell suspension. Cells are usually stained with one or more fluorescent dyes specific to cell components of interest, e.g., DNA, and fluorescence of each cell is measured as it rapidly transverses the excitation beam (laser or mercury arc lamp). Fluorescence provides a quantitative measure of various biochemical and biophysical properties of the cell, as well as a basis for cell sorting. Other measurable optical parameters include light absorption and light scattering, the latter being applicable to the measurement of cell size, shape, density, granularity, and stain uptake.Pleural Neoplasms: Neoplasms of the thin serous membrane that envelopes the lungs and lines the thoracic cavity. Pleural neoplasms are exceedingly rare and are usually not diagnosed until they are advanced because in the early stages they produce no symptoms.Down-Regulation: A negative regulatory effect on physiological processes at the molecular, cellular, or systemic level. At the molecular level, the major regulatory sites include membrane receptors, genes (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION), mRNAs (RNA, MESSENGER), and proteins.Clinical Trials, Phase III as Topic: Works about comparative studies to verify the effectiveness of diagnostic, therapeutic, or prophylactic drugs, devices, or techniques determined in phase II studies. During these trials, patients are monitored closely by physicians to identify any adverse reactions from long-term use. These studies are performed on groups of patients large enough to identify clinically significant responses and usually last about three years. This concept includes phase III studies conducted in both the U.S. and in other countries.Mitoxantrone: An anthracenedione-derived antineoplastic agent.Hematologic Diseases: Disorders of the blood and blood forming tissues.Genital Neoplasms, Female: Tumor or cancer of the female reproductive tract (GENITALIA, FEMALE).Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Mice, Inbred BALB CMaximum Tolerated Dose: The highest dose of a biologically active agent given during a chronic study that will not reduce longevity from effects other than carcinogenicity. (from Lewis Dictionary of Toxicology, 1st ed)QuinazolinesReceptor, Epidermal Growth Factor: A cell surface receptor involved in regulation of cell growth and differentiation. It is specific for EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR and EGF-related peptides including TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR ALPHA; AMPHIREGULIN; and HEPARIN-BINDING EGF-LIKE GROWTH FACTOR. The binding of ligand to the receptor causes activation of its intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity and rapid internalization of the receptor-ligand complex into the cell.DNA-Binding Proteins: Proteins which bind to DNA. The family includes proteins which bind to both double- and single-stranded DNA and also includes specific DNA binding proteins in serum which can be used as markers for malignant diseases.Drug Therapy: The use of DRUGS to treat a DISEASE or its symptoms. One example is the use of ANTINEOPLASTIC AGENTS to treat CANCER.Nasopharyngeal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the NASOPHARYNX.Cell Division: The fission of a CELL. It includes CYTOKINESIS, when the CYTOPLASM of a cell is divided, and CELL NUCLEUS DIVISION.Dose Fractionation: Administration of the total dose of radiation (RADIATION DOSAGE) in parts, at timed intervals.Biliary Tract Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer in the BILIARY TRACT including the BILE DUCTS and the GALLBLADDER.Melanoma: A malignant neoplasm derived from cells that are capable of forming melanin, which may occur in the skin of any part of the body, in the eye, or, rarely, in the mucous membranes of the genitalia, anus, oral cavity, or other sites. It occurs mostly in adults and may originate de novo or from a pigmented nevus or malignant lentigo. Melanomas frequently metastasize widely, and the regional lymph nodes, liver, lungs, and brain are likely to be involved. The incidence of malignant skin melanomas is rising rapidly in all parts of the world. (Stedman, 25th ed; from Rook et al., Textbook of Dermatology, 4th ed, p2445)Small Cell Lung Carcinoma: A form of highly malignant lung cancer that is composed of small ovoid cells (SMALL CELL CARCINOMA).Urologic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the URINARY TRACT in either the male or the female.Mastectomy: Surgical procedure to remove one or both breasts.Poly I: A group of inosine ribonucleotides in which the phosphate residues of each inosine ribonucleotide act as bridges in forming diester linkages between the ribose moieties.Odds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Molecular Targeted Therapy: Treatments with drugs which interact with or block synthesis of specific cellular components characteristic of the individual's disease in order to stop or interrupt the specific biochemical dysfunction involved in progression of the disease.Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2: Membrane proteins encoded by the BCL-2 GENES and serving as potent inhibitors of cell death by APOPTOSIS. The proteins are found on mitochondrial, microsomal, and NUCLEAR MEMBRANE sites within many cell types. Overexpression of bcl-2 proteins, due to a translocation of the gene, is associated with follicular lymphoma.Mouth Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the MOUTH.Lymphoma: A general term for various neoplastic diseases of the lymphoid tissue.Thiotepa: A very toxic alkylating antineoplastic agent also used as an insect sterilant. It causes skin, gastrointestinal, CNS, and bone marrow damage. According to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP 85-002, 1985), thiotepa may reasonably be anticipated to be a carcinogen (Merck Index, 11th ed).Drug Resistance: Diminished or failed response of an organism, disease or tissue to the intended effectiveness of a chemical or drug. It should be differentiated from DRUG TOLERANCE which is the progressive diminution of the susceptibility of a human or animal to the effects of a drug, as a result of continued administration.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Actuarial Analysis: The application of probability and statistical methods to calculate the risk of occurrence of any event, such as onset of illness, recurrent disease, hospitalization, disability, or death. It may include calculation of the anticipated money costs of such events and of the premiums necessary to provide for payment of such costs.Antigens, Neoplasm: Proteins, glycoprotein, or lipoprotein moieties on surfaces of tumor cells that are usually identified by monoclonal antibodies. Many of these are of either embryonic or viral origin.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Mitomycins: A group of methylazirinopyrroloindolediones obtained from certain Streptomyces strains. They are very toxic antibiotics used as ANTINEOPLASTIC AGENTS in some solid tumors. PORFIROMYCIN and MITOMYCIN are the most useful members of the group.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Bridged Compounds: Cyclic hydrocarbons that contain multiple rings and share one or more atoms.Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Transfer of HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELLS from BONE MARROW or BLOOD between individuals within the same species (TRANSPLANTATION, HOMOLOGOUS) or transfer within the same individual (TRANSPLANTATION, AUTOLOGOUS). Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been used as an alternative to BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTATION in the treatment of a variety of neoplasms.Lymphatic Metastasis: Transfer of a neoplasm from its primary site to lymph nodes or to distant parts of the body by way of the lymphatic system.
Titanocene dichloride displays anti-cancer activity, and Dichloridobis[(p-methoxybenzyl)cyclopentadienyl]titanium is a current ... Much work was instigated by the success of cisplatin in chemotherapy, and the related compounds carboplatin and oxaliplatin. ... anticancer drug candidate. Arene- and cyclopentadienyl complexes are kinetically inert platforms for the design of new ...
Cisplatin Yu JJ, Yang X, Song Q, Mueller MD, Remick SC (Jan 2014). "Dicycloplatin, a novel platinum analog in chemotherapy: ... It has been tested for use in cancer patients in Phase I and Phase II clinical trials. It was developed by Sopo-Xingda ... synthesis of chinese pre-clinical and clinical profile and emerging mechanistic studies". Anticancer Res. 34 (1): 455-63. doi: ... Apps, M. G.; Choi, E. H. Y.; Wheate, N. J. (2015). "The state-of-play and future of platinum drugs". Endocrine-related Cancer. ...
Holdings established Results of a phase III trial on combination chemotherapy of TS-1 and cisplatin for advanced gastric cancer ... "TAS-108: A Better Anti-Estrogen Drug for Treating Breast Cancer". SRI International. Retrieved 2013-02-24. Taiho Corporate Site ... The company mainly covers oncology related therapeutic area: stomach cancer, colorectal cancer, pancreatic cancer, breast ... established 2009 Marketing approval for TS-1 obtained in China Results of adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer treatment ...
... localized chemotherapy). The group of metal-based anticancer drugs originated with cisplatin, one of the leading agents in ... Conventional cancer treatment kills cancer cells rather than altering their transformation process. For cells to replicate, ... Cisplatin acts by binding to DNA, forming one or two intrastrand cross-links of the G-G adduct at 70 % and the A-G adduct at ~ ... The aqua-Cl rationale, detaching the chloride ligands from the cisplatin when they enter a cell and binding them to G-G or A-G ...
In the treatment of cancer, chemoprotective agents are drugs which protect healthy tissue from the toxic effects of anticancer ... which helps prevent kidney damage in patients undergoing cisplatin and carboplatin chemotherapy Mesna, approved by the FDA in ... Cancer, Cleveland Clinic. "Chemoprotective Agents: Amifostine, Mesna, Dexrazoxane - What is Chemotherapy? - Chemocare". ... National Cancer Institute document "Dictionary of Cancer Terms".. ...
... cisplatin, obtained US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval in 1978 and went on to become a widely used anti-cancer drug ... The chemotherapy drug that eventually resulted from this work, ... best known for the discovery of the anti-cancer drug cisplatin ... http://visualsonline.cancer.gov/details.cfm?imageid=8173. ...
Cisplatin is one of the most frequently used chemotherapy medications for many forms of cancer. It was discovered in the 1960s ... Blend focused on developing anti-cancer medicines for treatment of solid tumor cancers, with the goal of targeting cancerous ... and the mechanisms of cisplatin anticancer drugs. His work has applications for the treatment of cancer, for bioremediation of ... Cisplatin : chemistry and biochemistry of a leading anticancer drug. Zürich: Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta. pp. 456-458. ISBN ...
Cancer Chemotherapy and Pharmacology. 31 (6): 442-4. doi:10.1007/bf00685032. PMID 8453682. Alphin RS, Proakis AG, Leonard CA, ... "Emesis induced by cisplatin in the ferret as a model for the detection of anti-emetic drugs". Neuropharmacology. 26 (9): 1321-6 ... evaluation of the substituted benzamide dazopride when used as an antiemetic in patients receiving anticancer chemotherapy". ... May 1986). "Antagonism of cisplatin-induced emesis by metoclopramide and dazopride through enhancement of gastric motility". ...
A phase I clinical trial of safingol in combination with cisplatin in advanced solid tumors. Clinical Cancer Research, 17(8), ... Medicinally, safingol has demonstrated promising anticancer potential as a modulator of multi-drug resistance and as an inducer ... However, preclinical and clinical studies have shown that combining safingol with conventional chemotherapy agents such as ... Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 87(18), 1394-1399. Ling, L. U., Tan, K. B., Lin, H., & Chiu, G. N. C. (2011). The ...
Interleukin-6 prevented peripheral nerve damage in animals without inhibiting the anti-cancer effect. As possible preventative ... and the platinum-based drugs cisplatin, oxaliplatin and carboplatin. Whether CIPN arises, and to what degree, is determined by ... Chemotherapy-induced Peripheral Neuropathy. NCI Cancer Bulletin. Feb 23, 2010;7(4):6. Grisold W, Oberndorfer S, Windebank AJ. ... Savage L. Chemotherapy-induced pain puzzles scientists. Journal of the National Cancer Institute. 2007;99(14):1070-1071. doi: ...
In this procedure, warmed anti-cancer drugs are infused and circulated in the peritoneal cavity (abdomen) for a short period of ... The chemotherapeutic agents generally infused during IPHC are mitomycin-C and cisplatin. IPHC is generally used after surgical ... The diseases most often treated with this method are cancer of the appendix, colorectal cancer, ovarian cancer, desmoplastic ... Unlike systemic chemotherapy that is delivered in the blood stream, throughout the whole body, the chemotherapy in the HIPEC ...
... a derivative of cisplatin, for chemotherapy 1990 - US FDA approves tamoxifen for major additional use to help prevent the ... the therapeutic cancer vaccine for lung cancer 2015 - US FDA approves anti-CDK4/6, Palbociclib for advanced breast cancer 2015 ... anti-cancer compound, isolated from the yew plant 1967 - Camptothecin, anti-cancer compound, isolated from the Camptotheca ... Invention of tamoxifen breast cancer anti-estrogen (SERM) hormonal therapy drug 1961 - Vincristine, anti-cancer alkoloid, ...
Lung Cancer: Usually when a lung cancer spreads to the pleural surface, the cancer has also spread to distant sites making the ... "Pleural space perfusion with cisplatin in the multimodality treatment of malignant mesothelioma: a feasibility and ... Anticancer research. 19 (1B): 699-702. PMID 10216479.. ... Ovarian Carcinoma: Cancer that forms in tissues of the ovary. ... The increased heat of the chemotherapy perfusion can itself injure the cancer cells and makes the chemotherapy more effective. ...
The increased heat of the chemotherapy perfusion can itself injure the cancer cells and makes the chemotherapy more effective. ... Anticancer research. 19 (1B): 699-702. PMID 10216479. Ambrogi, MC; Korasidis, S (Feb 2015). "Pleural recurrence of thymoma: ... "Pleural space perfusion with cisplatin in the multimodality treatment of malignant mesothelioma: a feasibility and ... Lung Cancer: Usually when a lung cancer spreads to the pleural surface, the cancer has also spread to distant sites making the ...
... : cancer, chemotherapy and the kidney by Jhaveri et al by Springer [1] and Cancer and the Kidney by Eric Cohen by ... Newer agents such as anti Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (anti VEGF) are also associated with similar injuries, as well as ... especially in those who receive chemotherapy. Several chemotherapeutic agents - for example cisplatin - are associated with ... The ethics of dialysis in the dying cancer patient 13. Dialysis and chemotherapy agents 14. Tumor invasion of the kidney 15. ...
These drugs are used to treat almost 50% of cancer patients. In this form of chemotherapy, popular drugs include cisplatin and ... Approved platinum-based anticancer drugs cisplatin Carboplatin Oxaliplatin Nedaplatin Platinum-based anticancer drugs in trials ... Cisplatin was the first to be developed. Cisplatin is particularly effective against testicular cancer; the cure rate was ... Kelland, L. (2007). "The resurgence of platinum-based cancer chemotherapy". Nature Reviews Cancer. 7 (8): 573-584. doi:10.1038/ ...
... toxic side effects usually associated with current anticancer drugs and further supporting its potential use in chemotherapy. ... Undissolved cisplatin is filtered out and diethyl ether is added to the filtrate to precipitate out phenanthriplatin crystals. ... Apps MG, Choi EH, Wheate NJ (2015). "The state-of-play and future of platinum drugs". Endocrine-related Cancer. 22 (4): 219-233 ... It also demonstrated that phenanthriplatin, like cisplatin, was able to dissolve lysogens as well as alter the morphology of E ...
Arsenic in drinking water exposes millions of people to increased cancer risk, but the means by which arsenic causes cancer are ... with an inhibitor of the polyamine transport system not only blocks tumor growth but also promotes anticancer immune responses ... suggesting that such therapy could heighten the effectiveness of both conventional chemotherapy and antitumor immunotherapy. In ... enhanced the antitumor and antimetastatic activity of standard chemotherapeutic drugs such as cyclophosphamide and cisplatin. ...
Anti-Cancer Drugs (journal) Antimicrobial chemotherapy Cancer and nausea Cancer-related fatigue Chemo brain Chemotherapy ... Aziridines include thiotepa, mytomycin and diaziquone (AZQ). Cisplatin and derivatives include cisplatin, carboplatin and ... Depending on the patient, the cancer, the stage of cancer, the type of chemotherapy, and the dosage, intravenous chemotherapy ... Chemotherapy (often abbreviated to chemo and sometimes CTX or CTx) is a category of cancer treatment that uses one or more anti ...
Cisplatin resistance occurs when cancer cells develop an enhanced ability to reverse such damage by removing the cisplatin from ... upon anti-estrogen treatment of breast cancer. Tumors with loss of ER and PR no longer respond to tamoxifen or other anti- ... Platinum-based chemotherapies, such as cisplatin, target tumour cells by cross-linking their DNA strands, causing mutation and ... Increased MGMT expression has been found in colon cancer, lung cancer, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, breast cancer, gliomas, myeloma ...
... in combination chemotherapy with cisplatin and gemcitabine or with cisplatin and irinotecan) for experimental non-squamous cell ... "Efficiency and tolerance of aranose combinations with cisplatin and gemcitabine in experimental lung cancer". Bulletin of ... The L-arabinose is a well-known component of some other effective anticancer drug molecules, including cytarabine (cytosine ... cisplatin and irinotecan in the treatment of experimental lung cancer". Voprosy onkologii. 55 (3): 341-4. PMID 19670735. ...
This effect has been observed with dexamethasone, the anti-cancer drugs docetaxel and etoposide, and to a minor (not clinically ... including highly emetogenic chemotherapy such as with cisplatin. In Europe, it is approved by the European Medicines Agency for ... "FDA approves Akynzeo for nausea and vomiting associated with cancer chemotherapy". Food and Drug Administration. October 10, ... is approved by the Food and Drug Administration for prevention of acute and delayed chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, ...
... is a chemotherapy medication used to treat a number of cancers.[1] This includes testicular cancer, ovarian cancer, ... Cisplatin: The Invention of an Anticancer Drug by Andri Smith. *Anti-cancer Agents: A treatment of Cisplatin and their ... cervical cancer, breast cancer, bladder cancer, head and neck cancer, esophageal cancer, lung cancer, mesothelioma, brain ... Cisplatin resistanceEdit. Cisplatin combination chemotherapy is the cornerstone of treatment of many cancers. Initial platinum ...
Scott RB (1970). "Cancer chemotherapy--the first twenty-five years". Br Med J. 4 (5730): 259-265. doi:10.1136/bmj.4.5730.259. ... and the same mechanism that makes them toxic allows them to be used as anti-cancer drugs. They stop tumor growth by ... "Enhanced DNA-PK-mediated RPA2 hyperphosphorylation in DNA polymerase eta-deficient human cells treated with cisplatin and ... These publications spurred rapid advancement in the previously non-existent field of cancer chemotherapy, and a wealth of new ...
Mitomycin C and Oxaliplatin are the most commonly used agent for colorectal cancer, while Cisplatin is used in ovarian cancer.[ ... warmed anti-cancer drugs are infused and circulated in the peritoneal cavity (abdomen) for a short period of time. The ... The diseases most often treated with this method are cancer of the appendix, colorectal cancer, ovarian cancer, desmoplastic ... Chemotherapy agents[edit]. Various chemotherapies are used[16] and there is no clear consensus on which drugs should be used. ...
... chemotherapy, hormone therapy, immunotherapy or some mixture of the four. Most common cancer types can be treated with ... In 2002, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved ibritumomab tiuxetan (Zevalin), which is an anti-CD20 ... Examples of radiosensitizing drugs include: Cisplatin, Nimorazole, and Cetuximab. The effect of radiotherapy on control of ... head and neck cancer, breast cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, cervical cancer, anal cancer, and prostate cancer. Metastatic ...
Cisplatin begins its interaction with cancer DNA by binding to the nit...,Light,activated,anticancer,drug,targeted,to,DNA,using ... cisplatin,like,sub-units,biological,biology news articles,biology news today,latest biology news,current biology news,biology ... One of the most effective chemotherapy drugs against cancer is cisplat...The latest results from the groups research to create ... One of the most effective chemotherapy drugs against cancer is cisplatin because it attaches to cancer DNA and disrupts repair ...
ERCC1 expression correlates with prolonged survival after cisplatin plus gemcitabine chemotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer ... Cancer Research Online ISSN: 1538-7445. Cancer Research Print ISSN: 0008-5472. Journal of Cancer Research ISSN: 0099-7013. ... have also been associated with cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancers (1 , 7) and testicular cancer cell lines (8) . In addition ... Aebi S, Kurdi-Haidar B, Gordon R, et al Loss of DNA mismatch repair in acquired resistance to cisplatin. Cancer Res, 56: 3087- ...
Correlation analysis revealed that imaging signals by cyclic ApoPep-1 at 1 week after treatment with cisplatin plus cetuximab ... is a sensitive and predictive tool for early decision on stomach tumor response after anti-cancer treatment. ... Treatment of stomach tumor cells with cistplatin or cetuximab alone induced apoptosis, while combination of cisplatin plus ... tumor was most remarkable in the group injected with cyclic form of ApoPep-1 at 1 week after combined treatment with cisplatin ...
Cancer Chemotherapy - MedlinePlus Health Information. Miscellaneous. *CIS-DIAMINEDICHLOROPLATINUM - Hazardous Substances Data ... Anti-Cancer and Ototoxicity Characteristics of the Curcuminoids, CLEFMA and EF24, in Combination with Cisplatin.. Monroe JD1, ... improved cisplatin efficacy and reduced cisplatin ototoxicity. We used the lung cancer cell line, A549, to determine the ... apoptosis; auditory evoked potential; cancer; cell migration; cisplatin; curcuminoid; reactive oxygen species; zebrafish ...
... is a novel technique of intraperitoneal chemotherapy. First results obtained with PIPAC in patients with advanced peritoneal... ... as an Alternative Therapy for Ovarian Cancer in an Octogenarian Patient. Anticancer Res. 2015 Apr;35(4):2309-14.Google Scholar ... Gastric cancer Peritoneal metastasis Pressurized intraperitoneal aerosol chemotherapy Intraperitoneal chemotherapy Cisplatin ... Gastric cancer is the second most common cause of death from cancer worldwide.1 In most patients with gastric cancer, therapy ...
Cancer Chemotherapy - MedlinePlus Health Information. Miscellaneous. *CIS-DIAMINEDICHLOROPLATINUM - Hazardous Substances Data ... Unmodified drug used as a material to construct nanoparticles: delivery of cisplatin for enhanced anti-cancer therapy.. Guo S1 ... Unmodified Drug Used as a Material to Construct Nanoparticles: Delivery of Cisplatin for Enhanced Anti-Cancer Therapy ... Unmodified Drug Used as a Material to Construct Nanoparticles: Delivery of Cisplatin for Enhanced Anti-Cancer Therapy ...
Merlano M. Alternating chemotherapy and radiotherapy in locally advanced head and neck cancer: an alternative? Oncologist. 2006 ... Other concomitant anticancer therapy. *Distant metastasis. *Concurrent chronic systemic immune therapy, chemotherapy for ... Induction Chemotherapy Followed by Cetuximab Plus Definitive Radiotherapy Versus Radiation Plus Cisplatin (INTERCEPTOR). The ... Induction Chemotherapy Followed by Cetuximab Plus Definitive Radiotherapy Versus Radiation Plus Cisplatin. ...
IIIA non-small-cell lung cancer includes adjuvant chemotherapy based on the results of randomized trials using cisplatin ... A recent meta-analysis (Lung Adjuvant Cisplatin Evaluation) showed no surv ... Title: Anti-cancer drugs Volume: 21 ISSN: 1473-5741 ISO Abbreviation: Anticancer Drugs Publication Date: 2010 Oct ... However, long-term results of the International Adjuvant Lung Cancer Trial evaluating adjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy in ...
Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as docetaxel and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either ... No other concurrent experimental drugs or anticancer therapy. *No concurrent drugs contraindicated for use with the study drugs ... Esophageal Cancer. Intervention ICMJE *Biological: cetuximab + docetaxel + cisplatin Chemoimmunotherapy: Patients receive ... Cetuximab, Docetaxel, Cisplatin, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced Esophageal Cancer That Can Be ...
Learn about this Cervical Cancer and Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma study at UCSD (now recruiting females ages 18 years and ... Testing the Addition of a New Anti-Cancer Drug, Triapine, to the Usual Chemotherapy Treatment (Cisplatin) During Radiation ... To determine the relative progression-free survival impact of triapine-cisplatin radio-chemotherapy and cisplatin radio- ... Cancer AJCC v6 and v7 Stage II Cervical Cancer AJCC v7 Stage II Vaginal Cancer AJCC v6 and v7 Stage IIA Cervical Cancer AJCC v7 ...
... chemotherapy side effects, how its given, how it works, precautions and self care tips for treatent of multiple cancers ... Cisplatin is an anti-cancer ("antineoplastic" or "cytotoxic") chemotherapy drug. This medication is classified as an " ... What Cisplatin Is Used For:. *Treatment of advanced bladder cancer, metastatic ovarian cancer, and metastatic testicular cancer ... The ability of chemotherapy to kill cancer cells depends on its ability to halt cell division. Usually, the drugs work by ...
Able to receive weekly cisplatin.. *No prior anticancer treatment for cervical cancer ... Planned for radical radiotherapy and concurrent cisplatin chemotherapy.. * ... Drug: Cisplatin Cisplatin is an antineoplastic agent given intravenously.. Drug: FAZA FAZA is an investigational imaging agent ... Drug: Cisplatin Cisplatin is an antineoplastic agent given intravenously.. Drug: FAZA FAZA is an investigational imaging agent ...
... chemotherapy drug classes online Wholesalers - choose chemotherapy drug classes from 220 list of China chemotherapy drug ... Anti Cancer Drugs Lyophilized Powder Injection Cisplatin for Injection 10mg 20mg ... Packing : 10 vials/box Description : ... chemotherapy drug , chemotherapy drugs , chemotherapy drugs for breast cancer , chemotherapy drugs list , list of chemotherapy ... oral chemotherapy drugs list , chemotherapy drugs side effects , list of oral chemotherapy drugs , cancer chemotherapy drugs , ...
... and after chemotherapy) may help doctors predict a p ... cancer (NSCLC).. Secondary. - Determine the safety of cisplatin ... Chemotherapy. - At least 5 years since prior chemotherapy. Endocrine therapy. - No concurrent anticancer hormonal therapy. ... Chemotherapy: Patients receive cisplatin IV over 30 minutes and pemetrexed disodium IV. over 10 minutes on day 1. Courses ... Early Positron Emission Tomography as a Predictor of Response in Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer. Trial ...
... and diarrhea as complications of cancer or its treatment. The management of these problems is discussed. ... Chemotherapy-related [19-21]. Capecitabine, cisplatin, cytosine arabinoside, cyclophosphamide, daunorubicin, docetaxel, ... Subcutaneous octreotide versus oral loperamide in the treatment of diarrhea following chemotherapy. Anticancer Drugs 4 (4): 443 ... Most text on the National Cancer Institute website may be reproduced or reused freely. The National Cancer Institute should be ...
Cisplatin (CP) is recommended as a first-line chemotherapeutic agent for solid tumors, however its usage outcomes in severe ... as major anticancer compounds against breast and prostate cancer cell lines [20, 21].Various species of genus Acacia were ... Hepatotoxicity secondary to chemotherapy. Journal of Clinical and Translational Hepatology. 2014;2(2):95-102.PubMedPubMed ... Aged garlic extract protects against oxidative stress and renal changes in cisplatin-treated adult male rats. Cancer Cell Int. ...
Numerous clinical trials and reports have shown BCMs effect when used in combination with cisplatin (CDDP) in lung tumor. Our ... and platinum-doublet chemotherapy [CDDP/paclitaxel (PTX)] in a rabbit VX2 lung tumor. Survival times of the RFA alone, CDDP/PTX ... survival was extended in a tumor model when RFA was followed by concomitant use of systemic chemotherapy. Bevacizumab (BCM) is ... Lessons from phase III clinical trials on anti-VEGF therapy for cancer. Nat Clin Pract Oncol. 2006;3:24-40. ...
... , Mojtaba Maleki ... In spite of the high efficacy of Cisplatin and regarding the treatment of cancer cells, cisplatin is potentially accompanied by ... Sequence variations of mitochondrial DNA and individual sensitivity to the ototoxic effect of cisplatin. Anticancer Res. 2003; ... The Protective Effect of Sertraline in Preventing Cisplatin induced Ototoxicity in Solid Organ Chemotherapy. Authors: Mojtaba ...
... cancer treatments, cancer research advances, continuing medical education, cancer prevention, and clinical trials ... the Webs first cancer resource,provides comprehensive information on coping with cancer, ... Subcutaneous octreotide versus oral loperamide in the treatment of diarrhea following chemotherapy. Anticancer Drugs 4 (4): 443 ... A randomized trial with placebo in patients receiving cisplatin. Oncology 51 (1): 70-3, 1994 Jan-Feb. ...
PtNPs are extensively studied because of their antimicrobial, antioxidant, and anticancer properties. So far, only one review ... Cisplatin is one of the major compounds used for the treatment of cancers such as small cell lung cancer, ovarian cancer, ... The classical platinum anticancer agent, cisplatin, exerts its cytotoxic effect by selectively binding to the N7 atom in the ... Although chemical treatment plays a major role in cancer therapy, chemotherapy is associated with some side effects. Radiation ...
D. B. Zamble and S. J. Lippard, "Cisplatin and DNA repair in cancer chemotherapy," Trends in Biochemical Sciences, vol. 20, no ... D. P. Gately and S. B. Howell, "Cellular accumulation of the anticancer agent cisplatin: a review," British Journal of Cancer, ... Interaction of Cisplatin with Glutathione. When cancer cells are exposed to cisplatin, the platinum atom in cisplatin is ... Cisplatin increased p53 and decreased XIAP in cisplatin-sensitive ovarian cancer 2008 cells but not in cisplatin-resistant ...
No other concurrent anticancer agents, including chemotherapy and biologic agents. - No other concurrent investigational drugs ... A Phase I Study of Capecitabine, Cisplatin and Imatinib in Patients With Unresectable or Metastatic Gastric Cancer.. Trial ... imatinib mesylate in combination with capecitabine and cisplatin in patients with. unresectable or metastatic gastric cancer.. ... A Phase I Study of Capecitabine, Cisplatin and Imatinib in Patients With Unresectable or Metastatic Gastric Cancer. ...
Treatments for nasopharyngeal cancer include radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Surgery is sometimes used. Find out more. ... Chemotherapy. Chemotherapy uses anti-cancer (cytotoxic) drugs to destroy cancer cells. For nasopharyngeal cancer, it is usually ... Cisplatin is the most common chemotherapy drug used with radiotherapy to treat nasopharyngeal cancer. Other drugs are sometimes ... About treatment for nasopharyngeal cancer. Nasopharyngeal cancer is a type of head and neck cancer. Cancers affecting the head ...
Using chemotherapy and immunotherapy together successfully extends survival of mice with glioblastoma. A three-drug combination ... Using chemotherapy and immunotherapy together successfully extends survival of mice with glioblastoma. A three-drug combination ... They used the chemotherapy cisplatin with anti-CD47 antibody against a breast cancer line. They found 48 hours of treatment ... Cancer Prevention Center The Lyda Hill Cancer Prevention Center provides cancer risk assessment, screening and diagnostic ...
Randomized comparative trial of a new anti-emetic: nabilone, in cancer patients treated with cisplatin.Biomed Pharmacother1983; ... Anti-emetic efficacy and toxicity of nabilone, a synthetic cannabinoid, in lung cancer chemotherapy.Br J Cancer1983;48:657-663. ... Nabilone: an effective antiemetic agent in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy.Cancer Treat Rev1982;9(suppl B):55-61. ... Nabilone vs placebo in the treatment of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in cancer patients.Cancer Treat Rev1982;9( ...
  • This report combines these two approaches to target the drug to DNA using cisplatin like units, directing the light activation to tumor cells and the sub-cellular target, DNA. (bio-medicine.org)
  • We hypothesized that the addition of an antiangiogenic drug to RFA with chemotherapy may inhibit VEGF signaling after ablation and reduce the healing response, which could prevent remaining tumor cells from re-establishing the tumor and prolong the survival period. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The success of cisplatin therapy is compromised due to dose-limiting toxicity, especially nephrotoxicity as well as resistance by tumor cells to cisplatin. (hindawi.com)
  • Triple combination therapy kills glioblastoma in mice by putting an "eat me" signal to the immune system on the surface of the brain tumor cells, blocking an offsetting "don't eat me" signal and protecting a cancer-killing immune response launched by the combination. (mdanderson.org)
  • A series of experiments showed that temozolomide and anti-CD47 increased antigen cross-presentation by the antigen-presenting macrophages that were eating tumor cells. (mdanderson.org)
  • When the tumor cells were treated ex vivo with chemotherapy and LMB-2, no synergy was observed, indicating that the in vivo synergy was due to improved distribution of LMB-2 to the tumor, rather than improved cytotoxicity. (aacrjournals.org)
  • However, chemotherapy is effective only at high doses, because, at low doses, tumor cells may repair damage and resume their original high proliferation rate ( 5 ). (aacrjournals.org)
  • Inside tumor cells, a second chemical step activates the platinum-based cisplatin, which kills by crosslinking and damaging DNA. (emory.edu)
  • Addition of the pan-caspase inhibitor ZVAD-FMK partly reversed the cisplatin-induced cell death. (springer.com)
  • EA at CV12 significantly reversed the cisplatin-induced change in kaolin intake (on days 1 and 2) and food intake and bodyweight (on day 1). (bmj.com)
  • In this study, researchers want to see if this approach - called neoadjuvant chemotherapy - can be useful in patients with urothelial cancer affecting the kidney and ureter, which is similar in behavior to urothelial cancer of the bladder. (mskcc.org)
  • Recently, special attention has been paid to sertraline as a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor for reducing cisplatin-induced ototoxicity. (tinnitusjournal.com)
  • However, for genetic profiling to be maximally effective a complete list of the genes affecting cisplatin sensitivity is required. (aacrjournals.org)
  • Early reports of the uptake of cisplatin presented conflicting data regarding whether uptake was mediated by passive diffusion or active transport. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • Recently, much work has centred on the importance of copper transporters, such as CTR1, which can mediate uptake of cisplatin by yeast [ 4 , 5 ]. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • There's also a much rarer form of thymus gland cancer called thymic carcinoma. (cancerresearchuk.org)
  • Human breast tumor cell lines MDAMB and MCF-7 and human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2 were from the National Cancer Institute (Bethesda, MD)/American Type Culture Collection (Manassas, VA) and were adapted to grow in Iscove's modified Dulbecco's medium containing 10% FCS, 100 units/mL penicillin, and 50 μg/mL streptomycin. (aacrjournals.org)
  • Only a small fraction of cisplatin, however, actually interacts with DNA and the inhibition of DNA replication cannot solely account for its biological activity [ 5 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • The anti-emetic effect of EA may be mediated through inhibition of 5-HT secretion in the duodenum and activity of the NTS. (bmj.com)
  • Further studies have revealed that phloretin has other biological benefits including inhibition of occurrence and progression of cancer ( 11 ). (spandidos-publications.com)
  • We included the following groups to our work: a) control, b) aerosol vector, c) aerosol vector plus cisplatin, d) aerosol cisplatin, e) intratumoral cisplatin administration, f) intratumoral vector plus cisplatin administration. (jcancer.org)