The movement of cells or organisms toward or away from a substance in response to its concentration gradient.
The movement of leukocytes in response to a chemical concentration gradient or to products formed in an immunologic reaction.
White blood cells. These include granular leukocytes (BASOPHILS; EOSINOPHILS; and NEUTROPHILS) as well as non-granular leukocytes (LYMPHOCYTES and MONOCYTES).
Movement of tethered, spherical LEUKOCYTES along the endothelial surface of the microvasculature. The tethering and rolling involves interaction with SELECTINS and other adhesion molecules in both the ENDOTHELIUM and leukocyte. The rolling leukocyte then becomes activated by CHEMOKINES, flattens out, and firmly adheres to the endothelial surface in preparation for transmigration through the interendothelial cell junction. (From Abbas, Cellular and Molecular Immunology, 3rd ed)
Granular leukocytes having a nucleus with three to five lobes connected by slender threads of chromatin, and cytoplasm containing fine inconspicuous granules and stainable by neutral dyes.
The number of WHITE BLOOD CELLS per unit volume in venous BLOOD. A differential leukocyte count measures the relative numbers of the different types of white cells.
Chemical substances that attract or repel cells. The concept denotes especially those factors released as a result of tissue injury, microbial invasion, or immunologic activity, that attract LEUKOCYTES; MACROPHAGES; or other cells to the site of infection or insult.
The movement of cells from one location to another. Distinguish from CYTOKINESIS which is the process of dividing the CYTOPLASM of a cell.
Adherence of cells to surfaces or to other cells.
A formylated tripeptide originally isolated from bacterial filtrates that is positively chemotactic to polymorphonuclear leucocytes, and causes them to release lysosomal enzymes and become metabolically activated.
A genus of protozoa, formerly also considered a fungus. Its natural habitat is decaying forest leaves, where it feeds on bacteria. D. discoideum is the best-known species and is widely used in biomedical research.
Assays that measure the rate of migration of LEUKOCYTES. They may involve a variety of techniques such as measuring the movement of leukocytes through substrates such as AGAROSE gels or the rate of exit of cells from a glass capillary.
An enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of proteins, including elastin. It cleaves preferentially bonds at the carboxyl side of Ala and Val, with greater specificity for Ala. EC 3.4.21.37.
Phenomenon of cell-mediated immunity measured by in vitro inhibition of the migration or phagocytosis of antigen-stimulated LEUKOCYTES or MACROPHAGES. Specific CELL MIGRATION ASSAYS have been developed to estimate levels of migration inhibitory factors, immune reactivity against tumor-associated antigens, and immunosuppressive effects of infectious microorganisms.
The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.
A proteinase inhibitor found in various BODILY SECRETIONS that coat mucosal surfaces such as SEMINAL PLASMA; CERVICAL MUCUS; and bronchial secretions. It plays a role in protecting epithelial tissues from LEUKOCYTE-derived serine proteases such as NEUTROPHIL ELASTASE.
Group of chemokines with paired cysteines separated by a different amino acid. CXC chemokines are chemoattractants for neutrophils but not monocytes.
Large, phagocytic mononuclear leukocytes produced in the vertebrate BONE MARROW and released into the BLOOD; contain a large, oval or somewhat indented nucleus surrounded by voluminous cytoplasm and numerous organelles.
The minute vessels that collect blood from the capillary plexuses and join together to form veins.
Cell surface glycoproteins that bind to chemokines and thus mediate the migration of pro-inflammatory molecules. The receptors are members of the seven-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor family. Like the CHEMOKINES themselves, the receptors can be divided into at least three structural branches: CR, CCR, and CXCR, according to variations in a shared cysteine motif.
Cell-surface glycoprotein beta-chains that are non-covalently linked to specific alpha-chains of the CD11 family of leukocyte-adhesion molecules (RECEPTORS, LEUKOCYTE-ADHESION). A defect in the gene encoding CD18 causes LEUKOCYTE-ADHESION DEFICIENCY SYNDROME.
The minor fragment formed when C5 convertase cleaves C5 into C5a and COMPLEMENT C5B. C5a is a 74-amino-acid glycopeptide with a carboxy-terminal ARGININE that is crucial for its spasmogenic activity. Of all the complement-derived anaphylatoxins, C5a is the most potent in mediating immediate hypersensitivity (HYPERSENSITIVITY, IMMEDIATE), smooth MUSCLE CONTRACTION; HISTAMINE RELEASE; and migration of LEUKOCYTES to site of INFLAMMATION.
Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.
A CXC chemokine that is chemotactic for T-LYMPHOCYTES and MONOCYTES. It has specificity for CXCR4 RECEPTORS. Two isoforms of CXCL12 are produced by alternative mRNA splicing.
The transfer of leukocytes from a donor to a recipient or reinfusion to the donor.
High-affinity G-protein-coupled receptors for INTERLEUKIN-8 present on NEUTROPHILS; MONOCYTES; and T-LYMPHOCYTES. These receptors also bind several other CXC CHEMOKINES.
Cell adhesion molecule and CD antigen that mediates the adhesion of neutrophils and monocytes to activated platelets and endothelial cells.
Proteins found in any species of bacterium.
Class of pro-inflammatory cytokines that have the ability to attract and activate leukocytes. They can be divided into at least three structural branches: C; (CHEMOKINES, C); CC; (CHEMOKINES, CC); and CXC; (CHEMOKINES, CXC); according to variations in a shared cysteine motif.
A member of the CXC chemokine family that plays a role in the regulation of the acute inflammatory response. It is secreted by variety of cell types and induces CHEMOTAXIS of NEUTROPHILS and other inflammatory cells.
A family of G-protein-coupled receptors that was originally identified by its ability to bind N-formyl peptides such as N-FORMYLMETHIONINE LEUCYL-PHENYLALANINE. Since N-formyl peptides are found in MITOCHONDRIA and BACTERIA, this class of receptors is believed to play a role in mediating cellular responses to cellular damage and bacterial invasion. However, non-formylated peptide ligands have also been found for this receptor class.
A pathological process characterized by injury or destruction of tissues caused by a variety of cytologic and chemical reactions. It is usually manifested by typical signs of pain, heat, redness, swelling, and loss of function.
Inbred C57BL mice are a strain of laboratory mice that have been produced by many generations of brother-sister matings, resulting in a high degree of genetic uniformity and homozygosity, making them widely used for biomedical research, including studies on genetics, immunology, cancer, and neuroscience.
An adhesion-promoting leukocyte surface membrane heterodimer. The alpha subunit consists of the CD11b ANTIGEN and the beta subunit the CD18 ANTIGEN. The antigen, which is an integrin, functions both as a receptor for complement 3 and in cell-cell and cell-substrate adhesive interactions.
Proteins which are found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. They consist of two types, peripheral and integral proteins. They include most membrane-associated enzymes, antigenic proteins, transport proteins, and drug, hormone, and lectin receptors.
A cell-surface ligand involved in leukocyte adhesion and inflammation. Its production is induced by gamma-interferon and it is required for neutrophil migration into inflamed tissue.
High-affinity G-protein-coupled receptors for INTERLEUKIN-8 present on NEUTROPHILS; MONOCYTES; and BASOPHILS.
A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.
Surface ligands, usually glycoproteins, that mediate cell-to-cell adhesion. Their functions include the assembly and interconnection of various vertebrate systems, as well as maintenance of tissue integration, wound healing, morphogenic movements, cellular migrations, and metastasis.
The major metabolite in neutrophil polymorphonuclear leukocytes. It stimulates polymorphonuclear cell function (degranulation, formation of oxygen-centered free radicals, arachidonic acid release, and metabolism). (From Dictionary of Prostaglandins and Related Compounds, 1990)
The process in which the neutrophil is stimulated by diverse substances, resulting in degranulation and/or generation of reactive oxygen products, and culminating in the destruction of invading pathogens. The stimulatory substances, including opsonized particles, immune complexes, and chemotactic factors, bind to specific cell-surface receptors on the neutrophil.
Single pavement layer of cells which line the luminal surface of the entire vascular system and regulate the transport of macromolecules and blood components.
Rare, autosomal recessive disorder caused by deficiency of the beta 2 integrin receptors (RECEPTORS, LEUKOCYTE-ADHESION) comprising the CD11/CD18 family of glycoproteins. The syndrome is characterized by abnormal adhesion-dependent functions, especially defective tissue emigration of neutrophils, leading to recurrent infection.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
A chemokine that is a chemoattractant for MONOCYTES and may also cause cellular activation of specific functions related to host defense. It is produced by LEUKOCYTES of both monocyte and lymphocyte lineage and by FIBROBLASTS during tissue injury. It has specificity for CCR2 RECEPTORS.
Cell adhesion molecule and CD antigen that serves as a homing receptor for lymphocytes to lymph node high endothelial venules.
A whiplike motility appendage present on the surface cells. Prokaryote flagella are composed of a protein called FLAGELLIN. Bacteria can have a single flagellum, a tuft at one pole, or multiple flagella covering the entire surface. In eukaryotes, flagella are threadlike protoplasmic extensions used to propel flagellates and sperm. Flagella have the same basic structure as CILIA but are longer in proportion to the cell bearing them and present in much smaller numbers. (From King & Stansfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)
Test for cell-mediated antitumor immunity and related serum blocking factors based on the finding that leukocytes from cancer patients, but not from controls, when mixed in vitro with antigenic extracts of tumors of the same histological type, undergo a diminution in their normal adherence to glass surfaces. Sera from tumor-bearing patients block the LAI reaction of their own leukocytes or those of other patients with the same type of tumor.
An integrin heterodimer widely expressed on cells of hematopoietic origin. CD11A ANTIGEN comprises the alpha chain and the CD18 antigen (ANTIGENS, CD18) the beta chain. Lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 is a major receptor of T-CELLS; B-CELLS; and GRANULOCYTES. It mediates the leukocyte adhesion reactions underlying cytolytic conjugate formation, helper T-cell interactions, and antibody-dependent killing by NATURAL KILLER CELLS and granulocytes. Intracellular adhesion molecule-1 has been defined as a ligand for lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1.
Group of chemokines with adjacent cysteines that are chemoattractants for lymphocytes, monocytes, eosinophils, basophils but not neutrophils.
CXCR receptors with specificity for CXCL12 CHEMOKINE. The receptors may play a role in HEMATOPOIESIS regulation and can also function as coreceptors for the HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS.
The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.
Technique using an instrument system for making, processing, and displaying one or more measurements on individual cells obtained from a cell suspension. Cells are usually stained with one or more fluorescent dyes specific to cell components of interest, e.g., DNA, and fluorescence of each cell is measured as it rapidly transverses the excitation beam (laser or mercury arc lamp). Fluorescence provides a quantitative measure of various biochemical and biophysical properties of the cell, as well as a basis for cell sorting. Other measurable optical parameters include light absorption and light scattering, the latter being applicable to the measurement of cell size, shape, density, granularity, and stain uptake.
The engulfing and degradation of microorganisms; other cells that are dead, dying, or pathogenic; and foreign particles by phagocytic cells (PHAGOCYTES).
Family of proteins associated with the capacity of LEUKOCYTES to adhere to each other and to certain substrata, e.g., the C3bi component of complement. Members of this family are the LYMPHOCYTE FUNCTION-ASSOCIATED ANTIGEN-1; (LFA-1), the MACROPHAGE-1 ANTIGEN; (Mac-1), and the INTEGRIN ALPHAXBETA2 or p150,95 leukocyte adhesion protein. They all share a common beta-subunit which is the CD18 antigen. All three of the above antigens are absent in inherited LEUKOCYTE-ADHESION DEFICIENCY SYNDROME, which is characterized by recurrent bacterial infections, impaired pus formation, and wound healing as well as abnormalities in a wide spectrum of adherence-dependent functions of granulocytes, monocytes, and lymphoid cells.
Antigens determined by leukocyte loci found on chromosome 6, the major histocompatibility loci in humans. They are polypeptides or glycoproteins found on most nucleated cells and platelets, determine tissue types for transplantation, and are associated with certain diseases.
Physiological processes and properties of BACTERIA.
Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.
The diffusion or accumulation of neutrophils in tissues or cells in response to a wide variety of substances released at the sites of inflammatory reactions.
Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.
Cell adhesion molecule and CD antigen that mediates neutrophil, monocyte, and memory T-cell adhesion to cytokine-activated endothelial cells. E-selectin recognizes sialylated carbohydrate groups related to the Lewis X or Lewis A family.
CCR receptors with specificity for CHEMOKINE CCL2 and several other CCL2-related chemokines. They are expressed at high levels in T-LYMPHOCYTES; B-LYMPHOCYTES; MACROPHAGES; BASOPHILS; and NK CELLS.
Differentiation antigens residing on mammalian leukocytes. CD stands for cluster of differentiation, which refers to groups of monoclonal antibodies that show similar reactivity with certain subpopulations of antigens of a particular lineage or differentiation stage. The subpopulations of antigens are also known by the same CD designation.
Filamentous proteins that are the main constituent of the thin filaments of muscle fibers. The filaments (known also as filamentous or F-actin) can be dissociated into their globular subunits; each subunit is composed of a single polypeptide 375 amino acids long. This is known as globular or G-actin. In conjunction with MYOSINS, actin is responsible for the contraction and relaxation of muscle.
Microscopy in which television cameras are used to brighten magnified images that are otherwise too dark to be seen with the naked eye. It is used frequently in TELEPATHOLOGY.
A dynamic actin-rich extension of the surface of an animal cell used for locomotion or prehension of food.
Cells specialized to detect chemical substances and relay that information centrally in the nervous system. Chemoreceptor cells may monitor external stimuli, as in TASTE and OLFACTION, or internal stimuli, such as the concentrations of OXYGEN and CARBON DIOXIDE in the blood.
Effective in the initiation of protein synthesis. The initiating methionine residue enters the ribosome as N-formylmethionyl tRNA. This process occurs in Escherichia coli and other bacteria as well as in the mitochondria of eucaryotic cells.
The relatively long-lived phagocytic cell of mammalian tissues that are derived from blood MONOCYTES. Main types are PERITONEAL MACROPHAGES; ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGES; HISTIOCYTES; KUPFFER CELLS of the liver; and OSTEOCLASTS. They may further differentiate within chronic inflammatory lesions to EPITHELIOID CELLS or may fuse to form FOREIGN BODY GIANT CELLS or LANGHANS GIANT CELLS. (from The Dictionary of Cell Biology, Lackie and Dow, 3rd ed.)
A CC-type chemokine that is a chemoattractant for EOSINOPHILS; MONOCYTES; and LYMPHOCYTES. It is a potent and selective eosinophil chemotaxin that is stored in and released from PLATELETS and activated T-LYMPHOCYTES. Chemokine CCL5 is specific for CCR1 RECEPTORS; CCR3 RECEPTORS; and CCR5 RECEPTORS. The acronym RANTES refers to Regulated on Activation, Normal T Expressed and Secreted.
Cell surface proteins that bind amino acids and trigger changes which influence the behavior of cells. Glutamate receptors are the most common receptors for fast excitatory synaptic transmission in the vertebrate central nervous system, and GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID and glycine receptors are the most common receptors for fast inhibition.
Transmembrane proteins consisting of a lectin-like domain, an epidermal growth factor-like domain, and a variable number of domains that are homologous to complement regulatory proteins. They are important cell adhesion molecules which help LEUKOCYTES attach to VASCULAR ENDOTHELIUM.
Lymphocytes responsible for cell-mediated immunity. Two types have been identified - cytotoxic (T-LYMPHOCYTES, CYTOTOXIC) and helper T-lymphocytes (T-LYMPHOCYTES, HELPER-INDUCER). They are formed when lymphocytes circulate through the THYMUS GLAND and differentiate to thymocytes. When exposed to an antigen, they divide rapidly and produce large numbers of new T cells sensitized to that antigen.
Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.
A promyelocytic cell line derived from a patient with ACUTE PROMYELOCYTIC LEUKEMIA. HL-60 cells lack specific markers for LYMPHOID CELLS but express surface receptors for FC FRAGMENTS and COMPLEMENT SYSTEM PROTEINS. They also exhibit phagocytic activity and responsiveness to chemotactic stimuli. (From Hay et al., American Type Culture Collection, 7th ed, pp127-8)
Granular leukocytes with a nucleus that usually has two lobes connected by a slender thread of chromatin, and cytoplasm containing coarse, round granules that are uniform in size and stainable by eosin.
Orientation of intracellular structures especially with respect to the apical and basolateral domains of the plasma membrane. Polarized cells must direct proteins from the Golgi apparatus to the appropriate domain since tight junctions prevent proteins from diffusing between the two domains.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.
A molecule that binds to another molecule, used especially to refer to a small molecule that binds specifically to a larger molecule, e.g., an antigen binding to an antibody, a hormone or neurotransmitter binding to a receptor, or a substrate or allosteric effector binding to an enzyme. Ligands are also molecules that donate or accept a pair of electrons to form a coordinate covalent bond with the central metal atom of a coordination complex. (From Dorland, 27th ed)
C5 plays a central role in both the classical and the alternative pathway of COMPLEMENT ACTIVATION. C5 is cleaved by C5 CONVERTASE into COMPLEMENT C5A and COMPLEMENT C5B. The smaller fragment C5a is an ANAPHYLATOXIN and mediator of inflammatory process. The major fragment C5b binds to the membrane initiating the spontaneous assembly of the late complement components, C5-C9, into the MEMBRANE ATTACK COMPLEX.
A CXC chemokine with specificity for CXCR2 RECEPTORS. It has growth factor activities and is implicated as a oncogenic factor in several tumor types.
The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.
Cytokine-induced cell adhesion molecule present on activated endothelial cells, tissue macrophages, dendritic cells, bone marrow fibroblasts, myoblasts, and myotubes. It is important for the recruitment of leukocytes to sites of inflammation. (From Pigott & Power, The Adhesion Molecule FactsBook, 1993, p154)
A CC-type chemokine with specificity for CCR7 RECEPTORS. It has activity towards T LYMPHOCYTES and B LYMPHOCYTES.
Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.
Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.
The introduction of a phosphoryl group into a compound through the formation of an ester bond between the compound and a phosphorus moiety.
Cell surface molecules on cells of the immune system that specifically bind surface molecules or messenger molecules and trigger changes in the behavior of cells. Although these receptors were first identified in the immune system, many have important functions elsewhere.
The phenomenon by which dissociated cells intermixed in vitro tend to group themselves with cells of their own type.
The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.
Non-antibody proteins secreted by inflammatory leukocytes and some non-leukocytic cells, that act as intercellular mediators. They differ from classical hormones in that they are produced by a number of tissue or cell types rather than by specialized glands. They generally act locally in a paracrine or autocrine rather than endocrine manner.
Phosphotransferases that catalyzes the conversion of 1-phosphatidylinositol to 1-phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate. Many members of this enzyme class are involved in RECEPTOR MEDIATED SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION and regulation of vesicular transport with the cell. Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases have been classified both according to their substrate specificity and their mode of action within the cell.
A monocyte chemoattractant protein that has activity towards a broad variety of immune cell types. Chemokine CCL7 has specificity for CCR1 RECEPTORS; CCR2 RECEPTORS; and CCR5 RECEPTORS.
Cell surface proteins that bind LIPOXINS with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes influencing the behavior of cells.
Leukocytes with abundant granules in the cytoplasm. They are divided into three groups according to the staining properties of the granules: neutrophilic, eosinophilic, and basophilic. Mature granulocytes are the NEUTROPHILS; EOSINOPHILS; and BASOPHILS.
Zymosan is a polysaccharide derived from the cell walls of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, commonly used in research as an immunostimulant to induce inflammation and study phagocytosis, complement activation, and oxidative burst in neutrophils and macrophages.
Addition of methyl groups. In histo-chemistry methylation is used to esterify carboxyl groups and remove sulfate groups by treating tissue sections with hot methanol in the presence of hydrochloric acid. (From Stedman, 25th ed)
Cell surface proteins that bind signalling molecules external to the cell with high affinity and convert this extracellular event into one or more intracellular signals that alter the behavior of the target cell (From Alberts, Molecular Biology of the Cell, 2nd ed, pp693-5). Cell surface receptors, unlike enzymes, do not chemically alter their ligands.
White blood cells formed in the body's lymphoid tissue. The nucleus is round or ovoid with coarse, irregularly clumped chromatin while the cytoplasm is typically pale blue with azurophilic (if any) granules. Most lymphocytes can be classified as either T or B (with subpopulations of each), or NATURAL KILLER CELLS.
Heparin-binding proteins that exhibit a number of inflammatory and immunoregulatory activities. Originally identified as secretory products of MACROPHAGES, these chemokines are produced by a variety of cell types including NEUTROPHILS; FIBROBLASTS; and EPITHELIAL CELLS. They likely play a significant role in respiratory tract defenses.
A family of transmembrane glycoproteins (MEMBRANE GLYCOPROTEINS) consisting of noncovalent heterodimers. They interact with a wide variety of ligands including EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX PROTEINS; COMPLEMENT, and other cells, while their intracellular domains interact with the CYTOSKELETON. The integrins consist of at least three identified families: the cytoadhesin receptors(RECEPTORS, CYTOADHESIN), the leukocyte adhesion receptors (RECEPTORS, LEUKOCYTE ADHESION), and the VERY LATE ANTIGEN RECEPTORS. Each family contains a common beta-subunit (INTEGRIN BETA CHAINS) combined with one or more distinct alpha-subunits (INTEGRIN ALPHA CHAINS). These receptors participate in cell-matrix and cell-cell adhesion in many physiologically important processes, including embryological development; HEMOSTASIS; THROMBOSIS; WOUND HEALING; immune and nonimmune defense mechanisms; and oncogenic transformation.
CXCR receptors that are expressed on the surface of a number of cell types, including T-LYMPHOCYTES; NK CELLS; DENDRITIC CELLS; and a subset of B-LYMPHOCYTES. The receptors are activated by CHEMOKINE CXCL9; CHEMOKINE CXCL10; and CHEMOKINE CXCL11.
Highly specialized EPITHELIAL CELLS that line the HEART; BLOOD VESSELS; and lymph vessels, forming the ENDOTHELIUM. They are polygonal in shape and joined together by TIGHT JUNCTIONS. The tight junctions allow for variable permeability to specific macromolecules that are transported across the endothelial layer.
A CX3C chemokine that is a transmembrane protein found on the surface of cells. The soluble form of chemokine CX3CL1 can be released from cell surface by proteolysis and act as a chemoattractant that may be involved in the extravasation of leukocytes into inflamed tissues. The membrane form of the protein may also play a role in cell adhesion.
A sub-family of RHO GTP-BINDING PROTEINS that is involved in regulating the organization of cytoskeletal filaments. This enzyme was formerly listed as EC 3.6.1.47.
A protease of broad specificity, obtained from dried pancreas. Molecular weight is approximately 25,000. The enzyme breaks down elastin, the specific protein of elastic fibers, and digests other proteins such as fibrin, hemoglobin, and albumin. EC 3.4.21.36.
Serum glycoprotein produced by activated MACROPHAGES and other mammalian MONONUCLEAR LEUKOCYTES. It has necrotizing activity against tumor cell lines and increases ability to reject tumor transplants. Also known as TNF-alpha, it is only 30% homologous to TNF-beta (LYMPHOTOXIN), but they share TNF RECEPTORS.
A phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase subclass that includes enzymes formed through the association of a p110gamma catalytic subunit and one of the three regulatory subunits of 84, 87, and 101 kDa in size. This subclass of enzymes is a downstream target of G PROTEIN-COUPLED RECEPTORS.
The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.
Chemokines that are chemoattractants for monocytes. These CC chemokines (cysteines adjacent) number at least three including CHEMOKINE CCL2.
The circulation of the BLOOD through the MICROVASCULAR NETWORK.
RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.
An adenine nucleotide containing one phosphate group which is esterified to both the 3'- and 5'-positions of the sugar moiety. It is a second messenger and a key intracellular regulator, functioning as a mediator of activity for a number of hormones, including epinephrine, glucagon, and ACTH.
A large increase in oxygen uptake by neutrophils and most types of tissue macrophages through activation of an NADPH-cytochrome b-dependent oxidase that reduces oxygen to a superoxide. Individuals with an inherited defect in which the oxidase that reduces oxygen to superoxide is decreased or absent (GRANULOMATOUS DISEASE, CHRONIC) often die as a result of recurrent bacterial infections.
A CC chemokine with specificity for CCR5 RECEPTORS. It is a chemoattractant for NK CELLS; MONOCYTES and a variety of other immune cells. This chemokine is encoded by multiple genes.
A basic element found in nearly all organized tissues. It is a member of the alkaline earth family of metals with the atomic symbol Ca, atomic number 20, and atomic weight 40. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body and combines with phosphorus to form calcium phosphate in the bones and teeth. It is essential for the normal functioning of nerves and muscles and plays a role in blood coagulation (as factor IV) and in many enzymatic processes.
CCR receptors with specificity for a broad variety of CC CHEMOKINES. They are expressed at high levels in MONOCYTES; tissue MACROPHAGES; NEUTROPHILS; and EOSINOPHILS.
INFLAMMATION of the PERITONEUM lining the ABDOMINAL CAVITY as the result of infectious, autoimmune, or chemical processes. Primary peritonitis is due to infection of the PERITONEAL CAVITY via hematogenous or lymphatic spread and without intra-abdominal source. Secondary peritonitis arises from the ABDOMINAL CAVITY itself through RUPTURE or ABSCESS of intra-abdominal organs.
A class of cell surface leukotriene receptors with a preference for leukotriene B4. Leukotriene B4 receptor activation influences chemotaxis, chemokinesis, adherence, enzyme release, oxidative bursts, and degranulation in polymorphonuclear leukocytes. There are at least two subtypes of these receptors. Some actions are mediated through the inositol phosphate and diacylglycerol second messenger systems.
A CC-type chemokine with specificity for CCR7 RECEPTORS. It has activity towards DENDRITIC CELLS and T-LYMPHOCYTES.
Disordered formation of various types of leukocytes or an abnormal accumulation or deficiency of these cells.
A group of three different alpha chains (CD11a, CD11b, CD11c) that are associated with an invariant CD18 beta chain (ANTIGENS, CD18). The three resulting leukocyte-adhesion molecules (RECEPTORS, LEUKOCYTE ADHESION) are LYMPHOCYTE FUNCTION-ASSOCIATED ANTIGEN-1; MACROPHAGE-1 ANTIGEN; and ANTIGEN, P150,95.
An integrin alpha subunit that is unique in that it does not contain an I domain, and its proteolytic cleavage site is near the middle of the extracellular portion of the polypeptide rather than close to the membrane as in other integrin alpha subunits.
Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.
Highly reactive compounds produced when oxygen is reduced by a single electron. In biological systems, they may be generated during the normal catalytic function of a number of enzymes and during the oxidation of hemoglobin to METHEMOGLOBIN. In living organisms, SUPEROXIDE DISMUTASE protects the cell from the deleterious effects of superoxides.
The network of filaments, tubules, and interconnecting filamentous bridges which give shape, structure, and organization to the cytoplasm.
A G-protein-coupled receptor that signals an increase in intracellular calcium in response to the potent ANAPHYLATOXIN peptide COMPLEMENT C5A.
Mature LYMPHOCYTES and MONOCYTES transported by the blood to the body's extravascular space. They are morphologically distinguishable from mature granulocytic leukocytes by their large, non-lobed nuclei and lack of coarse, heavily stained cytoplasmic granules.
Peptides and proteins found in BODILY SECRETIONS and BODY FLUIDS that are PROTEASE INHIBITORS. They play a role in INFLAMMATION, tissue repair and innate immunity (IMMUNITY, INNATE) by inhibiting endogenous proteinases such as those produced by LEUKOCYTES and exogenous proteases such as those produced by invading microorganisms.
Group of chemokines with the first two cysteines separated by three amino acids. CX3C chemokines are chemotactic for natural killer cells, monocytes, and activated T-cells.
Cell adhesion molecule expressed on activated leukocytes, fibroblasts, and neurons. It is a ligand for CD6. ALCAM-CD6 interactions may play a role in the binding of T and B cells to activated leukocytes.
The lipid- and protein-containing, selectively permeable membrane that surrounds the cytoplasm in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.
Inbred BALB/c mice are a strain of laboratory mice that have been selectively bred to be genetically identical to each other, making them useful for scientific research and experiments due to their consistent genetic background and predictable responses to various stimuli or treatments.
One of the virulence factors produced by BORDETELLA PERTUSSIS. It is a multimeric protein composed of five subunits S1 - S5. S1 contains mono ADPribose transferase activity.
Peptides composed of between two and twelve amino acids.
A serotype of Salmonella enterica that is a frequent agent of Salmonella gastroenteritis in humans. It also causes PARATYPHOID FEVER.
Glycoproteins found on the membrane or surface of cells.
A technique to study CELL MIGRATION in the INFLAMMATION process or during immune reactions. After an area on the skin is abraded, the movement of cells in the area is followed via microscopic observation of the exudate through a coverslip or tissue culture chamber placed over the area.
The largest family of cell surface receptors involved in SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION. They share a common structure and signal through HETEROTRIMERIC G-PROTEINS.
Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.
A CC chemokine with specificity for CCR1 RECEPTORS and CCR5 RECEPTORS. It is a chemoattractant for NK CELLS; MONOCYTES; and a variety of other immune cells. This chemokine is encoded by multiple genes.
A subclass of HLA-D antigens that consist of alpha and beta chains. The inheritance of HLA-DR antigens differs from that of the HLA-DQ ANTIGENS and HLA-DP ANTIGENS.
CCR receptors with specificity for CHEMOKINE CCL11 and a variety of other CC CHEMOKINES. They are expressed at high levels in T-LYMPHOCYTES; EOSINOPHILS; BASOPHILS; and MAST CELLS.
The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.
CCR receptors with specificity for CHEMOKINE CCL19 and CHEMOKINE CCL21. They are expressed at high levels in T-LYMPHOCYTES; B-LYMPHOCYTES; and DENDRITIC CELLS.
Conversion of an inactive form of an enzyme to one possessing metabolic activity. It includes 1, activation by ions (activators); 2, activation by cofactors (coenzymes); and 3, conversion of an enzyme precursor (proenzyme or zymogen) to an active enzyme.
Morphologic alteration of small B LYMPHOCYTES or T LYMPHOCYTES in culture into large blast-like cells able to synthesize DNA and RNA and to divide mitotically. It is induced by INTERLEUKINS; MITOGENS such as PHYTOHEMAGGLUTININS, and by specific ANTIGENS. It may also occur in vivo as in GRAFT REJECTION.
A serine protease found in the azurophil granules of NEUTROPHILS. It has an enzyme specificity similar to that of chymotrypsin C.
Lipid-containing polysaccharides which are endotoxins and important group-specific antigens. They are often derived from the cell wall of gram-negative bacteria and induce immunoglobulin secretion. The lipopolysaccharide molecule consists of three parts: LIPID A, core polysaccharide, and O-specific chains (O ANTIGENS). When derived from Escherichia coli, lipopolysaccharides serve as polyclonal B-cell mitogens commonly used in laboratory immunology. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
Any of several ways in which living cells of an organism communicate with one another, whether by direct contact between cells or by means of chemical signals carried by neurotransmitter substances, hormones, and cyclic AMP.
A hemeprotein from leukocytes. Deficiency of this enzyme leads to a hereditary disorder coupled with disseminated moniliasis. It catalyzes the conversion of a donor and peroxide to an oxidized donor and water. EC 1.11.1.7.
Methods utilizing the principles of MICROFLUIDICS for sample handling, reagent mixing, and separation and detection of specific components in fluids.
A transient increase in the number of leukocytes in a body fluid.
Organic esters of thioglycolic acid (HS-CH2COOH).
A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.
A species of motile, free-living, gram-negative bacteria that occur in the soil. They are aerobic or microaerophilic and are sometimes capable of nitrogen fixation.
A phospholipid derivative formed by PLATELETS; BASOPHILS; NEUTROPHILS; MONOCYTES; and MACROPHAGES. It is a potent platelet aggregating agent and inducer of systemic anaphylactic symptoms, including HYPOTENSION; THROMBOCYTOPENIA; NEUTROPENIA; and BRONCHOCONSTRICTION.
A positive regulatory effect on physiological processes at the molecular, cellular, or systemic level. At the molecular level, the major regulatory sites include membrane receptors, genes (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION), mRNAs (RNA, MESSENGER), and proteins.
A genus of flexible, spiral rods found in hydrogen sulfide-containing mud, sewage, and polluted water. None of the species properly referred to in this genus are pathogenic.
CCR receptors with specificity for CHEMOKINE CCL3; CHEMOKINE CCL4; and CHEMOKINE CCL5. They are expressed at high levels in T-LYMPHOCYTES; B-LYMPHOCYTES; MACROPHAGES; MAST CELLS; and NK CELLS. The CCR5 receptor is used by the HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS to infect cells.
An antiseptic with mild fungistatic, bacteriostatic, anthelmintic, and amebicidal action. It is also used as a reagent and metal chelator, as a carrier for radio-indium for diagnostic purposes, and its halogenated derivatives are used in addition as topical anti-infective agents and oral antiamebics.
Class I human histocompatibility (HLA) surface antigens encoded by more than 30 detectable alleles on locus B of the HLA complex, the most polymorphic of all the HLA specificities. Several of these antigens (e.g., HLA-B27, -B7, -B8) are strongly associated with predisposition to rheumatoid and other autoimmune disorders. Like other class I HLA determinants, they are involved in the cellular immune reactivity of cytolytic T lymphocytes.
Identification of the major histocompatibility antigens of transplant DONORS and potential recipients, usually by serological tests. Donor and recipient pairs should be of identical ABO blood group, and in addition should be matched as closely as possible for HISTOCOMPATIBILITY ANTIGENS in order to minimize the likelihood of allograft rejection. (King, Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)
Venous vessels in the umbilical cord. They carry oxygenated, nutrient-rich blood from the mother to the FETUS via the PLACENTA. In humans, there is normally one umbilical vein.
A CXC chemokine that is synthesized by activated MONOCYTES and NEUTROPHILS. It has specificity for CXCR2 RECEPTORS.
Compounds or agents that combine with an enzyme in such a manner as to prevent the normal substrate-enzyme combination and the catalytic reaction.
A CC-type chemokine that is specific for CCR3 RECEPTORS. It is a potent chemoattractant for EOSINOPHILS.
The uptake of naked or purified DNA by CELLS, usually meaning the process as it occurs in eukaryotic cells. It is analogous to bacterial transformation (TRANSFORMATION, BACTERIAL) and both are routinely employed in GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUES.
The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.
Glycoproteins found on the surfaces of cells, particularly in fibrillar structures. The proteins are lost or reduced when these cells undergo viral or chemical transformation. They are highly susceptible to proteolysis and are substrates for activated blood coagulation factor VIII. The forms present in plasma are called cold-insoluble globulins.
Colorless to yellow dye that is reducible to blue or black formazan crystals by certain cells; formerly used to distinguish between nonbacterial and bacterial diseases, the latter causing neutrophils to reduce the dye; used to confirm diagnosis of chronic granulomatous disease.
The process of losing secretory granules (SECRETORY VESICLES). This occurs, for example, in mast cells, basophils, neutrophils, eosinophils, and platelets when secretory products are released from the granules by EXOCYTOSIS.
Integrin alpha4beta1 is a FIBRONECTIN and VCAM-1 receptor present on LYMPHOCYTES; MONOCYTES; EOSINOPHILS; NK CELLS and thymocytes. It is involved in both cell-cell and cell- EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX adhesion and plays a role in INFLAMMATION, hematopoietic cell homing and immune function, and has been implicated in skeletal MYOGENESIS; NEURAL CREST migration and proliferation, lymphocyte maturation and morphogenesis of the PLACENTA and HEART.
A CD antigen that contains a conserved I domain which is involved in ligand binding. When combined with CD18 the two subunits form MACROPHAGE-1 ANTIGEN.
A CELL LINE derived from human T-CELL LEUKEMIA and used to determine the mechanism of differential susceptibility to anti-cancer drugs and radiation.
A derivative of complement C5a, generated when the carboxy-terminal ARGININE is removed by CARBOXYPEPTIDASE B present in normal human serum. C5a des-Arg shows complete loss of spasmogenic activity though it retains some chemotactic ability (CHEMOATTRACTANTS).
The study of fluid channels and chambers of tiny dimensions of tens to hundreds of micrometers and volumes of nanoliters or picoliters. This is of interest in biological MICROCIRCULATION and used in MICROCHEMISTRY and INVESTIGATIVE TECHNIQUES.
Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.
The level of protein structure in which combinations of secondary protein structures (alpha helices, beta sheets, loop regions, and motifs) pack together to form folded shapes called domains. Disulfide bridges between cysteines in two different parts of the polypeptide chain along with other interactions between the chains play a role in the formation and stabilization of tertiary structure. Small proteins usually consist of only one domain but larger proteins may contain a number of domains connected by segments of polypeptide chain which lack regular secondary structure.
The property of blood capillary ENDOTHELIUM that allows for the selective exchange of substances between the blood and surrounding tissues and through membranous barriers such as the BLOOD-AIR BARRIER; BLOOD-AQUEOUS BARRIER; BLOOD-BRAIN BARRIER; BLOOD-NERVE BARRIER; BLOOD-RETINAL BARRIER; and BLOOD-TESTIS BARRIER. Small lipid-soluble molecules such as carbon dioxide and oxygen move freely by diffusion. Water and water-soluble molecules cannot pass through the endothelial walls and are dependent on microscopic pores. These pores show narrow areas (TIGHT JUNCTIONS) which may limit large molecule movement.
Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.
Mitogenic peptide growth hormone carried in the alpha-granules of platelets. It is released when platelets adhere to traumatized tissues. Connective tissue cells near the traumatized region respond by initiating the process of replication.
Specialized structures of the cell that extend the cell membrane and project out from the cell surface.
Microscopy of specimens stained with fluorescent dye (usually fluorescein isothiocyanate) or of naturally fluorescent materials, which emit light when exposed to ultraviolet or blue light. Immunofluorescence microscopy utilizes antibodies that are labeled with fluorescent dye.
Cytotaxins liberated from normal or invading cells that specifically attract eosinophils; they may be complement fragments, lymphokines, neutrophil products, histamine or other; the best known is the tetrapeptide ECF-A, released mainly by mast cells.
A CXC chemokine that is induced by GAMMA-INTERFERON and is chemotactic for MONOCYTES and T-LYMPHOCYTES. It has specificity for the CXCR3 RECEPTOR.
Cell separation is the process of isolating and distinguishing specific cell types or individual cells from a heterogeneous mixture, often through the use of physical or biological techniques.
Phosphatidylinositols in which one or more alcohol group of the inositol has been substituted with a phosphate group.
Specialized cells of the hematopoietic system that have branch-like extensions. They are found throughout the lymphatic system, and in non-lymphoid tissues such as SKIN and the epithelia of the intestinal, respiratory, and reproductive tracts. They trap and process ANTIGENS, and present them to T-CELLS, thereby stimulating CELL-MEDIATED IMMUNITY. They are different from the non-hematopoietic FOLLICULAR DENDRITIC CELLS, which have a similar morphology and immune system function, but with respect to humoral immunity (ANTIBODY PRODUCTION).
Polymorphic class I human histocompatibility (HLA) surface antigens present on almost all nucleated cells. At least 20 antigens have been identified which are encoded by the A locus of multiple alleles on chromosome 6. They serve as targets for T-cell cytolytic responses and are involved with acceptance or rejection of tissue/organ grafts.
Class I human histocompatibility (HLA) surface antigens encoded by alleles on locus B of the HLA complex. The HLA-G antigens are considered non-classical class I antigens due to their distinct tissue distribution which differs from HLA-A; HLA-B; and HLA-C antigens. Note that several isoforms of HLA-G antigens result from alternative splicing of messenger RNAs produced from the HLA-G*01 allele.
Proteins obtained from ESCHERICHIA COLI.
Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.
The natural bactericidal property of BLOOD due to normally occurring antibacterial substances such as beta lysin, leukin, etc. This activity needs to be distinguished from the bactericidal activity contained in a patient's serum as a result of antimicrobial therapy, which is measured by a SERUM BACTERICIDAL TEST.
The loss of some TELOMERE sequence during DNA REPLICATION of the first several base pairs of a linear DNA molecule; or from DNA DAMAGE. Cells have various mechanisms to restore length (TELOMERE HOMEOSTASIS.) Telomere shortening is involved in the progression of CELL AGING.
Members of the class of compounds composed of AMINO ACIDS joined together by peptide bonds between adjacent amino acids into linear, branched or cyclical structures. OLIGOPEPTIDES are composed of approximately 2-12 amino acids. Polypeptides are composed of approximately 13 or more amino acids. PROTEINS are linear polypeptides that are normally synthesized on RIBOSOMES.
Derivatives of PHOSPHATIDIC ACIDS that lack one of its fatty acyl chains due to its hydrolytic removal.
Partial proteins formed by partial hydrolysis of complete proteins or generated through PROTEIN ENGINEERING techniques.
Recombinant proteins produced by the GENETIC TRANSLATION of fused genes formed by the combination of NUCLEIC ACID REGULATORY SEQUENCES of one or more genes with the protein coding sequences of one or more genes.
Trihydroxy derivatives of eicosanoic acids. They are primarily derived from arachidonic acid, however eicosapentaenoic acid derivatives also exist. Many of them are naturally occurring mediators of immune regulation.
The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.

Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2, platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase, generates two bioactive products during the oxidation of low-density lipoprotein: use of a novel inhibitor. (1/4263)

A novel and potent azetidinone inhibitor of the lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2), i.e. platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase, is described for the first time. This inhibitor, SB-222657 (Ki=40+/-3 nM, kobs/[I]=6. 6x10(5) M-1.s-1), is inactive against paraoxonase, is a poor inhibitor of lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase and has been used to investigate the role of Lp-PLA2 in the oxidative modification of lipoproteins. Although pretreatment with SB-222657 did not affect the kinetics of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation by Cu2+ or an azo free-radical generator as determined by assay of lipid hydroperoxides (LOOHs), conjugated dienes and thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances, in both cases it inhibited the elevation in lysophosphatidylcholine content. Moreover, the significantly increased monocyte chemoattractant activity found in a non-esterified fatty acid fraction from LDL oxidized by Cu2+ was also prevented by pretreatment with SB-222657, with an IC50 value of 5.0+/-0.4 nM. The less potent diastereoisomer of SB-222657, SB-223777 (Ki=6.3+/-0.5 microM, kobs/[I]=1.6x10(4) M-1.s-1), was found to be significantly less active in both assays. Thus, in addition to generating lysophosphatidylcholine, a known biologically active lipid, these results demonstrate that Lp-PLA2 is capable of generating oxidized non-esterified fatty acid moieties that are also bioactive. These findings are consistent with our proposal that Lp-PLA2 has a predominantly pro-inflammatory role in atherogenesis. Finally, similar studies have demonstrated that a different situation exists during the oxidation of high-density lipoprotein, with enzyme(s) other than Lp-PLA2 apparently being responsible for generating lysophosphatidylcholine.  (+info)

Non-serum-dependent chemotactic factors produced by Candida albicans stimulate chemotaxis by binding to the formyl peptide receptor on neutrophils and to an unknown receptor on macrophages. (2/4263)

Serum-free culture filtrates of six Candida species and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were found to contain chemoattractants for human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and a mouse macrophage-like cell line, J774. The chemotactic factors differed for the PMN and J774 cells, however, in terms of heat stability, kinetics of liberation by the yeast cells, and divalent cation requirements for production. The chemoattractant in Candida albicans culture filtrates appeared to act through the formyl peptide receptor (FPR) of PMNs, since it was found to induce chemotaxis of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells that were expressing the human FPR but did not induce chemotaxis of wild-type CHO cells. The C. albicans culture filtrates also induced migration of PMNs across confluent monolayers of a human gastrointestinal epithelial cell line, T84; migration occurred in the basolateral-to-apical direction but not the reverse direction, unless the epithelial tight junctions were disrupted. J774 cells did not migrate toward the formylated peptide (fMet-Leu-Phe; fMLF), and chemotaxis toward the C. albicans culture filtrate was not inhibited by an FPR antagonist (t-butoxycarbonyl-Met-Leu-Phe), suggesting that a different receptor mediated J774 cell chemotaxis. In conclusion, we have identified a receptor by which a non-serum-dependent chemotactic factor (NSCF) produced by C. albicans induced chemotaxis of PMNs. Additionally, we have shown that NSCF was active across epithelial monolayers. These findings suggest that NSCFs produced by C. albicans and other yeast species may influence host-pathogen interactions at the gastrointestinal tract mucosal surface by inducing phagocytic-cell infiltration.  (+info)

Interleukin-8: A pathogenetic role in antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody-associated glomerulonephritis. (3/4263)

BACKGROUND: In neutrophil trafficking, the role of interleukin-8 (IL-8) is location dependent. Tissue IL-8 directs transmigration, whereas intravascular IL-8 frustrates this process. The bystander damage of glomerular endothelium by antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (ANCA)-activated neutrophils is believed to be an early event in the pathogenesis of ANCA-associated glomerulonephritis. We have studied the role of IL-8 in this process. METHODS: Intraglomerular expression of IL-8 in patients with ANCA-associated glomerulonephritis was studied by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry and location of neutrophils by serial section immunohistochemistry. In vitro, we analyzed ANCA-stimulated neutrophil IL-8 production by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and the IL-8 attributable effect of ANCA-stimulated neutrophil supernatant by chemotactic and transendothelial assays. RESULTS: There was intraglomerular expression of IL-8 at segmental, crescentic, and parietal epithelial sites. IL-8 protein expression colocalized to intraglomerular neutrophils; many localized within glomerular capillary loops, suggesting failed trafficking to tissue IL-8. ANCAs differentially stimulated time- and dose-dependent neutrophil IL-8 production, and ANCA-stimulated neutrophil supernatant demonstrated potent IL-8-dependent chemotactic activity and inhibited transendothelial migration of normal human neutrophils toward an IL-8 gradient. CONCLUSION: Despite heavy tissue expression of IL-8 in ANCA-associated GN, the production of IL-8 by ANCA-stimulated neutrophils within the intravascular compartment may frustrate neutrophil transmigration, encourage intravascular stasis, and contribute to bystander damage of glomerular endothelial cells.  (+info)

Structural determinants of the eosinophil: chemotactic activity of the acidic tetrapeptides of eosinophil chemotactic factor of anaphylaxis. (4/4263)

The acidic tetrapeptides of ECF-A, Ala/Val-Gly-Ser-Glu, exhibit peak in vitro chemotactic activity for human eosinophils at concentrations of 3 X 10(-8) M to 10(-6) M, and rapidly deactivate eosinophils to homologous and other stimuli at concentrations as low as 10(-10) M. The analogue Leu-Gly-Ser-Glu reaches peak activity at 10(-8)M-10(-7)M, while Phe-Gly-Ser-Glu requires 10(-4)M to elicit a peak response. Although inversion of the order of glycine and serine does not alter the eosinophil chemotactic activity of the tetrapeptides, deletion of glycine increases by 10-fold the concentration required for peak chemotactic activity, indicating the critical nature of the spacing between NH2- and COOH-terminal residues. The substituent COOH-terminal tripeptide, which is only marginally chemotactic, irreversibly suppresses eosinophil chemotactic responsiveness at a concentration 10,000-fold higher than concentrations necessary for deactivation by the intact tetrapeptide. The high concentration of tripeptide required for this cell directed effect, which is assumed to be analogous to deactivation, is attributed to the absence of the NH2-terminal residue which would facilitate effective interaction with the eosinophil. A substituent NH2-terminal tripeptide and amides of the NH2-terminal amino acids, which are devoid of chemotactic and deactivating activities, reversibly inhibit the tetrapeptide stimulus in a dose-response fashion. The additional finding that the NH2-terminal tripeptide protects the eosinophil from deactivation by the intact tetrapeptide confirms that the competitive interaction is stimulus specific.  (+info)

Bile duct epithelial cells exposed to alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate produce a factor that causes neutrophil-dependent hepatocellular injury in vitro. (5/4263)

The acute hepatotoxicity induced by alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT) in rats is manifested as neutrophil-dependent necrosis of bile duct epithelial cells (BDECs) and hepatic parenchymal cells. This hepatotoxicity mirrors that of drug-induced cholangiolitic hepatitis in humans. Since BDECs are primary targets of ANIT-induced toxicity, we hypothesized that after exposure to ANIT, BDECs produce a factor(s) that causes neutrophil chemotaxis and neutrophil-dependent hepatocellular injury. To test this hypothesis BDECs were isolated from male Sprague Dawley rats and incubated with ANIT (6.25, 12.5, 25, or 50 microM) or vehicle for 24 h. The conditioned medium (CM) was collected and placed in the bottom chamber of a two-chambered chemotaxis system, while isolated neutrophils were placed in the top chamber. Chemotaxis was indicated by neutrophil migration through a membrane to the bottom chamber. CM from BDECs exposed to each concentration of ANIT was chemotactic, whereas CM from vehicle-treated BDECs was not. ANIT alone caused a modest degree of chemotaxis at 50 microM. The conditioned media were added to isolated hepatocytes or to hepatocyte-neutrophil cocultures and incubated for 24 h. Hepatocyte toxicity was indicated by alanine aminotransferase release into the culture medium. CM from vehicle-treated BDECs did not cause hepatocyte killing in either hepatocyte-neutrophil cocultures or hepatocyte cultures. In contrast, the addition of CM from ANIT-treated BDECs (CM-BDEC-A) to hepatocyte-neutrophil cocultures resulted in hepatocyte killing. The same CM was not cytotoxic to hepatocyte cultures devoid of neutrophils. The hepatocyte killing could not be explained by residual ANIT in the CM, which was below the limit of detection (< or = 0.5 microM). The addition of antiproteases afforded protection against neutrophil-dependent hepatocellular injury induced by CM-BDEC-A. These results indicate that ANIT causes BDECs to release a factor(s) that attracts neutrophils and stimulates them to injure hepatocytes in vitro.  (+info)

Selective eosinophil transendothelial migration triggered by eotaxin via modulation of Mac-1/ICAM-1 and VLA-4/VCAM-1 interactions. (6/4263)

We have recently cloned eotaxin, a highly efficacious eosinophilic chemokine involved in the development of lung eosinophilia during allergic inflammatory reactions. To understand more precisely how eotaxin facilitates the specific migration of eosinophils, we have studied which adhesion receptors are essential for eotaxin action both in vivo and in vitro. Experiments using mice genetically deficient in adhesion receptors demonstrated that molecules previously reported to be involved in both leukocyte tethering/rolling (P-selectin and E-selectin) and in sticking/ transmigration (ICAM-1 and VCAM-1) are required for eotaxin action in vivo. To further elucidate the mechanism(s) involved in this process, we have used an in vitro transendothelial chemotaxis model. mAb neutralization studies performed in this system suggest that the integrins Mac-1 (CD11b/18), VLA-4 (alpha4beta1) and LFA-1 (CD11a/18) are involved in the transendothelial chemotaxis of eosinophils to eotaxin. Accordingly, the expression of these integrins on eosinophils is elevated by direct action of this chemokine in a concentration-dependent manner. Taken together, our results suggest that eotaxin-induced eosinophil transendothelial migration in vivo and in vitro relies on Mac-1/ICAM-1 and VLA-4NCAM-1 interactions, the latter ones becoming more relevant at later time points of the eotaxin-induced recruitment process.  (+info)

Selective recruitment of CCR4-bearing Th2 cells toward antigen-presenting cells by the CC chemokines thymus and activation-regulated chemokine and macrophage-derived chemokine. (7/4263)

Helper T cells are classified into Th1 and Th2 subsets based on their profiles of cytokine production. Th1 cells are involved in cell-mediated immunity, whereas Th2 cells induce humoral responses. Selective recruitment of these two subsets depends on specific adhesion molecules and specific chemoattractants. Here, we demonstrate that the T cell-directed CC chemokine thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC) was abundantly produced by monocytes treated with granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) or IL-3, especially in the presence of IL-4 and by dendritic cells derived from monocytes cultured with GM-CSF + IL-4. The receptor for TARC and another macrophage/dendritic cell-derived CC chemokine macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC) is CCR4, a G protein-coupled receptor. CCR4 was found to be expressed on approximately 20% of adult peripheral blood effector/memory CD4+ T cells. T cells attracted by TARC and MDC generated cell lines predominantly producing Th2-type cytokines, IL-4 and IL-5. Fractionated CCR4+ cells but not CCR4- cells also selectively gave rise to Th2-type cell lines. When naive CD4+ T cells from adult peripheral blood were polarized in vitro, Th2-type cells selectively expressed CCR4 and vigorously migrated toward TARC and MDC. Taken together, CCR4 is selectively expressed on Th2-type T cells and antigen-presenting cells may recruit Th2 cells expressing CCR4 by producing TARC and MDC in Th2-dominant conditions.  (+info)

Effect of leukocytes on corneal cellular proliferation and wound healing. (8/4263)

PURPOSE: To establish whether fucoidin, by blocking the adhesion of leukocytes on the limbal vascular endothelium, prevents extravasation of the cells from the blood stream into the limbal stroma and the wounded area after corneal injury. Successful leukocyte blocking enabled investigation of the influence of leukocytes on corneal cellular proliferation after corneal wounding. METHODS: Thirty-two New Zealand White rabbits were used. Photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) and a standardized alkali corneal wound were used as models in two sets of experiments. In half of the injured rabbits fucoidin was used to prevent leukocytes from leaving the local vessels. The efficiency of the blocking technique was evaluated by counting the number of leukocytes in the limbal and wounded corneal areas. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was used as a marker for proliferative activity. RESULTS: The infiltration of leukocytes into the limbus and the cornea after PRK and alkali injuries can be blocked by fucoidin. The healing rate of corneal epithelium after alkali burn was retarded in the absence of leukocytes. PCNA expression was enhanced in the presence of leukocytes. Fucoidin per se had no influence on corneal cell proliferation and wound healing. CONCLUSIONS: Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) can be prevented from entering the cornea in vivo by fucoidin after PRK and after alkali burn. The corneal epithelial healing rate is delayed in the absence of PMNs in vivo, and PCNA expression increases in the presence of leukocytes.  (+info)

Chemotaxis is a term used in biology and medicine to describe the movement of an organism or cell towards or away from a chemical stimulus. This process plays a crucial role in various biological phenomena, including immune responses, wound healing, and the development and progression of diseases such as cancer.

In chemotaxis, cells can detect and respond to changes in the concentration of specific chemicals, known as chemoattractants or chemorepellents, in their environment. These chemicals bind to receptors on the cell surface, triggering a series of intracellular signaling events that ultimately lead to changes in the cytoskeleton and directed movement of the cell towards or away from the chemical gradient.

For example, during an immune response, white blood cells called neutrophils use chemotaxis to migrate towards sites of infection or inflammation, where they can attack and destroy invading pathogens. Similarly, cancer cells can use chemotaxis to migrate towards blood vessels and metastasize to other parts of the body.

Understanding chemotaxis is important for developing new therapies and treatments for a variety of diseases, including cancer, infectious diseases, and inflammatory disorders.

Chemotaxis, Leukocyte is the movement of leukocytes (white blood cells) towards a higher concentration of a particular chemical substance, known as a chemotactic factor. This process plays a crucial role in the immune system's response to infection and injury.

When there is an infection or tissue damage, certain cells release chemotactic factors, which are small molecules or proteins that can attract leukocytes to the site of inflammation. Leukocytes have receptors on their surface that can detect these chemotactic factors and move towards them through a process called chemotaxis.

Once they reach the site of inflammation, leukocytes can help eliminate pathogens or damaged cells by phagocytosis (engulfing and destroying) or releasing toxic substances that kill the invading microorganisms. Chemotaxis is an essential part of the immune system's defense mechanisms and helps to maintain tissue homeostasis and prevent the spread of infection.

Leukocytes, also known as white blood cells (WBCs), are a crucial component of the human immune system. They are responsible for protecting the body against infections and foreign substances. Leukocytes are produced in the bone marrow and circulate throughout the body in the bloodstream and lymphatic system.

There are several types of leukocytes, including:

1. Neutrophils - These are the most abundant type of leukocyte and are primarily responsible for fighting bacterial infections. They contain enzymes that can destroy bacteria.
2. Lymphocytes - These are responsible for producing antibodies and destroying virus-infected cells, as well as cancer cells. There are two main types of lymphocytes: B-lymphocytes and T-lymphocytes.
3. Monocytes - These are the largest type of leukocyte and help to break down and remove dead or damaged tissues, as well as microorganisms.
4. Eosinophils - These play a role in fighting parasitic infections and are also involved in allergic reactions and inflammation.
5. Basophils - These release histamine and other chemicals that cause inflammation in response to allergens or irritants.

An abnormal increase or decrease in the number of leukocytes can indicate an underlying medical condition, such as an infection, inflammation, or a blood disorder.

Leukocyte rolling is a crucial step in the process of leukocytes (white blood cells) migrating from the bloodstream to the site of infection or inflammation, which is known as extravasation. This phenomenon is mediated by the interaction between selectins on the surface of endothelial cells and their ligands on leukocytes.

The multi-step adhesion cascade begins with leukocyte rolling, where leukocytes move along the vessel wall in a slow, rolling motion. This is facilitated by the transient interactions between selectins (P-selectin, E-selectin, and L-selectin) on endothelial cells and their ligands (PSGL-1, CD44, and others) on leukocytes. These interactions are weak and short-lived but sufficient to reduce the leukocyte's velocity and enable it to roll along the vessel wall.

Leukocyte rolling allows the leukocytes to come in close contact with the endothelium, where they can receive further signals that promote their activation and firm adhesion. This process is critical for the immune response to infection and inflammation, as it enables the recruitment of effector cells to the site of injury or infection.

Neutrophils are a type of white blood cell that are part of the immune system's response to infection. They are produced in the bone marrow and released into the bloodstream where they circulate and are able to move quickly to sites of infection or inflammation in the body. Neutrophils are capable of engulfing and destroying bacteria, viruses, and other foreign substances through a process called phagocytosis. They are also involved in the release of inflammatory mediators, which can contribute to tissue damage in some cases. Neutrophils are characterized by the presence of granules in their cytoplasm, which contain enzymes and other proteins that help them carry out their immune functions.

A leukocyte count, also known as a white blood cell (WBC) count, is a laboratory test that measures the number of leukocytes in a sample of blood. Leukocytes are a vital part of the body's immune system and help fight infection and inflammation. A high or low leukocyte count may indicate an underlying medical condition, such as an infection, inflammation, or a bone marrow disorder. The normal range for a leukocyte count in adults is typically between 4,500 and 11,000 cells per microliter (mcL) of blood. However, the normal range can vary slightly depending on the laboratory and the individual's age and sex.

Chemotactic factors are substances that attract or repel cells, particularly immune cells, by stimulating directional movement in response to a chemical gradient. These factors play a crucial role in the body's immune response and inflammation process. They include:

1. Chemokines: A family of small signaling proteins that direct the migration of immune cells to sites of infection or tissue damage.
2. Cytokines: A broad category of signaling molecules that mediate and regulate immunity, inflammation, and hematopoiesis. Some cytokines can also act as chemotactic factors.
3. Complement components: Cleavage products of the complement system can attract immune cells to the site of infection or tissue injury.
4. Growth factors: Certain growth factors, like colony-stimulating factors (CSFs), can stimulate the migration and proliferation of specific cell types.
5. Lipid mediators: Products derived from arachidonic acid metabolism, such as leukotrienes and prostaglandins, can also act as chemotactic factors.
6. Formyl peptides: Bacterial-derived formylated peptides can attract and activate neutrophils during an infection.
7. Extracellular matrix (ECM) components: Fragments of ECM proteins, like collagen and fibronectin, can serve as chemotactic factors for immune cells.

These factors help orchestrate the immune response by guiding the movement of immune cells to specific locations in the body where they are needed.

Cell movement, also known as cell motility, refers to the ability of cells to move independently and change their location within tissue or inside the body. This process is essential for various biological functions, including embryonic development, wound healing, immune responses, and cancer metastasis.

There are several types of cell movement, including:

1. **Crawling or mesenchymal migration:** Cells move by extending and retracting protrusions called pseudopodia or filopodia, which contain actin filaments. This type of movement is common in fibroblasts, immune cells, and cancer cells during tissue invasion and metastasis.
2. **Amoeboid migration:** Cells move by changing their shape and squeezing through tight spaces without forming protrusions. This type of movement is often observed in white blood cells (leukocytes) as they migrate through the body to fight infections.
3. **Pseudopodial extension:** Cells extend pseudopodia, which are temporary cytoplasmic projections containing actin filaments. These protrusions help the cell explore its environment and move forward.
4. **Bacterial flagellar motion:** Bacteria use a whip-like structure called a flagellum to propel themselves through their environment. The rotation of the flagellum is driven by a molecular motor in the bacterial cell membrane.
5. **Ciliary and ependymal movement:** Ciliated cells, such as those lining the respiratory tract and fallopian tubes, have hair-like structures called cilia that beat in coordinated waves to move fluids or mucus across the cell surface.

Cell movement is regulated by a complex interplay of signaling pathways, cytoskeletal rearrangements, and adhesion molecules, which enable cells to respond to environmental cues and navigate through tissues.

Cell adhesion refers to the binding of cells to extracellular matrices or to other cells, a process that is fundamental to the development, function, and maintenance of multicellular organisms. Cell adhesion is mediated by various cell surface receptors, such as integrins, cadherins, and immunoglobulin-like cell adhesion molecules (Ig-CAMs), which interact with specific ligands in the extracellular environment. These interactions lead to the formation of specialized junctions, such as tight junctions, adherens junctions, and desmosomes, that help to maintain tissue architecture and regulate various cellular processes, including proliferation, differentiation, migration, and survival. Disruptions in cell adhesion can contribute to a variety of diseases, including cancer, inflammation, and degenerative disorders.

N-Formylmethionine Leucyl-Phenylalanine (fMLP) is not a medical condition, but rather a synthetic peptide that is often used in laboratory settings for research purposes. It is a formylated methionine residue linked to a leucine and phenylalanine tripeptide.

fMLP is a potent chemoattractant for certain types of white blood cells, including neutrophils and monocytes. When these cells encounter fMLP, they are stimulated to migrate towards the source of the peptide and release various inflammatory mediators. As such, fMLP is often used in studies of inflammation, immune cell function, and signal transduction pathways.

It's important to note that while fMLP has important research applications, it is not a substance that would be encountered or used in clinical medicine.

'Dictyostelium' is a genus of social amoebae that are commonly found in soil and decaying organic matter. These microscopic organisms have a unique life cycle, starting as individual cells that feed on bacteria. When food becomes scarce, the cells undergo a developmental process where they aggregate together to form a multicellular slug-like structure called a pseudoplasmodium or grex. This grex then moves and differentiates into a fruiting body that can release spores for further reproduction.

Dictyostelium discoideum is the most well-studied species in this genus, serving as a valuable model organism for research in various fields such as cell biology, developmental biology, and evolutionary biology. The study of Dictyostelium has contributed significantly to our understanding of fundamental biological processes like chemotaxis, signal transduction, and cell differentiation.

Leukocyte cell migration assays are in vitro tests used to measure the movement or migration of leukocytes (white blood cells) through a porous membrane from one chamber to another. These assays are commonly used in immunology and inflammation research to study the mechanisms that regulate leukocyte migration, which is an important process in the immune response.

There are several types of leukocyte cell migration assays, including Boyden chamber assays, Transwell migration assays, and Zigmond chamber assays. These assays typically involve placing leukocytes in the upper chamber of a device separated from the lower chamber by a porous membrane. The lower chamber contains a chemoattractant, such as a chemokine or bacterial product, which stimulates the migration of the leukocytes through the membrane to the lower chamber.

The number of leukocytes that migrate to the lower chamber is then measured and used to calculate the rate of migration. The assay can be modified to study different aspects of leukocyte migration, such as the role of specific receptors or signaling pathways, by adding inhibitors or blocking antibodies to the upper chamber.

Overall, leukocyte cell migration assays are a valuable tool for studying the mechanisms that regulate leukocyte migration and for identifying potential therapeutic targets for inflammatory diseases.

Leukocyte elastase is a type of enzyme that is released by white blood cells (leukocytes), specifically neutrophils, during inflammation. Its primary function is to help fight infection by breaking down the proteins in bacteria and viruses. However, if not properly regulated, leukocyte elastase can also damage surrounding tissues, contributing to the progression of various diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and cystic fibrosis.

Leukocyte elastase is often measured in clinical settings as a marker of inflammation and neutrophil activation, particularly in patients with lung diseases. Inhibitors of leukocyte elastase have been developed as potential therapeutic agents for these conditions.

Cell migration inhibition refers to the process or agents that restrict the movement of cells, particularly in the context of cancer metastasis. Cell migration is a critical biological process involved in various physiological and pathological conditions, including embryonic development, wound healing, and tumor cell dissemination. Inhibiting cell migration can help prevent the spread of cancer to distant organs, thereby improving treatment outcomes and patient survival rates.

Various factors and mechanisms contribute to cell migration inhibition, such as:

1. Modulation of signaling pathways: Cell migration is regulated by complex intracellular signaling networks that control cytoskeletal rearrangements, adhesion molecules, and other components required for cell motility. Inhibiting specific signaling proteins or pathways can suppress cell migration.
2. Extracellular matrix (ECM) modifications: The ECM provides structural support and biochemical cues that guide cell migration. Altering the composition or organization of the ECM can hinder cell movement.
3. Inhibition of adhesion molecules: Cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions are mediated by adhesion molecules, such as integrins and cadherins. Blocking these molecules can prevent cells from attaching to their surroundings and migrating.
4. Targeting cytoskeletal components: The cytoskeleton is responsible for the mechanical forces required for cell migration. Inhibiting cytoskeletal proteins, such as actin or tubulin, can impair cell motility.
5. Use of pharmacological agents: Several drugs and compounds have been identified to inhibit cell migration, either by targeting specific molecules or indirectly affecting the overall cellular environment. These agents include chemotherapeutic drugs, natural compounds, and small molecule inhibitors.

Understanding the mechanisms underlying cell migration inhibition can provide valuable insights into developing novel therapeutic strategies for cancer treatment and other diseases involving aberrant cell migration.

Signal transduction is the process by which a cell converts an extracellular signal, such as a hormone or neurotransmitter, into an intracellular response. This involves a series of molecular events that transmit the signal from the cell surface to the interior of the cell, ultimately resulting in changes in gene expression, protein activity, or metabolism.

The process typically begins with the binding of the extracellular signal to a receptor located on the cell membrane. This binding event activates the receptor, which then triggers a cascade of intracellular signaling molecules, such as second messengers, protein kinases, and ion channels. These molecules amplify and propagate the signal, ultimately leading to the activation or inhibition of specific cellular responses.

Signal transduction pathways are highly regulated and can be modulated by various factors, including other signaling molecules, post-translational modifications, and feedback mechanisms. Dysregulation of these pathways has been implicated in a variety of diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

Secretory Leukocyte Protease Inhibitor (SLPI) is a protein that belongs to the family of serine protease inhibitors. It is primarily produced by the epithelial cells of various tissues, including the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts, as well as the genital mucosa. SLPI functions as an important defense mechanism against inflammation and infection by inhibiting the activity of proteolytic enzymes released by neutrophils and other immune cells during the inflammatory response. These enzymes can cause tissue damage if they are not properly regulated, so SLPI plays a crucial role in maintaining the integrity and health of the epithelial barrier. In addition to its anti-inflammatory effects, SLPI has also been shown to have antimicrobial properties against a variety of pathogens, including bacteria, viruses, and fungi.

Chemokines are a family of small signaling proteins that are involved in immune regulation and inflammation. They mediate their effects by interacting with specific cell surface receptors, leading to the activation and migration of various types of immune cells. Chemokines can be divided into four subfamilies based on the arrangement of conserved cysteine residues near the N-terminus: CXC, CC, C, and CX3C.

CXC chemokines are characterized by the presence of a single amino acid (X) between the first two conserved cysteine residues. They play important roles in the recruitment and activation of neutrophils, which are critical effector cells in the early stages of inflammation. CXC chemokines can be further divided into two subgroups based on the presence or absence of a specific amino acid sequence (ELR motif) near the N-terminus: ELR+ and ELR-.

ELR+ CXC chemokines, such as IL-8, are potent chemoattractants for neutrophils and play important roles in the recruitment of these cells to sites of infection or injury. They bind to and activate the CXCR1 and CXCR2 receptors on the surface of neutrophils, leading to their migration towards the source of the chemokine.

ELR- CXC chemokines, such as IP-10 and MIG, are involved in the recruitment of T cells and other immune cells to sites of inflammation. They bind to and activate different receptors, such as CXCR3, on the surface of these cells, leading to their migration towards the source of the chemokine.

Overall, CXC chemokines play important roles in the regulation of immune responses and inflammation, and dysregulation of their expression or activity has been implicated in a variety of diseases, including cancer, autoimmune disorders, and infectious diseases.

Monocytes are a type of white blood cell that are part of the immune system. They are large cells with a round or oval shape and a nucleus that is typically indented or horseshoe-shaped. Monocytes are produced in the bone marrow and then circulate in the bloodstream, where they can differentiate into other types of immune cells such as macrophages and dendritic cells.

Monocytes play an important role in the body's defense against infection and tissue damage. They are able to engulf and digest foreign particles, microorganisms, and dead or damaged cells, which helps to clear them from the body. Monocytes also produce cytokines, which are signaling molecules that help to coordinate the immune response.

Elevated levels of monocytes in the bloodstream can be a sign of an ongoing infection, inflammation, or other medical conditions such as cancer or autoimmune disorders.

Venules are very small blood vessels that carry oxygen-depleted blood from capillaries to veins. They have a diameter of 8-50 micrometers and are an integral part of the microcirculation system in the body. Venules merge together to form veins, which then transport the low-oxygen blood back to the heart.

Chemokine receptors are a type of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that bind to chemokines, which are small signaling proteins involved in immune cell trafficking and inflammation. These receptors play a crucial role in the regulation of immune responses, hematopoiesis, and development. Chemokine receptors are expressed on the surface of various cells, including leukocytes, endothelial cells, and fibroblasts. Upon binding to their respective chemokines, these receptors activate intracellular signaling pathways that lead to cell migration, activation, or proliferation. There are several subfamilies of chemokine receptors, including CXCR, CCR, CX3CR, and XCR, each with distinct specificities for different chemokines. Dysregulation of chemokine receptor signaling has been implicated in various pathological conditions, such as autoimmune diseases, cancer, and viral infections.

CD18 is a type of protein called an integrin that is found on the surface of many different types of cells in the human body, including white blood cells (leukocytes). It plays a crucial role in the immune system by helping these cells to migrate through blood vessel walls and into tissues where they can carry out their various functions, such as fighting infection and inflammation.

CD18 forms a complex with another protein called CD11b, and together they are known as Mac-1 or CR3 (complement receptor 3). This complex is involved in the recognition and binding of various molecules, including bacterial proteins and fragments of complement proteins, which help to trigger an immune response.

CD18 has been implicated in a number of diseases, including certain types of cancer, inflammatory bowel disease, and rheumatoid arthritis. Mutations in the gene that encodes CD18 can lead to a rare disorder called leukocyte adhesion deficiency (LAD) type 1, which is characterized by recurrent bacterial infections and impaired wound healing.

Complement C5a is a protein fragment that is generated during the activation of the complement system, which is a part of the immune system. The complement system helps to eliminate pathogens and damaged cells from the body by tagging them for destruction and attracting immune cells to the site of infection or injury.

C5a is formed when the fifth component of the complement system (C5) is cleaved into two smaller fragments, C5a and C5b, during the complement activation cascade. C5a is a potent pro-inflammatory mediator that can attract and activate various immune cells, such as neutrophils, monocytes, and eosinophils, to the site of infection or injury. It can also increase vascular permeability, promote the release of histamine, and induce the production of reactive oxygen species, all of which contribute to the inflammatory response.

However, excessive or uncontrolled activation of the complement system and generation of C5a can lead to tissue damage and inflammation, contributing to the pathogenesis of various diseases, such as sepsis, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and autoimmune disorders. Therefore, targeting C5a or its receptors has been explored as a potential therapeutic strategy for these conditions.

"Cells, cultured" is a medical term that refers to cells that have been removed from an organism and grown in controlled laboratory conditions outside of the body. This process is called cell culture and it allows scientists to study cells in a more controlled and accessible environment than they would have inside the body. Cultured cells can be derived from a variety of sources, including tissues, organs, or fluids from humans, animals, or cell lines that have been previously established in the laboratory.

Cell culture involves several steps, including isolation of the cells from the tissue, purification and characterization of the cells, and maintenance of the cells in appropriate growth conditions. The cells are typically grown in specialized media that contain nutrients, growth factors, and other components necessary for their survival and proliferation. Cultured cells can be used for a variety of purposes, including basic research, drug development and testing, and production of biological products such as vaccines and gene therapies.

It is important to note that cultured cells may behave differently than they do in the body, and results obtained from cell culture studies may not always translate directly to human physiology or disease. Therefore, it is essential to validate findings from cell culture experiments using additional models and ultimately in clinical trials involving human subjects.

Chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 12 (CXCL12), also known as stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1), is a small signaling protein belonging to the chemokine family. Chemokines are a group of cytokines, or signaling molecules, that play important roles in immune responses and inflammation by recruiting and activating various immune cells.

CXCL12 is produced by several types of cells, including stromal cells, endothelial cells, and certain immune cells. It exerts its effects by binding to a specific receptor called C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4), which is found on the surface of various cell types, including immune cells, stem cells, and some cancer cells.

The CXCL12-CXCR4 axis plays crucial roles in various physiological processes, such as embryonic development, tissue homeostasis, hematopoiesis (the formation of blood cells), and neurogenesis (the formation of neurons). Additionally, this signaling pathway has been implicated in several pathological conditions, including cancer metastasis, inflammatory diseases, and HIV infection.

In summary, Chemokine CXCL12 is a small signaling protein that binds to the CXCR4 receptor and plays essential roles in various physiological processes and pathological conditions.

Leukocyte transfusion, also known as white blood cell (WBC) transfusion, involves the intravenous administration of leukocytes (white blood cells) from a donor to a recipient. This procedure is typically used in patients with severe immunodeficiency or those undergoing bone marrow transplantation, where they are unable to produce sufficient white blood cells to fight off infections.

Leukocyte transfusions can help boost the recipient's immune system and provide them with temporary protection against infections. However, this procedure carries some risks, including febrile non-hemolytic transfusion reactions, allergic reactions, transmission of infectious diseases, and the potential for transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease (TA-GVHD). Therefore, leukocyte transfusions are usually reserved for specific clinical situations where the benefits outweigh the risks.

Interleukin-8 (IL-8) receptors are a type of G protein-coupled receptor that bind to and are activated by the cytokine IL-8. There are two main types of IL-8 receptors, known as CXCR1 and CXCR2.

IL-8B, also known as CXCR2, is a gene that encodes for the Interleukin-8 receptor B. This receptor is found on the surface of various cells, including neutrophils, monocytes, and endothelial cells. It plays a crucial role in the immune response, particularly in the recruitment and activation of neutrophils to sites of infection or inflammation.

IL-8B has a high affinity for IL-8 and other related chemokines, such as CXCL1, CXCL5, and CXCL7. Upon binding to its ligand, IL-8B activates various signaling pathways that lead to the mobilization and migration of neutrophils towards the site of inflammation. This process is critical for the elimination of invading pathogens and the resolution of inflammation.

However, excessive or prolonged activation of IL-8B has been implicated in various pathological conditions, including chronic inflammation, cancer, and autoimmune diseases. Therefore, targeting IL-8B with therapeutic agents has emerged as a promising strategy for the treatment of these conditions.

P-Selectin is a type of cell adhesion molecule, specifically a member of the selectin family, that is involved in the inflammatory response. It is primarily expressed on the surface of activated platelets and endothelial cells. P-Selectin plays a crucial role in the initial interaction between leukocytes (white blood cells) and the vascular endothelium, which is an essential step in the recruitment of leukocytes to sites of inflammation or injury. This process helps to mediate the rolling and adhesion of leukocytes to the endothelial surface, facilitating their extravasation into the surrounding tissue. P-Selectin's function is regulated by its interaction with specific ligands on the surface of leukocytes, such as PSGL-1 (P-Selectin Glycoprotein Ligand-1).

Bacterial proteins are a type of protein that are produced by bacteria as part of their structural or functional components. These proteins can be involved in various cellular processes, such as metabolism, DNA replication, transcription, and translation. They can also play a role in bacterial pathogenesis, helping the bacteria to evade the host's immune system, acquire nutrients, and multiply within the host.

Bacterial proteins can be classified into different categories based on their function, such as:

1. Enzymes: Proteins that catalyze chemical reactions in the bacterial cell.
2. Structural proteins: Proteins that provide structural support and maintain the shape of the bacterial cell.
3. Signaling proteins: Proteins that help bacteria to communicate with each other and coordinate their behavior.
4. Transport proteins: Proteins that facilitate the movement of molecules across the bacterial cell membrane.
5. Toxins: Proteins that are produced by pathogenic bacteria to damage host cells and promote infection.
6. Surface proteins: Proteins that are located on the surface of the bacterial cell and interact with the environment or host cells.

Understanding the structure and function of bacterial proteins is important for developing new antibiotics, vaccines, and other therapeutic strategies to combat bacterial infections.

Chemokines are a family of small cytokines, or signaling proteins, that are secreted by cells and play an important role in the immune system. They are chemotactic, meaning they can attract and guide the movement of various immune cells to specific locations within the body. Chemokines do this by binding to G protein-coupled receptors on the surface of target cells, initiating a signaling cascade that leads to cell migration.

There are four main subfamilies of chemokines, classified based on the arrangement of conserved cysteine residues near the amino terminus: CXC, CC, C, and CX3C. Different chemokines have specific roles in inflammation, immune surveillance, hematopoiesis, and development. Dysregulation of chemokine function has been implicated in various diseases, including autoimmune disorders, infections, and cancer.

In summary, Chemokines are a group of signaling proteins that play a crucial role in the immune system by directing the movement of immune cells to specific locations within the body, thus helping to coordinate the immune response.

Interleukin-8 (IL-8) is a type of cytokine, which is a small signaling protein involved in immune response and inflammation. IL-8 is also known as neutrophil chemotactic factor or NCF because it attracts neutrophils, a type of white blood cell, to the site of infection or injury.

IL-8 is produced by various cells including macrophages, epithelial cells, and endothelial cells in response to bacterial or inflammatory stimuli. It acts by binding to specific receptors called CXCR1 and CXCR2 on the surface of neutrophils, which triggers a series of intracellular signaling events leading to neutrophil activation, migration, and degranulation.

IL-8 plays an important role in the recruitment of neutrophils to the site of infection or tissue damage, where they can phagocytose and destroy invading microorganisms. However, excessive or prolonged production of IL-8 has been implicated in various inflammatory diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), rheumatoid arthritis, and cancer.

Formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) are a type of G protein-coupled receptors that play a crucial role in the innate immune system. They are expressed on various cells including neutrophils, monocytes, and macrophages. FPRs recognize and respond to formylated peptides derived from bacteria, mitochondria, and host proteins during cell damage or stress. Activation of FPRs triggers a variety of cellular responses, such as chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and release of inflammatory mediators, which help to eliminate invading pathogens and promote tissue repair. There are three subtypes of human FPRs (FPR1, FPR2, and FPR3) that have distinct ligand specificities and functions in the immune response.

Inflammation is a complex biological response of tissues to harmful stimuli, such as pathogens, damaged cells, or irritants. It is characterized by the following signs: rubor (redness), tumor (swelling), calor (heat), dolor (pain), and functio laesa (loss of function). The process involves the activation of the immune system, recruitment of white blood cells, and release of inflammatory mediators, which contribute to the elimination of the injurious stimuli and initiation of the healing process. However, uncontrolled or chronic inflammation can also lead to tissue damage and diseases.

C57BL/6 (C57 Black 6) is an inbred strain of laboratory mouse that is widely used in biomedical research. The term "inbred" refers to a strain of animals where matings have been carried out between siblings or other closely related individuals for many generations, resulting in a population that is highly homozygous at most genetic loci.

The C57BL/6 strain was established in 1920 by crossing a female mouse from the dilute brown (DBA) strain with a male mouse from the black strain. The resulting offspring were then interbred for many generations to create the inbred C57BL/6 strain.

C57BL/6 mice are known for their robust health, longevity, and ease of handling, making them a popular choice for researchers. They have been used in a wide range of biomedical research areas, including studies of cancer, immunology, neuroscience, cardiovascular disease, and metabolism.

One of the most notable features of the C57BL/6 strain is its sensitivity to certain genetic modifications, such as the introduction of mutations that lead to obesity or impaired glucose tolerance. This has made it a valuable tool for studying the genetic basis of complex diseases and traits.

Overall, the C57BL/6 inbred mouse strain is an important model organism in biomedical research, providing a valuable resource for understanding the genetic and molecular mechanisms underlying human health and disease.

The Macrophage-1 Antigen (also known as Macrophage Antigen-1 or CD14) is a glycoprotein found on the surface of various cells, including monocytes, macrophages, and some dendritic cells. It functions as a receptor for complexes formed by lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and LPS-binding protein (LBP), which are involved in the immune response to gram-negative bacteria. CD14 plays a crucial role in activating immune cells and initiating the release of proinflammatory cytokines upon recognizing bacterial components.

In summary, Macrophage-1 Antigen is a cell surface receptor that contributes to the recognition and response against gram-negative bacteria by interacting with LPS-LBP complexes.

Membrane proteins are a type of protein that are embedded in the lipid bilayer of biological membranes, such as the plasma membrane of cells or the inner membrane of mitochondria. These proteins play crucial roles in various cellular processes, including:

1. Cell-cell recognition and signaling
2. Transport of molecules across the membrane (selective permeability)
3. Enzymatic reactions at the membrane surface
4. Energy transduction and conversion
5. Mechanosensation and signal transduction

Membrane proteins can be classified into two main categories: integral membrane proteins, which are permanently associated with the lipid bilayer, and peripheral membrane proteins, which are temporarily or loosely attached to the membrane surface. Integral membrane proteins can further be divided into three subcategories based on their topology:

1. Transmembrane proteins, which span the entire width of the lipid bilayer with one or more alpha-helices or beta-barrels.
2. Lipid-anchored proteins, which are covalently attached to lipids in the membrane via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor or other lipid modifications.
3. Monotopic proteins, which are partially embedded in the membrane and have one or more domains exposed to either side of the bilayer.

Membrane proteins are essential for maintaining cellular homeostasis and are targets for various therapeutic interventions, including drug development and gene therapy. However, their structural complexity and hydrophobicity make them challenging to study using traditional biochemical methods, requiring specialized techniques such as X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM).

Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 (ICAM-1), also known as CD54, is a transmembrane glycoprotein expressed on the surface of various cell types including endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and immune cells. ICAM-1 plays a crucial role in the inflammatory response and the immune system by mediating the adhesion of leukocytes (white blood cells) to the endothelium, allowing them to migrate into surrounding tissues during an immune response or inflammation.

ICAM-1 contains five immunoglobulin-like domains in its extracellular region and binds to several integrins present on leukocytes, such as LFA-1 (lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1) and Mac-1 (macrophage-1 antigen). This interaction facilitates the firm adhesion of leukocytes to the endothelium, which is a critical step in the extravasation process.

In addition to its role in inflammation and immunity, ICAM-1 has been implicated in several pathological conditions, including atherosclerosis, cancer, and autoimmune diseases. Increased expression of ICAM-1 on endothelial cells is associated with the recruitment of immune cells to sites of injury or infection, making it an important target for therapeutic interventions in various inflammatory disorders.

Interleukin-8 (IL-8) receptors are a type of cell surface receptor that bind to and are activated by the cytokine IL-8. There are two main types of IL-8 receptors, known as CXCR1 and CXCR2. Both of these receptors belong to the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family and play important roles in the immune response, particularly in the recruitment and activation of neutrophils, a type of white blood cell that helps to fight infection.

IL-8A, also known as CXCR1, is a specific subtype of IL-8 receptor. It is a 354-amino acid protein that is expressed on the surface of many different types of cells, including neutrophils, monocytes, and certain tumor cells. When IL-8 binds to CXCR1, it activates a variety of signaling pathways within the cell that lead to changes in gene expression, cell activation, and chemotaxis (directed movement) towards the source of IL-8.

CXCR1 plays an important role in the immune response to bacterial and fungal infections, as well as in the development and progression of certain inflammatory diseases and cancers. It is also a target for drug development, particularly in the areas of cancer therapy and inflammatory disease.

'Escherichia coli' (E. coli) is a type of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacterium that commonly inhabits the intestinal tract of humans and warm-blooded animals. It is a member of the family Enterobacteriaceae and one of the most well-studied prokaryotic model organisms in molecular biology.

While most E. coli strains are harmless and even beneficial to their hosts, some serotypes can cause various forms of gastrointestinal and extraintestinal illnesses in humans and animals. These pathogenic strains possess virulence factors that enable them to colonize and damage host tissues, leading to diseases such as diarrhea, urinary tract infections, pneumonia, and sepsis.

E. coli is a versatile organism with remarkable genetic diversity, which allows it to adapt to various environmental niches. It can be found in water, soil, food, and various man-made environments, making it an essential indicator of fecal contamination and a common cause of foodborne illnesses. The study of E. coli has contributed significantly to our understanding of fundamental biological processes, including DNA replication, gene regulation, and protein synthesis.

Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) are a type of protein found on the surface of cells that mediate the attachment or adhesion of cells to either other cells or to the extracellular matrix (ECM), which is the network of proteins and carbohydrates that provides structural and biochemical support to surrounding cells.

CAMs play crucial roles in various biological processes, including tissue development, differentiation, repair, and maintenance of tissue architecture and function. They are also involved in cell signaling, migration, and regulation of the immune response.

There are several types of CAMs, classified based on their structure and function, such as immunoglobulin-like CAMs (IgCAMs), cadherins, integrins, and selectins. Dysregulation of CAMs has been implicated in various diseases, including cancer, inflammation, and neurological disorders.

Leukotriene B4 (LTB4) is a type of lipid mediator called eicosanoid, which is derived from arachidonic acid through the 5-lipoxygenase pathway. It is primarily produced by neutrophils, eosinophils, monocytes, and macrophages in response to various stimuli such as infection, inflammation, or injury. LTB4 acts as a potent chemoattractant and activator of these immune cells, playing a crucial role in the recruitment and activation of neutrophils during acute inflammatory responses. It also enhances the adhesion of leukocytes to endothelial cells, contributing to the development of tissue damage and edema. Dysregulation of LTB4 production has been implicated in several pathological conditions, including asthma, atherosclerosis, and cancer.

Neutrophil activation refers to the process by which neutrophils, a type of white blood cell, become activated in response to a signal or stimulus, such as an infection or inflammation. This activation triggers a series of responses within the neutrophil that enable it to carry out its immune functions, including:

1. Degranulation: The release of granules containing enzymes and other proteins that can destroy microbes.
2. Phagocytosis: The engulfment and destruction of microbes through the use of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and other toxic substances.
3. Formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs): A process in which neutrophils release DNA and proteins to trap and kill microbes outside the cell.
4. Release of cytokines and chemokines: Signaling molecules that recruit other immune cells to the site of infection or inflammation.

Neutrophil activation is a critical component of the innate immune response, but excessive or uncontrolled activation can contribute to tissue damage and chronic inflammation.

The endothelium is a thin layer of simple squamous epithelial cells that lines the interior surface of blood vessels, lymphatic vessels, and heart chambers. The vascular endothelium, specifically, refers to the endothelial cells that line the blood vessels. These cells play a crucial role in maintaining vascular homeostasis by regulating vasomotor tone, coagulation, platelet activation, inflammation, and permeability of the vessel wall. They also contribute to the growth and repair of the vascular system and are involved in various pathological processes such as atherosclerosis, hypertension, and diabetes.

Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency Syndrome (LAD) is a group of rare inherited disorders that affect the ability of white blood cells, specifically neutrophils, to adhere to and migrate into tissues, particularly those involved in immune responses. This results in recurrent bacterial and fungal infections starting in infancy.

There are three types of LAD, each caused by different genetic mutations:

1. LAD I: This is the most common and severe form, caused by a deficiency in the CD18 protein which is crucial for neutrophil adhesion. Symptoms include delayed separation of the umbilical cord, severe periodontal disease, and recurrent skin, lung and gastrointestinal infections.

2. LAD II: Also known as congenital disorder of glycosylation, type Ib, it is caused by a deficiency in the enzyme glucosyltransferase, leading to abnormal sugar chains on cell surfaces. Symptoms are similar to LAD I but less severe, and also include mental retardation and impaired growth.

3. LAD III: This is the least common form, caused by a defect in the integrin-linked kinase (ILK) gene. It results in a more complex phenotype with muscular and cardiac abnormalities, in addition to immune dysfunction.

Treatment typically involves prophylactic antibiotics, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) to increase neutrophil counts, and sometimes bone marrow transplantation.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

Chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2, also known as monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), is a small signaling protein that belongs to the chemokine family. Chemokines are a group of cytokines, or regulatory proteins, that play important roles in immune responses and inflammation by recruiting various immune cells to sites of infection or injury.

CCL2 specifically acts as a chemoattractant for monocytes, memory T cells, and dendritic cells, guiding them to migrate towards the source of infection or tissue damage. It does this by binding to its receptor, CCR2, which is expressed on the surface of these immune cells.

CCL2 has been implicated in several pathological conditions, including atherosclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and various cancers, where it contributes to the recruitment of immune cells that can exacerbate tissue damage or promote tumor growth and metastasis. Therefore, targeting CCL2 or its signaling pathways has emerged as a potential therapeutic strategy for these diseases.

L-Selectin, also known as LECAM-1 (Leukocyte Cell Adhesion Molecule 1), is a type of cell adhesion molecule that is found on the surface of leukocytes (white blood cells). It plays an important role in the immune system by mediating the initial attachment and rolling of leukocytes along the endothelial lining of blood vessels, which is a critical step in the process of inflammation and immune response.

L-Selectin recognizes specific sugar structures called sialyl Lewis x (sLeX) and related structures on the surface of endothelial cells, allowing leukocytes to bind to them. This interaction helps to slow down the leukocytes and facilitate their extravasation from the blood vessels into the surrounding tissues, where they can carry out their immune functions.

L-Selectin is involved in a variety of immunological processes, including the recruitment of leukocytes to sites of infection or injury, the homing of lymphocytes to lymphoid organs, and the regulation of immune cell trafficking under homeostatic conditions.

Flagella are long, thin, whip-like structures that some types of cells use to move themselves around. They are made up of a protein called tubulin and are surrounded by a membrane. In bacteria, flagella rotate like a propeller to push the cell through its environment. In eukaryotic cells (cells with a true nucleus), such as sperm cells or certain types of algae, flagella move in a wave-like motion to achieve locomotion. The ability to produce flagella is called flagellation.

The Leukocyte Adherence Inhibition (LAI) test is not widely recognized as a standardized or established medical diagnostic procedure in modern medicine. However, it has been historically used as an alternative or complementary medical test in some contexts. The LAI test is based on the observation that the adherence of white blood cells (leukocytes) to endothelial cells can be inhibited by certain substances, such as antibodies or antigens present in the serum of an individual.

The LAI test generally involves mixing leukocytes from a donor with the serum of a patient and then measuring the degree of leukocyte adherence to a surface, such as a glass slide or endothelial cell culture. If the patient's serum contains antibodies or other substances that react with the donor's leukocytes, it is thought to inhibit the adherence of those leukocytes to the surface. This inhibition has been proposed as a potential indicator of immune system activation, response to therapy, or disease activity in various conditions, such as cancer, autoimmune disorders, and infections.

However, due to the lack of standardization, reproducibility, and robust scientific evidence supporting its clinical utility, the LAI test is not widely accepted or used in conventional medical practice. It should be noted that any information regarding the LAI test's medical definition, applications, or interpretations might vary significantly depending on the source and context.

Lymphocyte Function-Associated Antigen-1 (LFA-1) is a type of integrin, which is a family of cell surface proteins that are important for cell-cell adhesion and signal transduction. LFA-1 is composed of two subunits, called alpha-L (CD11a) and beta-2 (CD18), and it is widely expressed on various leukocytes, including T cells, B cells, and natural killer cells.

LFA-1 plays a crucial role in the immune system by mediating the adhesion of leukocytes to other cells, such as endothelial cells that line blood vessels, and extracellular matrix components. This adhesion is necessary for leukocyte migration from the bloodstream into tissues during inflammation or immune responses. LFA-1 also contributes to the activation of T cells and their interaction with antigen-presenting cells, such as dendritic cells and macrophages.

The binding of LFA-1 to its ligands, including intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and ICAM-2, triggers intracellular signaling pathways that regulate various cellular functions, such as cytoskeletal reorganization, gene expression, and cell survival. Dysregulation of LFA-1 function has been implicated in several immune-related diseases, including autoimmune disorders, inflammatory diseases, and cancer.

Chemokines are a family of small proteins that are involved in immune responses and inflammation. They mediate the chemotaxis (directed migration) of various cells, including leukocytes (white blood cells). Chemokines are classified into four major subfamilies based on the arrangement of conserved cysteine residues near the amino terminus: CXC, CC, C, and CX3C.

CC chemokines, also known as β-chemokines, are characterized by the presence of two adjacent cysteine residues near their N-terminal end. There are 27 known human CC chemokines, including MCP-1 (monocyte chemoattractant protein-1), RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted), and eotaxin.

CC chemokines play important roles in the recruitment of immune cells to sites of infection or injury, as well as in the development and maintenance of immune responses. They bind to specific G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) on the surface of target cells, leading to the activation of intracellular signaling pathways that regulate cell migration, proliferation, and survival.

Dysregulation of CC chemokines and their receptors has been implicated in various inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, as well as in cancer. Therefore, targeting CC chemokine-mediated signaling pathways has emerged as a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of these conditions.

C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) is a type of protein found on the surface of some cells, including white blood cells, and is a type of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). CXCR4 binds specifically to the chemokine ligand CXCL12 (also known as stromal cell-derived factor 1, or SDF-1), which plays a crucial role in the trafficking and homing of immune cells, particularly hematopoietic stem cells and lymphocytes. The binding of CXCL12 to CXCR4 triggers various intracellular signaling pathways that regulate cell migration, proliferation, survival, and differentiation.

In addition to its role in the immune system, CXCR4 has been implicated in several physiological and pathological processes, such as embryonic development, neurogenesis, angiogenesis, cancer metastasis, and HIV infection. In cancer, the overexpression of CXCR4 or increased levels of its ligand CXCL12 have been associated with poor prognosis, tumor growth, and metastasis in various types of malignancies, including breast, lung, prostate, colon, and ovarian cancers. In HIV infection, the CXCR4 coreceptor, together with CD4, facilitates viral entry into host cells, particularly during the later stages of the disease when the virus shifts its preference from CCR5 to CXCR4 as a coreceptor.

In summary, CXCR4 is a cell-surface receptor that binds specifically to the chemokine ligand CXCL12 and plays essential roles in immune cell trafficking, hematopoiesis, cancer metastasis, and HIV infection.

An amino acid sequence is the specific order of amino acids in a protein or peptide molecule, formed by the linking of the amino group (-NH2) of one amino acid to the carboxyl group (-COOH) of another amino acid through a peptide bond. The sequence is determined by the genetic code and is unique to each type of protein or peptide. It plays a crucial role in determining the three-dimensional structure and function of proteins.

Flow cytometry is a medical and research technique used to measure physical and chemical characteristics of cells or particles, one cell at a time, as they flow in a fluid stream through a beam of light. The properties measured include:

* Cell size (light scatter)
* Cell internal complexity (granularity, also light scatter)
* Presence or absence of specific proteins or other molecules on the cell surface or inside the cell (using fluorescent antibodies or other fluorescent probes)

The technique is widely used in cell counting, cell sorting, protein engineering, biomarker discovery and monitoring disease progression, particularly in hematology, immunology, and cancer research.

Phagocytosis is the process by which certain cells in the body, known as phagocytes, engulf and destroy foreign particles, bacteria, or dead cells. This mechanism plays a crucial role in the immune system's response to infection and inflammation. Phagocytes, such as neutrophils, monocytes, and macrophages, have receptors on their surface that recognize and bind to specific molecules (known as antigens) on the target particles or microorganisms.

Once attached, the phagocyte extends pseudopodia (cell extensions) around the particle, forming a vesicle called a phagosome that completely encloses it. The phagosome then fuses with a lysosome, an intracellular organelle containing digestive enzymes and other chemicals. This fusion results in the formation of a phagolysosome, where the engulfed particle is broken down by the action of these enzymes, neutralizing its harmful effects and allowing for the removal of cellular debris or pathogens.

Phagocytosis not only serves as a crucial defense mechanism against infections but also contributes to tissue homeostasis by removing dead cells and debris.

Leukocyte adhesion receptors are a type of cell surface molecules found on the white blood cells (leukocytes), which play a crucial role in the immune system's response to infection and inflammation. These receptors mediate the adhesion of leukocytes to the endothelial cells that line the blood vessels, allowing them to migrate out of the bloodstream and into the surrounding tissues where they can carry out their immune functions.

There are several types of leukocyte adhesion receptors, including selectins, integrins, and immunoglobulin-like receptors. Selectins are involved in the initial capture and rolling of leukocytes along the endothelium, while integrins mediate their firm adhesion and subsequent transmigration into the tissues. Immunoglobulin-like receptors can either enhance or inhibit leukocyte activation and function.

Dysregulation of leukocyte adhesion receptors has been implicated in various inflammatory and immune-related diseases, such as atherosclerosis, arthritis, and cancer metastasis. Therefore, targeting these receptors with therapeutic agents has emerged as a promising strategy for the treatment of these conditions.

HLA (Human Leukocyte Antigen) antigens are a group of proteins found on the surface of cells in our body. They play a crucial role in the immune system's ability to differentiate between "self" and "non-self." HLA antigens are encoded by a group of genes located on chromosome 6, known as the major histocompatibility complex (MHC).

There are three types of HLA antigens: HLA class I, HLA class II, and HLA class III. HLA class I antigens are found on the surface of almost all cells in the body and help the immune system recognize and destroy virus-infected or cancerous cells. They consist of three components: HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-C.

HLA class II antigens are primarily found on the surface of immune cells, such as macrophages, B cells, and dendritic cells. They assist in the presentation of foreign particles (like bacteria and viruses) to CD4+ T cells, which then activate other parts of the immune system. HLA class II antigens include HLA-DP, HLA-DQ, and HLA-DR.

HLA class III antigens consist of various molecules involved in immune responses, such as cytokines and complement components. They are not directly related to antigen presentation.

The genetic diversity of HLA antigens is extensive, with thousands of variations or alleles. This diversity allows for a better ability to recognize and respond to a wide range of pathogens. However, this variation can also lead to compatibility issues in organ transplantation, as the recipient's immune system may recognize the donor's HLA antigens as foreign and attack the transplanted organ.

Bacterial physiological phenomena refer to the various functional processes and activities that occur within bacteria, which are necessary for their survival, growth, and reproduction. These phenomena include:

1. Metabolism: This is the process by which bacteria convert nutrients into energy and cellular components. It involves a series of chemical reactions that break down organic compounds such as carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins to produce energy in the form of ATP (adenosine triphosphate).
2. Respiration: This is the process by which bacteria use oxygen to convert organic compounds into carbon dioxide and water, releasing energy in the form of ATP. Some bacteria can also perform anaerobic respiration, using alternative electron acceptors such as nitrate or sulfate instead of oxygen.
3. Fermentation: This is a type of anaerobic metabolism in which bacteria convert organic compounds into simpler molecules, releasing energy in the form of ATP. Unlike respiration, fermentation does not require an external electron acceptor.
4. Motility: Many bacteria are capable of moving independently, using various mechanisms such as flagella or twitching motility. This allows them to move towards favorable environments and away from harmful ones.
5. Chemotaxis: Bacteria can sense and respond to chemical gradients in their environment, allowing them to move towards attractants and away from repellents.
6. Quorum sensing: Bacteria can communicate with each other using signaling molecules called autoinducers. When the concentration of autoinducers reaches a certain threshold, the bacteria can coordinate their behavior, such as initiating biofilm formation or producing virulence factors.
7. Sporulation: Some bacteria can form spores, which are highly resistant to heat, radiation, and chemicals. Spores can remain dormant for long periods of time and germinate when conditions are favorable.
8. Biofilm formation: Bacteria can form complex communities called biofilms, which are composed of cells embedded in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Biofilms can provide protection from environmental stressors and host immune responses.
9. Cell division: Bacteria reproduce by binary fission, where the cell divides into two identical daughter cells. This process is regulated by various cell cycle checkpoints and can be influenced by environmental factors such as nutrient availability.

A "knockout" mouse is a genetically engineered mouse in which one or more genes have been deleted or "knocked out" using molecular biology techniques. This allows researchers to study the function of specific genes and their role in various biological processes, as well as potential associations with human diseases. The mice are generated by introducing targeted DNA modifications into embryonic stem cells, which are then used to create a live animal. Knockout mice have been widely used in biomedical research to investigate gene function, disease mechanisms, and potential therapeutic targets.

Neutrophil infiltration is a pathological process characterized by the accumulation of neutrophils, a type of white blood cell, in tissue. It is a common feature of inflammation and occurs in response to infection, injury, or other stimuli that trigger an immune response. Neutrophils are attracted to the site of tissue damage by chemical signals called chemokines, which are released by damaged cells and activated immune cells. Once they reach the site of inflammation, neutrophils help to clear away damaged tissue and microorganisms through a process called phagocytosis. However, excessive or prolonged neutrophil infiltration can also contribute to tissue damage and may be associated with various disease states, including cancer, autoimmune disorders, and ischemia-reperfusion injury.

A cell line is a culture of cells that are grown in a laboratory for use in research. These cells are usually taken from a single cell or group of cells, and they are able to divide and grow continuously in the lab. Cell lines can come from many different sources, including animals, plants, and humans. They are often used in scientific research to study cellular processes, disease mechanisms, and to test new drugs or treatments. Some common types of human cell lines include HeLa cells (which come from a cancer patient named Henrietta Lacks), HEK293 cells (which come from embryonic kidney cells), and HUVEC cells (which come from umbilical vein endothelial cells). It is important to note that cell lines are not the same as primary cells, which are cells that are taken directly from a living organism and have not been grown in the lab.

E-Selectin, also known as Endothelial Leukocyte Adhesion Molecule 1 (ELAM-1), is a type of cell adhesion molecule mainly expressed on the surface of endothelial cells in response to inflammatory cytokines. It plays a crucial role in the initial recruitment and attachment of leukocytes (white blood cells) to the site of inflammation or injury, facilitating their transendothelial migration into the surrounding tissue. E-Selectin recognizes specific carbohydrate structures on the surface of leukocytes, contributing to the specificity of this adhesive interaction during the inflammatory response.

CCR2 (C-C chemokine receptor type 2) is a type of protein found on the surface of certain immune cells, including monocytes and memory T cells. It is a type of G protein-coupled receptor that binds to specific chemokines, which are small signaling proteins that help regulate the movement of immune cells throughout the body.

CCR2 plays an important role in the immune response by mediating the migration of monocytes and other immune cells to sites of inflammation or injury. When a chemokine binds to CCR2, it triggers a series of intracellular signaling events that cause the cell to move towards the source of the chemokine.

In addition to its role in the immune response, CCR2 has been implicated in various disease processes, including atherosclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and cancer metastasis. In these contexts, CCR2 antagonists have been explored as potential therapeutic agents to block the recruitment of immune cells and reduce inflammation or tumor growth.

CD (cluster of differentiation) antigens are cell-surface proteins that are expressed on leukocytes (white blood cells) and can be used to identify and distinguish different subsets of these cells. They are important markers in the field of immunology and hematology, and are commonly used to diagnose and monitor various diseases, including cancer, autoimmune disorders, and infectious diseases.

CD antigens are designated by numbers, such as CD4, CD8, CD19, etc., which refer to specific proteins found on the surface of different types of leukocytes. For example, CD4 is a protein found on the surface of helper T cells, while CD8 is found on cytotoxic T cells.

CD antigens can be used as targets for immunotherapy, such as monoclonal antibody therapy, in which antibodies are designed to bind to specific CD antigens and trigger an immune response against cancer cells or infected cells. They can also be used as markers to monitor the effectiveness of treatments and to detect minimal residual disease (MRD) after treatment.

It's important to note that not all CD antigens are exclusive to leukocytes, some can be found on other cell types as well, and their expression can vary depending on the activation state or differentiation stage of the cells.

Actin is a type of protein that forms part of the contractile apparatus in muscle cells, and is also found in various other cell types. It is a globular protein that polymerizes to form long filaments, which are important for many cellular processes such as cell division, cell motility, and the maintenance of cell shape. In muscle cells, actin filaments interact with another type of protein called myosin to enable muscle contraction. Actins can be further divided into different subtypes, including alpha-actin, beta-actin, and gamma-actin, which have distinct functions and expression patterns in the body.

Video microscopy is a medical technique that involves the use of a microscope equipped with a video camera to capture and display real-time images of specimens on a monitor. This allows for the observation and documentation of dynamic processes, such as cell movement or chemical reactions, at a level of detail that would be difficult or impossible to achieve with the naked eye. Video microscopy can also be used in conjunction with image analysis software to measure various parameters, such as size, shape, and motion, of individual cells or structures within the specimen.

There are several types of video microscopy, including brightfield, darkfield, phase contrast, fluorescence, and differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy. Each type uses different optical techniques to enhance contrast and reveal specific features of the specimen. For example, fluorescence microscopy uses fluorescent dyes or proteins to label specific structures within the specimen, allowing them to be visualized against a dark background.

Video microscopy is used in various fields of medicine, including pathology, microbiology, and neuroscience. It can help researchers and clinicians diagnose diseases, study disease mechanisms, develop new therapies, and understand fundamental biological processes at the cellular and molecular level.

Pseudopodia are temporary projections or extensions of the cytoplasm in certain types of cells, such as white blood cells (leukocytes) and some amoebas. They are used for locomotion and engulfing particles or other cells through a process called phagocytosis.

In simpler terms, pseudopodia are like "false feet" that some cells use to move around and interact with their environment. The term comes from the Greek words "pseudes," meaning false, and "podos," meaning foot.

Chemoreceptor cells are specialized sensory neurons that detect and respond to chemical changes in the internal or external environment. They play a crucial role in maintaining homeostasis within the body by converting chemical signals into electrical impulses, which are then transmitted to the central nervous system for further processing and response.

There are two main types of chemoreceptor cells:

1. Oxygen Chemoreceptors: These cells are located in the carotid bodies near the bifurcation of the common carotid artery and in the aortic bodies close to the aortic arch. They monitor the levels of oxygen, carbon dioxide, and pH in the blood and respond to decreases in oxygen concentration or increases in carbon dioxide and hydrogen ions (indicating acidity) by increasing their firing rate. This signals the brain to increase respiratory rate and depth, thereby restoring normal oxygen levels.

2. Taste Cells: These chemoreceptor cells are found within the taste buds of the tongue and other areas of the oral cavity. They detect specific tastes (salty, sour, sweet, bitter, and umami) by interacting with molecules from food. When a tastant binds to receptors on the surface of a taste cell, it triggers a series of intracellular signaling events that ultimately lead to the generation of an action potential. This information is then relayed to the brain, where it is interpreted as taste sensation.

In summary, chemoreceptor cells are essential for maintaining physiological balance by detecting and responding to chemical stimuli in the body. They play a critical role in regulating vital functions such as respiration and digestion.

N-Formylmethionine (fMet) is not a medical term per se, but rather a biochemical term. It is the formylated derivative of methionine, which is one of the twenty standard amino acids, and it plays a crucial role in the initiation of protein synthesis in prokaryotes and organelles of eukaryotic cells, such as mitochondria and chloroplasts.

In the context of medical research or clinical laboratory reports, you might encounter fMet in relation to bacterial infections, proteomics, or mitochondrial function. For example, formylated methionine residues on bacterial peptides can stimulate immune responses and are recognized by specific receptors on human immune cells, which can have implications for understanding infectious diseases and inflammation.

To provide a concise definition:
N-Formylmethionine (fMet) is the formylated derivative of methionine, primarily known for its role as the initiator amino acid in protein synthesis in prokaryotes and certain organelles of eukaryotic cells.

Macrophages are a type of white blood cell that are an essential part of the immune system. They are large, specialized cells that engulf and destroy foreign substances, such as bacteria, viruses, parasites, and fungi, as well as damaged or dead cells. Macrophages are found throughout the body, including in the bloodstream, lymph nodes, spleen, liver, lungs, and connective tissues. They play a critical role in inflammation, immune response, and tissue repair and remodeling.

Macrophages originate from monocytes, which are a type of white blood cell produced in the bone marrow. When monocytes enter the tissues, they differentiate into macrophages, which have a larger size and more specialized functions than monocytes. Macrophages can change their shape and move through tissues to reach sites of infection or injury. They also produce cytokines, chemokines, and other signaling molecules that help coordinate the immune response and recruit other immune cells to the site of infection or injury.

Macrophages have a variety of surface receptors that allow them to recognize and respond to different types of foreign substances and signals from other cells. They can engulf and digest foreign particles, bacteria, and viruses through a process called phagocytosis. Macrophages also play a role in presenting antigens to T cells, which are another type of immune cell that helps coordinate the immune response.

Overall, macrophages are crucial for maintaining tissue homeostasis, defending against infection, and promoting wound healing and tissue repair. Dysregulation of macrophage function has been implicated in a variety of diseases, including cancer, autoimmune disorders, and chronic inflammatory conditions.

Chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 5, also known as RANTES (Regulated on Activation, Normal T cell Expressed and Secreted), is a chemokine that plays a crucial role in the immune system. It is a small signaling protein that attracts and activates immune cells, such as leukocytes, to the sites of infection or inflammation. Chemokine CCL5 binds to specific receptors on the surface of target cells, including CCR1, CCR3, and CCR5, and triggers a cascade of intracellular signaling events that result in cell migration and activation.

Chemokine CCL5 is involved in various physiological and pathological processes, such as wound healing, immune surveillance, and inflammation. It has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several diseases, including HIV infection, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and cancer. In HIV infection, Chemokine CCL5 can bind to and inhibit the entry of the virus into CD4+ T cells by blocking the interaction between the viral envelope protein gp120 and the chemokine receptor CCR5. However, in advanced stages of HIV infection, the virus may develop resistance to this inhibitory effect, leading to increased viral replication and disease progression.

Amino acid receptors are a type of cell surface receptor that bind to specific amino acids or peptides and trigger intracellular signaling pathways. These receptors play important roles in various physiological processes, including neurotransmission, hormone signaling, and regulation of metabolism.

There are several types of amino acid receptors, including:

1. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs): These receptors are activated by amino acids such as γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glycine, and glutamate, and play important roles in neurotransmission and neuromodulation.
2. Ionotropic receptors: These receptors are ligand-gated ion channels that are activated by amino acids such as glutamate and glycine. They play critical roles in synaptic transmission and neural excitability.
3. Enzyme-linked receptors: These receptors activate intracellular signaling pathways through the activation of enzymes, such as receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). Some amino acid receptors, such as the insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R), are RTKs that play important roles in cell growth, differentiation, and metabolism.
4. Intracellular receptors: These receptors are located within the cell and bind to amino acids or peptides that have been transported into the cell. For example, the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are intracellular receptors that bind to fatty acids and play important roles in lipid metabolism and inflammation.

Overall, amino acid receptors are critical components of cell signaling pathways and play important roles in various physiological processes. Dysregulation of these receptors has been implicated in a variety of diseases, including neurological disorders, cancer, and metabolic disorders.

Selectins are a type of cell adhesion molecule that play a crucial role in the inflammatory response. They are involved in the initial attachment and rolling of white blood cells (such as neutrophils) along the walls of blood vessels, which is an essential step in the extravasation process that allows these cells to migrate from the bloodstream into surrounding tissues in order to respond to infection or injury.

There are three main types of selectins: E-selectin (expressed on endothelial cells), P-selectin (expressed on both endothelial cells and platelets), and L-selectin (expressed on leukocytes). These proteins recognize specific carbohydrate structures on the surface of white blood cells, allowing them to bind together and initiate the inflammatory cascade. Selectins have been implicated in various inflammatory diseases, including atherosclerosis, asthma, and rheumatoid arthritis, making them potential targets for therapeutic intervention.

T-lymphocytes, also known as T-cells, are a type of white blood cell that plays a key role in the adaptive immune system's response to infection. They are produced in the bone marrow and mature in the thymus gland. There are several different types of T-cells, including CD4+ helper T-cells, CD8+ cytotoxic T-cells, and regulatory T-cells (Tregs).

CD4+ helper T-cells assist in activating other immune cells, such as B-lymphocytes and macrophages. They also produce cytokines, which are signaling molecules that help coordinate the immune response. CD8+ cytotoxic T-cells directly kill infected cells by releasing toxic substances. Regulatory T-cells help maintain immune tolerance and prevent autoimmune diseases by suppressing the activity of other immune cells.

T-lymphocytes are important in the immune response to viral infections, cancer, and other diseases. Dysfunction or depletion of T-cells can lead to immunodeficiency and increased susceptibility to infections. On the other hand, an overactive T-cell response can contribute to autoimmune diseases and chronic inflammation.

Biological models, also known as physiological models or organismal models, are simplified representations of biological systems, processes, or mechanisms that are used to understand and explain the underlying principles and relationships. These models can be theoretical (conceptual or mathematical) or physical (such as anatomical models, cell cultures, or animal models). They are widely used in biomedical research to study various phenomena, including disease pathophysiology, drug action, and therapeutic interventions.

Examples of biological models include:

1. Mathematical models: These use mathematical equations and formulas to describe complex biological systems or processes, such as population dynamics, metabolic pathways, or gene regulation networks. They can help predict the behavior of these systems under different conditions and test hypotheses about their underlying mechanisms.
2. Cell cultures: These are collections of cells grown in a controlled environment, typically in a laboratory dish or flask. They can be used to study cellular processes, such as signal transduction, gene expression, or metabolism, and to test the effects of drugs or other treatments on these processes.
3. Animal models: These are living organisms, usually vertebrates like mice, rats, or non-human primates, that are used to study various aspects of human biology and disease. They can provide valuable insights into the pathophysiology of diseases, the mechanisms of drug action, and the safety and efficacy of new therapies.
4. Anatomical models: These are physical representations of biological structures or systems, such as plastic models of organs or tissues, that can be used for educational purposes or to plan surgical procedures. They can also serve as a basis for developing more sophisticated models, such as computer simulations or 3D-printed replicas.

Overall, biological models play a crucial role in advancing our understanding of biology and medicine, helping to identify new targets for therapeutic intervention, develop novel drugs and treatments, and improve human health.

HL-60 cells are a type of human promyelocytic leukemia cell line that is commonly used in scientific research. They are named after the hospital where they were first isolated, the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania (HUP) and the 60th culture attempt to grow these cells.

HL-60 cells have the ability to differentiate into various types of blood cells, such as granulocytes, monocytes, and macrophages, when exposed to certain chemical compounds or under specific culturing conditions. This makes them a valuable tool for studying the mechanisms of cell differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis (programmed cell death).

HL-60 cells are also often used in toxicity studies, drug discovery and development, and research on cancer, inflammation, and infectious diseases. They can be easily grown in the lab and have a stable genotype, making them ideal for use in standardized experiments and comparisons between different studies.

Eosinophils are a type of white blood cell that play an important role in the body's immune response. They are produced in the bone marrow and released into the bloodstream, where they can travel to different tissues and organs throughout the body. Eosinophils are characterized by their granules, which contain various proteins and enzymes that are toxic to parasites and can contribute to inflammation.

Eosinophils are typically associated with allergic reactions, asthma, and other inflammatory conditions. They can also be involved in the body's response to certain infections, particularly those caused by parasites such as worms. In some cases, elevated levels of eosinophils in the blood or tissues (a condition called eosinophilia) can indicate an underlying medical condition, such as a parasitic infection, autoimmune disorder, or cancer.

Eosinophils are named for their staining properties - they readily take up eosin dye, which is why they appear pink or red under the microscope. They make up only about 1-6% of circulating white blood cells in healthy individuals, but their numbers can increase significantly in response to certain triggers.

Cell polarity refers to the asymmetric distribution of membrane components, cytoskeleton, and organelles in a cell. This asymmetry is crucial for various cellular functions such as directed transport, cell division, and signal transduction. The plasma membrane of polarized cells exhibits distinct domains with unique protein and lipid compositions that define apical, basal, and lateral surfaces of the cell.

In epithelial cells, for example, the apical surface faces the lumen or external environment, while the basolateral surface interacts with other cells or the extracellular matrix. The establishment and maintenance of cell polarity are regulated by various factors including protein complexes, lipids, and small GTPases. Loss of cell polarity has been implicated in several diseases, including cancer and neurological disorders.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

A mutation is a permanent change in the DNA sequence of an organism's genome. Mutations can occur spontaneously or be caused by environmental factors such as exposure to radiation, chemicals, or viruses. They may have various effects on the organism, ranging from benign to harmful, depending on where they occur and whether they alter the function of essential proteins. In some cases, mutations can increase an individual's susceptibility to certain diseases or disorders, while in others, they may confer a survival advantage. Mutations are the driving force behind evolution, as they introduce new genetic variability into populations, which can then be acted upon by natural selection.

A ligand, in the context of biochemistry and medicine, is a molecule that binds to a specific site on a protein or a larger biomolecule, such as an enzyme or a receptor. This binding interaction can modify the function or activity of the target protein, either activating it or inhibiting it. Ligands can be small molecules, like hormones or neurotransmitters, or larger structures, like antibodies. The study of ligand-protein interactions is crucial for understanding cellular processes and developing drugs, as many therapeutic compounds function by binding to specific targets within the body.

Complement C5 is a protein that plays a crucial role in the complement system, which is a part of the immune system that helps to eliminate pathogens and damaged cells from the body. The complement system is a complex series of biochemical reactions that help to identify and destroy foreign substances, such as bacteria and viruses.

Complement C5 is one of several proteins in the complement system that are activated in a cascading manner in response to an activating event, such as the binding of an antibody to a pathogen. Once activated, Complement C5 can be cleaved into two smaller proteins, C5a and C5b.

C5a is a powerful anaphylatoxin, which means it can cause the release of histamine from mast cells and basophils, leading to inflammation and increased vascular permeability. It also acts as a chemoattractant, drawing immune cells to the site of infection or injury.

C5b, on the other hand, plays a role in the formation of the membrane attack complex (MAC), which is a protein structure that can punch holes in the membranes of pathogens, leading to their lysis and destruction.

Overall, Complement C5 is an important component of the immune system's response to infection and injury, helping to eliminate pathogens and damaged cells from the body.

Chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 (CXCL1), also known as growth-regulated oncogene-alpha (GRO-α), is a small signaling protein belonging to the chemokine family. Chemokines are a group of cytokines, or cell signaling molecules, that play important roles in immune responses and inflammation by recruiting immune cells to sites of infection or tissue injury.

CXCL1 specifically binds to and activates the CXCR2 receptor, which is found on various types of immune cells, such as neutrophils, monocytes, and lymphocytes. The activation of the CXCR2 receptor by CXCL1 leads to a series of intracellular signaling events that result in the directed migration of these immune cells towards the site of chemokine production.

CXCL1 is involved in various physiological and pathological processes, including wound healing, angiogenesis, and tumor growth and metastasis. It has been implicated in several inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and atherosclerosis, as well as in cancer progression and metastasis.

A dose-response relationship in the context of drugs refers to the changes in the effects or symptoms that occur as the dose of a drug is increased or decreased. Generally, as the dose of a drug is increased, the severity or intensity of its effects also increases. Conversely, as the dose is decreased, the effects of the drug become less severe or may disappear altogether.

The dose-response relationship is an important concept in pharmacology and toxicology because it helps to establish the safe and effective dosage range for a drug. By understanding how changes in the dose of a drug affect its therapeutic and adverse effects, healthcare providers can optimize treatment plans for their patients while minimizing the risk of harm.

The dose-response relationship is typically depicted as a curve that shows the relationship between the dose of a drug and its effect. The shape of the curve may vary depending on the drug and the specific effect being measured. Some drugs may have a steep dose-response curve, meaning that small changes in the dose can result in large differences in the effect. Other drugs may have a more gradual dose-response curve, where larger changes in the dose are needed to produce significant effects.

In addition to helping establish safe and effective dosages, the dose-response relationship is also used to evaluate the potential therapeutic benefits and risks of new drugs during clinical trials. By systematically testing different doses of a drug in controlled studies, researchers can identify the optimal dosage range for the drug and assess its safety and efficacy.

Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 (VCAM-1) is a glycoprotein expressed on the surface of endothelial cells that plays a crucial role in the inflammatory response. It is involved in the recruitment and adhesion of leukocytes to the site of inflammation. VCAM-1 interacts with integrins on the surface of leukocytes, particularly very late antigen-4 (VLA-4), to facilitate this adhesion process. This interaction leads to the activation of signaling pathways that promote the migration of leukocytes across the endothelial barrier and into the surrounding tissue, where they can contribute to the immune response and resolution of inflammation. Increased expression of VCAM-1 has been associated with various inflammatory diseases, including atherosclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and multiple sclerosis.

Chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 19 (CCL19), also known as macrophage inflammatory protein-3 beta (MIP-3β) or exodus-3, is a small signaling protein that belongs to the CC chemokine family. Chemokines are a group of cytokines, or cell signaling molecules, that play crucial roles in immunity and inflammation by directing the migration of various immune cells to sites of infection, injury, or inflammation through a process called chemotaxis.

CCL19 is primarily produced by mature dendritic cells, a type of antigen-presenting cell that plays a key role in initiating and regulating adaptive immunity. CCL19 attracts various immune cells expressing its receptor, CCR7, including T cells, B cells, and dendritic cells, to the T cell zones of secondary lymphoid organs such as lymph nodes and spleen. This facilitates the encounter between antigen-presenting cells and T cells, leading to the activation of T cells and the generation of adaptive immune responses.

In addition to its role in immunity and inflammation, CCL19 has been implicated in various physiological and pathological processes, such as lymphoid organ development, angiogenesis, and cancer metastasis. Dysregulation of CCL19 expression or function has been associated with several diseases, including autoimmune disorders, chronic inflammation, and malignancies.

Monoclonal antibodies are a type of antibody that are identical because they are produced by a single clone of cells. They are laboratory-produced molecules that act like human antibodies in the immune system. They can be designed to attach to specific proteins found on the surface of cancer cells, making them useful for targeting and treating cancer. Monoclonal antibodies can also be used as a therapy for other diseases, such as autoimmune disorders and inflammatory conditions.

Monoclonal antibodies are produced by fusing a single type of immune cell, called a B cell, with a tumor cell to create a hybrid cell, or hybridoma. This hybrid cell is then able to replicate indefinitely, producing a large number of identical copies of the original antibody. These antibodies can be further modified and engineered to enhance their ability to bind to specific targets, increase their stability, and improve their effectiveness as therapeutic agents.

Monoclonal antibodies have several mechanisms of action in cancer therapy. They can directly kill cancer cells by binding to them and triggering an immune response. They can also block the signals that promote cancer growth and survival. Additionally, monoclonal antibodies can be used to deliver drugs or radiation directly to cancer cells, increasing the effectiveness of these treatments while minimizing their side effects on healthy tissues.

Monoclonal antibodies have become an important tool in modern medicine, with several approved for use in cancer therapy and other diseases. They are continuing to be studied and developed as a promising approach to treating a wide range of medical conditions.

Recombinant proteins are artificially created proteins produced through the use of recombinant DNA technology. This process involves combining DNA molecules from different sources to create a new set of genes that encode for a specific protein. The resulting recombinant protein can then be expressed, purified, and used for various applications in research, medicine, and industry.

Recombinant proteins are widely used in biomedical research to study protein function, structure, and interactions. They are also used in the development of diagnostic tests, vaccines, and therapeutic drugs. For example, recombinant insulin is a common treatment for diabetes, while recombinant human growth hormone is used to treat growth disorders.

The production of recombinant proteins typically involves the use of host cells, such as bacteria, yeast, or mammalian cells, which are engineered to express the desired protein. The host cells are transformed with a plasmid vector containing the gene of interest, along with regulatory elements that control its expression. Once the host cells are cultured and the protein is expressed, it can be purified using various chromatography techniques.

Overall, recombinant proteins have revolutionized many areas of biology and medicine, enabling researchers to study and manipulate proteins in ways that were previously impossible.

Phosphorylation is the process of adding a phosphate group (a molecule consisting of one phosphorus atom and four oxygen atoms) to a protein or other organic molecule, which is usually done by enzymes called kinases. This post-translational modification can change the function, localization, or activity of the target molecule, playing a crucial role in various cellular processes such as signal transduction, metabolism, and regulation of gene expression. Phosphorylation is reversible, and the removal of the phosphate group is facilitated by enzymes called phosphatases.

Immunologic receptors are specialized proteins found on the surface of immune cells that recognize and bind to specific molecules, known as antigens, on the surface of pathogens or infected cells. This binding triggers a series of intracellular signaling events that activate the immune cell and initiate an immune response.

There are several types of immunologic receptors, including:

1. T-cell receptors (TCRs): These receptors are found on the surface of T cells and recognize antigens presented in the context of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules.
2. B-cell receptors (BCRs): These receptors are found on the surface of B cells and recognize free antigens in solution.
3. Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs): These receptors are found inside immune cells and recognize conserved molecular patterns associated with pathogens, such as lipopolysaccharides and flagellin.
4. Fc receptors: These receptors are found on the surface of various immune cells and bind to the constant region of antibodies, mediating effector functions such as phagocytosis and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC).

Immunologic receptors play a critical role in the recognition and elimination of pathogens and infected cells, and dysregulation of these receptors can lead to immune disorders and diseases.

Cell aggregation is the process by which individual cells come together and adhere to each other to form a group or cluster. This phenomenon can occur naturally during embryonic development, tissue repair, and wound healing, as well as in the formation of multicellular organisms such as slime molds. In some cases, cell aggregation may also be induced in the laboratory setting through the use of various techniques, including the use of cell culture surfaces that promote cell-to-cell adhesion or the addition of factors that stimulate the expression of adhesion molecules on the cell surface.

Cell aggregation can be influenced by a variety of factors, including the type and properties of the cells involved, as well as environmental conditions such as pH, temperature, and nutrient availability. The ability of cells to aggregate is often mediated by the presence of adhesion molecules on the cell surface, such as cadherins, integrins, and immunoglobulin-like cell adhesion molecules (Ig-CAMs). These molecules interact with each other and with extracellular matrix components to promote cell-to-cell adhesion and maintain the stability of the aggregate.

In some contexts, abnormal or excessive cell aggregation can contribute to the development of diseases such as cancer, fibrosis, and inflammatory disorders. For example, the aggregation of cancer cells can facilitate their invasion and metastasis, while the accumulation of fibrotic cells in tissues can lead to organ dysfunction and failure. Understanding the mechanisms that regulate cell aggregation is therefore an important area of research with potential implications for the development of new therapies and treatments for a variety of diseases.

Protein binding, in the context of medical and biological sciences, refers to the interaction between a protein and another molecule (known as the ligand) that results in a stable complex. This process is often reversible and can be influenced by various factors such as pH, temperature, and concentration of the involved molecules.

In clinical chemistry, protein binding is particularly important when it comes to drugs, as many of them bind to proteins (especially albumin) in the bloodstream. The degree of protein binding can affect a drug's distribution, metabolism, and excretion, which in turn influence its therapeutic effectiveness and potential side effects.

Protein-bound drugs may be less available for interaction with their target tissues, as only the unbound or "free" fraction of the drug is active. Therefore, understanding protein binding can help optimize dosing regimens and minimize adverse reactions.

Cytokines are a broad and diverse category of small signaling proteins that are secreted by various cells, including immune cells, in response to different stimuli. They play crucial roles in regulating the immune response, inflammation, hematopoiesis, and cellular communication.

Cytokines mediate their effects by binding to specific receptors on the surface of target cells, which triggers intracellular signaling pathways that ultimately result in changes in gene expression, cell behavior, and function. Some key functions of cytokines include:

1. Regulating the activation, differentiation, and proliferation of immune cells such as T cells, B cells, natural killer (NK) cells, and macrophages.
2. Coordinating the inflammatory response by recruiting immune cells to sites of infection or tissue damage and modulating their effector functions.
3. Regulating hematopoiesis, the process of blood cell formation in the bone marrow, by controlling the proliferation, differentiation, and survival of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.
4. Modulating the development and function of the nervous system, including neuroinflammation, neuroprotection, and neuroregeneration.

Cytokines can be classified into several categories based on their structure, function, or cellular origin. Some common types of cytokines include interleukins (ILs), interferons (IFNs), tumor necrosis factors (TNFs), chemokines, colony-stimulating factors (CSFs), and transforming growth factors (TGFs). Dysregulation of cytokine production and signaling has been implicated in various pathological conditions, such as autoimmune diseases, chronic inflammation, cancer, and neurodegenerative disorders.

Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases (PI3Ks) are a family of enzymes that play a crucial role in intracellular signal transduction. They phosphorylate the 3-hydroxyl group of the inositol ring in phosphatidylinositol and its derivatives, which results in the production of second messengers that regulate various cellular processes such as cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, motility, and survival.

PI3Ks are divided into three classes based on their structure and substrate specificity. Class I PI3Ks are further subdivided into two categories: class IA and class IB. Class IA PI3Ks are heterodimers consisting of a catalytic subunit (p110α, p110β, or p110δ) and a regulatory subunit (p85α, p85β, p55γ, or p50γ). They are primarily activated by receptor tyrosine kinases and G protein-coupled receptors. Class IB PI3Ks consist of a catalytic subunit (p110γ) and a regulatory subunit (p101 or p84/87). They are mainly activated by G protein-coupled receptors.

Dysregulation of PI3K signaling has been implicated in various human diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and autoimmune disorders. Therefore, PI3Ks have emerged as important targets for drug development in these areas.

Chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 7 (CCL7), also known as monocyte chemotactic protein 3 (MCP-3), is a small signaling protein that belongs to the CC-chemokine family. Chemokines are a group of cytokines, or cell signaling molecules, that play crucial roles in immune responses and inflammation by recruiting various immune cells to the sites of infection or injury.

CCL7 is produced by different types of cells, including monocytes, macrophages, fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and certain tumor cells. It exerts its functions by binding to specific chemokine receptors found on the surface of target cells, primarily CCR1, CCR2, and CCR3. The primary role of CCL7 is to attract monocytes, memory T cells, and dendritic cells to the site of inflammation or injury, thereby contributing to the initiation and progression of immune responses.

CCL7 has been implicated in several pathological conditions, such as atherosclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, cancer, and HIV infection. Its expression is often upregulated during these conditions, leading to excessive recruitment of immune cells, which can result in tissue damage and further exacerbate the disease process. Understanding the role of CCL7 in various diseases may provide insights into developing novel therapeutic strategies for their treatment.

Lipoxins are a group of anti-inflammatory mediators that play a role in the resolution of inflammation. They are produced from arachidonic acid, a type of omega-6 fatty acid, through the action of lipoxygenase enzymes. There are several types of lipoxin receptors (ALX/FPR2 and GPR31) that have been identified, which belong to the family of G protein-coupled receptors. These receptors are expressed in various tissues, including the cardiovascular, respiratory, and gastrointestinal systems. Activation of lipoxin receptors leads to a variety of cellular responses, such as inhibition of inflammatory cytokine production, reduction of oxidative stress, and promotion of tissue repair. Dysregulation of the lipoxin signaling pathway has been implicated in several diseases, including asthma, atherosclerosis, and cancer.

Granulocytes are a type of white blood cell that plays a crucial role in the body's immune system. They are called granulocytes because they contain small granules in their cytoplasm, which are filled with various enzymes and proteins that help them fight off infections and destroy foreign substances.

There are three types of granulocytes: neutrophils, eosinophils, and basophils. Neutrophils are the most abundant type and are primarily responsible for fighting bacterial infections. Eosinophils play a role in defending against parasitic infections and regulating immune responses. Basophils are involved in inflammatory reactions and allergic responses.

Granulocytes are produced in the bone marrow and released into the bloodstream, where they circulate and patrol for any signs of infection or foreign substances. When they encounter a threat, they quickly move to the site of infection or injury and release their granules to destroy the invading organisms or substances.

Abnormal levels of granulocytes in the blood can indicate an underlying medical condition, such as an infection, inflammation, or a bone marrow disorder.

Zymosan is a type of substance that is derived from the cell walls of yeast and some types of fungi. It's often used in laboratory research as an agent to stimulate inflammation, because it can activate certain immune cells (such as neutrophils) and cause them to release pro-inflammatory chemicals.

In medical terms, Zymosan is sometimes used as a tool for studying the immune system and inflammation in experimental settings. It's important to note that Zymosan itself is not a medical condition or disease, but rather a research reagent with potential applications in understanding human health and disease.

Methylation, in the context of genetics and epigenetics, refers to the addition of a methyl group (CH3) to a molecule, usually to the nitrogenous base of DNA or to the side chain of amino acids in proteins. In DNA methylation, this process typically occurs at the 5-carbon position of cytosine residues that precede guanine residues (CpG sites) and is catalyzed by enzymes called DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs).

DNA methylation plays a crucial role in regulating gene expression, genomic imprinting, X-chromosome inactivation, and suppression of repetitive elements. Hypermethylation or hypomethylation of specific genes can lead to altered gene expression patterns, which have been associated with various human diseases, including cancer.

In summary, methylation is a fundamental epigenetic modification that influences genomic stability, gene regulation, and cellular function by introducing methyl groups to DNA or proteins.

Cell surface receptors, also known as membrane receptors, are proteins located on the cell membrane that bind to specific molecules outside the cell, known as ligands. These receptors play a crucial role in signal transduction, which is the process of converting an extracellular signal into an intracellular response.

Cell surface receptors can be classified into several categories based on their structure and mechanism of action, including:

1. Ion channel receptors: These receptors contain a pore that opens to allow ions to flow across the cell membrane when they bind to their ligands. This ion flux can directly activate or inhibit various cellular processes.
2. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs): These receptors consist of seven transmembrane domains and are associated with heterotrimeric G proteins that modulate intracellular signaling pathways upon ligand binding.
3. Enzyme-linked receptors: These receptors possess an intrinsic enzymatic activity or are linked to an enzyme, which becomes activated when the receptor binds to its ligand. This activation can lead to the initiation of various signaling cascades within the cell.
4. Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs): These receptors contain intracellular tyrosine kinase domains that become activated upon ligand binding, leading to the phosphorylation and activation of downstream signaling molecules.
5. Integrins: These receptors are transmembrane proteins that mediate cell-cell or cell-matrix interactions by binding to extracellular matrix proteins or counter-receptors on adjacent cells. They play essential roles in cell adhesion, migration, and survival.

Cell surface receptors are involved in various physiological processes, including neurotransmission, hormone signaling, immune response, and cell growth and differentiation. Dysregulation of these receptors can contribute to the development of numerous diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

Lymphocytes are a type of white blood cell that is an essential part of the immune system. They are responsible for recognizing and responding to potentially harmful substances such as viruses, bacteria, and other foreign invaders. There are two main types of lymphocytes: B-lymphocytes (B-cells) and T-lymphocytes (T-cells).

B-lymphocytes produce antibodies, which are proteins that help to neutralize or destroy foreign substances. When a B-cell encounters a foreign substance, it becomes activated and begins to divide and differentiate into plasma cells, which produce and secrete large amounts of antibodies. These antibodies bind to the foreign substance, marking it for destruction by other immune cells.

T-lymphocytes, on the other hand, are involved in cell-mediated immunity. They directly attack and destroy infected cells or cancerous cells. T-cells can also help to regulate the immune response by producing chemical signals that activate or inhibit other immune cells.

Lymphocytes are produced in the bone marrow and mature in either the bone marrow (B-cells) or the thymus gland (T-cells). They circulate throughout the body in the blood and lymphatic system, where they can be found in high concentrations in lymph nodes, the spleen, and other lymphoid organs.

Abnormalities in the number or function of lymphocytes can lead to a variety of immune-related disorders, including immunodeficiency diseases, autoimmune disorders, and cancer.

Macrophage Inflammatory Proteins (MIPs) are a group of chemokines, which are a type of signaling protein involved in immune responses and inflammation. Specifically, MIPs are chemotactic cytokines that attract monocytes, macrophages, and other immune cells to sites of infection or tissue damage. They play a crucial role in the recruitment and activation of these cells during the immune response.

There are several subtypes of MIPs, including MIP-1α, MIP-1β, and MIP-3α (also known as CCL3, CCL4, and CCL20, respectively). These proteins bind to specific G protein-coupled receptors on the surface of target cells, triggering a cascade of intracellular signaling events that lead to cell migration and activation.

MIPs have been implicated in a variety of inflammatory and immune-related conditions, including autoimmune diseases, cancer, and infectious diseases. They are also being studied as potential targets for the development of new therapies aimed at modulating the immune response in these conditions.

Integrins are a type of cell-adhesion molecule that play a crucial role in cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions. They are heterodimeric transmembrane receptors composed of non-covalently associated α and β subunits, which form more than 24 distinct integrin heterodimers in humans.

Integrins bind to specific ligands, such as ECM proteins (e.g., collagen, fibronectin, laminin), cell surface molecules, and soluble factors, through their extracellular domains. The intracellular domains of integrins interact with the cytoskeleton and various signaling proteins, allowing them to transduce signals from the ECM into the cell (outside-in signaling) and vice versa (inside-out signaling).

These molecular interactions are essential for numerous biological processes, including cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, differentiation, survival, and angiogenesis. Dysregulation of integrin function has been implicated in various pathological conditions, such as cancer, fibrosis, inflammation, and autoimmune diseases.

CXCR3 is a type of chemokine receptor that is primarily expressed on the surface of certain immune cells, including T lymphocytes (a type of white blood cell involved in immune response). It belongs to the Class A orphan G protein-coupled receptors family.

CXCR3 has three known subtypes, CXCR3-A, CXCR3-B, and CXCR3-C, each with different roles in regulating immune cell functions. These receptors bind to specific chemokines, which are small signaling proteins that help direct the movement of immune cells towards sites of inflammation or infection.

The chemokines that bind to CXCR3 include CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11, which are produced by various cell types in response to inflammation or injury. Once bound to these chemokines, CXCR3 activates intracellular signaling pathways that trigger a range of responses, such as cell migration, activation, and proliferation.

In the context of disease, CXCR3 has been implicated in various pathological conditions, including cancer, autoimmune diseases, and viral infections, due to its role in regulating immune cell trafficking and activation.

Endothelial cells are the type of cells that line the inner surface of blood vessels, lymphatic vessels, and heart chambers. They play a crucial role in maintaining vascular homeostasis by controlling vasomotor tone, coagulation, platelet activation, and inflammation. Endothelial cells also regulate the transport of molecules between the blood and surrounding tissues, and contribute to the maintenance of the structural integrity of the vasculature. They are flat, elongated cells with a unique morphology that allows them to form a continuous, nonthrombogenic lining inside the vessels. Endothelial cells can be isolated from various tissues and cultured in vitro for research purposes.

Chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 (CX3CL1), also known as fractalkine, is a protein that belongs to the chemokine family. Chemokines are a group of small signaling proteins involved in immune responses and inflammation. CX3CL1 is unique among chemokines because it exists both as a soluble protein and as a membrane-bound protein on the surface of certain cells.

As a chemoattractant, CX3CL1 plays a crucial role in recruiting immune cells, particularly T cells and monocytes/macrophages, to sites of infection or injury. The interaction between CX3CL1 and its receptor, CX3CR1, expressed on the surface of these immune cells, mediates their migration and activation.

In addition to its role in immunity and inflammation, CX3CL1 has been implicated in various physiological and pathological processes, such as neuronal development, neuroinflammation, and neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease.

Rac (Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate) GTP-binding proteins are a subfamily of the Rho family of small GTPases, which function as molecular switches that regulate various cellular processes, including actin cytoskeleton organization, cell adhesion, and gene transcription.

Rac GTP-binding proteins cycle between an inactive GDP-bound state and an active GTP-bound state. When Rac is in its active state, it interacts with downstream effectors to regulate various signaling pathways that control cell behavior. Activation of Rac promotes the formation of lamellipodia and membrane ruffles, which are important for cell migration and invasion.

Rac GTP-binding proteins have been implicated in a variety of physiological and pathological processes, including embryonic development, immune function, and cancer. Dysregulation of Rac signaling has been associated with various diseases, such as inflammatory disorders, neurological disorders, and cancer. Therefore, understanding the regulation and function of Rac GTP-binding proteins is crucial for developing therapeutic strategies to target these diseases.

Pancreatic elastase is a type of elastase that is specifically produced by the pancreas. It is an enzyme that helps in digesting proteins found in the food we eat. Pancreatic elastase breaks down elastin, a protein that provides elasticity to tissues and organs in the body.

In clinical practice, pancreatic elastase is often measured in stool samples as a diagnostic tool to assess exocrine pancreatic function. Low levels of pancreatic elastase in stool may indicate malabsorption or exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, which can be caused by various conditions such as chronic pancreatitis, cystic fibrosis, or pancreatic cancer.

Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNF-α) is a cytokine, a type of small signaling protein involved in immune response and inflammation. It is primarily produced by activated macrophages, although other cell types such as T-cells, natural killer cells, and mast cells can also produce it.

TNF-α plays a crucial role in the body's defense against infection and tissue injury by mediating inflammatory responses, activating immune cells, and inducing apoptosis (programmed cell death) in certain types of cells. It does this by binding to its receptors, TNFR1 and TNFR2, which are found on the surface of many cell types.

In addition to its role in the immune response, TNF-α has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several diseases, including autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and psoriasis, as well as cancer, where it can promote tumor growth and metastasis.

Therapeutic agents that target TNF-α, such as infliximab, adalimumab, and etanercept, have been developed to treat these conditions. However, these drugs can also increase the risk of infections and other side effects, so their use must be carefully monitored.

Class Ib Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases (PI3Ks) are a subclass of PI3K enzymes that play a crucial role in cellular signaling pathways. These enzymes phosphorylate the 3-hydroxyl group of the inositol ring in phosphatidylinositol, creating phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PIP). This lipid second messenger is involved in various cellular processes such as cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, and survival.

The Class Ib PI3Ks are heterodimers composed of a catalytic subunit (p110γ) and a regulatory subunit (p84 or p101). The p110γ catalytic subunit is activated by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and Ras family small GTPases. Once activated, the p110γ subunit phosphorylates phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) to produce PIP3, which in turn recruits downstream signaling proteins containing pleckstrin homology (PH) domains to the plasma membrane.

Abnormal activation of Class Ib PI3Ks has been implicated in various diseases, including cancer and inflammatory disorders. Therefore, targeting these enzymes has emerged as a potential therapeutic strategy for treating these conditions.

In the context of medicine and pharmacology, "kinetics" refers to the study of how a drug moves throughout the body, including its absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (often abbreviated as ADME). This field is called "pharmacokinetics."

1. Absorption: This is the process of a drug moving from its site of administration into the bloodstream. Factors such as the route of administration (e.g., oral, intravenous, etc.), formulation, and individual physiological differences can affect absorption.

2. Distribution: Once a drug is in the bloodstream, it gets distributed throughout the body to various tissues and organs. This process is influenced by factors like blood flow, protein binding, and lipid solubility of the drug.

3. Metabolism: Drugs are often chemically modified in the body, typically in the liver, through processes known as metabolism. These changes can lead to the formation of active or inactive metabolites, which may then be further distributed, excreted, or undergo additional metabolic transformations.

4. Excretion: This is the process by which drugs and their metabolites are eliminated from the body, primarily through the kidneys (urine) and the liver (bile).

Understanding the kinetics of a drug is crucial for determining its optimal dosing regimen, potential interactions with other medications or foods, and any necessary adjustments for special populations like pediatric or geriatric patients, or those with impaired renal or hepatic function.

Monocyte chemoattractant proteins (MCPs) are a group of chemokines, which are small signaling proteins that attract immune cells to sites of infection or inflammation. Specifically, MCPs are responsible for recruiting monocytes and other immune cells to areas of tissue damage or infection.

There are several subtypes of MCPs, including MCP-1 (CCL2), MCP-2 (CCL8), MCP-3 (CCL7), and MCP-4 (CCL13). These proteins bind to specific receptors on the surface of monocytes and other immune cells, triggering a series of intracellular signaling events that result in cell migration towards the site of injury or infection.

MCPs play an important role in the pathogenesis of various inflammatory diseases, such as atherosclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and cancer. For example, elevated levels of MCP-1 have been associated with increased monocyte recruitment to the arterial wall, leading to the formation of plaques that can cause heart attacks and strokes. Similarly, high levels of MCPs have been found in the synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, contributing to joint inflammation and damage.

Overall, Monocyte chemoattractant proteins are crucial components of the immune system's response to injury and infection, but their dysregulation can contribute to the development of various diseases.

Microcirculation is the circulation of blood in the smallest blood vessels, including arterioles, venules, and capillaries. It's responsible for the delivery of oxygen and nutrients to the tissues and the removal of waste products. The microcirculation plays a crucial role in maintaining tissue homeostasis and is regulated by various physiological mechanisms such as autonomic nervous system activity, local metabolic factors, and hormones.

Impairment of microcirculation can lead to tissue hypoxia, inflammation, and organ dysfunction, which are common features in several diseases, including diabetes, hypertension, sepsis, and ischemia-reperfusion injury. Therefore, understanding the structure and function of the microcirculation is essential for developing new therapeutic strategies to treat these conditions.

Messenger RNA (mRNA) is a type of RNA (ribonucleic acid) that carries genetic information copied from DNA in the form of a series of three-base code "words," each of which specifies a particular amino acid. This information is used by the cell's machinery to construct proteins, a process known as translation. After being transcribed from DNA, mRNA travels out of the nucleus to the ribosomes in the cytoplasm where protein synthesis occurs. Once the protein has been synthesized, the mRNA may be degraded and recycled. Post-transcriptional modifications can also occur to mRNA, such as alternative splicing and addition of a 5' cap and a poly(A) tail, which can affect its stability, localization, and translation efficiency.

Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is a key secondary messenger in many biological processes, including the regulation of metabolism, gene expression, and cellular excitability. It is synthesized from adenosine triphosphate (ATP) by the enzyme adenylyl cyclase and is degraded by the enzyme phosphodiesterase.

In the body, cAMP plays a crucial role in mediating the effects of hormones and neurotransmitters on target cells. For example, when a hormone binds to its receptor on the surface of a cell, it can activate a G protein, which in turn activates adenylyl cyclase to produce cAMP. The increased levels of cAMP then activate various effector proteins, such as protein kinases, which go on to regulate various cellular processes.

Overall, the regulation of cAMP levels is critical for maintaining proper cellular function and homeostasis, and abnormalities in cAMP signaling have been implicated in a variety of diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

Respiratory burst is a term used in the field of biology, particularly in the context of immunology and cellular processes. It does not have a direct application to clinical medicine, but it is important for understanding certain physiological and pathophysiological mechanisms. Here's a definition of respiratory burst:

Respiratory burst is a rapid increase in oxygen consumption by phagocytic cells (like neutrophils, monocytes, and macrophages) following their activation in response to various stimuli, such as pathogens or inflammatory molecules. This process is part of the innate immune response and serves to eliminate invading microorganisms.

The respiratory burst involves the activation of NADPH oxidase, an enzyme complex present in the membrane of phagosomes (the compartment where pathogens are engulfed). Upon activation, NADPH oxidase catalyzes the reduction of oxygen to superoxide radicals, which then dismutate to form hydrogen peroxide. These reactive oxygen species (ROS) can directly kill or damage microorganisms and also serve as signaling molecules for other immune cells.

While respiratory burst is a crucial part of the immune response, excessive or dysregulated ROS production can contribute to tissue damage and chronic inflammation, which have implications in various pathological conditions, such as atherosclerosis, neurodegenerative diseases, and cancer.

Chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 4, also known as CCL4 or MIP-1β (Macrophage Inflammatory Protein-1β), is a small signaling protein that belongs to the chemokine family. Chemokines are a group of cytokines, or regulatory proteins, that play crucial roles in immunity and inflammation by directing the migration of various immune cells to sites of infection, injury, or tissue damage.

CCL4 is produced primarily by T cells, monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. It exerts its functions by binding to specific chemokine receptors found on the surface of target cells, particularly CCR5 and CXCR3. The primary role of CCL4 is to recruit immune cells like T cells, eosinophils, and monocytes/macrophages to areas of inflammation or infection, where it contributes to the elimination of pathogens and facilitates tissue repair.

Aberrant regulation of chemokines, including CCL4, has been implicated in various disease conditions such as chronic inflammation, autoimmune disorders, and viral infections like HIV. In HIV infection, CCL4 plays a significant role in the viral replication and pathogenesis by acting as a co-receptor for virus entry into host cells.

Calcium is an essential mineral that is vital for various physiological processes in the human body. The medical definition of calcium is as follows:

Calcium (Ca2+) is a crucial cation and the most abundant mineral in the human body, with approximately 99% of it found in bones and teeth. It plays a vital role in maintaining structural integrity, nerve impulse transmission, muscle contraction, hormonal secretion, blood coagulation, and enzyme activation.

Calcium homeostasis is tightly regulated through the interplay of several hormones, including parathyroid hormone (PTH), calcitonin, and vitamin D. Dietary calcium intake, absorption, and excretion are also critical factors in maintaining optimal calcium levels in the body.

Hypocalcemia refers to low serum calcium levels, while hypercalcemia indicates high serum calcium levels. Both conditions can have detrimental effects on various organ systems and require medical intervention to correct.

CCR1 (C-C chemokine receptor type 1) is a type of protein found on the surface of certain immune cells, including monocytes, neutrophils, and dendritic cells. It belongs to the family of G protein-coupled receptors that play a crucial role in the immune system's response to infection and inflammation.

CCR1 receptors bind to specific chemokines, which are small signaling proteins that help regulate the movement of immune cells throughout the body. When a chemokine binds to the CCR1 receptor, it triggers a series of intracellular signals that ultimately lead to the activation and migration of immune cells to the site of infection or inflammation.

CCR1 has been implicated in various physiological and pathological processes, including the development of atherosclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and certain types of cancer. As such, CCR1 has become a target for the development of new therapies aimed at modulating the immune response in these conditions.

Peritonitis is a medical condition characterized by inflammation of the peritoneum, which is the serous membrane that lines the inner wall of the abdominal cavity and covers the abdominal organs. The peritoneum has an important role in protecting the abdominal organs and providing a smooth surface for them to move against each other.

Peritonitis can occur as a result of bacterial or fungal infection, chemical irritation, or trauma to the abdomen. The most common cause of peritonitis is a rupture or perforation of an organ in the abdominal cavity, such as the appendix, stomach, or intestines, which allows bacteria from the gut to enter the peritoneal cavity.

Symptoms of peritonitis may include abdominal pain and tenderness, fever, nausea and vomiting, loss of appetite, and decreased bowel movements. In severe cases, peritonitis can lead to sepsis, a life-threatening condition characterized by widespread inflammation throughout the body.

Treatment for peritonitis typically involves antibiotics to treat the infection, as well as surgical intervention to repair any damage to the abdominal organs and remove any infected fluid or tissue from the peritoneal cavity. In some cases, a temporary or permanent drain may be placed in the abdomen to help remove excess fluid and promote healing.

Leukotriene B4 (LTB4) receptors are a type of G protein-coupled receptor that bind to and are activated by the lipid mediator Leukotriene B4. There are two main types of LTB4 receptors, named BLT1 and BLT2.

BLT1 is highly expressed in cells of the immune system such as neutrophils, eosinophils, monocytes, and dendritic cells, and it mediates many of the pro-inflammatory effects of LTB4, including chemotaxis, adhesion, and activation of these cells.

BLT2 is more widely expressed in various tissues, including the skin, lung, and intestine, and it has been shown to play a role in a variety of physiological and pathological processes, such as pain sensation, wound healing, and cancer progression.

Overall, LTB4 receptors are important targets for the development of therapies aimed at modulating inflammation and immune responses.

Chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 21 (CCL21), also known as secondary lymphoid tissue chemokine (SLC) or exodus-2, is a type of chemokine that belongs to the CC subfamily. Chemokines are small signaling proteins that play crucial roles in regulating immune responses and inflammation by recruiting various leukocytes to sites of infection or injury through specific receptor binding.

CCL21 is primarily expressed in high endothelial venules (HEVs) within lymphoid tissues, such as lymph nodes, spleen, and Peyer's patches. It functions as a chemoattractant for immune cells like dendritic cells, T cells, and B cells, guiding them to enter the HEVs and migrate into the lymphoid organs. This process is essential for initiating adaptive immune responses against pathogens or antigens.

CCL21 exerts its effects by binding to chemokine receptors CCR7 and atypical chemokine receptor ACKR3 (also known as CXCR7). The interaction between CCL21 and these receptors triggers intracellular signaling cascades, leading to cell migration and activation. Dysregulation of CCL21 expression or function has been implicated in various pathological conditions, including autoimmune diseases, cancer, and inflammatory disorders.

Leukocyte disorders, also known as white blood cell disorders, refer to a group of conditions that affect the production, function, or number of leukocytes (white blood cells) in the body. Leukocytes play a crucial role in protecting the body against infection and disease. Therefore, disorders that affect these cells can significantly impact an individual's immune system and overall health.

There are several types of leukocyte disorders, including:

1. Leukopenia: A condition characterized by abnormally low levels of white blood cells in the blood. This can increase the risk of infection.
2. Leukocytosis: A condition characterized by an elevated number of white blood cells in the blood. While this can be a normal response to infection or inflammation, it can also indicate an underlying medical condition such as leukemia.
3. Neutropenia: A condition characterized by abnormally low levels of neutrophils, a type of white blood cell that helps fight bacterial infections. This can increase the risk of infection.
4. Neutrophilia: A condition characterized by an elevated number of neutrophils in the blood. This can be a normal response to infection or inflammation, but it can also indicate an underlying medical condition such as an acute bacterial infection.
5. Lymphocytosis: A condition characterized by an elevated number of lymphocytes, a type of white blood cell that helps fight viral infections and cancer cells. This can be a normal response to infection or vaccination, but it can also indicate an underlying medical condition such as chronic lymphocytic leukemia.
6. Lymphopenia: A condition characterized by abnormally low levels of lymphocytes in the blood. This can increase the risk of infection and indicate an underlying medical condition such as HIV/AIDS or autoimmune disorders.
7. Monocytosis: A condition characterized by an elevated number of monocytes, a type of white blood cell that helps fight chronic infections and cancer cells. This can be a normal response to infection or inflammation, but it can also indicate an underlying medical condition such as chronic inflammatory diseases.
8. Monocytopenia: A condition characterized by abnormally low levels of monocytes in the blood. This can increase the risk of infection and indicate an underlying medical condition such as bone marrow disorders or autoimmune diseases.

These conditions can be caused by various factors, including infections, inflammation, cancer, autoimmune disorders, medications, and genetic disorders. Proper diagnosis and treatment require a thorough evaluation of the patient's medical history, physical examination, laboratory tests, and imaging studies.

CD11 is a group of integrin proteins that are present on the surface of various immune cells, including neutrophils, monocytes, and macrophages. They play a crucial role in the adhesion and migration of these cells to sites of inflammation or injury. CD11 includes three distinct subunits: CD11a (also known as LFA-1), CD11b (also known as Mac-1 or Mo1), and CD11c (also known as p150,95).

Antigens are substances that can stimulate an immune response in the body. In the context of CD11, antigens may refer to specific molecules or structures on pathogens such as bacteria or viruses that can be recognized by CD11-expressing immune cells. These antigens bind to CD11 and trigger a series of intracellular signaling events that lead to the activation and migration of the immune cells to the site of infection or injury.

Therefore, the medical definition of 'antigens, CD11' may refer to specific molecules or structures on pathogens that can bind to CD11 proteins on immune cells and trigger an immune response.

Integrin α4 (also known as CD49d or ITGA4) is a subunit of integrin proteins, which are heterodimeric transmembrane receptors that mediate cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions. Integrin α4 typically pairs with β1 (CD29 or ITGB1) or β7 (ITGB7) subunits to form integrins α4β1 and α4β7, respectively.

Integrin α4β1, also known as very late antigen-4 (VLA-4), is widely expressed on various hematopoietic cells, including lymphocytes, monocytes, eosinophils, and basophils. It plays crucial roles in the adhesion, migration, and homing of these cells to secondary lymphoid organs, as well as in the recruitment of immune cells to inflammatory sites. Integrin α4β1 binds to its ligands, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and fibronectin, via the arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) motif.

Integrin α4β7, on the other hand, is primarily expressed on gut-homing lymphocytes and interacts with mucosal addressin cell adhesion molecule-1 (MAdCAM-1), a protein mainly found in the high endothelial venules of intestinal Peyer's patches and mesenteric lymph nodes. This interaction facilitates the trafficking of immune cells to the gastrointestinal tract, where they participate in immune responses against pathogens and maintain gut homeostasis.

In summary, Integrin α4 is a crucial subunit of integrins that mediates cell adhesion, migration, and homing to specific tissues through its interactions with various ligands. Dysregulation of integrin α4 has been implicated in several pathological conditions, including inflammatory diseases, autoimmune disorders, and cancer metastasis.

Animal disease models are specialized animals, typically rodents such as mice or rats, that have been genetically engineered or exposed to certain conditions to develop symptoms and physiological changes similar to those seen in human diseases. These models are used in medical research to study the pathophysiology of diseases, identify potential therapeutic targets, test drug efficacy and safety, and understand disease mechanisms.

The genetic modifications can include knockout or knock-in mutations, transgenic expression of specific genes, or RNA interference techniques. The animals may also be exposed to environmental factors such as chemicals, radiation, or infectious agents to induce the disease state.

Examples of animal disease models include:

1. Mouse models of cancer: Genetically engineered mice that develop various types of tumors, allowing researchers to study cancer initiation, progression, and metastasis.
2. Alzheimer's disease models: Transgenic mice expressing mutant human genes associated with Alzheimer's disease, which exhibit amyloid plaque formation and cognitive decline.
3. Diabetes models: Obese and diabetic mouse strains like the NOD (non-obese diabetic) or db/db mice, used to study the development of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, respectively.
4. Cardiovascular disease models: Atherosclerosis-prone mice, such as ApoE-deficient or LDLR-deficient mice, that develop plaque buildup in their arteries when fed a high-fat diet.
5. Inflammatory bowel disease models: Mice with genetic mutations affecting intestinal barrier function and immune response, such as IL-10 knockout or SAMP1/YitFc mice, which develop colitis.

Animal disease models are essential tools in preclinical research, but it is important to recognize their limitations. Differences between species can affect the translatability of results from animal studies to human patients. Therefore, researchers must carefully consider the choice of model and interpret findings cautiously when applying them to human diseases.

Superoxides are partially reduced derivatives of oxygen that contain one extra electron, giving them an overall charge of -1. They are highly reactive and unstable, with the most common superoxide being the hydroxyl radical (•OH-) and the superoxide anion (O2-). Superoxides are produced naturally in the body during metabolic processes, particularly within the mitochondria during cellular respiration. They play a role in various physiological processes, but when produced in excess or not properly neutralized, they can contribute to oxidative stress and damage to cells and tissues, potentially leading to the development of various diseases such as cancer, atherosclerosis, and neurodegenerative disorders.

The cytoskeleton is a complex network of various protein filaments that provides structural support, shape, and stability to the cell. It plays a crucial role in maintaining cellular integrity, intracellular organization, and enabling cell movement. The cytoskeleton is composed of three major types of protein fibers: microfilaments (actin filaments), intermediate filaments, and microtubules. These filaments work together to provide mechanical support, participate in cell division, intracellular transport, and help maintain the cell's architecture. The dynamic nature of the cytoskeleton allows cells to adapt to changing environmental conditions and respond to various stimuli.

The term "Receptor, Anaphylatoxin C5a" refers to a specific type of receptor found on the surface of various cells in the human body, including immune cells and endothelial cells. This receptor binds to a molecule called C5a, which is a cleavage product of the complement component C5 and is one of the most potent anaphylatoxins.

Anaphylatoxins are inflammatory mediators that play a crucial role in the immune response, particularly in the activation of the complement system and the recruitment of immune cells to sites of infection or injury. C5a is generated during the activation of the complement system and has a wide range of biological activities, including chemotaxis (attracting immune cells to the site of inflammation), increased vascular permeability, and the activation of immune cells such as neutrophils, monocytes, and mast cells.

The C5a receptor, also known as CD88, is a G protein-coupled receptor that belongs to the superfamily of seven transmembrane domain receptors. When C5a binds to the receptor, it triggers a series of intracellular signaling events that lead to the activation of various cellular responses, such as the release of inflammatory mediators and the recruitment of immune cells to the site of inflammation.

Abnormal activation of the C5a/C5a receptor pathway has been implicated in a variety of inflammatory diseases, including sepsis, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and autoimmune disorders. Therefore, targeting this pathway with therapeutic agents has emerged as a promising strategy for the treatment of these conditions.

Mononuclear leukocytes are a type of white blood cells (leukocytes) that have a single, large nucleus. They include lymphocytes (B-cells, T-cells, and natural killer cells), monocytes, and dendritic cells. These cells play important roles in the body's immune system, including defending against infection and disease, and participating in immune responses and surveillance. Mononuclear leukocytes can be found in the bloodstream as well as in tissues throughout the body. They are involved in both innate and adaptive immunity, providing specific and nonspecific defense mechanisms to protect the body from harmful pathogens and other threats.

Secretory proteinase inhibitory proteins (SPIPs) are a group of proteins that function to regulate the activity of proteinases, which are enzymes that break down other proteins. SPIPs are produced by various cell types and secreted into extracellular spaces, where they help maintain the balance between protein degradation and synthesis.

Proteinases play crucial roles in many physiological processes, including tissue remodeling, wound healing, and immune defense. However, uncontrolled or excessive proteinase activity can lead to tissue damage and disease. SPIPs help prevent this by inhibiting the activity of specific proteinases, thereby protecting tissues from unwanted proteolysis.

Examples of SPIPs include:

1. Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT): A serine proteinase inhibitor that primarily inhibits neutrophil elastase and protects lung tissue from damage during inflammation.
2. Secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI): A serine proteinase inhibitor that inhibits several proteinases, including elastase, cathepsin G, and trypsin. SLPI is produced by epithelial cells and has anti-inflammatory properties.
3. Elafin: A serine proteinase inhibitor mainly expressed in the skin and mucous membranes that inhibits neutrophil elastase, proteinase 3, and trypsin.
4. Tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs): A family of proteins that inhibit matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), which are involved in extracellular matrix remodeling.
5. Cystatins: A group of proteins that inhibit cysteine proteinases, which play a role in various physiological and pathological processes, including inflammation, immune response, and cancer.

Dysregulation of SPIPs has been implicated in several diseases, such as emphysema, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cystic fibrosis, and cancer.

Chemokines are a family of small signaling proteins that play a crucial role in the immune system by recruiting immune cells to sites of infection or injury. They do this by binding to specific receptors on the surface of immune cells and guiding their movement towards the source of the chemokine.

CX3C is a subfamily of chemokines that contains only one member, called fractalkine (CX3CL1). Fractalkine is unique among chemokines because it exists in two forms: a soluble form and a membrane-bound form. The soluble form acts as a chemoattractant for immune cells, while the membrane-bound form functions as an adhesion molecule that helps to tether immune cells to the site of inflammation.

Fractalkine plays important roles in the immune response, including the recruitment and activation of immune cells such as natural killer (NK) cells, T cells, and monocytes/macrophages. It is also involved in the development and maintenance of the nervous system, where it helps to regulate the migration and differentiation of neural progenitor cells.

Abnormalities in fractalkine signaling have been implicated in a variety of diseases, including neurological disorders such as multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease, as well as inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and atherosclerosis.

The Activated Leukocyte Cell Adhesion Molecule (ALCAM or CD166) is a type of transmembrane protein that belongs to the immunoglobulin superfamily. It is involved in various biological processes, including cell adhesion, migration, and activation of immune cells.

ALCAM is expressed on the surface of several types of cells, including activated leukocytes (white blood cells), endothelial cells, and some cancer cells. It plays a crucial role in the interaction between leukocytes and endothelial cells during inflammation and immune responses. ALCAM mediates these interactions by binding to other cell adhesion molecules, such as CD6 on T cells and L1CAM on neurons and various cancer cells.

In summary, Activated Leukocyte Cell Adhesion Molecule (ALCAM or CD166) is a transmembrane protein involved in cell adhesion, migration, and activation of immune cells, particularly during inflammation and immune responses.

A cell membrane, also known as the plasma membrane, is a thin semi-permeable phospholipid bilayer that surrounds all cells in animals, plants, and microorganisms. It functions as a barrier to control the movement of substances in and out of the cell, allowing necessary molecules such as nutrients, oxygen, and signaling molecules to enter while keeping out harmful substances and waste products. The cell membrane is composed mainly of phospholipids, which have hydrophilic (water-loving) heads and hydrophobic (water-fearing) tails. This unique structure allows the membrane to be flexible and fluid, yet selectively permeable. Additionally, various proteins are embedded in the membrane that serve as channels, pumps, receptors, and enzymes, contributing to the cell's overall functionality and communication with its environment.

BALB/c is an inbred strain of laboratory mouse that is widely used in biomedical research. The strain was developed at the Institute of Cancer Research in London by Henry Baldwin and his colleagues in the 1920s, and it has since become one of the most commonly used inbred strains in the world.

BALB/c mice are characterized by their black coat color, which is determined by a recessive allele at the tyrosinase locus. They are also known for their docile and friendly temperament, making them easy to handle and work with in the laboratory.

One of the key features of BALB/c mice that makes them useful for research is their susceptibility to certain types of tumors and immune responses. For example, they are highly susceptible to developing mammary tumors, which can be induced by chemical carcinogens or viral infection. They also have a strong Th2-biased immune response, which makes them useful models for studying allergic diseases and asthma.

BALB/c mice are also commonly used in studies of genetics, neuroscience, behavior, and infectious diseases. Because they are an inbred strain, they have a uniform genetic background, which makes it easier to control for genetic factors in experiments. Additionally, because they have been bred in the laboratory for many generations, they are highly standardized and reproducible, making them ideal subjects for scientific research.

Pertussis toxin is an exotoxin produced by the bacterium Bordetella pertussis, which is responsible for causing whooping cough in humans. This toxin has several effects on the host organism, including:

1. Adenylyl cyclase activation: Pertussis toxin enters the host cell and modifies a specific G protein (Gαi), leading to the continuous activation of adenylyl cyclase. This results in increased levels of intracellular cAMP, which disrupts various cellular processes.
2. Inhibition of immune response: Pertussis toxin impairs the host's immune response by inhibiting the migration and function of immune cells like neutrophils and macrophages. It also interferes with antigen presentation and T-cell activation, making it difficult for the body to clear the infection.
3. Increased inflammation: The continuous activation of adenylyl cyclase by pertussis toxin leads to increased production of proinflammatory cytokines, contributing to the severe coughing fits and other symptoms associated with whooping cough.

Pertussis toxin is an essential virulence factor for Bordetella pertussis, and its effects contribute significantly to the pathogenesis of whooping cough. Vaccination against pertussis includes inactivated or genetically detoxified forms of pertussis toxin, which provide immunity without causing disease symptoms.

Oligopeptides are defined in medicine and biochemistry as short chains of amino acids, typically containing fewer than 20 amino acid residues. These small peptides are important components in various biological processes, such as serving as signaling molecules, enzyme inhibitors, or structural elements in some proteins. They can be found naturally in foods and may also be synthesized for use in medical research and therapeutic applications.

"Salmonella enterica" serovar "Typhimurium" is a subspecies of the bacterial species Salmonella enterica, which is a gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacterium. It is a common cause of foodborne illness in humans and animals worldwide. The bacteria can be found in a variety of sources, including contaminated food and water, raw meat, poultry, eggs, and dairy products.

The infection caused by Salmonella Typhimurium is typically self-limiting and results in gastroenteritis, which is characterized by symptoms such as diarrhea, abdominal cramps, fever, and vomiting. However, in some cases, the infection can spread to other parts of the body and cause more severe illness, particularly in young children, older adults, and people with weakened immune systems.

Salmonella Typhimurium is a major public health concern due to its ability to cause outbreaks of foodborne illness, as well as its potential to develop antibiotic resistance. Proper food handling, preparation, and storage practices can help prevent the spread of Salmonella Typhimurium and other foodborne pathogens.

Membrane glycoproteins are proteins that contain oligosaccharide chains (glycans) covalently attached to their polypeptide backbone. They are integral components of biological membranes, spanning the lipid bilayer and playing crucial roles in various cellular processes.

The glycosylation of these proteins occurs in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi apparatus during protein folding and trafficking. The attached glycans can vary in structure, length, and composition, which contributes to the diversity of membrane glycoproteins.

Membrane glycoproteins can be classified into two main types based on their orientation within the lipid bilayer:

1. Type I (N-linked): These glycoproteins have a single transmembrane domain and an extracellular N-terminus, where the oligosaccharides are predominantly attached via asparagine residues (Asn-X-Ser/Thr sequon).
2. Type II (C-linked): These glycoproteins possess two transmembrane domains and an intracellular C-terminus, with the oligosaccharides linked to tryptophan residues via a mannose moiety.

Membrane glycoproteins are involved in various cellular functions, such as:

* Cell adhesion and recognition
* Receptor-mediated signal transduction
* Enzymatic catalysis
* Transport of molecules across membranes
* Cell-cell communication
* Immunological responses

Some examples of membrane glycoproteins include cell surface receptors (e.g., growth factor receptors, cytokine receptors), adhesion molecules (e.g., integrins, cadherins), and transporters (e.g., ion channels, ABC transporters).

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Skin Window Technique" is not a recognized or established term in medicine or dermatology. It may refer to a specific procedure or technique used in a particular study or clinical setting, but without more context, it's difficult to provide an accurate definition.

However, there is a similar term called "Skin as a Window Technique," which is a non-invasive method used in dermatology to evaluate the underlying structures and processes of the skin through transillumination or direct visualization. This technique can be used to diagnose various skin conditions such as hemangiomas, nevi, and other vascular anomalies.

Without more context, I cannot provide a precise definition of "Skin Window Technique." If you could provide more information about where you encountered this term or its intended meaning, I would be happy to try to help further.

G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a family of membrane receptors that play an essential role in cellular signaling and communication. These receptors possess seven transmembrane domains, forming a structure that spans the lipid bilayer of the cell membrane. They are called "G-protein-coupled" because they interact with heterotrimeric G proteins upon activation, which in turn modulate various downstream signaling pathways.

When an extracellular ligand binds to a GPCR, it causes a conformational change in the receptor's structure, leading to the exchange of guanosine diphosphate (GDP) for guanosine triphosphate (GTP) on the associated G protein's α subunit. This exchange triggers the dissociation of the G protein into its α and βγ subunits, which then interact with various effector proteins to elicit cellular responses.

There are four main families of GPCRs, classified based on their sequence similarities and downstream signaling pathways:

1. Gq-coupled receptors: These receptors activate phospholipase C (PLC), which leads to the production of inositol trisphosphate (IP3) and diacylglycerol (DAG). IP3 induces calcium release from intracellular stores, while DAG activates protein kinase C (PKC).
2. Gs-coupled receptors: These receptors activate adenylyl cyclase, which increases the production of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and subsequently activates protein kinase A (PKA).
3. Gi/o-coupled receptors: These receptors inhibit adenylyl cyclase, reducing cAMP levels and modulating PKA activity. Additionally, they can activate ion channels or regulate other signaling pathways through the βγ subunits.
4. G12/13-coupled receptors: These receptors primarily activate RhoGEFs, which in turn activate RhoA and modulate cytoskeletal organization and cellular motility.

GPCRs are involved in various physiological processes, including neurotransmission, hormone signaling, immune response, and sensory perception. Dysregulation of GPCR function has been implicated in numerous diseases, making them attractive targets for drug development.

'Gene expression regulation' refers to the processes that control whether, when, and where a particular gene is expressed, meaning the production of a specific protein or functional RNA encoded by that gene. This complex mechanism can be influenced by various factors such as transcription factors, chromatin remodeling, DNA methylation, non-coding RNAs, and post-transcriptional modifications, among others. Proper regulation of gene expression is crucial for normal cellular function, development, and maintaining homeostasis in living organisms. Dysregulation of gene expression can lead to various diseases, including cancer and genetic disorders.

Chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 3 (CCL3), also known as macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha (MIP-1α), is a small signaling protein belonging to the chemokine family. Chemokines are a group of cytokines, or cell signaling molecules, that play important roles in immune responses and inflammation. They mediate their effects by interacting with specific receptors on the surface of target cells, leading to various biological responses such as chemotaxis (directed migration) of immune cells.

CCL3 is primarily produced by activated T cells, monocytes, macrophages, and other immune cells in response to infection or injury. It plays a crucial role in recruiting immune cells like monocytes, neutrophils, and dendritic cells to the sites of inflammation or infection. CCL3 also contributes to the activation and differentiation of immune cells, thereby participating in the regulation of adaptive immunity. Dysregulation of CCL3 has been implicated in several pathological conditions, including autoimmune diseases, chronic inflammation, and cancer.

HLA-DR antigens are a type of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II molecule that plays a crucial role in the immune system. They are found on the surface of antigen-presenting cells, such as dendritic cells, macrophages, and B lymphocytes. HLA-DR molecules present peptide antigens to CD4+ T cells, also known as helper T cells, thereby initiating an immune response.

HLA-DR antigens are highly polymorphic, meaning that there are many different variants of these molecules in the human population. This diversity allows for a wide range of potential peptide antigens to be presented and recognized by the immune system. HLA-DR antigens are encoded by genes located on chromosome 6 in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region.

In transplantation, HLA-DR compatibility between donor and recipient is an important factor in determining the success of the transplant. Incompatibility can lead to a heightened immune response against the transplanted organ or tissue, resulting in rejection. Additionally, certain HLA-DR types have been associated with increased susceptibility to autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis.

CCR3 (C-C chemokine receptor type 3) is a type of cell surface receptor that binds to specific chemokines, which are a group of small signaling proteins involved in immune responses and inflammation. CCR3 is primarily expressed on the surface of certain types of immune cells, including eosinophils, basophils, and Th2 lymphocytes.

The binding of chemokines to CCR3 triggers a series of intracellular signaling events that regulate various cellular functions, such as chemotaxis (directed migration), activation, and degranulation. CCR3 plays an important role in the pathophysiology of several diseases, including asthma, allergies, and inflammatory bowel disease, where it contributes to the recruitment and activation of immune cells that mediate tissue damage and inflammation.

Therefore, CCR3 is a potential target for the development of therapies aimed at modulating immune responses and reducing inflammation in these conditions.

A base sequence in the context of molecular biology refers to the specific order of nucleotides in a DNA or RNA molecule. In DNA, these nucleotides are adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T). In RNA, uracil (U) takes the place of thymine. The base sequence contains genetic information that is transcribed into RNA and ultimately translated into proteins. It is the exact order of these bases that determines the genetic code and thus the function of the DNA or RNA molecule.

CCR7 (C-C chemokine receptor type 7) is a type of protein found on the surface of certain immune cells, including T cells and dendritic cells. It is a type of G protein-coupled receptor that binds to specific chemokines, which are small signaling proteins that help regulate the migration and activation of immune cells during an immune response.

CCR7 recognizes and binds to two main chemokines, CCL19 and CCL21, which are produced by specialized cells in lymphoid organs such as lymph nodes and the spleen. When CCR7 on an immune cell binds to one of these chemokines, it triggers a series of intracellular signaling events that cause the cell to migrate towards the source of the chemokine.

This process is important for the proper functioning of the immune system, as it helps to coordinate the movement of immune cells between different tissues and organs during an immune response. For example, dendritic cells in the peripheral tissues can use CCR7 to migrate to the draining lymph nodes, where they can present antigens to T cells and help stimulate an adaptive immune response. Similarly, activated T cells can use CCR7 to migrate to the site of an infection or inflammation, where they can carry out their effector functions.

Enzyme activation refers to the process by which an enzyme becomes biologically active and capable of carrying out its specific chemical or biological reaction. This is often achieved through various post-translational modifications, such as proteolytic cleavage, phosphorylation, or addition of cofactors or prosthetic groups to the enzyme molecule. These modifications can change the conformation or structure of the enzyme, exposing or creating a binding site for the substrate and allowing the enzymatic reaction to occur.

For example, in the case of proteolytic cleavage, an inactive precursor enzyme, known as a zymogen, is cleaved into its active form by a specific protease. This is seen in enzymes such as trypsin and chymotrypsin, which are initially produced in the pancreas as inactive precursors called trypsinogen and chymotrypsinogen, respectively. Once they reach the small intestine, they are activated by enteropeptidase, a protease that cleaves a specific peptide bond, releasing the active enzyme.

Phosphorylation is another common mechanism of enzyme activation, where a phosphate group is added to a specific serine, threonine, or tyrosine residue on the enzyme by a protein kinase. This modification can alter the conformation of the enzyme and create a binding site for the substrate, allowing the enzymatic reaction to occur.

Enzyme activation is a crucial process in many biological pathways, as it allows for precise control over when and where specific reactions take place. It also provides a mechanism for regulating enzyme activity in response to various signals and stimuli, such as hormones, neurotransmitters, or changes in the intracellular environment.

Lymphocyte activation is the process by which B-cells and T-cells (types of lymphocytes) become activated to perform effector functions in an immune response. This process involves the recognition of specific antigens presented on the surface of antigen-presenting cells, such as dendritic cells or macrophages.

The activation of B-cells leads to their differentiation into plasma cells that produce antibodies, while the activation of T-cells results in the production of cytotoxic T-cells (CD8+ T-cells) that can directly kill infected cells or helper T-cells (CD4+ T-cells) that assist other immune cells.

Lymphocyte activation involves a series of intracellular signaling events, including the binding of co-stimulatory molecules and the release of cytokines, which ultimately result in the expression of genes involved in cell proliferation, differentiation, and effector functions. The activation process is tightly regulated to prevent excessive or inappropriate immune responses that can lead to autoimmunity or chronic inflammation.

Cathepsin G is a serine protease, which is a type of enzyme that breaks down other proteins. It is produced and released by neutrophils, a type of white blood cell that plays an important role in the body's immune response to infection. Cathepsin G helps to digest and kill microorganisms that have invaded the body. It can also contribute to tissue damage and inflammation in certain diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and cystic fibrosis.

Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are large molecules found in the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. They consist of a hydrophilic polysaccharide called the O-antigen, a core oligosaccharide, and a lipid portion known as Lipid A. The Lipid A component is responsible for the endotoxic activity of LPS, which can trigger a powerful immune response in animals, including humans. This response can lead to symptoms such as fever, inflammation, and septic shock, especially when large amounts of LPS are introduced into the bloodstream.

Cell communication, also known as cell signaling, is the process by which cells exchange and transmit signals between each other and their environment. This complex system allows cells to coordinate their functions and maintain tissue homeostasis. Cell communication can occur through various mechanisms including:

1. Autocrine signaling: When a cell releases a signal that binds to receptors on the same cell, leading to changes in its behavior or function.
2. Paracrine signaling: When a cell releases a signal that binds to receptors on nearby cells, influencing their behavior or function.
3. Endocrine signaling: When a cell releases a hormone into the bloodstream, which then travels to distant target cells and binds to specific receptors, triggering a response.
4. Synaptic signaling: In neurons, communication occurs through the release of neurotransmitters that cross the synapse and bind to receptors on the postsynaptic cell, transmitting electrical or chemical signals.
5. Contact-dependent signaling: When cells physically interact with each other, allowing for the direct exchange of signals and information.

Cell communication is essential for various physiological processes such as growth, development, differentiation, metabolism, immune response, and tissue repair. Dysregulation in cell communication can contribute to diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

Peroxidase is a type of enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction in which hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is broken down into water (H2O) and oxygen (O2). This enzymatic reaction also involves the oxidation of various organic and inorganic compounds, which can serve as electron donors.

Peroxidases are widely distributed in nature and can be found in various organisms, including bacteria, fungi, plants, and animals. They play important roles in various biological processes, such as defense against oxidative stress, breakdown of toxic substances, and participation in metabolic pathways.

The peroxidase-catalyzed reaction can be represented by the following chemical equation:

H2O2 + 2e- + 2H+ → 2H2O

In this reaction, hydrogen peroxide is reduced to water, and the electron donor is oxidized. The peroxidase enzyme facilitates the transfer of electrons between the substrate (hydrogen peroxide) and the electron donor, making the reaction more efficient and specific.

Peroxidases have various applications in medicine, industry, and research. For example, they can be used for diagnostic purposes, as biosensors, and in the treatment of wastewater and medical wastes. Additionally, peroxidases are involved in several pathological conditions, such as inflammation, cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases, making them potential targets for therapeutic interventions.

Microfluidic analytical techniques refer to the use of microfluidics, which is the manipulation of fluids in channels with dimensions of tens to hundreds of micrometers, for analytical measurements and applications. These techniques involve the integration of various functional components such as pumps, valves, mixers, and detectors onto a single chip or platform to perform chemical, biochemical, or biological analyses.

Microfluidic analytical techniques offer several advantages over traditional analytical methods, including reduced sample and reagent consumption, faster analysis times, increased sensitivity and throughput, and improved automation and portability. Examples of microfluidic analytical techniques include lab-on-a-chip devices, digital microfluidics, bead-based assays, and micro total analysis systems (μTAS). These techniques have found applications in various fields such as diagnostics, drug discovery, environmental monitoring, and food safety.

Leukocytosis is a condition characterized by an increased number of leukocytes (white blood cells) in the peripheral blood. A normal white blood cell count ranges from 4,500 to 11,000 cells per microliter of blood in adults. Leukocytosis is typically considered present when the white blood cell count exceeds 11,000 cells/µL. However, the definition might vary slightly depending on the laboratory and clinical context.

Leukocytosis can be a response to various underlying conditions, including bacterial or viral infections, inflammation, tissue damage, leukemia, and other hematological disorders. It is essential to investigate the cause of leukocytosis through further diagnostic tests, such as blood smears, differential counts, and additional laboratory and imaging studies, to guide appropriate treatment.

Thioglycolates are a group of chemical compounds that contain a thiol (sulfhydryl) group (-SH) bonded to a glycolate group. In the context of medical and cosmetic use, the term "thioglycolates" often refers to salts of thioglycolic acid, which are used as depilatories or hair-curling agents.

Thioglycolates work by breaking the disulfide bonds in keratin, the protein that makes up hair and nails. When applied to hair, thioglycolates reduce the disulfide bonds into sulfhydryl groups, making the hair more flexible and easier to shape or remove. This property is exploited in hair-curling products and depilatories (hair removal creams).

It's important to note that thioglycolates can cause skin irritation, allergic reactions, and respiratory issues in some individuals. Therefore, they should be used with caution, following the manufacturer's instructions, and in a well-ventilated area.

Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) is a laboratory technique used in molecular biology to amplify and detect specific DNA sequences. This technique is particularly useful for the detection and quantification of RNA viruses, as well as for the analysis of gene expression.

The process involves two main steps: reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In the first step, reverse transcriptase enzyme is used to convert RNA into complementary DNA (cDNA) by reading the template provided by the RNA molecule. This cDNA then serves as a template for the PCR amplification step.

In the second step, the PCR reaction uses two primers that flank the target DNA sequence and a thermostable polymerase enzyme to repeatedly copy the targeted cDNA sequence. The reaction mixture is heated and cooled in cycles, allowing the primers to anneal to the template, and the polymerase to extend the new strand. This results in exponential amplification of the target DNA sequence, making it possible to detect even small amounts of RNA or cDNA.

RT-PCR is a sensitive and specific technique that has many applications in medical research and diagnostics, including the detection of viruses such as HIV, hepatitis C virus, and SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19). It can also be used to study gene expression, identify genetic mutations, and diagnose genetic disorders.

'Azospirillum brasilense' is a species of free-living, nitrogen-fixing bacteria that is commonly found in the soil and in the roots of various plants. It belongs to the genus Azospirillum and is known for its ability to promote plant growth through a process called bacterial colonization. The bacteria colonize the root system of the plant and enhance nutrient uptake, leading to improved growth and yield. Additionally, 'Azospirillum brasilense' can convert atmospheric nitrogen into ammonia, making it available to the plants as a natural fertilizer. It is widely used in agricultural practices as a bioinoculant to improve crop productivity and sustainability.

Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent phospholipid mediator that plays a significant role in various inflammatory and immune responses. It is a powerful lipid signaling molecule released mainly by activated platelets, neutrophils, monocytes, endothelial cells, and other cell types during inflammation or injury.

PAF has a molecular structure consisting of an alkyl chain linked to a glycerol moiety, a phosphate group, and an sn-2 acetyl group. This unique structure allows PAF to bind to its specific G protein-coupled receptor (PAF-R) on the surface of target cells, triggering various intracellular signaling cascades that result in cell activation, degranulation, and aggregation.

The primary functions of PAF include:

1. Platelet activation and aggregation: PAF stimulates platelets to aggregate, release their granules, and activate the coagulation cascade, which can lead to thrombus formation.
2. Neutrophil and monocyte activation: PAF activates these immune cells, leading to increased adhesion, degranulation, and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and pro-inflammatory cytokines.
3. Vasodilation and increased vascular permeability: PAF can cause vasodilation by acting on endothelial cells, leading to an increase in blood flow and facilitating the extravasation of immune cells into inflamed tissues.
4. Bronchoconstriction: In the respiratory system, PAF can induce bronchoconstriction and recruitment of inflammatory cells, contributing to asthma symptoms.
5. Neurotransmission modulation: PAF has been implicated in neuroinflammation and may play a role in neuronal excitability, synaptic plasticity, and cognitive functions.

Dysregulated PAF signaling has been associated with several pathological conditions, including atherosclerosis, sepsis, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), ischemia-reperfusion injury, and neuroinflammatory disorders. Therefore, targeting the PAF pathway may provide therapeutic benefits in these diseases.

Up-regulation is a term used in molecular biology and medicine to describe an increase in the expression or activity of a gene, protein, or receptor in response to a stimulus. This can occur through various mechanisms such as increased transcription, translation, or reduced degradation of the molecule. Up-regulation can have important functional consequences, for example, enhancing the sensitivity or response of a cell to a hormone, neurotransmitter, or drug. It is a normal physiological process that can also be induced by disease or pharmacological interventions.

"Spirochaeta" is a genus of spirochete bacteria, characterized by their long, spiral-shaped bodies. These bacteria are gram-negative, meaning they do not retain crystal violet dye in the Gram staining method, and are typically motile, moving by means of endoflagella located within their outer membrane. Members of this genus are found in various environments, including freshwater, marine, and terrestrial habitats. Some species are free-living, while others are parasitic or symbiotic with animals. It is important to note that the medical significance of "Spirochaeta" species is limited compared to other spirochete genera like "Treponema," which includes the bacterium causing syphilis.

CCR5 (C-C chemokine receptor type 5) is a type of protein found on the surface of certain white blood cells, including T-cells, macrophages, and dendritic cells. It belongs to the family of G protein-coupled receptors, which are involved in various cellular responses.

CCR5 acts as a co-receptor for HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) entry into host cells, along with CD4. The virus binds to both CCR5 and CD4, leading to fusion of the viral and cell membranes and subsequent infection of the cell.

Individuals who have a genetic mutation that prevents CCR5 from functioning are resistant to HIV infection, highlighting its importance in the viral life cycle. Additionally, CCR5 antagonists have been developed as potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of HIV infection.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Oxyquinoline" does not have a specific medical definition as it is not a widely recognized medical term or a medication used in human healthcare. Oxyquinoline is an organic compound that contains a quinoline ring substituted with an alcohol group (hydroxyl) at position 8. It has been used in the past as a disinfectant and antiseptic, but it's not common in modern medical practice.

If you have any questions about medical terminology or concepts, please provide more context so I can offer a more accurate and helpful response.

HLA-B antigens are human leukocyte antigen (HLA) proteins found on the surface of cells that play an important role in the body's immune system. They are part of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules, which present pieces of proteins from inside the cell to T-cells, a type of white blood cell involved in immune responses.

HLA-B antigens are highly polymorphic, meaning that there are many different variations or alleles of this gene in the human population. This genetic diversity allows for a wide range of potential HLA-B proteins to be expressed, which can help recognize and respond to a variety of foreign substances, such as viruses and cancer cells.

The HLA-B antigens are inherited from both parents, and an individual may express one or two different HLA-B antigens depending on their genetic makeup. The specific combination of HLA-B antigens that a person expresses can have implications for their susceptibility to certain diseases, as well as their compatibility with organ transplants.

Histocompatibility testing, also known as tissue typing, is a medical procedure that determines the compatibility of tissues between two individuals, usually a potential donor and a recipient for organ or bone marrow transplantation. The test identifies specific antigens, called human leukocyte antigens (HLAs), found on the surface of most cells in the body. These antigens help the immune system distinguish between "self" and "non-self" cells.

The goal of histocompatibility testing is to find a donor whose HLA markers closely match those of the recipient, reducing the risk of rejection of the transplanted organ or tissue. The test involves taking blood samples from both the donor and the recipient and analyzing them for the presence of specific HLA antigens using various laboratory techniques such as molecular typing or serological testing.

A high degree of histocompatibility between the donor and recipient is crucial to ensure the success of the transplantation procedure, minimize complications, and improve long-term outcomes.

The umbilical veins are blood vessels in the umbilical cord that carry oxygenated and nutrient-rich blood from the mother to the developing fetus during pregnancy. There are typically two umbilical veins, one of which usually degenerates and becomes obliterated, leaving a single functional vein. This remaining vein is known as the larger umbilical vein or the venous duct. It enters the fetal abdomen through the umbilicus and passes through the liver, where it branches off to form the portal sinus. Ultimately, the blood from the umbilical vein mixes with the blood from the inferior vena cava and is pumped to the heart through the right atrium.

It's important to note that after birth, the umbilical veins are no longer needed and undergo involution, becoming the ligamentum teres in the adult.

Chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 2, also known as CXCL2, is a small signaling protein that belongs to the chemokine family. Chemokines are a group of cytokines, or cell signaling molecules, that play crucial roles in immune responses and inflammation. They mediate their effects by interacting with specific receptors on the surface of target cells, guiding the migration of various immune cells to sites of infection, injury, or inflammation.

CXCL2 is primarily produced by activated monocytes, macrophages, and neutrophils, as well as endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and certain types of tumor cells. Its primary function is to attract and activate neutrophils, which are key effector cells in the early stages of inflammation and host defense against invading pathogens. CXCL2 exerts its effects by binding to its specific receptor, CXCR2, which is expressed on the surface of neutrophils and other immune cells.

In addition to its role in inflammation and immunity, CXCL2 has been implicated in various pathological conditions, including cancer, atherosclerosis, and autoimmune diseases. Its expression can be regulated by several factors, such as pro-inflammatory cytokines, bacterial products, and growth factors. Understanding the role of CXCL2 in health and disease may provide insights into the development of novel therapeutic strategies for treating inflammation-associated disorders.

Enzyme inhibitors are substances that bind to an enzyme and decrease its activity, preventing it from catalyzing a chemical reaction in the body. They can work by several mechanisms, including blocking the active site where the substrate binds, or binding to another site on the enzyme to change its shape and prevent substrate binding. Enzyme inhibitors are often used as drugs to treat various medical conditions, such as high blood pressure, abnormal heart rhythms, and bacterial infections. They can also be found naturally in some foods and plants, and can be used in research to understand enzyme function and regulation.

Chemokine CCL11, also known as eotaxin-1, is a small chemotactic cytokine that belongs to the CC subfamily of chemokines. Chemokines are a group of proteins that play crucial roles in immunity and inflammation by recruiting immune cells to sites of infection or tissue injury.

CCL11 specifically attracts eosinophils, a type of white blood cell that is involved in allergic reactions and the immune response to parasitic worm infections. It does this by binding to its specific receptor, CCR3, which is expressed on the surface of eosinophils and other cells.

CCL11 is produced by a variety of cells, including epithelial cells, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and immune cells such as macrophages and Th2 lymphocytes. It has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several diseases, including asthma, allergies, and certain neurological disorders.

Transfection is a term used in molecular biology that refers to the process of deliberately introducing foreign genetic material (DNA, RNA or artificial gene constructs) into cells. This is typically done using chemical or physical methods, such as lipofection or electroporation. Transfection is widely used in research and medical settings for various purposes, including studying gene function, producing proteins, developing gene therapies, and creating genetically modified organisms. It's important to note that transfection is different from transduction, which is the process of introducing genetic material into cells using viruses as vectors.

I believe there may be some confusion in your question. "Rabbits" is a common name used to refer to the Lagomorpha species, particularly members of the family Leporidae. They are small mammals known for their long ears, strong legs, and quick reproduction.

However, if you're referring to "rabbits" in a medical context, there is a term called "rabbit syndrome," which is a rare movement disorder characterized by repetitive, involuntary movements of the fingers, resembling those of a rabbit chewing. It is also known as "finger-chewing chorea." This condition is usually associated with certain medications, particularly antipsychotics, and typically resolves when the medication is stopped or adjusted.

Fibronectin is a high molecular weight glycoprotein that is found in many tissues and body fluids, including plasma, connective tissue, and the extracellular matrix. It is composed of two similar subunits that are held together by disulfide bonds. Fibronectin plays an important role in cell adhesion, migration, and differentiation by binding to various cell surface receptors, such as integrins, and other extracellular matrix components, such as collagen and heparan sulfate proteoglycans.

Fibronectin has several isoforms that are produced by alternative splicing of a single gene transcript. These isoforms differ in their biological activities and can be found in different tissues and developmental stages. Fibronectin is involved in various physiological processes, such as wound healing, tissue repair, and embryonic development, and has been implicated in several pathological conditions, including fibrosis, tumor metastasis, and thrombosis.

Nitroblue Tetrazolium (NBT) is not a medical term per se, but a chemical compound that is widely used in scientific research and diagnostic tests. It's primarily used as an electron acceptor in various biochemical assays to detect the presence of certain enzymes or reactive oxygen species (ROS).

In a medical context, NBT is often used in the NBT reduction test, which is a diagnostic procedure to identify patients with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), an inherited immunodeficiency disorder. In this test, white blood cells called phagocytes from the patient's blood sample are incubated with NBT and a stimulus that triggers their respiratory burst, such as bacterial particles. If the phagocytes can produce superoxide radicals during the respiratory burst, these radicals reduce NBT to form a blue-black insoluble formazan precipitate. In CGD patients, who have impaired production of ROS, there is no or significantly reduced formazan formation, indicating an abnormal NBT reduction test result.

Cell degranulation is the process by which cells, particularly immune cells like mast cells and basophils, release granules containing inflammatory mediators in response to various stimuli. These mediators include histamine, leukotrienes, prostaglandins, and other chemicals that play a role in allergic reactions, inflammation, and immune responses. The activation of cell surface receptors triggers a signaling cascade that leads to the exocytosis of these granules, resulting in degranulation. This process is important for the immune system's response to foreign invaders and for the development of allergic reactions.

Integrin α4β1, also known as Very Late Antigen-4 (VLA-4), is a heterodimeric transmembrane receptor protein composed of two subunits, α4 and β1. It is involved in various cellular activities such as adhesion, migration, and signaling. This integrin plays a crucial role in the immune system by mediating the interaction between leukocytes (white blood cells) and the endothelial cells that line blood vessels. The activation of Integrin α4β1 allows leukocytes to roll along and then firmly adhere to the endothelium, followed by their migration into surrounding tissues, particularly during inflammation and immune responses. Additionally, Integrin α4β1 also interacts with extracellular matrix proteins such as fibronectin and helps regulate cell survival, proliferation, and differentiation in various cell types.

CD11b, also known as integrin αM or Mac-1, is not an antigen itself but a protein that forms part of a family of cell surface receptors called integrins. These integrins play a crucial role in various biological processes, including cell adhesion, migration, and signaling.

CD11b combines with CD18 (integrin β2) to form the heterodimeric integrin αMβ2, also known as Mac-1 or CR3 (complement receptor 3). This integrin is primarily expressed on the surface of myeloid cells, such as monocytes, macrophages, and neutrophils.

As an integral part of the immune system, CD11b/CD18 recognizes and binds to various ligands, including:

1. Icosahedral bacterial components like lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and peptidoglycans
2. Fragments of complement component C3b (iC3b)
3. Fibrinogen and other extracellular matrix proteins
4. Certain immune cell receptors, such as ICAM-1 (intercellular adhesion molecule 1)

The binding of CD11b/CD18 to these ligands triggers various intracellular signaling pathways that regulate the immune response and inflammation. In this context, antigens are substances (usually proteins or polysaccharides) found on the surface of cells, viruses, or bacteria that can be recognized by the immune system. CD11b/CD18 plays a role in recognizing and responding to these antigens during an immune response.

Jurkat cells are a type of human immortalized T lymphocyte (a type of white blood cell) cell line that is commonly used in scientific research. They were originally isolated from the peripheral blood of a patient with acute T-cell leukemia. Jurkat cells are widely used as a model system to study T-cell activation, signal transduction, and apoptosis (programmed cell death). They are also used in the study of HIV infection and replication, as they can be infected with the virus and used to investigate viral replication and host cell responses.

Complement C5a, des-Arginine is a derivative of the complement component C5a. The complement system is a group of proteins that are part of the body's immune defense against foreign invaders such as bacteria and viruses. When activated, the complement system can help to eliminate pathogens by attracting immune cells to the site of infection, promoting inflammation, and directly killing the pathogen.

C5a is a small protein that is generated when the complement component C5 is cleaved during the activation of the complement system. C5a is a potent anaphylatoxin, which means it can cause the release of histamine from mast cells and basophils, leading to increased vascular permeability, smooth muscle contraction, and recruitment of immune cells to the site of infection.

Des-Arginine refers to the removal of an arginine residue from the C-terminus of C5a. This modified form of C5a is known as C5a-desArg and has reduced pro-inflammatory activity compared to intact C5a. However, it can still contribute to the regulation of the immune response by interacting with specific receptors on immune cells.

In summary, Complement C5a, des-Arginine is a derivative of the complement component C5a that has reduced pro-inflammatory activity due to the removal of an arginine residue from its C-terminus.

Microfluidics is a multidisciplinary field that involves the study, manipulation, and control of fluids that are geometrically constrained to a small, typically sub-millimeter scale. It combines elements from physics, chemistry, biology, materials science, and engineering to design and fabricate microscale devices that can handle and analyze small volumes of fluids, often in the range of picoliters to microliters.

In medical contexts, microfluidics has numerous applications, including diagnostic testing, drug discovery, and personalized medicine. For example, microfluidic devices can be used to perform rapid and sensitive molecular assays for detecting pathogens or biomarkers in patient samples, as well as to screen drugs and evaluate their efficacy and toxicity in vitro.

Microfluidics also enables the development of organ-on-a-chip platforms that mimic the structure and function of human tissues and organs, allowing researchers to study disease mechanisms and test new therapies in a more physiologically relevant context than traditional cell culture models. Overall, microfluidics offers significant potential for improving healthcare outcomes by enabling faster, more accurate, and more cost-effective diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

Western blotting is a laboratory technique used in molecular biology to detect and quantify specific proteins in a mixture of many different proteins. This technique is commonly used to confirm the expression of a protein of interest, determine its size, and investigate its post-translational modifications. The name "Western" blotting distinguishes this technique from Southern blotting (for DNA) and Northern blotting (for RNA).

The Western blotting procedure involves several steps:

1. Protein extraction: The sample containing the proteins of interest is first extracted, often by breaking open cells or tissues and using a buffer to extract the proteins.
2. Separation of proteins by electrophoresis: The extracted proteins are then separated based on their size by loading them onto a polyacrylamide gel and running an electric current through the gel (a process called sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis or SDS-PAGE). This separates the proteins according to their molecular weight, with smaller proteins migrating faster than larger ones.
3. Transfer of proteins to a membrane: After separation, the proteins are transferred from the gel onto a nitrocellulose or polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane using an electric current in a process called blotting. This creates a replica of the protein pattern on the gel but now immobilized on the membrane for further analysis.
4. Blocking: The membrane is then blocked with a blocking agent, such as non-fat dry milk or bovine serum albumin (BSA), to prevent non-specific binding of antibodies in subsequent steps.
5. Primary antibody incubation: A primary antibody that specifically recognizes the protein of interest is added and allowed to bind to its target protein on the membrane. This step may be performed at room temperature or 4°C overnight, depending on the antibody's properties.
6. Washing: The membrane is washed with a buffer to remove unbound primary antibodies.
7. Secondary antibody incubation: A secondary antibody that recognizes the primary antibody (often coupled to an enzyme or fluorophore) is added and allowed to bind to the primary antibody. This step may involve using a horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated or alkaline phosphatase (AP)-conjugated secondary antibody, depending on the detection method used later.
8. Washing: The membrane is washed again to remove unbound secondary antibodies.
9. Detection: A detection reagent is added to visualize the protein of interest by detecting the signal generated from the enzyme-conjugated or fluorophore-conjugated secondary antibody. This can be done using chemiluminescent, colorimetric, or fluorescent methods.
10. Analysis: The resulting image is analyzed to determine the presence and quantity of the protein of interest in the sample.

Western blotting is a powerful technique for identifying and quantifying specific proteins within complex mixtures. It can be used to study protein expression, post-translational modifications, protein-protein interactions, and more. However, it requires careful optimization and validation to ensure accurate and reproducible results.

Tertiary protein structure refers to the three-dimensional arrangement of all the elements (polypeptide chains) of a single protein molecule. It is the highest level of structural organization and results from interactions between various side chains (R groups) of the amino acids that make up the protein. These interactions, which include hydrogen bonds, ionic bonds, van der Waals forces, and disulfide bridges, give the protein its unique shape and stability, which in turn determines its function. The tertiary structure of a protein can be stabilized by various factors such as temperature, pH, and the presence of certain ions. Any changes in these factors can lead to denaturation, where the protein loses its tertiary structure and thus its function.

Capillary permeability refers to the ability of substances to pass through the walls of capillaries, which are the smallest blood vessels in the body. These tiny vessels connect the arterioles and venules, allowing for the exchange of nutrients, waste products, and gases between the blood and the surrounding tissues.

The capillary wall is composed of a single layer of endothelial cells that are held together by tight junctions. The permeability of these walls varies depending on the size and charge of the molecules attempting to pass through. Small, uncharged molecules such as water, oxygen, and carbon dioxide can easily diffuse through the capillary wall, while larger or charged molecules such as proteins and large ions have more difficulty passing through.

Increased capillary permeability can occur in response to inflammation, infection, or injury, allowing larger molecules and immune cells to enter the surrounding tissues. This can lead to swelling (edema) and tissue damage if not controlled. Decreased capillary permeability, on the other hand, can lead to impaired nutrient exchange and tissue hypoxia.

Overall, the permeability of capillaries is a critical factor in maintaining the health and function of tissues throughout the body.

A lung is a pair of spongy, elastic organs in the chest that work together to enable breathing. They are responsible for taking in oxygen and expelling carbon dioxide through the process of respiration. The left lung has two lobes, while the right lung has three lobes. The lungs are protected by the ribcage and are covered by a double-layered membrane called the pleura. The trachea divides into two bronchi, which further divide into smaller bronchioles, leading to millions of tiny air sacs called alveoli, where the exchange of gases occurs.

Platelet-Derived Growth Factor (PDGF) is a dimeric protein with potent mitogenic and chemotactic properties that plays an essential role in wound healing, blood vessel growth, and cellular proliferation and differentiation. It is released from platelets during the process of blood clotting and binds to specific receptors on the surface of target cells, including fibroblasts, smooth muscle cells, and glial cells. PDGF exists in several isoforms, which are generated by alternative splicing of a single gene, and have been implicated in various physiological and pathological processes, such as tissue repair, atherosclerosis, and tumor growth.

Cell surface extensions, also known as cellular processes or protrusions, are specialized structures that extend from the plasma membrane of a eukaryotic cell. These extensions include various types of projections such as cilia, flagella, and filopodia, as well as larger and more complex structures like lamellipodia and pseudopodia.

Cilia and flagella are hair-like structures that are involved in cell movement and the sensation of external stimuli. They are composed of a core of microtubules surrounded by the plasma membrane.

Filopodia are thin, finger-like protrusions that contain bundles of actin filaments and are involved in cell motility, sensing the environment, and establishing cell-cell contacts.

Lamellipodia are sheet-like extensions composed of a branched network of actin filaments and are involved in cell migration.

Pseudopodia are large, irregularly shaped protrusions that contain a mixture of actin filaments and other cytoskeletal elements, and are involved in phagocytosis and cell motility.

These cell surface extensions play important roles in various biological processes, including cell motility, sensing the environment, establishing cell-cell contacts, and the uptake of extracellular material.

Fluorescence microscopy is a type of microscopy that uses fluorescent dyes or proteins to highlight and visualize specific components within a sample. In this technique, the sample is illuminated with high-energy light, typically ultraviolet (UV) or blue light, which excites the fluorescent molecules causing them to emit lower-energy, longer-wavelength light, usually visible light in the form of various colors. This emitted light is then collected by the microscope and detected to produce an image.

Fluorescence microscopy has several advantages over traditional brightfield microscopy, including the ability to visualize specific structures or molecules within a complex sample, increased sensitivity, and the potential for quantitative analysis. It is widely used in various fields of biology and medicine, such as cell biology, neuroscience, and pathology, to study the structure, function, and interactions of cells and proteins.

There are several types of fluorescence microscopy techniques, including widefield fluorescence microscopy, confocal microscopy, two-photon microscopy, and total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, each with its own strengths and limitations. These techniques can provide valuable insights into the behavior of cells and proteins in health and disease.

Chemotactic factors are substances that attract and guide cells, particularly immune cells, to specific locations in the body. Eosinophils are a type of white blood cell that play a role in the immune response, particularly against parasites and in allergic reactions. Therefore, chemotactic factors for eosinophils are substances that attract eosinophils to specific sites in the body.

These factors can be produced by various cells, including mast cells, basophils, and T-lymphocytes, in response to an infection or inflammation. They work by binding to receptors on the surface of eosinophils and activating signaling pathways that cause the eosinophils to migrate towards the source of the chemotactic factor.

Examples of chemotactic factors for eosinophils include:

1. Eotaxins: These are a group of chemokines (a type of signaling protein) that specifically attract eosinophils. They are produced by various cells, including endothelial cells, epithelial cells, and immune cells.
2. Leukotrienes: These are lipid mediators produced by mast cells and basophils in response to an allergic reaction or infection. They can attract eosinophils to the site of inflammation.
3. Platelet-activating factor (PAF): This is a lipid mediator produced by various cells, including endothelial cells and immune cells. It can attract eosinophils and activate them, leading to degranulation and release of their contents.
4. Complement components: The complement system is a group of proteins that play a role in the immune response. Some complement components, such as C3a and C5a, can act as chemotactic factors for eosinophils.

Overall, chemotactic factors for eosinophils play an important role in the immune response by recruiting these cells to sites of infection or inflammation. However, excessive activation of eosinophils and production of chemotactic factors can contribute to the development of various diseases, such as asthma and allergies.

Chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 10 (CXCL10), also known as interferon-gamma-inducible protein 10 (IP-10), is a small cytokine protein that belongs to the chemokine family. Chemokines are a group of signaling proteins that play crucial roles in immune responses and inflammation by recruiting various immune cells to the sites of infection or injury.

CXCL10 is primarily produced by several cell types, including monocytes, endothelial cells, and fibroblasts, in response to stimulation by interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), a cytokine that is critical for the activation of immune cells during an immune response. CXCL10 specifically binds to and activates its receptor, CXCR3, which is expressed on various immune cells such as T lymphocytes, natural killer (NK) cells, and monocytes.

The binding of CXCL10 to CXCR3 triggers a cascade of intracellular signaling events that result in the activation and migration of these immune cells towards the site of inflammation or infection. Consequently, CXCL10 plays essential roles in various physiological and pathological processes, including the recruitment of immune cells to sites of viral infections, tumor growth, and autoimmune diseases.

In summary, Chemokine CXCL10 is a crucial signaling protein that mediates immune cell trafficking and activation during inflammation and immune responses.

Cell separation is a process used to separate and isolate specific cell types from a heterogeneous mixture of cells. This can be accomplished through various physical or biological methods, depending on the characteristics of the cells of interest. Some common techniques for cell separation include:

1. Density gradient centrifugation: In this method, a sample containing a mixture of cells is layered onto a density gradient medium and then centrifuged. The cells are separated based on their size, density, and sedimentation rate, with denser cells settling closer to the bottom of the tube and less dense cells remaining near the top.

2. Magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS): This technique uses magnetic beads coated with antibodies that bind to specific cell surface markers. The labeled cells are then passed through a column placed in a magnetic field, which retains the magnetically labeled cells while allowing unlabeled cells to flow through.

3. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS): In this method, cells are stained with fluorochrome-conjugated antibodies that recognize specific cell surface or intracellular markers. The stained cells are then passed through a laser beam, which excites the fluorophores and allows for the detection and sorting of individual cells based on their fluorescence profile.

4. Filtration: This simple method relies on the physical size differences between cells to separate them. Cells can be passed through filters with pore sizes that allow smaller cells to pass through while retaining larger cells.

5. Enzymatic digestion: In some cases, cells can be separated by enzymatically dissociating tissues into single-cell suspensions and then using various separation techniques to isolate specific cell types.

These methods are widely used in research and clinical settings for applications such as isolating immune cells, stem cells, or tumor cells from biological samples.

Phosphatidylinositol phosphates (PIPs) are a family of lipid molecules that play crucial roles as secondary messengers in intracellular signaling pathways. They are formed by the phosphorylation of the hydroxyl group on the inositol ring of phosphatidylinositol (PI), a fundamental component of cell membranes.

There are seven main types of PIPs, classified based on the number and position of phosphate groups attached to the inositol ring:

1. Phosphatidylinositol 4-monophosphate (PI4P) - one phosphate group at the 4th position
2. Phosphatidylinositol 5-monophosphate (PI5P) - one phosphate group at the 5th position
3. Phosphatidylinositol 3,4-bisphosphate (PI(3,4)P2) - two phosphate groups at the 3rd and 4th positions
4. Phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate (PI(3,5)P2) - two phosphate groups at the 3rd and 5th positions
5. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] - two phosphate groups at the 4th and 5th positions
6. Phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate [PI(3,4,5)P3] - three phosphate groups at the 3rd, 4th, and 5th positions
7. Phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PI3P) - one phosphate group at the 3rd position

These PIPs are involved in various cellular processes such as membrane trafficking, cytoskeleton organization, cell survival, and metabolism. Dysregulation of PIP metabolism has been implicated in several diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

Dendritic cells (DCs) are a type of immune cell that play a critical role in the body's defense against infection and cancer. They are named for their dendrite-like projections, which they use to interact with and sample their environment. DCs are responsible for processing antigens (foreign substances that trigger an immune response) and presenting them to T cells, a type of white blood cell that plays a central role in the immune system's response to infection and cancer.

DCs can be found throughout the body, including in the skin, mucous membranes, and lymphoid organs. They are able to recognize and respond to a wide variety of antigens, including those from bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites. Once they have processed an antigen, DCs migrate to the lymph nodes, where they present the antigen to T cells. This interaction activates the T cells, which then go on to mount a targeted immune response against the invading pathogen or cancerous cells.

DCs are a diverse group of cells that can be divided into several subsets based on their surface markers and function. Some DCs, such as Langerhans cells and dermal DCs, are found in the skin and mucous membranes, where they serve as sentinels for invading pathogens. Other DCs, such as plasmacytoid DCs and conventional DCs, are found in the lymphoid organs, where they play a role in activating T cells and initiating an immune response.

Overall, dendritic cells are essential for the proper functioning of the immune system, and dysregulation of these cells has been implicated in a variety of diseases, including autoimmune disorders and cancer.

HLA-A antigens are a type of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) found on the surface of cells in our body. They are proteins that play an important role in the immune system by helping the body recognize and distinguish its own cells from foreign substances such as viruses, bacteria, and transplanted organs.

The HLA-A antigens are part of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules, which present peptide fragments from inside the cell to CD8+ T cells, also known as cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). The CTLs then recognize and destroy any cells that display foreign or abnormal peptides on their HLA-A antigens.

Each person has a unique set of HLA-A antigens, which are inherited from their parents. These antigens can vary widely between individuals, making it important to match HLA types in organ transplantation to reduce the risk of rejection. Additionally, certain HLA-A antigens have been associated with increased susceptibility or resistance to various diseases, including autoimmune disorders and infectious diseases.

HLA-G antigens are a type of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class Ib molecule that plays a crucial role in the immune system. HLA molecules are responsible for presenting pieces of proteins from inside the cell to the surface, where they can be recognized by the immune system's T-cells.

HLA-G antigens are primarily expressed in fetal tissues, including trophoblast cells that make up the placenta, and are involved in protecting the fetus from rejection by the mother's immune system during pregnancy. They have also been found to have immunosuppressive effects in other contexts, such as in cancer and transplantation.

HLA-G antigens are highly polymorphic, meaning that there are many different variations or "alleles" of the HLA-G gene that can be inherited from each parent. These genetic differences can affect the structure and function of the HLA-G molecule and may have implications for disease susceptibility and immune responses.

'Escherichia coli (E. coli) proteins' refer to the various types of proteins that are produced and expressed by the bacterium Escherichia coli. These proteins play a critical role in the growth, development, and survival of the organism. They are involved in various cellular processes such as metabolism, DNA replication, transcription, translation, repair, and regulation.

E. coli is a gram-negative, facultative anaerobe that is commonly found in the intestines of warm-blooded organisms. It is widely used as a model organism in scientific research due to its well-studied genetics, rapid growth, and ability to be easily manipulated in the laboratory. As a result, many E. coli proteins have been identified, characterized, and studied in great detail.

Some examples of E. coli proteins include enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism such as lactase, sucrase, and maltose; proteins involved in DNA replication such as the polymerases, single-stranded binding proteins, and helicases; proteins involved in transcription such as RNA polymerase and sigma factors; proteins involved in translation such as ribosomal proteins, tRNAs, and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases; and regulatory proteins such as global regulators, two-component systems, and transcription factors.

Understanding the structure, function, and regulation of E. coli proteins is essential for understanding the basic biology of this important organism, as well as for developing new strategies for combating bacterial infections and improving industrial processes involving bacteria.

Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is a technique used in pathology and laboratory medicine to identify specific proteins or antigens in tissue sections. It combines the principles of immunology and histology to detect the presence and location of these target molecules within cells and tissues. This technique utilizes antibodies that are specific to the protein or antigen of interest, which are then tagged with a detection system such as a chromogen or fluorophore. The stained tissue sections can be examined under a microscope, allowing for the visualization and analysis of the distribution and expression patterns of the target molecule in the context of the tissue architecture. Immunohistochemistry is widely used in diagnostic pathology to help identify various diseases, including cancer, infectious diseases, and immune-mediated disorders.

Blood bactericidal activity refers to the ability of an individual's blood to kill or inhibit the growth of bacteria. This is an important aspect of the body's immune system, as it helps to prevent infection and maintain overall health. The bactericidal activity of blood can be influenced by various factors, including the presence of antibodies, white blood cells (such as neutrophils), and complement proteins.

In medical terms, the term "bactericidal" specifically refers to an agent or substance that is capable of killing bacteria. Therefore, when we talk about blood bactericidal activity, we are referring to the collective ability of various components in the blood to kill or inhibit the growth of bacteria. This is often measured in laboratory tests as a way to assess a person's immune function and their susceptibility to infection.

It's worth noting that not all substances in the blood are bactericidal; some may simply inhibit the growth of bacteria without killing them. These substances are referred to as bacteriostatic. Both bactericidal and bacteriostatic agents play important roles in maintaining the body's defense against infection.

Telomere shortening is the gradual loss of repetitive DNA sequences and associated proteins from the ends of chromosomes that occurs naturally as cells divide. Telomeres are protective caps at the ends of chromosomes, which prevent the loss of genetic information during cell division. However, each time a cell divides, its telomeres become slightly shorter. When telomeres reach a critically short length, the cell can no longer divide and becomes senescent or dies. This process is thought to contribute to aging and age-related diseases, as well as to the development of cancer.

Peptides are short chains of amino acid residues linked by covalent bonds, known as peptide bonds. They are formed when two or more amino acids are joined together through a condensation reaction, which results in the elimination of a water molecule and the formation of an amide bond between the carboxyl group of one amino acid and the amino group of another.

Peptides can vary in length from two to about fifty amino acids, and they are often classified based on their size. For example, dipeptides contain two amino acids, tripeptides contain three, and so on. Oligopeptides typically contain up to ten amino acids, while polypeptides can contain dozens or even hundreds of amino acids.

Peptides play many important roles in the body, including serving as hormones, neurotransmitters, enzymes, and antibiotics. They are also used in medical research and therapeutic applications, such as drug delivery and tissue engineering.

Lysophospholipids are a type of glycerophospholipid, which is a major component of cell membranes. They are characterized by having only one fatty acid chain attached to the glycerol backbone, as opposed to two in regular phospholipids. This results in a more polar and charged molecule, which can play important roles in cell signaling and regulation.

Lysophospholipids can be derived from the breakdown of regular phospholipids through the action of enzymes such as phospholipase A1 or A2. They can also be synthesized de novo in the cell. Some lysophospholipids, such as lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), have been found to act as signaling molecules that bind to specific G protein-coupled receptors and regulate various cellular processes, including proliferation, survival, and migration.

Abnormal levels of lysophospholipids have been implicated in several diseases, such as cancer, inflammation, and neurological disorders. Therefore, understanding the biology of lysophospholipids has important implications for developing new therapeutic strategies.

A peptide fragment is a short chain of amino acids that is derived from a larger peptide or protein through various biological or chemical processes. These fragments can result from the natural breakdown of proteins in the body during regular physiological processes, such as digestion, or they can be produced experimentally in a laboratory setting for research or therapeutic purposes.

Peptide fragments are often used in research to map the structure and function of larger peptides and proteins, as well as to study their interactions with other molecules. In some cases, peptide fragments may also have biological activity of their own and can be developed into drugs or diagnostic tools. For example, certain peptide fragments derived from hormones or neurotransmitters may bind to receptors in the body and mimic or block the effects of the full-length molecule.

Recombinant fusion proteins are artificially created biomolecules that combine the functional domains or properties of two or more different proteins into a single protein entity. They are generated through recombinant DNA technology, where the genes encoding the desired protein domains are linked together and expressed as a single, chimeric gene in a host organism, such as bacteria, yeast, or mammalian cells.

The resulting fusion protein retains the functional properties of its individual constituent proteins, allowing for novel applications in research, diagnostics, and therapeutics. For instance, recombinant fusion proteins can be designed to enhance protein stability, solubility, or immunogenicity, making them valuable tools for studying protein-protein interactions, developing targeted therapies, or generating vaccines against infectious diseases or cancer.

Examples of recombinant fusion proteins include:

1. Etaglunatide (ABT-523): A soluble Fc fusion protein that combines the heavy chain fragment crystallizable region (Fc) of an immunoglobulin with the extracellular domain of the human interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R). This fusion protein functions as a decoy receptor, neutralizing IL-6 and its downstream signaling pathways in rheumatoid arthritis.
2. Etanercept (Enbrel): A soluble TNF receptor p75 Fc fusion protein that binds to tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and inhibits its proinflammatory activity, making it a valuable therapeutic option for treating autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and psoriasis.
3. Abatacept (Orencia): A fusion protein consisting of the extracellular domain of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) linked to the Fc region of an immunoglobulin, which downregulates T-cell activation and proliferation in autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis.
4. Belimumab (Benlysta): A monoclonal antibody that targets B-lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS) protein, preventing its interaction with the B-cell surface receptor and inhibiting B-cell activation in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).
5. Romiplostim (Nplate): A fusion protein consisting of a thrombopoietin receptor agonist peptide linked to an immunoglobulin Fc region, which stimulates platelet production in patients with chronic immune thrombocytopenia (ITP).
6. Darbepoetin alfa (Aranesp): A hyperglycosylated erythropoiesis-stimulating protein that functions as a longer-acting form of recombinant human erythropoietin, used to treat anemia in patients with chronic kidney disease or cancer.
7. Palivizumab (Synagis): A monoclonal antibody directed against the F protein of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), which prevents RSV infection and is administered prophylactically to high-risk infants during the RSV season.
8. Ranibizumab (Lucentis): A recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody fragment that binds and inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A), used in the treatment of age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and other ocular disorders.
9. Cetuximab (Erbitux): A chimeric monoclonal antibody that binds to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), used in the treatment of colorectal cancer and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.
10. Adalimumab (Humira): A fully humanized monoclonal antibody that targets tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), used in the treatment of various inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and Crohn's disease.
11. Bevacizumab (Avastin): A recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to VEGF-A, used in the treatment of various cancers, including colorectal, lung, breast, and kidney cancer.
12. Trastuzumab (Herceptin): A humanized monoclonal antibody that targets HER2/neu receptor, used in the treatment of breast cancer.
13. Rituximab (Rituxan): A chimeric monoclonal antibody that binds to CD20 antigen on B cells, used in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and rheumatoid arthritis.
14. Palivizumab (Synagis): A humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to the F protein of respiratory syncytial virus, used in the prevention of respiratory syncytial virus infection in high-risk infants.
15. Infliximab (Remicade): A chimeric monoclonal antibody that targets TNF-α, used in the treatment of various inflammatory diseases, including Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, rheumatoid arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis.
16. Natalizumab (Tysabri): A humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to α4β1 integrin, used in the treatment of multiple sclerosis and Crohn's disease.
17. Adalimumab (Humira): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets TNF-α, used in the treatment of various inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, Crohn's disease, and ulcerative colitis.
18. Golimumab (Simponi): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets TNF-α, used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and ulcerative colitis.
19. Certolizumab pegol (Cimzia): A PEGylated Fab' fragment of a humanized monoclonal antibody that targets TNF-α, used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and Crohn's disease.
20. Ustekinumab (Stelara): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-12 and IL-23, used in the treatment of psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and Crohn's disease.
21. Secukinumab (Cosentyx): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-17A, used in the treatment of psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis.
22. Ixekizumab (Taltz): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-17A, used in the treatment of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.
23. Brodalumab (Siliq): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-17 receptor A, used in the treatment of psoriasis.
24. Sarilumab (Kevzara): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets the IL-6 receptor, used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.
25. Tocilizumab (Actemra): A humanized monoclonal antibody that targets the IL-6 receptor, used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis, polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis, giant cell arteritis, and chimeric antigen receptor T-cell-induced cytokine release syndrome.
26. Siltuximab (Sylvant): A chimeric monoclonal antibody that targets IL-6, used in the treatment of multicentric Castleman disease.
27. Satralizumab (Enspryng): A humanized monoclonal antibody that targets IL-6 receptor alpha, used in the treatment of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder.
28. Sirukumab (Plivensia): A human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-6, used in the treatment

Lipoxins are a group of naturally occurring, short-lived signaling molecules called eicosanoids that are derived from arachidonic acid, a type of omega-6 fatty acid. They were first discovered in the 1980s and are produced by cells involved in the inflammatory response, such as white blood cells (leukocytes).

Lipoxins have potent anti-inflammatory effects and play a crucial role in regulating and resolving the inflammatory response. They work by modulating the activity of various immune cells, including neutrophils, monocytes, and lymphocytes, and promoting the resolution of inflammation through the activation of anti-inflammatory pathways.

Lipoxins have been shown to have potential therapeutic applications in a variety of inflammatory diseases, such as asthma, arthritis, and inflammatory bowel disease. However, further research is needed to fully understand their mechanisms of action and therapeutic potential.

In the context of medical and biological sciences, a "binding site" refers to a specific location on a protein, molecule, or cell where another molecule can attach or bind. This binding interaction can lead to various functional changes in the original protein or molecule. The other molecule that binds to the binding site is often referred to as a ligand, which can be a small molecule, ion, or even another protein.

The binding between a ligand and its target binding site can be specific and selective, meaning that only certain ligands can bind to particular binding sites with high affinity. This specificity plays a crucial role in various biological processes, such as signal transduction, enzyme catalysis, or drug action.

In the case of drug development, understanding the location and properties of binding sites on target proteins is essential for designing drugs that can selectively bind to these sites and modulate protein function. This knowledge can help create more effective and safer therapeutic options for various diseases.

Blood platelets, also known as thrombocytes, are small, colorless cell fragments in our blood that play an essential role in normal blood clotting. They are formed in the bone marrow from large cells called megakaryocytes and circulate in the blood in an inactive state until they are needed to help stop bleeding. When a blood vessel is damaged, platelets become activated and change shape, releasing chemicals that attract more platelets to the site of injury. These activated platelets then stick together to form a plug, or clot, that seals the wound and prevents further blood loss. In addition to their role in clotting, platelets also help to promote healing by releasing growth factors that stimulate the growth of new tissue.

Diffusion chambers are devices used in tissue culture and microbiology to maintain a sterile environment while allowing for the exchange of nutrients, gases, or other molecules between two separate environments. In the context of cell or tissue culture, diffusion chambers are often used to maintain cells or tissues in a controlled environment while allowing them to interact with other cells, molecules, or drugs present in a separate compartment.

Culture diffusion chambers typically consist of two compartments separated by a semi-permeable membrane that allows for the passive diffusion of small molecules. One compartment contains the cells or tissues of interest, while the other compartment may contain various nutrients, growth factors, drugs, or other substances to be tested.

The use of diffusion chambers in cell and tissue culture has several advantages, including:

1. Maintaining a sterile environment for the cells or tissues being cultured.
2. Allowing for the exchange of nutrients, gases, or other molecules between the two compartments.
3. Enabling the study of cell-cell interactions and the effects of various substances on cell behavior without direct contact between the cells and the test substance.
4. Providing a means to culture sensitive or difficult-to-grow cells in a controlled environment.

Diffusion chambers are widely used in research settings, particularly in the fields of cell biology, tissue engineering, and drug development.

Inflammation mediators are substances that are released by the body in response to injury or infection, which contribute to the inflammatory response. These mediators include various chemical factors such as cytokines, chemokines, prostaglandins, leukotrienes, and histamine, among others. They play a crucial role in regulating the inflammatory process by attracting immune cells to the site of injury or infection, increasing blood flow to the area, and promoting the repair and healing of damaged tissues. However, an overactive or chronic inflammatory response can also contribute to the development of various diseases and conditions, such as autoimmune disorders, cardiovascular disease, and cancer.

Monokines are cytokines that are produced and released by monocytes, which are a type of white blood cell. These proteins play an important role in the immune response, including inflammation, immunoregulation, and hematopoiesis (the formation of blood cells).

Monokines include several types of cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 (IL-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and interleukin-12 (IL-12). These molecules help to regulate the activity of other immune cells, such as T cells and B cells, and can also have direct effects on infected or damaged tissues.

Monokines are involved in a variety of physiological and pathological processes, including host defense against infection, tissue repair and regeneration, and the development of chronic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and atherosclerosis.

Chemokines are a family of small signaling proteins that are involved in immune regulation and inflammation. They exert their effects by binding to specific G protein-coupled receptors on the surface of target cells, leading to various cellular responses such as chemotaxis (directed migration) of leukocytes (white blood cells).

The "C" designation in "Chemokines, C" refers to a subfamily of chemokines that share a specific pattern of cysteine residues in their amino acid sequence. Specifically, the first two cysteines in the N-terminal region are separated by one amino acid, which is different from other chemokine subfamilies.

Chemokines, C can be further divided into two major groups based on the presence or absence of an ELR (glutamic acid-leucine-arginine) motif before the first cysteine residue:

* ELR+ chemokines, which have the ELR motif and are generally involved in neutrophil recruitment.
* ELR- chemokines, which lack the ELR motif and are typically involved in lymphocyte migration.

Examples of ELR+ Chemokines, C include CXCL1, CXCL2, CXCL3, CXCL5, CXCL6, and CXCL8 (also known as IL-8). Examples of ELR- Chemokines, C include CXCL4, CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL11, CXCL12, CXCL13, and CXCL16.

Chemokines, C play important roles in various physiological and pathological processes, including development, tissue homeostasis, inflammation, immune response, angiogenesis, and cancer progression. Dysregulation of chemokine signaling has been implicated in a variety of diseases, such as autoimmune disorders, infections, and malignancies.

Gene expression is the process by which the information encoded in a gene is used to synthesize a functional gene product, such as a protein or RNA molecule. This process involves several steps: transcription, RNA processing, and translation. During transcription, the genetic information in DNA is copied into a complementary RNA molecule, known as messenger RNA (mRNA). The mRNA then undergoes RNA processing, which includes adding a cap and tail to the mRNA and splicing out non-coding regions called introns. The resulting mature mRNA is then translated into a protein on ribosomes in the cytoplasm through the process of translation.

The regulation of gene expression is a complex and highly controlled process that allows cells to respond to changes in their environment, such as growth factors, hormones, and stress signals. This regulation can occur at various stages of gene expression, including transcriptional activation or repression, RNA processing, mRNA stability, and translation. Dysregulation of gene expression has been implicated in many diseases, including cancer, genetic disorders, and neurological conditions.

Mast cells are a type of white blood cell that are found in connective tissues throughout the body, including the skin, respiratory tract, and gastrointestinal tract. They play an important role in the immune system and help to defend the body against pathogens by releasing chemicals such as histamine, heparin, and leukotrienes, which help to attract other immune cells to the site of infection or injury. Mast cells also play a role in allergic reactions, as they release histamine and other chemicals in response to exposure to an allergen, leading to symptoms such as itching, swelling, and redness. They are derived from hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow and mature in the tissues where they reside.

In medical terms, the skin is the largest organ of the human body. It consists of two main layers: the epidermis (outer layer) and dermis (inner layer), as well as accessory structures like hair follicles, sweat glands, and oil glands. The skin plays a crucial role in protecting us from external factors such as bacteria, viruses, and environmental hazards, while also regulating body temperature and enabling the sense of touch.

Antibodies are proteins produced by the immune system in response to the presence of a foreign substance, such as a bacterium or virus. They are capable of identifying and binding to specific antigens (foreign substances) on the surface of these invaders, marking them for destruction by other immune cells. Antibodies are also known as immunoglobulins and come in several different types, including IgA, IgD, IgE, IgG, and IgM, each with a unique function in the immune response. They are composed of four polypeptide chains, two heavy chains and two light chains, that are held together by disulfide bonds. The variable regions of the heavy and light chains form the antigen-binding site, which is specific to a particular antigen.

Anaphylatoxins are a group of small protein molecules that are released during an immune response, specifically as a result of the activation of the complement system. The term "anaphylatoxin" comes from their ability to induce anaphylaxis, a severe and rapid allergic reaction. There are three main anaphylatoxins, known as C3a, C4a, and C5a, which are derived from the cleavage of complement components C3, C4, and C5, respectively.

Anaphylatoxins play a crucial role in the immune response by attracting and activating various immune cells, such as neutrophils, eosinophils, and mast cells, to the site of infection or injury. They also increase vascular permeability, causing fluid to leak out of blood vessels and leading to tissue swelling. Additionally, anaphylatoxins can induce smooth muscle contraction, which can result in bronchoconstriction and hypotension.

While anaphylatoxins are important for the immune response, they can also contribute to the pathogenesis of various inflammatory diseases, such as asthma, arthritis, and sepsis. Therefore, therapies that target the complement system and anaphylatoxin production have been developed and are being investigated as potential treatments for these conditions.

Luminescent measurements refer to the quantitative assessment of the emission of light from a substance that has been excited, typically through some form of energy input such as electrical energy or radiation. In the context of medical diagnostics and research, luminescent measurements can be used in various applications, including bioluminescence imaging, which is used to study biological processes at the cellular and molecular level.

Bioluminescence occurs when a chemical reaction produces light within a living organism, often through the action of enzymes such as luciferase. By introducing a luciferase gene into cells or organisms, researchers can use bioluminescent measurements to track cellular processes and monitor gene expression in real time.

Luminescent measurements may also be used in medical research to study the properties of materials used in medical devices, such as LEDs or optical fibers, or to develop new diagnostic tools based on light-emitting nanoparticles or other luminescent materials.

In summary, luminescent measurements are a valuable tool in medical research and diagnostics, providing a non-invasive way to study biological processes and develop new technologies for disease detection and treatment.

Bone marrow cells are the types of cells found within the bone marrow, which is the spongy tissue inside certain bones in the body. The main function of bone marrow is to produce blood cells. There are two types of bone marrow: red and yellow. Red bone marrow is where most blood cell production takes place, while yellow bone marrow serves as a fat storage site.

The three main types of bone marrow cells are:

1. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs): These are immature cells that can differentiate into any type of blood cell, including red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. They have the ability to self-renew, meaning they can divide and create more hematopoietic stem cells.
2. Red blood cell progenitors: These are immature cells that will develop into mature red blood cells, also known as erythrocytes. Red blood cells carry oxygen from the lungs to the body's tissues and carbon dioxide back to the lungs.
3. Myeloid and lymphoid white blood cell progenitors: These are immature cells that will develop into various types of white blood cells, which play a crucial role in the body's immune system by fighting infections and diseases. Myeloid progenitors give rise to granulocytes (neutrophils, eosinophils, and basophils), monocytes, and megakaryocytes (which eventually become platelets). Lymphoid progenitors differentiate into B cells, T cells, and natural killer (NK) cells.

Bone marrow cells are essential for maintaining a healthy blood cell count and immune system function. Abnormalities in bone marrow cells can lead to various medical conditions, such as anemia, leukopenia, leukocytosis, thrombocytopenia, or thrombocytosis, depending on the specific type of blood cell affected. Additionally, bone marrow cells are often used in transplantation procedures to treat patients with certain types of cancer, such as leukemia and lymphoma, or other hematologic disorders.

Lymphocyte homing receptors are specialized molecules found on the surface of lymphocytes (white blood cells that include T-cells and B-cells), which play a crucial role in the immune system's response to infection and disease. These receptors facilitate the targeted migration and trafficking of lymphocytes from the bloodstream to specific secondary lymphoid organs, such as lymph nodes, spleen, and Peyer's patches in the intestines, where they can encounter antigens and mount an immune response.

The homing receptors consist of two main components: adhesion molecules and chemokine receptors. Adhesion molecules, such as selectins and integrins, mediate the initial attachment and rolling of lymphocytes along the endothelial cells that line the blood vessels in lymphoid organs. Chemokine receptors, on the other hand, interact with chemokines (a type of cytokine) that are secreted by the endothelial cells and stromal cells within the lymphoid organs. This interaction triggers a signaling cascade that activates integrins, leading to their firm adhesion to the endothelium and subsequent transmigration into the lymphoid tissue.

The specificity of this homing process is determined by the unique combination of adhesion molecules and chemokine receptors expressed on different subsets of lymphocytes, which allows them to home to distinct anatomical locations in response to various chemokine gradients. This targeted migration ensures that the immune system can effectively mount a rapid and localized response against pathogens while minimizing unnecessary inflammation in other parts of the body.

GTP-binding protein alpha subunits, Gi-Go, are a type of heterotrimeric G proteins that play a crucial role in signal transduction pathways associated with many hormones and neurotransmitters. These G proteins are composed of three subunits: alpha, beta, and gamma. The "Gi-Go" specifically refers to the alpha subunit of these G proteins, which can exist in two isoforms, Gi and Go.

When a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) is activated by an agonist, it undergoes a conformational change that allows it to act as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF). The GEF activity of the GPCR promotes the exchange of GDP for GTP on the alpha subunit of the heterotrimeric G protein. Once GTP is bound, the alpha subunit dissociates from the beta-gamma dimer and can then interact with downstream effectors to modulate various cellular responses.

The Gi-Go alpha subunits are inhibitory in nature, meaning that they typically inhibit the activity of adenylyl cyclase, an enzyme responsible for converting ATP to cAMP. This reduction in cAMP levels can have downstream effects on various cellular processes, such as gene transcription, ion channel regulation, and metabolic pathways.

In summary, GTP-binding protein alpha subunits, Gi-Go, are heterotrimeric G proteins that play an essential role in signal transduction pathways by modulating adenylyl cyclase activity upon GPCR activation, ultimately influencing various cellular responses through cAMP regulation.

Down-regulation is a process that occurs in response to various stimuli, where the number or sensitivity of cell surface receptors or the expression of specific genes is decreased. This process helps maintain homeostasis within cells and tissues by reducing the ability of cells to respond to certain signals or molecules.

In the context of cell surface receptors, down-regulation can occur through several mechanisms:

1. Receptor internalization: After binding to their ligands, receptors can be internalized into the cell through endocytosis. Once inside the cell, these receptors may be degraded or recycled back to the cell surface in smaller numbers.
2. Reduced receptor synthesis: Down-regulation can also occur at the transcriptional level, where the expression of genes encoding for specific receptors is decreased, leading to fewer receptors being produced.
3. Receptor desensitization: Prolonged exposure to a ligand can lead to a decrease in receptor sensitivity or affinity, making it more difficult for the cell to respond to the signal.

In the context of gene expression, down-regulation refers to the decreased transcription and/or stability of specific mRNAs, leading to reduced protein levels. This process can be induced by various factors, including microRNA (miRNA)-mediated regulation, histone modification, or DNA methylation.

Down-regulation is an essential mechanism in many physiological processes and can also contribute to the development of several diseases, such as cancer and neurodegenerative disorders.

Methyltransferases are a class of enzymes that catalyze the transfer of a methyl group (-CH3) from a donor molecule to an acceptor molecule, which is often a protein, DNA, or RNA. This transfer of a methyl group can modify the chemical and physical properties of the acceptor molecule, playing a crucial role in various cellular processes such as gene expression, signal transduction, and DNA repair.

In biochemistry, methyltransferases are classified based on the type of donor molecule they use for the transfer of the methyl group. The most common methyl donor is S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), a universal methyl group donor found in many organisms. Methyltransferases that utilize SAM as a cofactor are called SAM-dependent methyltransferases.

Abnormal regulation or function of methyltransferases has been implicated in several diseases, including cancer and neurological disorders. Therefore, understanding the structure, function, and regulation of these enzymes is essential for developing targeted therapies to treat these conditions.

Anti-inflammatory agents are a class of drugs or substances that reduce inflammation in the body. They work by inhibiting the production of inflammatory mediators, such as prostaglandins and leukotrienes, which are released during an immune response and contribute to symptoms like pain, swelling, redness, and warmth.

There are two main types of anti-inflammatory agents: steroidal and nonsteroidal. Steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (SAIDs) include corticosteroids, which mimic the effects of hormones produced by the adrenal gland. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are a larger group that includes both prescription and over-the-counter medications, such as aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen, and celecoxib.

While both types of anti-inflammatory agents can be effective in reducing inflammation and relieving symptoms, they differ in their mechanisms of action, side effects, and potential risks. Long-term use of NSAIDs, for example, can increase the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding, kidney damage, and cardiovascular events. Corticosteroids can have significant side effects as well, particularly with long-term use, including weight gain, mood changes, and increased susceptibility to infections.

It's important to use anti-inflammatory agents only as directed by a healthcare provider, and to be aware of potential risks and interactions with other medications or health conditions.

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The aberrant chemotaxis of leukocytes and lymphocytes also contribute to inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis, asthma ... Chemotaxis Neutrophil Chemotaxis Cell Migration Gateway Downloadable Matlab chemotaxis simulator Bacterial Chemotaxis ... Chemotaxis (from chemo- + taxis) is the movement of an organism or entity in response to a chemical stimulus. Somatic cells, ... Positive chemotaxis occurs if the movement is toward a higher concentration of the chemical in question; negative chemotaxis if ...
Leukocyte chemotaxis: Methodology, physiology, clinical implications. New York.: Raven Press. O'Flaherty JT, Showell HJ, ... fMLF led to the first discovery of a leukocyte receptor for a chemotactic factor, defined three different types of fMLF ... In 1887, Élie Metchnikoff observed that leukocytes isolated from the blood of various animals were attracted towards certain ... I. {{cite journal}}: Cite uses generic title (help) Harris H (Jul 1954). "Role of chemotaxis in inflammation". Physiological ...
Further, Slit2 participates in inhibiting leukocyte chemotaxis. In rats, Slit1 was found in the neurons of adult and fetal ...
He developed the first reliable in vitro technology to quantify leukocyte chemotaxis. His work led to the standard methodology ... Snyderman, R.; Goetzl, E. J. (August 21, 1981). "Molecular and cellular mechanisms of leukocyte chemotaxis". Science. 213 (4510 ... There, he had the opportunity to learn how to separate proteins, measure cellular chemotaxis, and make an important biomedical ... His laboratory successfully discovered important aspects of the role of the complement system and cytokines in leukocyte ...
2010). Methods for Quantitation of Leukocyte Chemotaxis and Fugetaxis. T-Cell Trafficking. F. M. Marelli-Berg and S. Nourshargh ... 2001). "The neuronal repellent Slit inhibits leukocyte chemotaxis induced by chemotactic factors". Nature. 410 (6831): 948-952 ... Leukocytes can exhibit active chemorepulsion away from a factor that is normally considered to stimulate chemoattraction ... Other innate leukocytes include natural killer cells, mast cells, eosinophils, basophils, macrophages, and dendritic cells. ...
Turner SR, Campbell JA, Lynn WS (June 1975). "Polymorphonulcear leukocyte chemotaxis toward oxidized lipid components of cell ... Leukocyte-type 12-lipoxygenase in these animal species shares 73-86% amino acid identity with human ALOX15 but only 57-66% ... In 1975, the first biological activity was attached to this metabolite in studies showing that it simulated the chemotaxis of ... Studies on rodents lacking or made deficient in the leukocyte-type 12-lipoxygenase, Alox12 (which is most closely related to ...
Resolution of inflammation by retrograde chemotaxis of neutrophils in transgenic zebrafish. Journal of Leukocyte Biology, 80(6 ... By 2005, her research team had identified a novel pathway that turned out to be critical for cell migration and chemotaxis, ... In 2011 her group reported the first redox sensor that mediates leukocyte attraction to wounds. In 2005 she was elected a ... that regulate cell migration and identified basic adhesive mechanisms that regulate cell migration and leukocyte chemotaxis. ...
... activation mediates leukocyte chemotaxis toward TAAR1 agonists. TAAR1 agonists (specifically, trace amines) have also ... Leukocytes ...Pancreatic islet β cells ... Primary Tonsillar B Cells ... Circulating leukocytes of healthy subjects ( ... Babusyte A, Kotthoff M, Fiedler J, Krautwurst D (March 2013). "Biogenic amines activate blood leukocytes via trace amine- ... Response measured: cAMP accumulation ... Activation of leukocytes Species: Human Tissue: PMN, T and B cells Response measured: ...
2001). "The neuronal repellent Slit inhibits leukocyte chemotaxis induced by chemotactic factors". Nature. 410 (6831): 948-52. ... Wong K; Park HT; Wu JY; Rao Y (2003). "Slit proteins: molecular guidance cues for cells ranging from neurons to leukocytes". ...
These bacteria are not mediators of osteoclast activity but do cause leukocyte chemotaxis. Leukocytes differentiate into ...
Zigmond S.H. (1977). "Ability of polymorphonuclear leukocytes to orient in gradients of chemotactic factors". Journal of Cell ... Chemotaxis Cell Migration Gateway Cytometric chemotaxis and cell migration assay Free tool based on ImageJ to analyse ... Zicha D.; Dunn G.A.; Brown A.F. (1991). "A new direct-viewing chemotaxis chamber". J Cell Sci. 99 (4): 769-75. doi:10.1242/jcs. ... Chemotaxis assays are experimental tools for evaluation of chemotactic ability of prokaryotic or eukaryotic cells. A wide ...
This reduces leukocyte adhesion and infiltration into tissues, while also limiting damage to underlying tissue. APC supports ... endothelial barrier function and reduces chemotaxis. APC inhibits the release of inflammatory-response mediators in leukocytes ... and it is these cells and leukocytes (white blood cells) that APC affects.: 34 : 3162 Because of the crucial role that protein ... Activated leukocytes release these inflammatory mediators during inflammation, inhibiting the creation of both thrombomodulin ...
"The effect of verapamil and other calcium antagonists on chemotaxis of polymorphonuclear leukocytes". Biochemical Pharmacology ...
The adhesion defects result in poor leukocyte chemotaxis, particularly neutrophil, inability to form pus and neutrophilia. ... Leukocyte adhesion cascade Congenital disorder of glycosylation "Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency: Immunodeficiency Disorders: ... Types of leukocyte adhesion deficiency include LAD1, LAD2, and LAD3. LAD1 is the most common. Patients with LAD1 have an ... Leukocyte adhesion deficiency (LAD) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by immunodeficiency resulting in ...
It is named after Morton McCutcheon who introduced it to describe chemotaxis in leukocytes. Chemotaxis in Leukocytes Archived ... The index is used to evaluate movements of, for example, leukocytes, bacteria, or amoebae. ...
Journal of Leukocyte Biology. 67 (6): 869-75. doi:10.1002/jlb.67.6.869. PMID 10857861. S2CID 28719955. This article ... "Serum-induced monocyte differentiation and monocyte chemotaxis are regulated by the p38 MAP kinase signal transduction pathway ...
The effect of these gene knockouts appeared due to faulty leukocyte function and other causes leading to a breakdown in the ... and exhibit chemotaxis in response to H. pylori-derived peptide Hp(2-20)". Journal of Immunology. 172 (12): 7734-43. doi: ... "Evaluation of human leukocyte N-formylpeptide receptor (FPR1) SNPs in aggressive periodontitis patients". Genes and Immunity. 4 ... Journal of Leukocyte Biology. 67 (6): 869-75. doi:10.1002/jlb.67.6.869. PMID 10857861. S2CID 28719955. This article ...
The first studies of leukocyte killing in the presence of specific antiserum were performed by Joseph Denys and Joseph Leclef, ... I. Harris H (July 1954). "Role of chemotaxis in inflammation". Physiological Reviews. 34 (3): 529-62. doi:10.1152/physrev. ... In 1887, he observed that leukocytes isolated from the blood of various animals were attracted towards certain bacteria. ... Ward PA, Lepow IH, Newman LJ (April 1968). "Bacterial factors chemotactic for polymorphonuclear leukocytes". The American ...
Another example of an innovative drug delivery system that uses the property of chemotaxis is leukocytes. Indeed, during ... For example, Leukocytes cannot penetrate deeply into the tumors, have a low capacity for carrying drugs, and slow down when the ... In general terms, chemotaxis is a biological process where living entities, such as cells or organisms, detect, maneuver, and ... Chemotaxis also plays an essential role in serval diseases, such as tumor metastasis, the recruitment of T-lymphocytes during ...
Here OPN knock-out mast cells were cultured and they observed a decreased level of chemotaxis in these cells compared to ... OPN binds to several integrin receptors including α4β1, α9β1, and α9β4 expressed by leukocytes. These receptors have been well- ... Seiffge D (December 1996). "Protective effects of monoclonal antibody to VLA-4 on leukocyte adhesion and course of disease in ... Burdo TH, Wood MR, Fox HS (June 2007). "Osteopontin prevents monocyte recirculation and apoptosis". Journal of Leukocyte ...
Leukocytes make up roughly 1% of the total blood cells in the average human body. Leukocytes maintain the expression of CD47 ... The distinct chemotaxis behavior of neutrophils allows for localized targeting of cancer sites using manipulated neutrophils. ... Leukocytes, otherwise known as white blood cells (WBCs), come in various types and generally circulate around the body to ... There exists leukocytes that do not circulate but instead remain in a particular tissue. These include histiocytes and ...
Sialyl-Lewisx is important in leukocyte tethering and rolling. Leukocytes move through the blood stream and then tether ... Sialyl-Lewisx mediates phagocytosis and chemotaxis, found on neutrophils; expressed in patients with Hodgkin disease, some B- ... Sialyl-Lewisx is a necessary partner for the three selectins that bind the leukocyte and endothelial cells. When sialyl-Lewisx ... Sialyl Lewis x is being researched for detection and treatment of immune disorders because of its presence on leukocytes. ...
ISBN 978-0-12-849905-4 Gallin, J. I. and Quie, P. G. "Leukocyte Chemotaxis: Methods, Physiology and Clinical Implications." New ... Human Services Secretary's Award for Distinguished Service 2002 Society for Leukocyte Biology Marie T. Bonazinga Lifetime ... microtubule and microfilament orientation and function during chemotaxis". Journal of Cell Biology. 75 (3): 666-693. doi: ...
70, 203-209 (1979). "Measurement of leukocyte motility and chemotaxis parameters using a quantitative analysis of the under- ... "Effects of cell motility and chemotaxis on microbial population growth" (with D. Lauffenburger and K. Keller). Biophys. J. 40, ...
Devreotes, P.N. and Zigmond, S.H. (1988) Chemotaxis in eukaryotic cells: a focus on leukocytes and Dictyostelium. Annu Rev Cell ... Eisenbach, M. (2004) Chemotaxis. Imperial College Press, London. Miller, R.L. (1997) Specificity of sperm chemotaxis among ... In some species (for example, herring or the ascidian Ciona) activation of motility precedes chemotaxis. In chemotaxis, cells ... chemotaxis was substantiated as the cause of this accumulation. Sperm chemotaxis was later also demonstrated in mice and ...
Ligands that activate DP2 stimulate the in vitro chemotaxis (i.e. directed migration) of leukocytes active in mediating ... PGD2, acting through DP2, stimulates the in vitro chemotaxis of CD8+ cells, although the contribution of this to the in vivo ... DP2 was found to stimulate the directed movement or chemotaxis of human T-helper type 2 cells (see T helper cell#Th1/Th2 Model ... "Prostaglandin D2 selectively induces chemotaxis in T helper type 2 cells, eosinophils, and basophils via seven-transmembrane ...
Chemotaxis towards an injured cell". Antibiot. Chemother. 19: 369-81. doi:10.1159/000395442. PMID 4463832. Hu CL, Barnes FS ( ... see interactions of leukocytes with corpse of dead cells). Composition of the substances inducing necrotaxis is rather complex ... Necrotaxis embodies a special type of chemotaxis when the chemoattractant molecules are released from necrotic or apoptotic ... "A particular form of chemotaxis: necrotaxis. An historical view". Blood Cells. 19 (1): 5-19. PMID 8400312. Ragot R. (1993). " ...
Lipocortin-1 both suppresses phospholipase A2, thereby blocking eicosanoid production, and inhibits various leukocyte ... inflammatory events (epithelial adhesion, emigration, chemotaxis, phagocytosis, respiratory burst, etc.). In other words, ... secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor 1 (SLPI), and Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase (MAPK phosphatase) Increased ...
The lack of CR3 interferes with chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and respiratory burst Flow cytometry with monoclonal antibodies is ... Leukocyte adhesion deficiency Etzioni A, Harlan JM. Cell adhesion and leukocyte adhesion defects. In: Ochs HD, Smith CIE, Puck ... Leukocyte adhesion deficiency-1 (LAD1) is a rare and often fatal genetic disorder in humans. The main sign of the disease is ... Etzioni, A. (2010). "Defects in the leukocyte adhesion cascade". Clinic Rev Allerg Immunol. 38 (1): 54-60. doi:10.1007/s12016- ...
... both suppresses phospholipase A2, thereby blocking eicosanoid production, and inhibits various leukocyte ... inflammatory events (epithelial adhesion, emigration, chemotaxis, phagocytosis, respiratory burst, etc.). In other words, ...
leukocyte chemotaxis involved in immune response. go back to main search page ...
Dive into the research topics of Psoriasis and leukocyte chemotaxis. Together they form a unique fingerprint. ...
"Human mononuclear leukocyte chemotaxis: a quantitative assay for humoral and cellular chemotactic factors." J Immunol 108, no. ... Human mononuclear leukocyte chemotaxis: a quantitative assay for humoral and cellular chemotactic factors.. Publication , ... "Human mononuclear leukocyte chemotaxis: a quantitative assay for humoral and cellular chemotactic factors." J Immunol, vol. 108 ... Human mononuclear leukocyte chemotaxis: a quantitative assay for humoral and cellular chemotactic factors. J Immunol. 1972 Mar; ...
"Leukocyte chemotaxis in recurrent polyserositis (familial Mediterranean fever)",. abstract = "Polymorphonuclear leukocyte ... Leukocyte chemotaxis in recurrent polyserositis (familial Mediterranean fever). / Bar-Eli, M.; Ehrenfeld, M.; Levy, M. et al. ... Leukocyte chemotaxis in recurrent polyserositis (familial Mediterranean fever). M. Bar-Eli, M. Ehrenfeld, M. Levy, R. Gallily, ... Leukocyte chemotaxis in recurrent polyserositis (familial Mediterranean fever). In: Unknown Journal. 1981 ; Vol. 281, No. 1. pp ...
The mechanism of leukocyte locomotion. In: Gallin JL, Quie PG, eds. Leukocyte Chemotaxis. New York: Raven Press, 1978:143-57. ... The motor of ameboid leukocytes. Biochem Soc Symp. 1980; 45:51-63. 39. Becker EL, Stossel TP. Chemotaxis. Fed Proc. 1980; 39: ... The motor of leukocytes. Fed Proc. 1984; 43:2760-2763. 56. Stossel TP. Contribution of actin to the cytoplasmic matrix. J. Cell ... The motor of leukocytes and platelets. In: The Molecular Biology of the Arterial Wall. G. Schettler, ed., Springer-Verlag. 1987 ...
Proteolytic cascades trigger blood clotting, fibrinolysis, and complement activation, while proteases released upon leukocyte ... and local intratissue leukocyte positioning via chemotaxis, modulation of attractant activities by proteases may have profound ... This report reviews the emerging literature describing a novel class of proteolytic targets, leukocyte chemoattractants, and, ... As chemoattractants are critical for both systemic leukocyte positioning by triggering integrin activation and subsequent ...
keywords = "Andrograpanin, CXCR4, Chemokine, Chemotaxis, Internalization, Leukocyte, SDF-1α",. author = "Ji, {Li Li} and Zhu ... enhances chemokine SDF-1α-induced leukocytes chemotaxis. / Ji, Li Li; Wang, Zhu; Dong, Fang et al. In: Journal of Cellular ... enhances chemokine SDF-1α-induced leukocytes chemotaxis, Journal of Cellular Biochemistry, vol. 95, no. 5, pp. 970-978. https ... enhances chemokine SDF-1α-induced leukocytes chemotaxis. In: Journal of Cellular Biochemistry. 2005 ; Vol. 95, No. 5. pp. 970- ...
Chemotaxis Assay. We examined the effect of MSC-Exo on the chemotaxis of leukocytesin vitro. In this experiment, the indicator ... The effect of MSC-exo on the chemotaxis of leukocytes. IRBP-specific spleen monocytes prepared from immunized rat on day 12 ... Analysis of the leukocytes infiltration in eyes. (A and B) On day 15 after immunization, representive figures of FACS analysis ... MSC-Exo treatment reduced leukocyte infiltration in the eye. To further determine the effects of MSC-Exo treatment on the ...
Leukocyte function in elasmobranch species: Phagocytosis/chemotaxis. In: "Immunobiology of the Shark." (S Smith, R Sim and M ...
Data suggest impaired leukocyte function, including altered chemotaxis and phagocytic activity. Tight control of serum glucose ...
Stephens L, Ellson C, Hawkins P. Roles of PI3Ks in leukocyte chemotaxis and phagocytosis. Curr Opin Cell Biol. 2002;14(2):203- ... Activated factor XI inhibits chemotaxis of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. J Leukoc Biol. 2011;90(5):923-927.. View this article ... WT (D), F12-/- (F), and Plaur-/- (H). Chemotaxis rates of neutrophils from each indicated genotype as determined by the slope ... uPAR appeared to mediate FXII-induced chemotaxis, since Plaur-/- neutrophils had no significant chemotaxis in response to FXII/ ...
Polymorphonuclear leukocyte chemotaxis in generalized pustular psoriasis. Acta Derm Venereol. 1987. 67(4):326-30. [QxMD MEDLINE ... Enhanced polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMNL) chemotaxis is much more pronounced in pustular psoriasis than in psoriasis vulgaris ... several new pathways involved directly and indirectly with neutrophil chemotaxis have been the topic of recent investigations. ...
Complement can then alter endothelial function to enhance thrombosis and leukocyte chemotaxis. When this occurs acutely, most ... Leukocytes Platelets Monocytes Neutrophils. C1q. Up-regulation of phagocytic capacity Protein chaperone. ... These readily diffusible complement components have a variety of functions, including chemotaxis and release of histamine from ... Chemokine receptor CCR1 but not CCR5 mediates leukocyte recruitment and subsequent renal fibrosis after unilateral ureteral ...
C-C chemokine-induced eosinophil chemotaxis during allergic airway inflammation. J Leukocyte Biol. 1996;60:573-8 ... A transmigratory cup in leukocyte diapedesis both through individual vascular endothelial cells and between them. J Cell Biol. ... and is associated with the transmigration of inflammatory leukocytes [36]. The application of PVP-I induced the highest levels ... which acts as a chemoattractant that induces eosinophil chemotaxis to lesions in allergic respiratory diseases [30]. ...
2012). IL1beta induces mesenchymal stem cells migration and leucocyte chemotaxis through NF-kappaB. Stem Cell Rev. Rep. 8, 905- ...
Chemotaxis, Leukocyte * Cytosol/metabolism * Humans * Kinetics * N-Formylmethionine Leucyl-Phenylalanine * Neutrophils/cytology ...
Chemotaxis, Leukocyte. 2. 2006. 59. 0.140. Why? Follow-Up Studies. 2. 2019 ...
Jobs syndrome is an immunodeficiency disorder with defect in leukocyte chemotaxis in some patients. It is also called hyper ...
Effect of Growth Hormone-Releasing Hormone on Human Peripheral Blood Leukocyte Chemotaxis and Migration in Normal Subjects ... Magdolna Horváth, Tibor Bakács; Effect of Cytostatics on the Migration of Leukocytes. Oncology 1 January 1982; 39 (1): 29-30. ... generally applied in the treatment of human cancer were tested on the motility of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. In the ...
Nitrogen utilisation, enzyme activity, glucose tolerance and leucocyte chemotaxis in human experimental zinc depletion. Am ...
... transcriptome and ultrastructure analysis reveals a TLR2-specific chemotaxis signature and cytoskeleton remodeling in leukocyte ...
Bradykinin increases vascular permeability, promotes vasodilatation, induces leukocyte chemotaxis, and activates nociceptors. ... some of which increase vascular permeability and chemotaxis of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Leukotriene B4 results in the ... activate leukocyte migration, and sensitize nociceptors; and the enzyme lipoxygenase results in the formation of leukotrienes, ... increased leukocyte migration, and increased sensitivity of nociceptors. ...
Chemotaxis, Leukocyte. MESH. Humans. MESH. Incubators. MESH. Lymphocytes. MESH. Monocytes/classification. MESH. ... Human monocyte chemotaxis: migrating cells are a subpopulation with multiple chemotaxin specificities on each cell. ... of cells migrating toward a given concentration of chemotaxin was directly proportional to the number added to the chemotaxis ... of cells migrating toward a given concentration of chemotaxin was directly proportional to the number added to the chemotaxis ...
BLT1 is a high-affinity receptor specific for LTB4, which is expressed primarily in leukocytes and mediates chemotaxis [25]; ... The endothelium activation contributes to the regulation of vascular tone, haemostasis, and blood leukocyte recruitment and ... "A G-protein-coupled receptor for leukotriene B4 that mediates chemotaxis," Nature, vol. 387, no. 6633, pp. 620-624, 1997. ... "endothelial dysfunction" having antihemostatic properties, regulating vascular tone, determining a heightened leukocyte ...
4-S1). CWO treatment of tumors stimulated inflammatory response and chemotaxis pathways. Additionally, myeloid leukocyte ... and leukocyte chemotaxis. Based on this intriguing finding, we postulated that CWO treatment of keratinocytes stimulates immune ...
... to determine whether effects on lung in-vitro are predicted by leukocyte chemotaxis, ciliary inhibition and fibroblast ...
Inhibition of leukocyte chemotaxis by factor in alloxan-induced diabetic rat plasma. MAA Pereira, P Sannomiya, JG Leme ... Inhibition of leukocyte chemotaxis by serum factor in diabetes mellitus: selective depression of cell responses mediated by ... Inhibition of eosinophil chemotaxis by chronic blockade of nitric oxide biosynthesis. HHA Ferreira, MV Medeiros, CSP Lima, CA ... Effect of fatty acids on leukocyte function. C Pomp ia, LR Lopes, CK Miyasaka, J Proc pio, P Sannomiya, R Curi ...
  • sRAGE can enhance chemotaxis and promote maturation and differentiation of monocytes. (nih.gov)
  • monocytes ( CL:0000576 ) - Myeloid mononuclear recirculating leukocyte that can act as a precursor of tissue macrophages, osteoclasts and some populations of tissue dendritic cells. (guidetoimmunopharmacology.org)
  • The addition of chemoattractants to polymorphonuclear leukocyte suspensions evoked a single wave of increased light transmission, whereas the perpendicular scattering measurement demonstrated a previously unrecognized biphasic response. (jci.org)
  • C and its relationship to polymorphonuclear leukocyte chemotaxis in aggressive periodontitis. (cdc.gov)
  • 22. Abnormalities of chemotactic lymphokine synthesis and mononuclear leukocyte chemotaxis in Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome. (nih.gov)
  • Low doses of aliphatic alcohols, which have been shown to enhance chemotaxis but to inhibit secretion and superoxide anion production, abolished the slow perpendicular light-scattering response but left the fast response intact. (jci.org)
  • Chemotaxis is directional cell migration guided by extracellular chemoattractant gradients. (nih.gov)
  • Microtubules (MTs) are required for persistent migration and chemotaxis, but how they affect cell polarity is not known. (exeter.ac.uk)
  • Chemokines are a superfamily of 8- to 10-kDa soluble chemotactic cytokines that bind to their connate G protein-coupled receptors to cause a cellular response, such as migration, adhesion, or chemotaxis. (molvis.org)
  • They are produced by tissue cells and leukocytes and regulate leukocyte migration in inflammatory and immune processes. (molvis.org)
  • van Buul JD, van Alphen FP, Hordijk PL. The presence of alpha-catenin in the VE-cadherin complex is required for efficient transendothelial migration of leukocytes. (ijbs.com)
  • This VE-cadherin-catenin complex is believed to dynamically control endothelial cell-cell junctions and to regulate the passage of leukocytes, although not much is known about the role of alpha- and beta-catenin during the process of transendothelial migration (TEM). (ijbs.com)
  • We and others have previously reported that inhibition of VE-cadherin function by the use of blocking antibodies promotes transendothelial migration of neutrophils and CD34 + cells in vitro and in vivo [ 6 - 8 ], suggesting that VE-cadherin mediates transendothelial migration of leukocytes. (ijbs.com)
  • Therefore, employing 2D and 3D computer-assisted motion analysis systems, we have analyzed the basic motile behavior and chemotactic responsiveness of individual polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) of 14 clinically diagnosed SDS patients. (nih.gov)
  • The biphasic nature of the light-scattering responses to chemoattractants, moreover, correlates with the dual regulation of the chemotactic and secretory responses of leukocytes. (jci.org)
  • Once in the interstitial fluid , leukocytes migrate along a chemotactic gradient towards the site of injury or infection. (wikidoc.org)
  • Interplay between computational simulation and experimental verification allowed her to propose a novel model, specifically a local inhibitory model, in GPCR-mediated chemotaxis to identify new components and novel signaling pathways essential for chemotaxis. (nih.gov)
  • The central hypothesis is that DHA attenuates hyperoxia- induced lung injury by decreasing leukocyte chemotaxis, through altering RAGE expression and signaling pathways. (nih.gov)
  • Transmigration of the leukocyte occurs as PECAM proteins, found on the leukocyte and endothelial cell surfaces, interact and effectively pull the cell through the endothelium. (wikidoc.org)
  • Measurement of Ca 2+ levels in peripheral blood leukocytes endogenously expressing the CCR6 receptor. (guidetopharmacology.org)
  • Measurement of chemotaxis of peripheral blood leukocytes endogenously the CCR6 receptor. (guidetopharmacology.org)
  • Measurement of chemotaxis of HEK 293 cells transfected with the human CCR6 receptor. (guidetopharmacology.org)
  • Evaluation of human leukocyte N-formylpeptide receptor (FPR1) SNPs in aggressive periodontitis patients. (cdc.gov)
  • At the same time, chemokines released by macrophages activate the rolling leukocytes and cause surface integrin molecules to switch from the default low-affinity state to a high-affinity state. (wikidoc.org)
  • Leukocyte adhesion deficiency (LAD) is a rare primary immunodeficiency. (medscape.com)
  • Thus the infections in patients with leukocyte adhesion deficiency act similarly as those observed in patients with neutropenia. (medscape.com)
  • Labial ulceration from which Escherichia coli was cultured in an 8-month-old girl with leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1 (LAD I). Note the thin bluish scar at the superior aspect of the labia from an earlier cellulitis. (medscape.com)
  • This 3-year-old girl had leukocyte adhesion deficiency type I (LAD I) with complete absence of CD18 expression. (medscape.com)
  • This 10-month-old patient with severe leukocyte adhesion deficiency type I (LAD I) developed a cervical adenitis caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae. (medscape.com)
  • Leukocyte adhesion deficiency type I (LAD I) is a failure to express CD18, which composes the common ß 2 subunit of LFA1 family (ß2 integrins). (medscape.com)
  • In milder forms of leukocyte adhesion deficiency I (1-30% expression of CD8), patients may survive to adulthood. (medscape.com)
  • Patients with leukocyte adhesion deficiency II manifest the Bombay phenotype (ie, negative for O and H blood group antigens with potential production of anti-H antibody). (medscape.com)
  • However, IgM and IgG serum levels are within the reference range in patients with leukocyte adhesion deficiency II. (medscape.com)
  • Leukocyte adhesion deficiency II may be classified as one of the congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG), a rapidly expanding group of metabolic syndromes with a wide symptomatology and severity. (medscape.com)
  • Currently, 18 subtypes have been reported: 12 are type I (dysfunctional lipid-linked oligosaccharide precursor synthesis), and 6 are type II (dysfunctional trimming/processing of the protein-bound oligosaccharide), including leukocyte adhesion deficiency II (CDG-IIc). (medscape.com)
  • Variants of leukocyte adhesion deficiency have also been reported, including fully expressed but nonfunctional CD18 and an E selectin that is expressed but rapidly cleaved from the cell surface (only present in soluble form). (medscape.com)
  • Another reported type of leukocyte adhesion deficiency involves dysfunction in platelet aggregation in addition to a defect in leukocyte adhesion. (medscape.com)
  • Thus, patients with this type of leukocyte adhesion deficiency manifest both severe bacterial infections and bleeding disorder. (medscape.com)
  • This leukocyte adhesion deficiency variant is associated with defective expression of the Rap-1 activator CalDAG-GEFI. (medscape.com)
  • These 2 members mediate leukocyte adhesions to endothelial cells but they also serve as receptors for iC3b (inactivated C3b). (medscape.com)
  • This disease is a defect in fucose metabolism (lack of fucosylation of the carbohydrate selectin ligands) that results in failure to express the ligand for E and P selectin, sialyl Lewis-X (CD15s) expressed on leukocytes and endothelial cells. (medscape.com)
  • The majority of the leukocytes cross the endothelial lining of the vessels through cell-cell junctions. (ijbs.com)
  • The junctional protein Vascular Endothelial (VE)-cadherin is transiently re-distributed from sites of cell-cell contacts during passage of leukocytes. (ijbs.com)
  • Because VE-cadherin-mediated cell-cell junctions hold the endothelial cells tightly together, the endothelial layer functions as a barrier for macromolecules and leukocytes and thereby protects the underlying tissue from damage. (ijbs.com)
  • However, under certain (pathologic) conditions, such as inflammation, traffic of leukocytes across the endothelial layer through the cell-cell junctions is required. (ijbs.com)
  • The cytoskeletons of the leukocytes are reorganised in such a way that the leukocytes are spread out over the endothelial cells. (wikidoc.org)
  • In this form, leukocytes extend pseudopodia and pass through gaps between endothelial cells. (wikidoc.org)
  • Endothelial selectins bind carbohydrates on leukocyte transmembrane glycoproteins , including sialyl-Lewis X . (wikidoc.org)
  • One of Dr. Xu's primary areas of research focuses on chemoattractant GPCR-mediated chemotaxis using both the model organism D. discoideum and mammalian neutrophils. (nih.gov)
  • This would mean that at 1900 the neutrophils are quite low and would endanger the person of having infections since the neutrophils are the most numerous leukocytes and the first responders of any infection. (quizlet.com)
  • Leukocyte extravasation is the movement of leukocytes out of the circulatory system , towards the site of tissue damage or infection. (wikidoc.org)
  • Neutrophil senses and moves to inflammatory sites through chemotaxis, provides first-line host defense during pathogen invasion, and plays critical roles in both innate and adaptive immunity. (nih.gov)
  • These in vivo assays include (1) assessing the ability of larvae to recover from experimental infections, (2) quantifying the release reactive oxygen species after immune stimulation, (3) visualizing leukocyte chemotaxis and (4) quantifying NFkB activation. (nih.gov)
  • This process forms part of the innate immune response , involving the recruitment of non-specific leukocytes. (wikidoc.org)
  • If L-selectin is not produced, the immune response may be ten times slower, as P-selectins (which can also be produced by leukocytes) bind to each other. (wikidoc.org)
  • Xu X, Wen X, Veltman DM, Keizer-Gunnink I, Pots H, Kortholt A, Jin T. GPCR-controlled membrane recruitment of negative regulator C2GAP1 locally inhibits Ras signaling for adaptation and long-range chemotaxis . (nih.gov)
  • [ 1 , 2 ] The clinical picture is characterized by marked leukocytosis and localized bacterial infections that are difficult to detect until they have progressed to an extensive level secondary to lack of leukocyte recruitment at the site of infection. (medscape.com)
  • It has been demonstrated that leukocyte recruitment is halted whenever any of these steps is suppressed. (wikidoc.org)
  • Circulating leukocytes are localised towards the site of injury or infection due to the presence of chemokines. (wikidoc.org)
  • The movement of leukocytes in response to a chemical concentration gradient or to products formed in an immunologic reaction. (nih.gov)
  • This causes the leukocytes to slow down and begin rolling along the inner surface of the vessel wall. (wikidoc.org)
  • Dr. Xu focused on developing and applying state-of-the-art imaging technologies to monitor the signaling network of GPCR-mediated chemotaxis in the model organism Dictyostelium discoideum. (nih.gov)
  • At low evolutionary levels, such as the unicellular eukaryote Tetrahymena pyriformis, histamine is critical for organism survival, playing key roles in phagocytosis, cell growth, glucose metabolism, and chemotaxis ( 7 ). (lww.com)
  • Her discoveries suggest an evolutionarily conserved mechanism by which eukaryotic cells gate sensitive concentration ranges of chemoattractant for chemotaxis. (nih.gov)
  • Like velcro, selectin ligands on circulating leukocytes bind selectins on the inner wall of the vessel, with marginal affinity . (wikidoc.org)
  • Effects of serotonin, carbamylcholine, and ascorbic acid on leukocyte cyclic GMP and chemotaxis. (rupress.org)
  • One of the more common adverse effects of cancer chemotherapy is the destruction of leukocytes. (quizlet.com)
  • This effects the immobilisation of the leukocytes, despite the shear forces of the ongoing blood flow. (wikidoc.org)
  • The dose-response curve of chemoattractants for inducing the rapid (10 +/- 1 s) perpendicular scattering peak corresponded to that which initiated chemotaxis. (jci.org)
  • The rapid perpendicular light-scattering response of polymorphonuclear leukocytes to chemoattractants appears to record an initial event in the stimulus-response coupling, and its measurement should provide a useful new tool for the study of leukocyte function. (jci.org)
  • Peripheral blood leukocytes. (guidetopharmacology.org)
  • The leukocytes secrete proteases that degrade the basement membrane , allowing them to escape the blood vessel - a process known as diapedesis. (wikidoc.org)
  • METHODS--We measured IL-6, IL-1 beta, tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha), granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor, IL-8, and polymorphonuclear leucocyte (PMNL) chemotaxis and degranulation in SF from patients with RA (n = 30) in the early phase of the disease. (bmj.com)
  • Leukocyte chemotaxis from caudal vein to tailfin wound site. (ucsd.edu)
  • Rapid changes in light scattering from human polymorphonuclear leukocytes exposed to chemoattractants. (jci.org)
  • CCR5 plays a role in mediating leukocyte chemotaxis in tient age was 40.35 years. (cdc.gov)