An order of BIRDS including over 300 species that primarily inhabit coastal waters, beaches, and marshes. They are comprised of shorebirds, gulls, and terns.
The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.
An activity in which the organism plunges into water. It includes scuba and bell diving. Diving as natural behavior of animals goes here, as well as diving in decompression experiments with humans or animals.
Warm-blooded VERTEBRATES possessing FEATHERS and belonging to the class Aves.
Circulation of water among various ecological systems, in various states, on, above, and below the surface of the earth.
Inland bodies of still or slowly moving FRESH WATER or salt water, larger than a pond, and supplied by RIVERS and streams.
The process of cumulative change over successive generations through which organisms acquire their distinguishing morphological and physiological characteristics.
The genetic complement of MITOCHONDRIA as represented in their DNA.
A widely distributed order of perching BIRDS, including more than half of all bird species.
The production of offspring by selective mating or HYBRIDIZATION, GENETIC in animals or plants.
Large natural streams of FRESH WATER formed by converging tributaries and which empty into a body of water (lake or ocean).
Time period from 1501 through 1600 of the common era.
A British colony in the western North Atlantic Ocean about 640 miles east southeast of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. It comprises a group of about 300 islands of which only about 20 are inhabited. It is called also the Bermuda Islands or the Bermudas. It was named for the Spanish explorer Juan Bermudez who visited the islands in 1515. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p140 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p61)
A superorder of large, mostly flightless birds, named for their distinctive PALATE morphology. It includes the orders Apterygiformes, Casuriiformes, Dinornithiformes, RHEIFORMES; STRUTHIONIFORMES and Tinamiformes.
Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)
In some animals, the jaws together with their horny covering. The beak usually refers to the bill of birds in which the whole varies greatly in form according of the food and habits of the bird. While the beak refers most commonly to birds, the anatomical counterpart is found also in the turtle, squid, and octopus. (From Webster, 3d ed & Storer, et al., General Zoology, 6th ed, p491, 755)
A group of islands in the southwest Pacific. Its capital is Wellington. It was discovered by the Dutch explorer Abel Tasman in 1642 and circumnavigated by Cook in 1769. Colonized in 1840 by the New Zealand Company, it became a British crown colony in 1840 until 1907 when colonial status was terminated. New Zealand is a partly anglicized form of the original Dutch name Nieuw Zeeland, new sea land, possibly with reference to the Dutch province of Zeeland. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p842 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p378)
NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE service for health professionals and consumers. It links extensive information from the National Institutes of Health and other reviewed sources of information on specific diseases and conditions.
Coloration or discoloration of a part by a pigment.
The use of wings or wing-like appendages to remain aloft and move through the air.
The part of brain that lies behind the BRAIN STEM in the posterior base of skull (CRANIAL FOSSA, POSTERIOR). It is also known as the "little brain" with convolutions similar to those of CEREBRAL CORTEX, inner white matter, and deep cerebellar nuclei. Its function is to coordinate voluntary movements, maintain balance, and learn motor skills.
Discomfort associated with the bones that make up the pelvic girdle. It occurs frequently during pregnancy.
A plant family of the order Lamiales. It is characterized by simple leaves in opposite pairs, cystoliths (enlarged cells containing crystals of calcium carbonate), and bilaterally symmetrical and bisexual flowers that are usually crowded together. The common name for Ruellia of wild petunia is easily confused with PETUNIA.
In glycogen or amylopectin synthesis, the enzyme that catalyzes the transfer of a segment of a 1,4-alpha-glucan chain to a primary hydroxy group in a similar glucan chain. EC 2.4.1.18.
A POU domain factor that activates neuronal cell GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION of GENES encoding NEUROFILAMENT PROTEINS, alpha internexin, and SYNAPTOSOMAL-ASSOCIATED PROTEIN 25. Mutations in the Brn-3c gene have been associated with DEAFNESS.
Anomaly of the tooth, found chiefly in upper lateral incisors. It is characterized by invagination of the enamel at the incisal edge.
Genetic loci in the vertebrate major histocompatibility complex which encode polymorphic characteristics not related to immune responsiveness or complement activity, e.g., B loci (chicken), DLA (dog), GPLA (guinea pig), H-2 (mouse), RT-1 (rat), HLA-A, -B, and -C class I genes of man.
Membrane glycoproteins consisting of an alpha subunit and a BETA 2-MICROGLOBULIN beta subunit. In humans, highly polymorphic genes on CHROMOSOME 6 encode the alpha subunits of class I antigens and play an important role in determining the serological specificity of the surface antigen. Class I antigens are found on most nucleated cells and are generally detected by their reactivity with alloantisera. These antigens are recognized during GRAFT REJECTION and restrict cell-mediated lysis of virus-infected cells.
A family of the order Rodentia which contains 49 genera. Some of the more common genera are MARMOTA, which includes the marmot and woodchuck; Sciurus, the gray squirrel, S. carolinensis, and the fox squirrel, S. niger; Tamias, the eastern and western chipmunk; and Tamiasciurus, the red squirrel. The flying squirrels, except the scaly-tailed Anomaluridae, also belong to this family.
The genetic region which contains the loci of genes which determine the structure of the serologically defined (SD) and lymphocyte-defined (LD) TRANSPLANTATION ANTIGENS, genes which control the structure of the IMMUNE RESPONSE-ASSOCIATED ANTIGENS, HUMAN; the IMMUNE RESPONSE GENES which control the ability of an animal to respond immunologically to antigenic stimuli, and genes which determine the structure and/or level of the first four components of complement.
The process by which antigen is presented to lymphocytes in a form they can recognize. This is performed by antigen presenting cells (APCs). Some antigens require processing before they can be recognized. Antigen processing consists of ingestion and partial digestion of the antigen by the APC, followed by presentation of fragments on the cell surface. (From Rosen et al., Dictionary of Immunology, 1989)
It is a form of protection provided by law. In the United States this protection is granted to authors of original works of authorship, including literary, dramatic, musical, artistic, and certain other intellectual works. This protection is available to both published and unpublished works. (from Circular of the United States Copyright Office, 6/30/2008)
Protective measures against unauthorized access to or interference with computer operating systems, telecommunications, or data structures, especially the modification, deletion, destruction, or release of data in computers. It includes methods of forestalling interference by computer viruses or so-called computer hackers aiming to compromise stored data.
The privacy of information and its protection against unauthorized disclosure.
Woody, usually tall, perennial higher plants (Angiosperms, Gymnosperms, and some Pterophyta) having usually a main stem and numerous branches.
The state of being free from intrusion or disturbance in one's private life or affairs. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, 1993)
Property, such as patents, trademarks, and copyright, that results from creative effort. The Patent and Copyright Clause (Art. 1, Sec. 8, cl. 8) of the United States Constitution provides for promoting the progress of science and useful arts by securing for limited times to authors and inventors, the exclusive right to their respective writings and discoveries. (From Black's Law Dictionary, 5th ed, p1014)
The profession of writing. Also the identity of the writer as the creator of a literary production.

A supertree approach to shorebird phylogeny. (1/229)

BACKGROUND: Order Charadriiformes (shorebirds) is an ideal model group in which to study a wide range of behavioural, ecological and macroevolutionary processes across species. However, comparative studies depend on phylogeny to control for the effects of shared evolutionary history. Although numerous hypotheses have been presented for subsets of the Charadriiformes none to date include all recognised species. Here we use the matrix representation with parsimony method to produce the first fully inclusive supertree of Charadriiformes. We also provide preliminary estimates of ages for all nodes in the tree. RESULTS: Three main lineages are revealed: i) the plovers and allies; ii) the gulls and allies; and iii) the sandpipers and allies. The relative position of these clades is unresolved in the strict consensus tree but a 50% majority-rule consensus tree indicates that the sandpiper clade is sister group to the gulls and allies whilst the plover group is placed at the base of the tree. The overall topology is highly consistent with recent molecular hypotheses of shorebird phylogeny. CONCLUSION: The supertree hypothesis presented herein is (to our knowledge) the only complete phylogenetic hypothesis of all extant shorebirds. Despite concerns over the robustness of supertrees (see Discussion), we believe that it provides a valuable framework for testing numerous evolutionary hypotheses relating to the diversity of behaviour, ecology and life-history of the Charadriiformes.  (+info)

Molecular sexing of prey remains permits a test of sex-biased predation in a wintering population of western sandpipers. (2/229)

Population sex ratios in monogamous birds are often male biased. One factor that can affect population sex ratios is sex-biased predation. However, most estimates of sex-biased predation in birds have focused on species with obvious sexual colour dimorphism or body size dimorphism. Data on sexually monomorphic birds are generally lacking. In the present study, we adopt a PCR-based sexing procedure to help test for sex-biased predation in a wintering population of western sandpipers (Calidris mauri), a shorebird that shows only subtle sexual size dimorphism. Specifically, by comparing the a priori determined sex ratio of live birds wintering at a site in western Mexico to the molecular estimate obtained from depredated birds at this same site, we were able to perform a population-specific test for sex bias in predator-induced mortality. The proportion of females estimated from living (ca. 25%) versus dead (ca. 24%) individuals was in fact not significantly different, indicating that the strong male bias in this population is not due to differential predation. However, molecular sexing of prey remains is a hitherto unexploited test of sex-biased predation in birds, and is potentially applicable to any species for which prey remains can be gathered. We discuss our results in the context of alternate ecological hypotheses for population sex biases.  (+info)

Stroke patterns and regulation of swim speed and energy cost in free-ranging Brunnich's guillemots. (3/229)

Loggers were attached to free-ranging Brunnich's guillemots Uria lomvia during dives, to measure swim speeds, body angles, stroke rates, stroke and glide durations, and acceleration patterns within strokes, and the data were used to model the mechanical costs of propelling the body fuselage (head and trunk excluding wings). During vertical dives to 102-135 m, guillemots regulated their speed during descent and much of ascent to about 1.6+/-0.2 m s(-1). Stroke rate declined very gradually with depth, with little or no gliding between strokes. Entire strokes from 2 m to 20 m depth had similar forward thrust on upstroke vs downstroke, whereas at deeper depths and during horizontal swimming there was much greater thrust on the downstroke. Despite this distinct transition, these differences had small effect (<6%) on our estimates of mechanical cost to propel the body fuselage, which did not include drag of the wings. Work stroke(-1) was quite high as speed increased dramatically in the first 5 m of descent against high buoyancy. Thereafter, speed and associated drag increased gradually as buoyancy slowly declined, so that mechanical work stroke(-1) during the rest of descent stayed relatively constant. Similar work stroke(-1) was maintained during non-pursuit swimming at the bottom, and during powered ascent to the depth of neutral buoyancy (about 71 m). Even with adjustments in respiratory air volume of +/-60%, modeled work against buoyancy was important mainly in the top 15 m of descent, after which almost all work was against drag. Drag was in fact underestimated, as our values did not include enhancement of drag by altered flow around active swimmers. With increasing buoyancy during ascent above 71 m, stroke rate, glide periods, stroke acceleration patterns, body angle and work stroke(-1) were far more variable than during descent; however, mean speed remained fairly constant until buoyancy increased rapidly near the surface. For dives to depths >20 m, drag is by far the main component of mechanical work for these diving birds, and speed may be regulated to keep work against drag within a relatively narrow range.  (+info)

Energetics of a long-distance migrant shorebird (Philomachus pugnax) during cold exposure and running. (4/229)

The metabolic consequences of cold exposure and exercise are not well characterized in birds. Ruff sandpipers Philomachus pugnax are migrant shorebirds traveling between Africa and Siberia for up to 30,000 km annually. Our goal was to quantify the fuel selection pattern of these remarkable athletes during shivering and terrestrial locomotion. We used indirect calorimetry and nitrogen excretion analysis to measure their rates of lipid, carbohydrate and protein oxidation at different temperatures (22, 15, 10 or 5 degrees C) and different treadmill speeds (15, 20, 25, 30, 35 or 40 m min(-1)). Results show that lipid oxidation supplies nearly all the energy necessary to support shivering and running, and that the pattern of oxidative fuel selection is independent of shivering or running intensity. During shivering, total ATP production is unequally shared between lipids (82%), carbohydrates (12%) and proteins (6%). During running, lipids remain the dominant substrate (66%), with carbohydrates (29%) and proteins (5%) playing more minor roles. The prevailing use of lipids during intense shivering and high-speed running is not consistent with the fuel selection pattern observed in exercising and cold-exposed mammals. The exact mechanisms allowing birds to use lipids at extremely high rates are still largely unexplored, and quantifying the relative importance of different fuels during long-distance flight remains a major challenge for future research.  (+info)

Effects of physiological state, mass change and diet on plasma metabolite profiles in the western sandpiper Calidris mauri. (5/229)

We used a food restriction/refeeding protocol to put birds through a controlled cycle of mass loss and mass gain to investigate the effects of rate and phase of mass change on plasma metabolite levels in relation to diet. Despite marked differences in fat content of the two diets (18% vs 4%) mean rate of mass loss or mass gain was independent of diet. There was also no effect of diet on plasma levels of any of the four measured metabolite (triglyceride, glycerol, uric acid and beta-OH-butyrate) during mass loss. However, during mass gain birds on the low fat diet had higher plasma levels of triglyceride and uric acid and lower beta-OH-butyrate than birds gaining mass on the high-fat diet. Thus, diet composition can affect plasma metabolite profiles independently of differences in rates of mass change. Nevertheless, certain plasma metabolites were related to variation in rates of mass change across physiological states. Glycerol levels were negatively related to the rate of mass change (independent of diet), and butyrate was negatively related to the rate of mass change on both diets (though the slope of this relationship was diet dependent). Uric acid was positively related to the rate of mass change but only for birds on the low-fat diet. Our study therefore confirms that measurement of plasma metabolites can provide robust information on physiological state (gain, loss) and the rate of mass change (e.g. in free-living birds caught only once) although researchers should be cogniscent of potential confounding effects of diet composition for certain metabolites, both for field studies and for future experimental validations of this technique.  (+info)

Metabolic profile of long-distance migratory flight and stopover in a shorebird. (6/229)

Migrating birds often complete long non-stop flights during which body energy stores exclusively support energetic demands. The metabolic correlates of such long-distance travel in free-living migrants are as yet poorly studied. Bar-tailed godwits, Limosa lapponica taymyrensis, undertake a 4500 km flight to their single spring stopover site and thus provide an excellent model in which to determine the energy fuels associated with endurance travel. To this end, we evaluated plasma concentrations of six key metabolites in arriving godwits caught immediately upon landing near their stopover site. Initial metabolite levels were compared with levels after 5 h of inactive rest to determine how flight per se affects energy metabolism. Birds refuelling on the stopover site were also examined. Arriving godwits displayed elevated plasma free fatty acids, glycerol and butyrate, confirming the importance of lipid fuel in the support of extended migratory activity. Further-more, elevated plasma triglycerides in these birds suggest that fatty acid provisioning is facilitated through hepatic synthesis and release of neutral lipids, as previously hypothesized for small migrants with high mass-specific metabolic rates. Finally, elevations in plasma uric acid suggest that protein breakdown contributes to the support of long-distance movement, to possibly maintain citric acid cycle intermediates, gluconeogenesis and/or water balance.  (+info)

Characterization of a novel influenza A virus hemagglutinin subtype (H16) obtained from black-headed gulls. (7/229)

In wild aquatic birds and poultry around the world, influenza A viruses carrying 15 antigenic subtypes of hemagglutinin (HA) and 9 antigenic subtypes of neuraminidase (NA) have been described. Here we describe a previously unidentified antigenic subtype of HA (H16), detected in viruses circulating in black-headed gulls in Sweden. In agreement with established criteria for the definition of antigenic subtypes, hemagglutination inhibition assays and immunodiffusion assays failed to detect specific reactivity between H16 and the previously described subtypes H1 to H15. Genetically, H16 HA was found to be distantly related to H13 HA, a subtype also detected exclusively in shorebirds, and the amino acid composition of the putative receptor-binding site of H13 and H16 HAs was found to be distinct from that in HA subtypes circulating in ducks and geese. The H16 viruses contained NA genes that were similar to those of other Eurasian shorebirds but genetically distinct from N3 genes detected in other birds and geographical locations. The European gull viruses were further distinguishable from other influenza A viruses based on their PB2, NP, and NS genes. Gaining information on the full spectrum of avian influenza A viruses and creating reagents for their detection and identification will remain an important task for influenza surveillance, outbreak control, and animal and public health. We propose that sequence analyses of HA and NA genes of influenza A viruses be used for the rapid identification of existing and novel HA and NA subtypes.  (+info)

Highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus infection in migratory birds. (8/229)

H5N1 avian influenza virus (AIV) has emerged as a pathogenic entity for a variety of species, including humans, in recent years. Here we report an outbreak among migratory birds on Lake Qinghaihu, China, in May and June 2005, in which more than a thousand birds were affected. Pancreatic necrosis and abnormal neurological symptoms were the major clinical features. Sequencing of the complete genomes of four H5N1 AIV strains revealed them to be reassortants related to a peregrine falcon isolate from Hong Kong and to have known highly pathogenic characteristics. Experimental animal infections reproduced typical highly pathogenic AIV infection symptoms and pathology.  (+info)

abstract) Ericson, P.G.P., I. Envall, M. Irestedt, and J.A. Norman (2003), Inter-familial relationships of the shorebirds (Aves: Charadriiformes) based on nuclear DNA sequence data, BMC Evol. Biol. 3, 16. DOI: 10.1186/1471-2148-3-16. (pdf) Fain, M.G., and P. Houde (2007), Multilocus perspectives on the monophyly and phylogeny of the order Charadriiformes, BMC Evol. Biol. 7, 35. DOI: 10.1186/1471-2148-7-35. (pdf) Gibson, R. and A. Baker (2012), Multiple gene sequences resolve phylogenetic relationships in the shorebird suborder Scolopaci (Aves: Charadriiformes), Mol. Phylogenet. Evol. 64, 66-72. DOI: 10.1016/j.ympev.2012.03.008. (abstract) Hu, C. C. Zhang, l. Sun, Y. Zhang, W. Xie, B. Zhang, and Q. Chang (2017), The mitochondrial genome of the pin-tailed snipe Gallinago stenura, and its implications for the phylogeny of Charadriiformes, PloS ONE 12(4), e0175244. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0175244. (pdf) Jackson, D.G, S.D. Emslie, and M. van Tuinen (2012), Genome skimming identifies polymorphism in ...
Larus hyperboreus (es); Jeges sirály (hu); Hvítmáfur (is); Ipar-kaio (eu); Larus hyperboreus (ast); gavinot hiperbori (ca); Eismöwe (de); Larus hyperboreus (sq); Naajarujussuaq (kw); 北极鸥 (zh); Gråmåge (da); Kutup martısı (tr); シロカモメ (ja); Larus hyperboreus (ia); Glacimevo (eo); Vittrut (sv); Faoileán glas (ga); שחף לבן-כנף (he); Larus hyperboreus (la); Larus hyperboreus (it); Glaucous Gull (en); Nauyavasugruk (ik); Stuorraskávli (se); Ismeew (frr); Larus hyperboreus (pms); racek šedý (cs); Isolokki (fi); Foillan glass (gv); Бургомистр (ru); Goéland bourgmestre (fr); Valmási (fo); Ledeni galeb (hr); Polarmåse (nn); Grote burgemeester (nl); Polarmåke (nb); Larus hyperboreus (ro); Мөсний цахлай (mn); Gwylan y Gogledd (cy); Gaivota-hiperbórea (pt); Larus hyperboreus (war); Lielā polārkaija (lv); Larus hyperboreus (vi); Tónteel tsídii dinilbáhígíí (nv); čajka bledá (sk); Didysis poliarinis kiras (lt); полярна чайка ...
We sampled 7,511 black-headed gulls for influenza virus in the Netherlands during 2006-2010 and found that subtypes H13 and H16 caused annual epidemics in fledglings on colony sites. Our findings validate targeted surveillance of wild waterbirds and clarify underlying factors for influenza virus emergence in other species ...
Define Rissa. Rissa synonyms, Rissa pronunciation, Rissa translation, English dictionary definition of Rissa. Noun 1. Rissa - a genus of Laridae genus Rissa bird genus - a genus of birds family Laridae, Laridae - gull family: gulls and terns kittiwake - small...
charadriiformes: large diverse order of aquatic birds found along seacoasts and inland waters; shorebirds and coastal diving birds; most feed on animal life.
We provide evidence of a positive correlation between North Sea SST, the abundance of swimming crabs and changes in the abundance of lesser black-backed gulls at 21 major North Sea breeding colonies. In particular, the cross-correlation analyses (table 1) revealed a propagation of a climate signal from SST through decapod larvae, adult crabs and lesser black-backed gulls with lags that match the biology of each trophic group. Many biological changes have been observed among different trophic levels of the North Sea from phytoplankton to fish, as the North Sea has warmed [1]. Here, we suggest that climate-induced changes in the marine fauna extend to the avian fauna, and so also to the terrestrial food web around seabird colonies.. Seabird breeding success is controlled partially by the abundance, composition and nutritional quality of the prey the parents feed to their chicks on the nest [18]. Pelagic swimming crabs are an important component of the diet of seabirds such as the related ...
In recent years, a number of zoonotic flaviviruses have emerged worldwide, and wild birds serve as their major reservoirs. Epidemiological surveys of bird populations at various geographical scales can clarify key aspects of the eco-epidemiology of these viruses. In this study, we aimed at exploring the presence of flaviviruses in the western Mediterranean by sampling breeding populations of the yellow-legged gull (Larus michahellis), a widely distributed, anthropophilic, and abundant seabird species. For 3 years, we sampled eggs from 19 breeding colonies in Spain, France, Algeria, and Tunisia. First, ELISAs were used to determine if the eggs contained antibodies against flaviviruses. Second, neutralization assays were used to identify the specific flaviviruses present. Finally, for colonies in which ELISA-positive eggs had been found, chick serum samples and potential vectors, culicid mosquitoes and soft ticks (Ornithodoros maritimus), were collected and analyzed using serology and PCR, ...
Black-legged Kittiwake (Rissa tridactyla) species account - latest update of status, international importance, population size and trends in breeding abundance, productivity, survival rates, phenology and diet in the UK, Scotland, England, Wales, Northern Ireland, Republic of Ireland, Channel Islands and the Isle of Man.
Egg composition varies both within and between clutches, and mothers are expected to alter their deposition of resources to the egg depending on environmental conditions and breeding strategies. Within-clutch variation in egg composition has been proposed to reflect an adaptive maternal strategy influencing sibling competition. In species with brood reduction, mothers should reinforce brood hierarchies due to hatching asynchrony and favour senior chicks by making first-laid eggs larger, richer in nutrients, with higher testosterone and carotenoid levels and lower corticosterone concentrations than last-laid eggs [parental favouritism hypothesis (PFH)]. Moreover, mothers that are of better quality and/or experience better feeding conditions during laying are expected to increase their deposition of resources to the egg, resulting in differences between clutches [investment hypothesis (IH)]. Several components may act together to provide an optimal reproductive strategy, but studies of variation ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - GENETIC CHARACTERIZATION OF H13 AND H16 INFLUENZA A VIRUSES IN GULLS (LARUS SPP.) WITH CLINICALLY SEVERE DISEASE AND CONCURRENT CIRCOVIRUS INFECTION. AU - Lindh, Erika. AU - Ek-Kommonen, Christine. AU - Isomursu, Marja. AU - Alasaari, Jukka. AU - Vaheri, Antti. AU - Vapalahti, Olli. AU - Huovilainen, Anita. PY - 2017/7. Y1 - 2017/7. KW - Circovirus. KW - gulls. KW - H13. KW - H16. KW - influenza A virus. KW - molecular epidemiology. KW - BLACK-HEADED GULLS. KW - AVIAN INFLUENZA. KW - WILD BIRDS. KW - EVOLUTION. KW - PATTERNS. KW - DUCKS. KW - CHAIN. KW - H5. KW - 413 Veterinary science. U2 - 10.7589/2016-09-212. DO - 10.7589/2016-09-212. M3 - Article. VL - 53. SP - 561. EP - 571. JO - Journal of Wildlife Diseases. JF - Journal of Wildlife Diseases. SN - 0090-3558. IS - 3. ER - ...
Binds to sialic acid-containing receptors on the cell surface, bringing about the attachment of the virus particle to the cell. This attachment induces virion internalization either through clathrin-dependent endocytosis or through clathrin- and caveolin-independent pathway. Plays a major role in the determination of host range restriction and virulence. Class I viral fusion protein. Responsible for penetration of the virus into the cell cytoplasm by mediating the fusion of the membrane of the endocytosed virus particle with the endosomal membrane. Low pH in endosomes induces an irreversible conformational change in HA2, releasing the fusion hydrophobic peptide. Several trimers are required to form a competent fusion pore.
Oystercatchers (Haematopus sp.) are shorebirds that inhabit most continental sea coasts. There are thirteen species of Oystercatcher worldwide and nine of these species occur in the Southern Hemisphere. The Northern Hemisphere species have been recorded to fly great distances between breeding and non-breeding areas whereas the African Black Oystercatcher is largely resident, migrating only short distances to nursary areas in Namibia after fledging and then returning to their natal sites to breed.. The African Black Oystercatcher is the largest of all the species. Adults have jet black plumage, pinkish legs and a long, dagger-like orange-red bill. In addition its eye and eye ring are red. There is sexual dimorphism, females being larger and heavier with longer bills; a male weighing an average of about 660g and a female about 720g when fully grown.. African Black Oystercatchers can be found on both rocky and sandy shores throughout the year and they attempt to breed in varied habitat types. They ...
The royal tern belongs to the class Aves and the order Charadriiformes. Charadriiformes are mainly seabirds of small to medium-large size. The royal tern is also in the family Sternidae because of its white plumage, black cap on its head, long bill, webbed feet, and bodies that are more streamlined than those of gulls.. The taxonomy of the royal tern has been debated, whether the correct scientific name was Thalasseus maximus or Sterna maxima. It is presently classified as Thalasseus maximus, which places it with five other seabirds from the tern family. The royal tern was originally placed in the genus Sterna; however, a 2005 study suggest that it is actually part of the genus Thalasseus.[3] Before 2017 the royal tern was divided into two subspecies: Thalasseus maximus maximus and Thalasseus maximus albididorsalis. T. m. maximus is found on the east coast of North America and is referred to as the New World species. T. m. albidorsalis, referred to as the Old World species, is found on the ...
Word Scramble - English word OYSTERCATCHERS: words that start with oystercatchers, words that end with oystercatchers, anagrams of oystercatchers, how to spell oystercatchers!, Words with Friends, Scrabble
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In southern California, USFWS (2006) concluded that Rana muscosa requires the following habitat elements: (1) Water source(s) found between 1,214 to 7,546 feet (370 to 2,300 meter) in elevation that are permanent. Water sources include, but are not limited to, streams, rivers, perennial creeks (or permanent plunge pools within intermittent creeks), pools (i.e., a body of impounded water that is contained above a natural dam) and other forms of aquatic habitat. The water source should maintain a natural flow pattern including periodic natural flooding. Aquatic habitats that are used by mountain yellow-legged frog for breeding purposes must maintain water during the entire tadpole growth phase, which can last for up to 2 years. During periods of drought, or less than average rainfall, these breeding sites may not hold water long enough for individuals to complete metamorphosis, but they would still be considered essential breeding habitat in wetter years. Further, the aquatic includes: a. Bank and ...
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The sturdily built Knot is the largest of the Calidris sandpipers found in Finland. In their breeding plumage, Knots have bright rust-coloured underparts and reddish brown upper parts with black, grey and white patterning. They can best be distinguished from the similarly coloured Curlew Sandpiper by their larger size, their shorter, straight bills, and their shorter legs. Juvenile Knots have grey upper parts with thin-lined paler patterning, and paler underparts. Their flanks have indistinct speckles. In all plumages a distinctive pale wing stripe and a pale rump are good distinguishing features. Knots legs are black during the breeding season but otherwise grey-green. Their beaks are black and their irises are brown. ...
Curlew sandpipers in remnants of coastal habitat, being destroyed for development - View amazing Curlew sandpiper photos - Calidris ferruginea - on Arkive
Common Guillemot (Uria aalge) species account - latest update of status, international importance, population size and trends in breeding abundance, productivity, survival rates, phenology and diet in the UK, Scotland, England, Wales, Northern Ireland, Republic of Ireland, Channel Islands and the Isle of Man.
The family Laridae was introduced (as Laridia) by the French polymath Constantine Samuel Rafinesque in 1815.[2][3] Historically, Laridae were restricted to the gulls, while the terns were placed in a separate family, Sternidae, and the skimmers in a third family, Rynchopidae.[4] The noddies were traditionally included in Sternidae. In 1990 Charles Sibley and Jon Ahlquist included auks and skuas in a broader family Laridae.[5] A molecular phylogenetic study by Baker and colleagues published in 2007 found that the noddies in the genus Anous formed a sister group to a clade containing the gulls, skimmers and the other terns.[1] To create a monophyletic family group, Laridae was expanded to include the genera that had previously been in Sternidae and Rynchopidae.[6][7] Baker and colleagues found that the Laridae lineage diverged from a lineage that gave rise to both the skuas (Stercorariidae) and auks (Alcidae) before the end of the Cretaceous in the age of dinosaurs. They also found that the ...
23-26 (58-66 cm). Adult white with light gray back and wings; wing tip black with white spots; bill yellow with red spot on lower mandible; feet pink or flesh colored. First-year birds brownish. Acquires adult plumage in 4 years. See California Gull.
There are several terns of a similar size and general appearance to the common tern. A traditionally difficult species to separate is the Arctic tern, and until the key characteristics were clarified, distant or flying birds of the two species were often jointly recorded as commic terns. Although similar in size, the two terns differ in structure and flight. The common tern has a larger head, thicker neck, longer legs, and more triangular and stiffer wings than its relative, and has a more powerful, direct flight.[25] The Arctic tern has greyer underparts than the common, which make its white cheeks more obvious, whereas the rump of the common tern can be greyish in non-breeding plumage, compared to the white of its relative. The common tern develops a dark wedge on the wings as the breeding season progresses, but the wings of Arctic stay white throughout the northern summer. All the flight feathers of the Arctic tern are translucent against a bright sky, only the four innermost wing feathers ...
We used 8 years of live recapture data (1998-2005) to estimate apparent annual survival for male (n = 237) and female (n = 296) Western Sandpipers (Calidris mauri) breeding on a 36-ha plot on the Yukon-Kuskokwim River Delta, western Alaska. Apparent annual survival (Φ) is the product of true survival and site fidelity, and estimates of Φ were corrected for the probability of encounter. Overall return rates (individual returned to the study site in a subsequent season) were lower for females (40%) than males (65%), as was Φ (± SE, females = 0.65 ± 0.05, males = 0.78 ± 0.03), and encounter rate (females = 0.51 ± 0.07, males = 0.74 ± 0.04). Results differed from previous estimates of Φ for this species as our estimates of Φ were higher for both males and females compared to estimates from another breeding site and two nonbreeding locations. Disparity among Φ estimates from breeding and nonbreeding areas highlights the need to delineate site-specific factors throughout the annual cycle that
It has been suggested that I may like contribute to the blogs on this site, which is surprising as this year I have been learning How to be a Bad Bird Watcher by following the advice of Simon Barnes in his book of that title. Ive kept no lists and just concentrated on watching and enjoying the birds I happen to see. For instance, consider gulls. I live in a wee house in a cul-de-sac in Alnwick with a very small back garden half of which is garage. On 5th December I was cooking a chicken casserole and threw the cut up chicken skin on to the roof of the garage into the snow. Within a couple of minutes the black-headed gulls were there swooping and calling and picking up the courage to dive down to gobble up their lunch. A brave carrion crow managed to sneak one piece while a magpie fluttered between the gulls but in no time at all the food was gone and so were the gulls. How do they discover the skins in the snow in the first place? On two occasions recently Ive heard gulls crying above our ...
Order: CHARADRIIFORMES - Plovers, Sandpipers, and Allies Family: LARIDAE - Gulls, Terns, and Skimmers Generally absent December through February
Some species, like the Peregrine Falcon, Black-headed Gull and Ring-necked Parakeet, have seen their fortunes soar over recent decades; others, such as House Sparrow, have suffered a population collapse. While as recently as a century ago, the London area had breeding populations of birds such as Wryneck and Red-backed Shrike, which are now nationally extinct. The status, distribution and history of every species on the regional list is discussed in rich detail in this book, the first comprehensive avifauna for the London area ever published ...
Camouflage may enable snipe to remain undetected by hunters in marshland. If the snipe flies, hunters have difficulty wing-shooting due to the birds erratic flight pattern. The difficulties involved in hunting snipes gave rise to the term sniper, meaning a hunter highly skilled in marksmanship and camouflaging, which later evolved to mean a sharpshooter or someone who shoots from a concealed location.[3][4] Going on a snipe hunt is a phrase suggesting a fools errand, or an impossible task.[citation needed] As an American rite of passage, it is often associated with summer camps and groups such as the Boy Scouts.[5] ...
The Black Hills population of black-backed woodpeckers (Picoides arcticus) was petitioned, but deemed not warranted, to be listed as a threatened or endangered species under the Endangered Species Act and more information on their population size in the region is needed. Our objective was to map abundance and provide a population estimate of black-backed woodpeckers in the Black Hills and Bear Lodge Mountains of South Dakota and Wyoming, USA ...
Terns are normally monogamous, although trios or female-female pairings have been observed in at least three species.[7][46] Most terns breed annually and at the same time of year, but some tropical species may nest at intervals shorter than 12 months or asynchronously. Most terns become sexually mature when aged three, although some small species may breed in their second year. Some large sea terns, including the sooty and bridled terns, are four or older when they first breed. Terns normally breed in colonies, and are site-faithful if their habitat is sufficiently stable. A few species nest in small or dispersed groups, but most breed in colonies of up to a few hundred pairs, often alongside other seabirds such as gulls or skimmers.[7] Large tern species tend to form larger colonies,[42] which in the case of the sooty tern can contain up to two million pairs. Large species nest very close together and sit tightly, making it difficult for aerial predators to land among them. Smaller species are ...
tr, ,td,Kingdom:,/td, ,td,Animalia,/td, ,/tr, ,tr, ,td,Phylum:,/td, ,td,Chordata,/td, ,/tr, ,tr, ,td,Class:,/td, ,td,Aves,/td, ,/tr, ,tr, ,td,Order:,/td, ,td,Charadriiformes,/td, ,/tr, ,tr, ,td,Family:,/td, ,td,Scolopacidae,/td, ,/tr, ,tr, ,td,Genus:,/td, ,td,Limosa,/td, ,/tr, ,tr, ,td,Species:,/td, ,td,L. limosa,/td, ,/tr, ,tr, ,th,binominal name,/th, ,/tr, ,tr, ,td,Limosa limosa,/i, ,td,(Linnaeus, 1758),/td, ,/tr ...
tr, ,td,Kingdom:,/td, ,td,Animalia,/td, ,/tr, ,tr, ,td,Phylum:,/td, ,td,Chordata,/td, ,/tr, ,tr, ,td,Class:,/td, ,td,Aves,/td, ,/tr, ,tr, ,td,Order:,/td, ,td,Charadriiformes,/td, ,/tr, ,tr, ,td,Family:,/td, ,td,Scolopacidae,/td, ,/tr, ,tr, ,td,Genus:,/td, ,td,Limosa,/td, ,/tr, ,tr, ,td,Species:,/td, ,td,L. limosa,/td, ,/tr, ,tr, ,th,binominal name,/th, ,/tr, ,tr, ,td,Limosa limosa,/i, ,td,(Linnaeus, 1758),/td, ,/tr ...
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Imagine a world with no frogs. No longer would you hear frog melodies in the evening, algae would flourish, and entire ecosystems could change dramatically. This is a possibility in the Sierra Nevada because 90 percent of the Mountain yellow-legged frogs have been disappearing due to an amphibian pathogen and loss of habitat from fish introductions in our lakes. An ambitious and promising effort is underway to recover these frogs, and this approach may be applied to conserving other threatened amphibians globally. Join Dr. Roland Knapp from the Sierra Nevada Aquatic Research Laboratory to learn more about the recovery effort ...
ID A0A0A0A5L2_CHAVO Unreviewed; 873 AA. AC A0A0A0A5L2; DT 07-JAN-2015, integrated into UniProtKB/TrEMBL. DT 07-JAN-2015, sequence version 1. DT 20-DEC-2017, entry version 13. DE SubName: Full=Bifunctional heparan sulfate N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferase 4 {ECO:0000313,EMBL:KGL88295.1}; GN ORFNames=N301_01195 {ECO:0000313,EMBL:KGL88295.1}; OS Charadrius vociferus (Killdeer) (Aegialitis vocifera). OC Eukaryota; Metazoa; Chordata; Craniata; Vertebrata; Euteleostomi; OC Archelosauria; Archosauria; Dinosauria; Saurischia; Theropoda; OC Coelurosauria; Aves; Neognathae; Charadriiformes; Charadriidae; OC Charadrius. OX NCBI_TaxID=50402 {ECO:0000313,EMBL:KGL88295.1, ECO:0000313,Proteomes:UP000053858}; RN [1] {ECO:0000313,EMBL:KGL88295.1, ECO:0000313,Proteomes:UP000053858} RP NUCLEOTIDE SEQUENCE [LARGE SCALE GENOMIC DNA]. RC STRAIN=BGI_N301 {ECO:0000313,EMBL:KGL88295.1}; RA Zhang G., Li C.; RT Genome evolution of avian class.; RL Submitted (JUN-2014) to the EMBL/GenBank/DDBJ databases. CC ...
Wildlife Sanctuary protecting wombats, birds, reptiles, fauna & flora. Promoting conservation, wildlife education and understanding
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Status Assessment and Conservation Action Plan for the Long-billed Curlew (Numenius americanus) Biological Technical Publication BTP-R6012-2009 Bob Gress© U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Status Assessment and Conservation Action Plan for the Long-billed Curlew (Numenius americanus) Biological Technical Publication BTP-R6012-2009 Suzanne D. Fellows Stephanie L. Jones U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Region 6, Nongame Migratory Bird Coordinators Office, Denver, CO Cover image: Long-billed Curlew Photo credit: Bob Gress© ii Status Assessment and Conservation Action Plan for the Long-billed Curlew (Numenius americanus) Author contact information: Suzanne D. Fellows U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Region 6 Nongame Migratory Birds P. O. Box 25486 DFC Denver, CO 80225-0486 Phone: 303-236-4417 Email: [email protected] Stephanie L. Jones U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Region 6 Nongame Migratory Birds P. O. Box 25486 DFC Denver, CO 80225-0486 Phone: 303-236-4409 Email: ...
Adults occur in caves and other dimly lit biotopes. Active during daytime. They feed mainly on small sessile invertebrates and algae, to a lesser extent on harpacticoids (Ref. 5981). Oviparous. Eggs are demersal and adhesive (Ref. 205), and are attached to the substrate via a filamentous, adhesive pad or pedestal (Ref. 94114). Larvae are planktonic, often found in shallow, coastal waters (Ref. 94114). ...
ID: Distinguished from similar species by its black thorax, head and palps. C.dubitana also has a black thorax but has white head. C.hybridella has a white thorax and head. C.molliculana has a brown head and thorax with a variable mix of white ...
Murrelet: Murrelet, any of six species of small diving birds belonging to the auk family, Alcidae (order Charadriiformes). Murrelets are about 20 cm (8 inches) long, thin billed and,
uuid: 82206190-2f2f-459f-8373-ab6ab3b85888, type: records, etag: 4a9ffbd049044fc084e9c452ce853bc39afa239a, data: { dwc:startDayOfYear: 277, dwc:specificEpithet: alba, dwc:countryCode: US, dwc:county: Grays Harbor, dwc:recordedBy: Johnson, R. E., dwc:order: Charadriiformes, dcterms:references: http://portal.vertnet.org/o/crcm/birds?id=89-191, dcterms:accessRights: http://vertnet.org/resources/norms.html, dwc:occurrenceID: urn:catalog:CRCM:Birds:89-191, dcterms:language: en, id: urn:catalog:CRCM:Birds:89-191, dwc:establishmentMeans: native, dwc:stateProvince: Washington, dwc:eventDate: 1988-10-03, dwc:country: United States, dwc:collectionCode: Birds, dwc:occurrenceStatus: present, dwc:kingdom: Animalia, dwc:occurrenceRemarks: Mod. fat, dwc:basisOfRecord: PreservedSpecimen, dwc:genus: Calidris, dwc:continent: North America, dwc:family: Scolopacidae, dwc:sex: male, dwc:dynamicProperties: ...
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TY - JOUR. T1 - Corticosterone and growth hormone levels in shorebirds during spring and fall migration stopover. AU - Tsipoura, Nellie. AU - Scanes, Colin G.. AU - Burger, Joanna. PY - 1999/11/1. Y1 - 1999/11/1. N2 - Large numbers of shorebirds stop over at Delaware Bay during spring migration and undergo major mass increases within a two- to three-week period. We studied plasma levels of corticosterone and growth hormone in three species of migrants that use this site, sanderlings, Calidris alba, semipalmated plovers, Charadrius semipalmatus, and semipalmated sandpipers, Calidris pusilla. Semipalmated sandpipers were also studied at a fall migration stopover in Manomet, Massachusetts. These two hormones were chosen because they modulate the physiological processes of lipogenesis/lipolysis and promote increased feeding in birds. The stress response was not suppressed in the shorebirds studied, and plasma levels of corticosterone were elevated compared to other studies. We believe that the high ...
Other articles where Black-backed jackal is discussed: jackal: …and eastern Africa, and the black-backed (C. mesomelas) and side-striped (C. adustus) jackals of southern and eastern Africa. Jackals grow to a length of about 85-95 cm (34-37 inches), including the 30-35-cm (12-14-inch) tail, and weigh about 7-11 kg (15-24 pounds). Golden jackals and African golden wolves are yellowish, the…
Squalidus argentatus (Sauvage and Dabry de Thiersant 1874) is a small-sized freshwater fish which is distributed in Mainland China, Hainan Island and Taiwan. The populations of S. argentatus have dropped sharply probably due to overharvesting and water pollution recently. Eleven polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed for the cyprinid fish S. argentatus. These new markers were tested on 43 individuals collected from Yangtze River and Qiantang River. The number of alleles, observed and expected heterozygosity per locus, in two populations ranged from 3 to 14, from 0.333 to 0.954 and from 0.480 to 0.928, respectively. Only two loci are significantly deviated from Hardy-Weinberg expectations due to the heterozygote deficiency. No significant linkage disequilibrium was detected between the pairwise comparisons of these loci. These polymorphic microsatellite loci will enable us to study the genetic variation, population structure, and conservation genetics of this species in the future.
Sub-tropical tern; slightly smaller than Common Tern with a lighter and less powerful flight. In all plumages note the darker upperparts including the rump and uppertail. Bill longer and legs shorter. Adults have medium dark gray underparts with a dark underwing trailing edge, similar to the smaller Whiskered Tern that has a shorter tail. Note than in different light conditions Common Tern also shows gray underparts, but Common Tern always has a white tail and rump. Young birds are very similar to Common Tern, but White-cheeked Terns are more strongly marked. Breeds on small islands and coral reefs. Vocalisations similar to Common Tern.
The white-fronted tern is the most common tern on the New Zealand coastline, at times occurring in flocks of many hundreds or even thousands of birds. It is mainly a marine species that is seldom found far from the coast. The name white-fronted refers to the frons or forehead, where a thin strip of white separates the black cap from the black bill. Most other capped terns, including the black-fronted tern, have black caps that reach the bill when in breeding plumage. The scientific name striata refers to the finely-barred (striated) dorsal plumage of recently fledged white-fronted terns, as the original description and name was based on a juvenile bird painted by William Ellis, surgeons second mate on the Discovery, on Captain Cooks third visit to New Zealand.. Identification. The white-fronted tern is a medium-sized, long-tailed sea tern that is common around New Zealand coasts. It is pale grey above and white below, with a black cap that is separated from the bill by a white band (or ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Persistence of H5 and H7 avian influenza viruses in water. AU - Brown, Justin D.. AU - Swayne, David E.. AU - Cooper, Robert J.. AU - Burns, Rachel E.. AU - Stallknecht, David E.. PY - 2007. Y1 - 2007. N2 - Although fecal-oral transmission of avian influenza viruses (AIV) via contaminated water represents a recognized mechanism for transmission within wild waterfowl populations, little is known about viral persistence in this medium. In order to provide initial data on persistence of H5 and H7 AIVs in water, we evaluated eight wild-type low-pathogenicity H5 and H7 AIVs isolated from species representing the two major influenza reservoirs (Anseriformes and Charadriiformes). In addition, the persistence of two highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 viruses from Asia was examined to provide some insight into the potential for these viruses to be transmitted and maintained in the environments of wild bird populations. Viruses were tested at two temperatures (17 C and 28 C) and ...
Top predators are relevant indicators of the ecological status of a system and can have a high impact on food webs. But top predators are difficult to include in network analyses because their biomass in ash free dry weight or carbon content ismissing. Regression equations were determined for the relationships between fresh weight and dry weight, ash free dryweight, carbon and nitrogen contents respectively for six of the most abundant bird species in theWadden Sea (Calidris canutus, Limosa lapponica, Haematopus ostralegus, Chroicocephalus ridibundus, Larus canus, Anas penelope) and harbor seals (Phoca vitulina). The relationships for all specieswere interpreted as linear through the origin. Carbon content vs. freshweight ratios for birds ranged from0.16±0.01 to 0.22±0.02. Carbon content vs. fresh weight ratio was 0.17± 0.02 on average for harbor seals. This work highlights that the biomass of top predatorswas often over- or underestimated in previous studies. The determined conversion ...
Hildebrandt, Nicole; Niehoff, Barbara; Sartoris, Franz-Josef (2014): Performance of the Arctic calanoid copepods Calanus glacialis and C. hyperboreus under elevated pCO2 and temperatures. PANGAEA, https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.834091, Supplement to: Hildebrandt, N et al. (2014): Long-term effects of elevated CO2 and temperature on the Arctic calanoid copepods Calanus glacialis and C. hyperboreus. Marine Pollution Bulletin, 80(1-2), 59-70, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.marpolbul.2014.01.050
Phylogeographical analyses on Squalidus argentatus samples from thirteen localities within mainland China and Taiwan were conducted for biogeographic studies, as their dispersal strictly depends on geological evolution of the landmasses. A total of 95 haplotypes were genotyped for mtDNA cyt b gene in 160 specimens from nine river systems. Relatively high levels of haplotype diversity (h = 0.984) and low levels of nucleotide diversity (π = 0.020) were detected in S. argentatus. Two major phylogenetic haplotype groups, A and B, were revealed via phylogenetic analysis. The degree of intergroup divergence (3.96%) indicates that these groups diverged about 4.55 myr (million years) ago. Haplotype network and population analyses indicated significant genetic structure (FST = 0.775), largely concordant with the geographical location of the populations. According to SAMOVA analysis, we divided these populations into four units: Yangtze-Pearl, Qiantang-Minjiang, Jiulong-Beijiang and Taiwan groups. Mismatch
Ring recoveries indicate that taimyrensis spend the winter in coastal areas in the north-western Pacific and that they cross the mainland of Asia in a south-easterly direction when migrating from the breeding grounds towards the wintering areas. As a result they appear unlikely to occur in the Arabia Gulf region, although this cannot be entirely ruled out. There are indications, but no ring recoveries, that taimyrensis might predominantly winter in a quite mild environment, most likely in coastal areas of the East China Sea and the South China Sea. More observations of birds marked on Taimyr and more insight in the winter ecology are needed to establish its core winter range and to get a better picture of the migration route. Furthermore, observations of marked birds are necessary to clarify if Taimyr Gulls also spend the winter in coastal areas around the Arabian Sea, or elsewhere along a south-westerly flyway. Recent sources indicate that gulls resembling Taimyr Gulls spend the winter in low ...
Few studies have attempted to investigate carnivore dynamics in the privatised agricultural sector of South Africa. As such, the effect of lethal predator management on carnivore populations in private game-farms remains unclear. The black-backed jackal (Canis mesomelas) is one of a number of species that has historically been perceived as a threat to economic security and has frequently been targeted as a pest species. Despite efforts to reduce or remove C. mesomelas from livestock producing areas, recent land owner questionnaires and faecal density surveys report this species as prevalent. The mechanism by which this species persists under such circumstances is currently under debate, and remains a significant question that restricts the sustainable management of this species ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Serum concentrations of ionized calcium, vitamin D3, and parathyroid hormone in captive thick-billed parrots (Rhynchopsitta pachyrhyncha). AU - Howard, Lauren L.. AU - Kass, Philip H. AU - Lamberski, Nadine. AU - Wack, Ray F.. PY - 2004/6. Y1 - 2004/6. N2 - Serum collected from 68 thick-billed parrots (Rhynchopsitta pachyrhyncha) from 15 institutions was analyzed for ionized Ca (iCa), total Ca (tCa), P, total protein (TP), albumin (Alb), parathyroid hormone (PTH), and vitamin D 3. Values were not distributed normally; 95% frequency intervals were as follows: iCa (0.82-1.3 mmol/L), tCa (1.37-2.09 mmol/L,), P (0.35-1.75 mmol/L), TP (21-39 g/L), Alb (9-13 g/L), PTH (0-65.68 pmol/L), and vitamin D, (5.2-51 nmol/L). Sixty percent (±7.5%) of tCa was ionized. Female thick-billed parrots had significantly higher mean iCa (1.11 mmol/L, n = 22) than male thick-billed parrots (1.05 mmol/L, n = 32). tCa and iCa values in thick-billed parrots were lower than the reported values for other ...
You can read more about him at the University of Western Ontario Department of Biology Directory.. Recent Publications: Gerson, A.R. and C.G. Guglielmo. 2013. Measurement of glomerular filtration rate during flight in a migratory bird using a single bolus injection of FITC-inulin. American Journal of Physiology - Renal Physiology doi:10.1152/ajprenal.00247.2013. Nebel, S., D.M. Buehler, A. MacMillan, and C.G. Guglielmo. 2013. Flight performance of western sandpipers (Calidris mauri) remains uncompromised when mounting an acute phase immune response. Journal of Experimental Biology (doi:10.1242/jeb.083204). Boyle, W.A., D.W. Winkler and C.G. Guglielmo. 2012. Rapid loss of fat but not lean mass prior to chick provisioning supports the flight efficiency hypothesis in Tree Swallows. Functional Ecology doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2435.2012.01997.x. McGuire, L.P., C.G. Guglielmo, S.A. Mackenzie and P.D. Taylor. 2012. Migration stopover in the North American long-distance migrant silver-haired bat, ...
Size of muscle fibres predicted flight performance in the wild Muscle structure and body size predict the athletic performance of Olympic athletes, such as sprinters. The same, it appears, is true of wild seabirds that can commute hundreds of kilometres a day to find food, according to a recent paper by scientists from McGill and Colgate universities published in the Journal of Experimental Biology. The researchers studied a colony of small gulls, known as black-legged kittiwakes, that breed and nest in an abandoned radar tower on Middleton Island, Alaska. They attached GPS-accelerometers-Fitbit for birds -- onto kittiwakes to track their flight performance, discovering that they sometimes travel as far as 250 km a day to find food for their offspring. By combining data from the GPS tracker with minute muscle samples from some of the birds, the researchers found that, despite beating their wings less frequently, birds with larger muscle fibres were able to fly as fast as those with smaller fibres. The
The Common Gull (European and Asian subspecies; see below) or Mew Gull (North American subspecies) Larus canus is a medium-sized gull which breeds in northern Asia, northern Europe and northwestern North America. It migrates further south in winter.[2] Its name does not indicate that it is an abundant species, but that during the winter it feeds on common land, short pasture used for grazing.[3]. Adults are 40-46 cm long, obviously smaller than the Herring Gull, and slightly smaller than the Ring-billed Gull, also differing from this in its shorter, more tapered bill with a more greenish shade of yellow, as well as being unmarked during the breeding season. The body is grey above and white below. The legs are greenish-yellow. In winter, the head is streaked grey, and the bill often has a poorly-defined blackish band near the tip (sometimes sufficiently obvious to cause confusion with Ring-billed Gull). They have black wingtips with large white mirrors. Young birds have scaly black-brown ...
The objectives of this study are (1) to evaluate the current status of thyroid function in developing Herring gulls (Larus argentatus) from Great Lakes sites with different chemical pollutant exposures and (2) to determine, using laboratory studies on developing chickens (Gallus domesticus), if the disruption of avian thyroid function by polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs; key contaminants at many Great Lakes sites) is similar mechanistically to that in laboratory mammals. Herring gulls, a fish-eating, top-predator, have been used as a sentinel species to monitor the concentrations and biological effects of environmental contaminants in the Great Lakes for more than 25 years. Past research has focused on mortality, developmental abnormalities and reproductive effects of chemical pollutants in the lakes. Studies of thyroid histology and developmental effects suggest that thyroid function is disrupted in these gulls. This study examines the thyroid status of developing gulls in the Great Lakes and ...
Exciting opportunity in Plover, WI for Oakview Veterinary Medical Center as a Associate Veterinarian (Progressive Practice) - Plover, WI
Auel, H. , Klages, M. and Werner, I. (2003): Respiration and lipid content of the Arctic copepod Calanus hyperboreus overwintering 1 m above the seafloor at 2300 m water depth in the Fram Strait , Marine Biology ...
A randomized, replicated, controlled study in 2007 in a laboratory in Virginia, USA (Woodhams et al. 2012) found that survival of mountain yellow-legged frogs Rana muscosa naturally infected with chytridiomycosis was not increased by adding chytrid-inhibiting skin bacteria. Survival of frogs treated with bacteria was 50% compared to 39% for infected controls. Infection was not cleared in surviving frogs. However, weight loss was reduced with treatment (0.1 vs 0.4 g/week). Wild-caught frogs were randomly assigned to treatments. Twenty were bathed in water containing bacteria (Pedobacter cryoconitis) isolated from mountain yellow-legged frog and 13 control frogs in water alone for two hours. Frogs were swabbed and tested at seven and 13 days after treatment.. A randomized, replicated, controlled study in 2010 in a laboratory in Switzerland (Woodhams, Geiger, Reinert, Rollins-Smith, Lam, Harris, Briggs, Vredenburg & Voyles 2012) found that survival of common toad Bufo bufo toadlets was not ...
2008 San Diego Zoo Global. Disclaimer: Although San Diego Zoo Global makes every attempt to provide accurate information, some of the facts may become outdated or replaced by new research findings. Questions and comments may be addressed to [email protected] ...
The egg-laying occurs through June. The nest is on the ground and usually near water. The female builds a shallow depression on a hummock of moss. It is lined with leaves, sedges, moss and lichens.. She lays 4 dull white/buff/olive eggs with dark markings. She incubates alone during 23-25 days. At hatching, the chicks are brownish-grey above with dark mottling and white tips, the underparts are whitish and the crown is dark. They leave the nest within 24 hours after hatching, and they are able to feed themselves. They are tended by the female. They fledge about 16-20 days after hatching. ...
mp3 - spectrogram 128383. The name grosbeak comes from the French term grosbec , meaning large beak-an obvious attribute of this bird, Black-headed Grosbeak, and others in their family. When people try to get on. One of the cool things about PowerPoint is that it lets you embed sounds into directly into the presentation. MP3 320 kbps (zip) Lenght: 1:25 min File size: 3. Happy Parrot Sounds! Happy is one of those words that is open to interpretation. Download and learn Hawk Sounds and Eagle Sounds to use for your wildlife watching. They are all really nice looking birds, but I couldnt find one that sang the Happy Birthday Song. Other Bird Sounds. Works perfectly on your tablet and phone!. The trick is becoming familiar with the bird sounds (the mourning dove and chickadee are very familiar to me, so I reset, when needed, near the time when those are to sing). Bed time DONT WORRY BE HAPPY Whistle Practice Cockatiel Bird Sings (60 Minutes Narration Free Birds) Cockatiel Companion Parrots ...
The strong-billed honeyeater was first described by ornithologist John Gould in 1837.[2] Its specific name is derived from the Latin words validus strong, and rostrum bill.[3] It is a member of the genus Melithreptus with several species, of similar size and (apart from the brown-headed honeyeater) black-headed appearance, in the honeyeater family Meliphagidae. Molecular markers show the strong-billed honeyeater separated from the common ancestor of the brown-headed and black-chinned honeyeaters between 6.7 and 3.4 million years ago.[4]. The next closest relative outside the genus is the much larger but similarly marked blue-faced honeyeater.[5] More recently, DNA analysis has shown honeyeaters to be related to the Pardalotidae (pardalotes), Acanthizidae (Australian warblers, scrubwrens, thornbills, etc.), and the Maluridae (Australian fairy-wrens) in a large Meliphagoidea superfamily.[6]. ...
The dorper sheep is one of the largest species of meat sheep in the world. Developed in South Africa in the 1930s by crossing dorset-horned and black-headed Persian sheep, the sturdy dorper spread around the globe due to its ease of care and high meat output. Meat sheep are fed a slightly different diet than wool or milk sheep, resulting in larger muscle mass and higher weights on market day. ...
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Its that summer trip, and the company the gray and white bird keeps in Canada, that make it a prime candidate for a new study in which researchers from the Georgia Wildlife Resources Division are testing migratory shorebirds for bird flu.. There is a potential that they could cross paths with migrant species from Alaska or Iceland, so it is important that we monitor for the presence of highly pathogenic avian flu, said Brad Winn, program manager for the WRD Coastal Nongame Program.. In the first round of sampling on the Altamaha delta between Sapelo and Sea islands late last month, Winn and colleagues launched netting over roosting flocks and caught 14 birds, including seven red knots. The other birds were black-bellied plovers, ruddy turnstones and sanderlings.. Researchers test for avian flu by taking a fecal sample from each bird. The birds are released unharmed.. Federal and state biologists will be capturing and sampling birds in every state as part of the interagency strategic plan ...
Jan 3: a very windy day (even for Coto Donana standards, according to Claudio), but almost no rain and long breaks of sunshine. Claudio drove us, by way of a long detour NW of the park, to the area of Lucio Cerrado Garrido and Canada Mayor. Without his jeep we would never get there: the roads were often flooded and very bumpy and the vehicle proved to be a very useful windscreen. Without his guidance we would never see all the birds we saw. Greylag Geese were everywhere and the most common gull was the Lesser Black-backed. The first rarities were 7 Black Storks and in the same area we saw also several shorebirds and a flying Squacco Heron. By the roadside we saw a small party (adults and juveniles) of Purple Gallinules and a single Stone- curlew. later we had our first Imperial Eagles: 1 juvenile and 2 immatures were hunting along a small strip of land which was surrounded by water. Several unlucky rabbits were trapped there and the hunting was easy and rewarding for the young eagles. An Osprey ...
Migrants have been hypothesised to use different migration strategies between seasons: a time-minimization strategy during their pre-breeding migration towards the breeding grounds and an energy-minimization strategy during their post-breeding migration towards the wintering grounds. Besides season, we propose body size as a key factor in shaping migratory behaviour. Specifically, given that body size is expected to correlate negatively with maximum migration speed and that large birds tend to use more time to complete their annual life-history events (such as moult, breeding and migration), we hypothesise that large-sized species are time stressed all year round. Consequently, large birds are not only likely to adopt a time-minimization strategy during pre-breeding migration, but also during post-breeding migration, to guarantee a timely arrival at both the non-breeding (i.e. wintering) and breeding grounds. We tested this idea using individual tracks across six long-distance migratory shorebird
Oral History Interview with John Wesley Snipes, 1976 September 20 and November 20. Interview H-98. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007). By John Wesley Snipes
The State of the Birds United States of America 2009 Cover photos from top, left to right: Magnolia Warbler by Pamela Wells; Saguaro National Monument, Arizona, by Gerrit Vyn, Greater Prairie-Chicken by Gerrit Vyn; Pacific forest, Opal Creek, Oregon, by Gerrit Vyn; Snowy Owl by Gerrit Vyn; arctic coastal plain tundra, Colville River Delta, Alaska, by Gerrit Vyn; Osprey by James Livaudais. This page: Scarlet Tanager by Gerrit Vyn. Facing page: Bar-tailed Godwit nest by Gerrit Vyn. 2 Birds are a priceless part of Americas heritage. They are beautiful, they are economically important-and they reflect the health of our environment. This State of the Birds report reveals troubling declines of bird populations during the past 40 years-a warning signal of the failing health of our ecosystems. At the same time, we see heartening evidence that strategic land management and conservation action can reverse declines of birds. This report calls attention to the collective efforts needed to protect natures ...
La Gaviota cocinera, (Larus dominicanus) cría en las costas e islas de la mayor parte del Hemisferio septentrional. La raza Larus dominicanus vetula habita alrededor del África del sur y la denominada Larus dominicanus dominicanus es la subespecie hallada en Sudamérica, partes de Australia (allí coexiste con la gaviota del Pacífico, Larus pacificus) y en Nueva Zelandia (donde se la conoce como gaviota de espalda negra o por su apelativo Māori, Karoro). Su nombre científico deriva de la Orden de frailes Dominicanos, quienes vestían hábitos en blanco y negro. Esta ave sería a su vez el equivalente a la Gaviota sombría del Hemisferio boreal (Larus fuscus), pero es un tanto más grande; poseyendo una longitud total de 54-65 cm y 128-142 cm de lado a lado en las alas. Se trata de una gaviota más bien costera. El nido es una depresión llana en el suelo rodeada de materia vegetal y plumas. La hembra usualmente pone 2 o 3 huevos. Ambos progenitores alimentan a sus crías. Los adultos ...
Slender-billed Gull (Larus genei). Birds of Kazakhstan. author: Askar Isabekov. date: 2017-05-29. location: Ashyozek river, between Volga and Ural rivers..
Eventbrite - Charcoal Expressions LLC Robert Gorder presents Charcoal Drawing Event Snow Globe in Plover - Sunday, February 18, 2018 at Oso Brewing Co., Plover, WI. Find event and ticket information.
Delaware Bay Shorebird Migration - Daily Log 2005 - an account of shorbird migration activity along Delaware Bay beaches from the New Jersey Divison of Fish and Wildlife.
The Early Shorebird Will Catch Fewer Invertebrates on Trampled Sandy Beaches. . Biblioteca virtual para leer y descargar libros, documentos, trabajos y tesis universitarias en PDF. Material universiario, documentación y tareas realizadas por universitarios en nuestra biblioteca. Para descargar gratis y para leer online.
This chunky shorebird has a rather anonymous look in winter plumage, but is unmistakable in spring, when it wears robin-red on its chest. It nests in the far north, mostly well above the Arctic Circle (the first known nest was discovered during Admiral Pearys expedition to the North Pole in 1909); its winter range includes shorelines around the world, south to Australia and southern South America. Where it is common, the Red Knot may roost in very densely packed flocks, standing shoulder to shoulder on the sand.
Acheter à Mauri Pro Sailing Gill Technique Équipement - UV Chemises. Mauri Pro Sailing magasin, votre accès direct à léquipement voilier Gill pour la croisière et des voiliers de course.
The Atlantic Flyway is home to a wide variety of ecosystems-and more than a third of the human population of the United States. Protecting birds and their habitats from human activity and the threat of sea-level rise is at the forefront of Audubons mission in this flyway. Shorebird monitoring programs from New York to the Bahamas ensure beach-nesting species, including the Piping Plover and American Oystercatcher, have safe places to rear their young.. ...
鴴形目 Charadriiformes[编辑]. *彩鷸科 Rostratulidae. *彩鷸 - Rostratula benghalensis (w:Greater Painted-snipe) ※迷鳥 ...
2016: e.T22693785A93423145.CS1 maint: uses authors parameter (link) Coomber, Richard (1991). "Charadriiformes: Plovers". Birds ...
Editor). CRC Press (1992), ISBN 978-0-8493-4258-5. Coomber, Richard (1991). "Charadriiformes: Plovers". Birds of the World. ...
Coomber, Richard (1991). "Charadriiformes: Plovers". Birds of the World. Godalming, Surrey: Colour Library Books Ltd. pp. 97- ...
Charadriiformes. Family:. Laridae. Genus:. Chlidonias. Species:. C. leucopterus. Binomial name. Chlidonias leucopterus. ( ...
Camouflage may enable snipe to remain undetected by hunters in marshland. If the snipe flies, hunters have difficulty wing-shooting due to the bird's erratic flight pattern. The difficulties involved in hunting snipes gave rise to the term sniper, meaning a hunter highly skilled in marksmanship and camouflaging, which later evolved to mean a sharpshooter or someone who shoots from a concealed location.[3][4] "Going on a snipe hunt" is a phrase suggesting a fool's errand, or an impossible task.[citation needed] As an American rite of passage, it is often associated with summer camps and groups such as the Boy Scouts.[5] ...
"Multilocus perspectives on the monophyly and phylogeny of the order Charadriiformes (Aves)". BMC Evolutionary Biology. 7: 35. ...
Charadriiformes. Family:. Charadriidae. Genus:. Pluvialis. Species:. P. apricaria. Binomial name. Pluvialis apricaria. ( ...
An adult red knot is the second largest Calidris sandpiper, measuring 23-26 cm (9.1-10.2 in) long with a 47-53 cm (19-21 in) wingspan. The body shape is typical for the genus, with a small head and eyes, a short neck and a slightly tapering bill that is no longer than its head.[19] It has short dark legs and a medium thin dark bill. The winter, or basic, plumage becomes uniformly pale grey, and is similar between the sexes. The alternate, or breeding, plumage is mottled grey on top with a cinnamon face, throat and breast and light-coloured rear belly. The alternate plumage of females is similar to that of the male except it is slightly lighter and the eye-line is less distinct. Canutus, islandica and piersmai are the "darker" subspecies. Subspecies rogersi has a lighter belly than either roselaari or piersmai, and rufa is the lightest in overall plumage. The transition from alternate to basic plumages begins at the breeding site but is most pronounced during the southwards migration. The molt to ...
The royal tern belongs to the class Aves and the order Charadriiformes. Charadriiformes are mainly seabirds of small to medium- ...
Order: Charadriiformes Family: Jacanidae The jacanas are a group of waders which are found throughout the tropics. They are ... Order: Charadriiformes Family: Laridae Laridae is a family of medium to large seabirds and includes gulls, kittiwakes, terns ... Order: Charadriiformes Family: Haematopodidae The oystercatchers are large and noisy plover-like birds, with strong bills used ... Order: Charadriiformes Family: Charadriidae The family Charadriidae includes the plovers, dotterels, and lapwings. They are ...
It is a very long-distance migrant, and about half of the species breeds in the boggy tundra of northeast Asia, the rest nesting in a range from Alaska to central Canada.[7] The American and most of the Asian birds winter in South America, but some Asian breeders winter in southern and Australia and New Zealand. On migration and in winter, the pectoral sandpiper is typically found in freshwater habitats. This species also occurs as a regular migrant to western Europe, and is seen most years in Ireland or Great Britain.[8] While the pectoral sandpiper has not been recorded as breeding species in Europe, vagrant individuals were found in Scotland in suitable breeding habitat during summer.[9] Many of the birds occurring in Western Europe may be on a regular migration from Asian breeding grounds to winter in Southern Africa.[10] September 2003 saw a record influx to those two countries, with 40 found in Ireland and 150 in Great Britain. On the US Pacific coast, such stagings of migrant flocks ...
Charadriiformes Family:. Charadriidae Subfamily:. Vanellinae. Bonaparte, 1842 Genera Erythrogonys. Vanellus. and see text ...
Charadriiformes. Family:. Scolopacidae. Genus:. Bartramia. Lesson, 1831. Species:. B. longicauda. Binomial name. ...
Charadriiformes (gulls, terns, auks)Edit. Great auk. *Great auk, Pinguinus impennis †. Falconiformes (birds of prey)Edit. * ...
Order: Charadriiformes Family: Laridae Laridae is a family of medium to large seabirds, the gulls, terns and skimmers. Gulls ... Order: Charadriiformes Family: Haematopodidae The oystercatchers are large and noisy plover-like birds, with strong bills used ... Order: Charadriiformes Family: Ibidorhynchidae The ibisbill is related to the waders, but is sufficiently distinctive to be a ... Order: Charadriiformes Family: Burhinidae The thick-knees are a group of largely tropical waders in the family Burhinidae. They ...
Order: Charadriiformes Family: Laridae Laridae is a family of medium to large seabirds and includes gulls, terns, and skimmers ... Order: Charadriiformes Family: Stercorariidae Skuas and jaegers are in general medium to large birds, typically with gray or ... Order: Charadriiformes Family: Recurvirostridae Recurvirostridae is a family of large wading birds which includes the avocets ... Order: Charadriiformes Family: Scolopacidae Scolopacidae is a large diverse family of small to medium-sized shorebirds ...
Order: Charadriiformes Family: Laridae Laridae is a family of medium to large seabirds, the gulls, terns, and skimmers. Gulls ... Order: Charadriiformes Family: Dromadidae The crab-plover is related to the waders. It resembles a plover but with very long ... Order: Charadriiformes Family: Jacanidae The jacanas are a group of tropical waders in the family Jacanidae. They are found ... Order: Charadriiformes Family: Burhinidae The thick-knees are a group of largely tropical waders in the family Burhinidae. They ...
Order Charadriiformes *Charadrius vociferus, killdeer (2014[63]). *Order Ciconiiformes *Nipponia nippon, crested ibis (2014[63] ...
Charadriiformes (gulls and relatives). *Gruiformes (cranes and relatives). Phaethontimorphae. *Phaethontiformes (tropicbirds). ...
Order: Charadriiformes Family: Alcidae Alcids are superficially similar to penguins due to their black-and-white colors, their ... Order: Charadriiformes Family: Stercorariidae They are in general medium to large birds, typically with gray or brown plumage, ... Order: Charadriiformes Family: Laridae Gulls are typically medium to large birds, usually gray or white, often with black ... Order: Charadriiformes Family: Haematopodidae The oystercatchers are large, obvious and noisy plover-like birds, with strong ...
Order: Charadriiformes Family: Laridae Laridae is a family of medium to large seabirds, the gulls, terns, and skimmers. Gulls ... Order: Charadriiformes Family: Jacanidae The jacanas are a group of tropical waders in the family Jacanidae. They are found ... Order: Charadriiformes Family: Burhinidae The thick-knees are a group of largely tropical waders in the family Burhinidae. They ... Order: Charadriiformes Family: Charadriidae The family Charadriidae includes the plovers, dotterels and lapwings. They are ...
Order: Charadriiformes Family: Chionididae *Snowy sheathbill, Chionis albus (A). Thick-knees[edit]. Order: Charadriiformes ...
a b John Harshman, Joseph W. Brown: Charadriiformes. Shorebirds and relatives. In: The Tree of Life Web Project. 2008. ... Die Regenpfeiferartigen (Charadriiformes), auch Limikolen oder Watvögel genannt, sind eine Ordnung der Vögel. Zu ihr gehören ...
Anseriformes, Gruiformes, Charadriiformes, Passeriformes". Aquila. 85: 11-39. Federico L. Agnolin (2006). "Dos Nuevos Anatidae ...
Charadriiformes gen. et spp. indet. (Early/Middle Miocene) - several species, 1 probably larid Charadriiformes gen. et sp. ... shorebirds Basal and unresolved taxa Charadriiformes gen. et sp. indet. (Late Cretaceous) - burhinid? basal? "Morsoravis" (Late ...
"Fossil record of the Charadriiformes". Palaeobiology and Biodiversity Research Group, University of Bristol. Retrieved 13 May ...
Maclean GL (1974). "Belly-soaking in the Charadriiformes". J. Bombay Nat. Hist. Soc. 72: 74-82. Jerdon, TC (1864). Birds of ...
The bird order Charadriiformes contains 18 coastal seabird and wader families. Within the order, the terns form a lineage with ... de Pietri, Vanesa L; Costeur, Loïc; Güntert, Marcel; Mayr, Gerald (2011). "A revision of the Lari (Aves, Charadriiformes) from ... Relationships between various tern species, and between the terns and the other Charadriiformes, were formerly difficult to ... "Fossil record of the Charadriiformes". Palaeobiology and Biodiversity Research Group, University of Bristol. Archived from the ...
Maclean, GL (1974). "Belly-soaking in the Charadriiformes". J. Bombay Nat. Hist. Soc. 72 (1): 74-82. Jayakar, SD; Spurway, H ( ...
... Shorebirds and relatives. John Harshman and Joseph W. Brown Click on an image to view larger version & data in ... Page: Tree of Life Charadriiformes. Shorebirds and relatives. Authored by John Harshman and Joseph W. Brown. The TEXT of this ... Inter-familial relationships of the shorebirds (Aves : Charadriiformes) based on nuclear DNA sequence data. BMC Evol. Biol. 3: ... Phylogenetic relationships and divergence times of Charadriiformes genera: Multigene evidence for he Cretaceous origin of at ...
2016) That the Charadriiformes are an ancient group is also borne out by the fossil record. Alongside the Anseriformes, the ... List of Charadriiformes by population Fain & Houde (2004) Ericson et al. (2003), Paton et al. (2003), Thomas et al. (2004a,b), ... Charadriiformes (/kəˈrædri.ɪfɔːrmiːz/, from Charadrius, the type genus of family Charadriidae) is a diverse order of small to ... "Charadriiformes". jboyd.net. Retrieved 2017-07-16. van Tuinen et al. (2004), Paton & Baker (2006) Baker, Allan J.; Yatsenko, ...
Charadriiformes (Charadrius being Latin for "plover") is the taxonomic order to which the waders, gulls, and auks belong. ... The Charadriiformes, for example, are grouped with the Ciconiiformes in the Sibley-Ahlquist taxonomy. In the interest of ... This is a list of Charadriiformes species by global population. While numbers are estimates, they have been made by the experts ... A variety of methods are used for counting Charadriiformes. For example, the piping plover is subject to the quinquennial ...
GenDR A curated database of genes associated with dietary restriction in model organisms either from genetic manipulation experiments or gene expression profiling.. ...
charadriiformes: large diverse order of aquatic birds found along seacoasts and inland waters; shorebirds and coastal diving ... Do not diabolically buy computer online to any sauropodomorpha charadriiformes that asks for your built or slick bangladeshi. ...
Order Charadriiformes contains bird families like Buttonquails, Jacanas, Painted-snipes, Crab-plover, Oystercatchers, Ibisbill ... Charadriiformes. Families overview for this order. Thick-knees (Burhinidae) * Medium-sized terrestrial waders, with long legs, ... Previously placed in Gruiformes, but now universally accepted as belonging in Charadriiformes#R#R#R. ... both belonging to the scolopacine radiation of the Charadriiformes. ...
History, distribution, and seasonal abundance of the Least Tern Sternula antillarum (Aves: Charadriiformes: Sternidae) in ... Registros relevantes de Charadriiformes em praias do litoral norte do Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil. Revista Brasileira de ... Reprodução de Sternula antillarum (Charadriiformes: Sternidae) na costa amazônica do Brasil. Revista Brasileira de Ornitologia ... Primer registro de Sternula antillarum Lesson, 1847 (Aves, Charadriiformes) para el estado de Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil. ...
Fossil Calidridinae (Aves: Charadriiformes) from the Middle Miocene of the Nördlinger Ries. Bonner Zoologische Beitrge, 52, 101 ... A revision of the Lari (Aves, Charadriiformes) from the early Miocene of Saint-Gérand-le-Puy (Allier, France). Journal of ... Article: An assessment of the diversity of early Miocene Scolopaci (Aves, Charadriiformes) from Saint-Gérand-le-Puy (Allier, ... An assessment of the diversity of early Miocene Scolopaci (Aves, Charadriiformes) from Saint-Gérand-le-Puy (Allier, France). ...
an order of birds comprising 11 families, including Jacanidae, Rostratulidae, Thinocoridae,... Explanation of Charadriiformes ... Find out information about Charadriiformes. An order of cosmopolitan birds, most of which live near water. ... Related to Charadriiformes: Anseriformes, Scolopaci, Shorebirds Charadriiformes. [kə‚rad·rē·ə′fȯr‚mēz] (vertebrate zoology) An ... Charadriiformes live along seashores, riverbanks, lakeshores, and the edges of swamps. Some live in dry steppes and deserts and ...
Order Charadriiformes shorebirds and relatives Charadriiformes: pictures (830) Charadriiformes: specimens (5) Charadriiformes: ...
Charadriiformes. The order Charadriiformes is conservatively divided here into three suborders. Note, however, that sometimes ... Timetree of Charadriiformes, with the distribution of each family being indicated by the colour-code used throughout this ... of Gruiformes and Charadriiformes, Pakistan J. Zool. 52(2), 425-439. DOI: 10.17582/journal.pjz/20190603010623. (pdf) ... Charadriiformes: Scolopacidae) and phylogeny analysis among Scolopacidae, Genes & Genomics 40(5), 455-463. (abstract) ...
Northern Cardinals are popular with new and experienced birders. Photo by Josh Crozier.. In the list below, the 87 species marked with an * have been known to breed in this site. Those marked with (*) may breed here also. The two species marked with ** are escapees. One species is marked with !; this is the extinct Passenger Pigeon. Historical records indicate that this species may have had a breeding colony along the Speed River close to The Arboretum and thus this species was likely a common sight here long ago.. ...
This page is a collection of images that are attached to a branch of the Tree of Life.. For a more detailed explanation of the different ToL page types, have a look at the Structure of the Tree of Life page.. close box ...
Containing group: Charadriiformes. Discussion of Phylogenetic Relationships. The genus Pluvialis (golden plovers), though it ... Phylogenetic relationships and divergence times of Charadriiformes genera: Multigene evidence for the Cretaceous origin of at ...
鴴形目 Charadriiformes[编辑]. *彩鷸科 Rostratulidae. *彩鷸 - Rostratula benghalensis (w:Greater Painted-snipe) ※迷鳥 ...
Charadriiformes. Family:. Laridae. Genus:. Chlidonias. Species:. C. leucopterus. Binomial name. Chlidonias leucopterus. ( ...
Camouflage may enable snipe to remain undetected by hunters in marshland. If the snipe flies, hunters have difficulty wing-shooting due to the birds erratic flight pattern. The difficulties involved in hunting snipes gave rise to the term sniper, meaning a hunter highly skilled in marksmanship and camouflaging, which later evolved to mean a sharpshooter or someone who shoots from a concealed location.[3][4] "Going on a snipe hunt" is a phrase suggesting a fools errand, or an impossible task.[citation needed] As an American rite of passage, it is often associated with summer camps and groups such as the Boy Scouts.[5] ...
Charadriiformes (gulls, terns, auks)Edit. Great auk. *Great auk, Pinguinus impennis †. Falconiformes (birds of prey)Edit. * ...
Multivariate assessment of the phenetic affinities of Australasian oystercatchers (Aves: Charadriiformes). Publication. ... Baker, A. J. (1977). Multivariate assessment of the phenetic affinities of Australasian oystercatchers (Aves: Charadriiformes ...
Charadriiformes • Familia: Laridae • Genus: Chlidonias • Species: Chlidonias niger (Linnaeus, 1758) ...
Charadriiformes • Familia: Laridae • Genus: Anous • Species: Anous albivittus (Bonaparte, 1856) ...
Charadriiformes, order Charadriiformes - large diverse order of aquatic birds found along seacoasts and inland waters: ... The true northern penguin, the great auk (family Alcidae), was also flightless, a member of the Charadriiformes related to ... Charadriiformes: Alcidae).. Analysis of mechanisms of microevolutionary change in Cepphus guillemots using patterns of control ...
a b John Harshman, Joseph W. Brown: Charadriiformes. Shorebirds and relatives. In: The Tree of Life Web Project. 2008. ... Die Regenpfeiferartigen (Charadriiformes), auch Limikolen oder Watvögel genannt, sind eine Ordnung der Vögel. Zu ihr gehören ...
... is characterized by processes that pass a combination of genetic material to offspring, resulting in increased genetic diversity. The two main processes are: meiosis, involving the halving of the number of chromosomes; and fertilization, involving the fusion of two gametes and the restoration of the original number of chromosomes. During meiosis, the chromosomes of each pair usually cross over to achieve homologous recombination.. The evolution of sexual reproduction is a major puzzle. The first fossilized evidence of sexually reproducing organisms is from eukaryotes of the Stenian period, about 1 to 1.2 billion years ago.[1] Sexual reproduction is the primary method of reproduction for the vast majority of macroscopic organisms, including almost all animals and plants. Bacterial conjugation, the transfer of DNA between two bacteria, is often mistakenly confused with sexual reproduction, because the mechanics are similar.. A major question is why sexual reproduction persists ...
Band 8. Charadriiformes (3. Teil). Akademische Verlagsgesellschaft, Wiesbaden, Germany. *. Hemmingsson, E. & Eriksson, M.O.G. ( ...
order: Charadriiformes. family: Alcidae. status: Vulnerable, IUCN Threatened, ESA. range: Canada, USA (Alaska, California, ...
Order Charadriiformes. Suborder Charadrii. Family Burhinidae. Thumbnail description Medium-sized, long-legged, terrestrial ...
Waders : Charadriiformes --. Skuas : Stercorariidae --. Gulls : Laridae --. Terns : Sternidae --. Auks : Alcidae --. Sandgrouse ... Charadriiformes -- Skuas : Stercorariidae -- Gulls : Laridae -- Terns : Sternidae -- Auks : Alcidae -- Sandgrouse : ...
2011). Charadriiformes species-specific neighbour-networks on exon 3 were built using SplitsTree v.4.14.4 (Huson and Bryant ... Outside the order Charadriiformes, our data on godwit MHC diversity is similar to those described for other non-passerine ... These two Charadriiformes species exhibit striking differences in MHC-I characteristics and MHC-I diversity. We therefore set ... However, in contrast to previous MHC-I data within Charadriiformes, we did not find any evidence of alleles with low sequence ...
Charadriiformes. Email:. Contributor ID:. 736. Contribute to the ToL. ToL Contributions. Ways to Contribute. Use of ...
  • 2003. Inter-familial relationships of the shorebirds (Aves : Charadriiformes) based on nuclear DNA sequence data. (tolweb.org)
  • Fossil Calidridinae (Aves: Charadriiformes) from the Middle Miocene of the Nördlinger Ries. (palass.org)
  • Observando aves en el Peru: 1963-2006. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • 15 vetted fossil calibrations for divergence dating of Charadriiformes (Aves, Neognathae). (nescent.org)
  • Systematics and evolution of the Pan-Alcidae (Aves, Charadriiformes) N. Adam Smith and Julia A. Clarke. (nescent.org)
  • Osteological histology of the Pan-Alcidae (Aves, Charadriiformes): correlates of wing-propelled diving and flightlessness. (nescent.org)
  • 2012. Variation in the endocranial anatomy of the Charadriiformes (Aves): sensory system evolution associated with the transition to wing-propelled diving. (nescent.org)
  • Phylogenetic relationships within the Laridae (Charadriiformes: Aves) inferred from mitochondrial markers. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2007. Phylogenetic relationships and divergence times of Charadriiformes genera: Multigene evidence for he Cretaceous origin of at least 14 clades of shorebirds. (tolweb.org)
  • We used a meta-transcriptomic approach to characterize the viromes of nine avian species in the Anseriformes (ducks) and Charadriiformes (shorebirds). (nature.com)
  • Shorebirds (Charadriiformes) and wild waterfowl ( Anseriformes ) represent the major natural reservoirs of avian influenza viruses (AIVs). (thefreedictionary.com)
  • 100 species, several species from the orders Anseriformes (ducks, geese, and swans) and Charadriiformes (shorebirds) are thought to act as the reservoir community for AIV (6), primarily because AIVs have been most frequently isolated from these groups (9). (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Charadriiformes (/kəˈrædri.ɪfɔːrmiːz/, from Charadrius, the type genus of family Charadriidae) is a diverse order of small to medium-large birds. (wikipedia.org)
  • Traditionally placed in Gruiformes, in close association with Turnicidae, but genetic data #R #R #R #R indicate that it is sister to Thinocoridae, both belonging to the scolopacine radiation of the Charadriiformes. (hbw.com)
  • Previously placed in Gruiformes, but now universally accepted as belonging in Charadriiformes #R #R #R . (hbw.com)
  • The risk of intra-species transmission was high for Anseriformes (ducks and geese) and Charadriiformes birds and was relatively low for Gruiformes and Ciconiiformes birds. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Alongside the Anseriformes, the Charadriiformes are the only other order of modern bird to have an established fossil record within the late Cretaceous, alongside the other dinosaurs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Wild aquatic birds belonging to the orders Anseriformes and Charadriiformes have long been recognized as the natural reservoirs for all influenza type A viruses (1). (thefreedictionary.com)
  • AIVs have been isolated in 12 bird orders, but most isolations have been reported in the orders Anseriformes (in particular in the family Anatidae: ducks, swans, geese) and Charadriiformes (shore birds, gulls, terns). (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Virome connectivity was apparent in two well described multi-host virus species -avian coronavirus and influenza A virus- and a novel Rotavirus species that were shared among some Anseriform species, while virome heterogeneity was reflected in the absence of viruses shared between Anseriformes and Charadriiformes, as well as differences in viral abundance and alpha diversity among species. (nature.com)
  • Wild aquatic birds of the orders Anseriformes and Charadriiformes are the natural reservoir for influenza A viruses (1) and are thought to serve as a source of virus that leads to outbreaks in domestic poultry. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Wild waterfowl, primarily species in the orders Charadriiformes and Anseriformes (1), are natural reservoirs for type A influenza viruses. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • This is a list of Charadriiformes species by global population. (wikipedia.org)
  • So far, the main focus has been on species within the bird orders Galliformes and Passeriformes, while Charadriiformes remain vastly underrepresented with only two species studied to date. (springer.com)
  • These two Charadriiformes species exhibit striking differences in MHC-I characteristics and MHC-I diversity. (springer.com)
  • We therefore set out to study a third species within Charadriiformes, the Icelandic subspecies of black-tailed godwits ( Limosa limosa islandica ). (springer.com)
  • A new species of auk (Charadriiformes, Pan-Alcidae) from the Miocene of Mexico. (nescent.org)
  • The Sibley-Ahlquist taxonomy lumps all the Charadriiformes together with other seabirds and birds of prey into a greatly enlarged order Ciconiiformes. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Charadriiformes, for example, are grouped with the Ciconiiformes in the Sibley-Ahlquist taxonomy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Charadriiformes (Charadrius being Latin for "plover") is the taxonomic order to which the waders, gulls, and auks belong. (wikipedia.org)
  • The true northern penguin, the great auk (family Alcidae ), was also flightless, a member of the Charadriiformes related to gulls, auks, and lapwings. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The nineteen families in the taxonomic order CHARADRIIFORMES (pronounced kah-RAH-dree-ih-FOR-meez) include waterbirds such as auks, sandpipers, gulls, and terns. (whatbird.com)
  • Muscovy duck Cairina moschata Mallard Anas platyrhynchos Greater scaup Aythya marila Tufted duck Aythya fuligula Common merganser Mergus merganser Smew Mergus albellus Falconiformes Common buzzard Buteo buteo Rough-legged hawk Buteo lagopus Peregrine falcon Falco peregrinus Galliformes Common peafowl Pavo cristatus Domestic chicken Gallus gallus Charadriiformes (herring gull) Larus argentatus Strigiformes (eagle owl) Bubo bubo Passeriformes (Eurasian magpie) Pica pica All birds No. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Siewkowce [2] (Charadrii) - podrząd ptaków z rzędu siewkowych (Charadriiformes). (wikipedia.org)
  • Phylogenetic reanalysis of Strauch's osteological data set for the Charadriiformes. (tolweb.org)
  • Phylogenetic relationships among Charadriiformes: reanalysis of previous data. (palass.org)
  • Earliest northeastern Atlantic Ocean basin record of an auk (Charadriiformes, Pan-Alcidae): fossil remains from the Miocene of Germany. (nescent.org)
  • It comprises the family Dromadidae (order Charadriiformes). (britannica.com)
  • The diversity and divergence of the godwits MHC-I genes to a large extent fell between the previous estimates within Charadriiformes. (springer.com)
  • Charadriiformes) su raznovrsni red malih i ptica srednje veličine. (wikipedia.org)
  • Charadriiformes) su red iz razreda ptica . (wikipedia.org)
  • 2016) That the Charadriiformes are an ancient group is also borne out by the fossil record. (wikipedia.org)
  • Catalogue of fossil birds: Part 3 (Ralliformes, Ichthyornithiformes, Charadriiformes). (palass.org)
  • However, the resolution of the DNA-DNA hybridization technique used by Sibley & Ahlquist was not sufficient to properly resolve the relationships in this group, and indeed it appears as if the Charadriiformes constitute a single large and very distinctive lineage of modern birds of their own. (wikipedia.org)
  • A number of ornithologists divide the order Charadriiformes into three separate orders: Limicolae, Lari, and Alcae. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Se obtuvieron registros de especies migratorias en verano como Pelecanus erythrorhynchos, Calidris alba, Tringa semipalmata, Numenius americanus, N. phaeopus y Limosa fedoa. (gbif.org)