Acute, localized autoinoculable infectious disease usually acquired through sexual contact. Caused by HAEMOPHILUS DUCREYI, it occurs endemically almost worldwide, especially in tropical and subtropical countries and more commonly in seaports and urban areas than in rural areas.
A species of HAEMOPHILUS that appears to be the pathogen or causative agent of the sexually transmitted disease, CHANCROID.
A lesion on the surface of the skin or a mucous surface, produced by the sloughing of inflammatory necrotic tissue.
Pathological processes involving the male reproductive tract (GENITALIA, MALE).
A methylsulfonyl analog of CHLORAMPHENICOL. It is an antibiotic and immunosuppressive agent.
Pathological processes involving the female reproductive tract (GENITALIA, FEMALE).
A skin ulcer is a breakdown of the skin's surface and underlying tissues, often caused by prolonged pressure, infection, or poor circulation, leading to a loss of continuity in the epidermis and dermis, potentially extending into deeper layers such as subcutaneous tissue, muscle, and bone.
A genus of bacteria causing GRANULOMA INGUINALE and other granulomatous lesions.
Subacute inflammation of the inguinal lymph glands caused by certain immunotypes of CHLAMYDIA TRACHOMATIS. It is a sexually transmitted disease in the U.S. but is more widespread in developing countries. It is distinguished from granuloma venereum (see GRANULOMA INGUINALE), which is caused by Calymmatobacterium granulomatis.
"Mississippi, in medical shorthand, is often used to denote the large artery in the lower extremity, the primary vessel carrying blood from the heart to the leg, analogous to its geographical namesake that flows from north to south."
A contagious venereal disease caused by the spirochete TREPONEMA PALLIDUM.
A pyrimidine inhibitor of dihydrofolate reductase, it is an antibacterial related to PYRIMETHAMINE. It is potentiated by SULFONAMIDES and the TRIMETHOPRIM, SULFAMETHOXAZOLE DRUG COMBINATION is the form most often used. It is sometimes used alone as an antimalarial. TRIMETHOPRIM RESISTANCE has been reported.
A broad-spectrum antimicrobial fluoroquinolone. The drug strongly inhibits the DNA-supercoiling activity of DNA GYRASE.
Infection of the genitals (GENITALIA) with HERPES SIMPLEX VIRUS in either the males or the females.
The causative agent of venereal and non-venereal syphilis as well as yaws.
A bacteriostatic antibiotic macrolide produced by Streptomyces erythreus. Erythromycin A is considered its major active component. In sensitive organisms, it inhibits protein synthesis by binding to 50S ribosomal subunits. This binding process inhibits peptidyl transferase activity and interferes with translocation of amino acids during translation and assembly of proteins.

Treatment of chancroid, 1997. (1/171)

Since the 1993 treatment guidelines for sexually transmitted diseases were published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, experience has indicated that the regimens recommended then remain largely effective. The recommended therapies--with azithromycin (1 g orally, once), ceftriaxone (250 mg intramuscularly, once), or erythromycin (500 mg orally, four times a day for 7 days)--appear highly effective in the United States; limited data from Kenya suggest that the ceftriaxone regimen may not be as effective there as it once was. The alternative regimen of ciprofloxacin proposed in 1993 (500 mg orally, twice a day for 3 days) is as effective as the recommended therapies, but new information indicates that single-dose therapy with 500 mg orally is not as effective as the use of either larger single doses or more prolonged therapy. Persons who are infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) do not respond as well as those who are not HIV-infected, and males who are uncircumcised appear not to respond as well as those who are circumcised.  (+info)

Experimental infection of human volunteers with Haemophilus ducreyi does not confer protection against subsequent challenge. (2/171)

Two groups of human volunteers were inoculated with 2 doses of live Haemophilus ducreyi 35000HP. The reinfection group consisted of 7 subjects who previously had participated in experimental infection with 35000HP to the pustular stage of disease. The control group consisted of 7 naive subjects. Papules developed at 92.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 66.1%-99.8%) of sites inoculated with live bacteria, in the reinfection group, and at 85.7% (95% CI, 57.2%-98. 2%) of sites in the control group. Sixty-nine percent (95% CI, 36. 8%-90.9%) of papules evolved into pustules in the reinfection group, compared with 41% (95% CI, 15.2%-72.3%) in the control group. The recovery rates of H. ducreyi from surface cultures and the histopathology of biopsies obtained from both groups were similar. Thus, experimental infection to the pustular stage of disease does not provide protective immunity against subsequent challenge.  (+info)

Molecular characterization of Haemophilus ducreyi strains from Jackson, Mississippi, and New Orleans, Louisiana. (3/171)

Chancroid, a sexually transmitted disease caused by Haemophilus ducreyi, is one of the most common genital ulcer diseases in developing countries. In the United States, while less common, the disease has been associated with outbreaks in inner cities, particularly among persons who engage in sex for drugs or money. Two outbreaks of chancroid were recently studied in the United States, one in New Orleans (from 1990 to 1992) and one in Jackson, Mississippi (from 1994 to 1995). By use of ribotyping, plasmid content, and antibiotic susceptibility, the chancroid cases in New Orleans were found to be due to a limited number of strains, consistent with a limited introduction of H. ducreyi into this community. The H. ducreyi isolates from New Orleans and Jackson had different ribotype patterns, suggesting that the two outbreaks were probably not linked.  (+info)

Prevalence of, antibody response to, and immunity induced by Haemophilus ducreyi hemolysin. (4/171)

Haemophilus ducreyi, the etiologic agent of chancroid, a genital ulcer disease, produces a cell-associated hemolysin whose role in virulence is not well defined. Hemolysin is encoded by two genes, hhdA and hhdB, which, based on their homology to Serratia marcescens shlA and shlB genes, are believed to encode the hemolysin structural protein and a protein required for secretion and modification of this protein, respectively. In this study, we determined the prevalence and expression of the hemolysin genes in 90 H. ducreyi isolates obtained from diverse geographic locations from 1952 to 1996 and found that all strains contained DNA homologous to the hhdB and hhdA genes. In addition, all strains expressed a hemolytic activity. We also determined that hemolysin is expressed in vivo and is immunogenic, as indicated by the induction of antibodies to hemolysin in both the primate and rabbit disease models as well as in human patients with naturally acquired chancroid. Wild-type strain 35000 and isogenic hemolysin-negative mutants showed no difference in lesion development in the temperature-dependent rabbit model. However, immunization of rabbits with the purified hemolysin protein reduced the recovery of wild-type H. ducreyi, but not hemolysin-negative mutants, from lesions. Our study indicates that hemolysin is a possible candidate for vaccine development due to its immunogenicity, expression in vitro and in vivo by most, if not all, strains, and the effect of immunization on reducing the recovery of viable H. ducreyi in experimental disease in rabbits.  (+info)

Target cell range of Haemophilus ducreyi hemolysin and its involvement in invasion of human epithelial cells. (5/171)

Haemophilus ducreyi, the causative agent of chancroid, produces a hemolysin, whose role in virulence is not well defined. To assess the possible role of hemolysin in pathogenesis, we evaluated its target cell range by using wild-type H. ducreyi 35000, nonhemolytic mutants with the hemolysin structural gene deleted, and isogenic strains expressing different amounts of hemolytic activity. The cytotoxicity of the various cell types was assessed by quantitating the release of lactate dehydrogenase into culture supernatants as a measure of cell lysis. In these experiments, human foreskin fibroblasts, human foreskin epithelial cells, and, to a lesser extent, HEp-2 cells were lysed by H. ducreyi hemolysin. Hemolysin also lysed human blood mononuclear cells and immune system cell lines including U937 macrophage-like cells, T lymphocytes, and B lymphocytes. In contrast, human polymorphonuclear leukocytes were not sensitive to hemolysin under the conditions tested. We also analyzed the effect of hemolysin on invasion of human epithelial cells and found that H. ducreyi strains expressing cloned hemolysin genes showed a 10-fold increase in invasion compared to the control strain. These data support the hypothesis that the H. ducreyi hemolysin is important in the pathogenesis of chancroid and may contribute to ulcer formation, invasion of epithelial cells, and evasion of the immune response.  (+info)

Seroprevalence and incidence of genital ulcer infections in a rural Ugandan population. (6/171)

OBJECTIVES: To determine age-sex specific seroprevalence and incidence rates of Treponema pallidum, Haemophilus ducreyi, and HSV-2; to assess the association between HIV-1 status and incidence of these STIs; and HSV-2 serostatus with number of lifetime sexual partners. METHODS: Antibodies against HIV-1, T pallidum, H ducreyi, and HSV-2 infections were tested using approximately 1000 paired (2 year interval) sera collected from a rural adult (15-54 years) population cohort in south west Uganda. RESULTS: Overall HIV-1 prevalence was 4.9%. Prevalence for T pallidum was 12.9% among males and 12.6% among females. The corresponding rates for H ducreyi were 9.8% and 7.3% respectively. HSV-2 prevalence rates were considerably lower in males (36.0%) than in females (71.5%), p < 0.001. Incidence rates for T pallidum per 1000 person years of observation were 8.4 for males and 12.3 for females. The corresponding rates for H ducreyi were 24.6 and 20.0 and for HSV-2 were 73.2 and 122.9 per 1000 person years of observation, respectively. The RR of HSV-2 incidence was 3.69 in HIV seropositive cases versus HIV seronegative after adjusting for age and sex. The corresponding RR for H ducreyi was 3.50 among female HIV positive cases versus negatives with no effect seen in males. Association between HIV-1 prevalence and prevalence of other STIs was significant (Mantel-Haenszel test) for H ducreyi (p = 0.01) and for HSV-2 (p = 0.004) but not for T pallidum (p > 0.4). HSV-2 prevalence was associated with number of lifetime sexual partners (females, p = 0.003; males, p = 0.08). CONCLUSIONS: The results have provided a reliable estimate of the magnitude of the STI problem and demonstrated an association between HIV-1 status and serology of other STIs in a general rural population in sub-Saharan Africa. The study has also highlighted a correlation between HSV-2 seropositivity and number of reported lifetime sexual partners.  (+info)

Genital ulcers: etiology, clinical diagnosis, and associated human immunodeficiency virus infection in Kingston, Jamaica. (7/171)

Individuals presenting consecutively with genital ulcers in Kingston, Jamaica, underwent serological testing for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, chlamydial infection, and syphilis. Ulcer material was analyzed by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (M-PCR) analysis. DNA from herpes simplex virus (HSV), Haemophilus ducreyi, and Treponema pallidum was detected in 158 (52.0%), 72 (23.7%), and 31 (10.2%) of 304 ulcer specimens. Of the 304 subjects, 67 (22%) were HIV-seropositive and 64 (21%) were T. pallidum-seroreactive. Granuloma inguinale was clinically diagnosed in nine (13.4%) of 67 ulcers negative by M-PCR analysis and in 12 (5.1%) of 237 ulcers positive by M-PCR analysis (P = .03). Lymphogranuloma venereum was clinically diagnosed in eight patients. Compared with M-PCR analysis, the sensitivity and specificity of a clinical diagnosis of syphilis, herpes, and chancroid were 67.7%, 53.8%, and 75% and 91.2%, 83.6%, and 75.4%, respectively. Reactive syphilis serology was 74% sensitive and 85% specific compared with M-PCR analysis. Reported contact with a prostitute in the preceding 3 months was associated with chancroid (P = .009), reactive syphilis serology (P = .011), and HIV infection (P = .007). The relatively poor accuracy of clinical and locally available laboratory diagnoses pleads for syndromic management of genital ulcers in Jamaica. Prevention efforts should be intensified.  (+info)

Immune cells are required for cutaneous ulceration in a swine model of chancroid. (8/171)

Cutaneous lesions of the human sexually transmitted genital ulcer disease chancroid are characterized by the presence of intraepidermal pustules, keratinocyte cytopathology, and epidermal and dermal erosion. These lesions are replete with neutrophils, macrophages, and CD4(+) T cells and contain very low numbers of cells of Haemophilus ducreyi, the bacterial agent of chancroid. We examined lesion formation by H. ducreyi in a pig model by using cyclophosphamide (CPA)-induced immune cell deficiency to distinguish between host and bacterial contributions to chancroid ulcer formation. Histologic presentation of H. ducreyi-induced lesions in CPA-treated pigs differed from ulcers that developed in immune-competent animals in that pustules did not form and surface epithelia remained intact. However, these lesions had significant suprabasal keratinocyte cytotoxicity. These results demonstrate that the host immune response was required for chancroid ulceration, while bacterial products were at least partially responsible for the keratinocyte cytopathology associated with chancroid lesions in the pig. The low numbers of H. ducreyi present in lesions in humans and immune-competent pigs have prevented localization of these organisms within skin. However, H. ducreyi organisms were readily visualized in lesion biopsies from infected CPA-treated pigs by immunoelectron microscopy. These bacteria were extracellular and associated with necrotic host cells in the epidermis and dermis. The relative abundance of H. ducreyi in inoculated CPA-treated pig skin suggests control of bacterial replication by host immune cells during natural human infection.  (+info)

Chancroid is a sexually transmitted infection caused by the bacterium Haemophilus ducreyi. It is characterized by the presence of painful, ulcerating lesions on the genitals. The infection is more common in men than women and is often found in areas with poor sanitation and hygiene. Chancroid is a major cause of genital ulcers in many parts of the world, but it is relatively rare in developed countries.

The primary symptom of chancroid is the development of one or more painful, soft, and easily bleeding ulcers on the genitals within a few days to two weeks after exposure. The ulcers may be accompanied by swelling of the lymph nodes in the groin. In some cases, the ulcers may become covered with a gray or yellowish-white exudate.

Chancroid is diagnosed through the examination of a sample taken from the ulcer. The sample is examined under a microscope for the presence of H. ducreyi bacteria. If the bacteria are not visible, a culture can be grown to confirm the diagnosis.

Treatment for chancroid typically involves the use of antibiotics such as azithromycin or ceftriaxone. It is important to receive treatment promptly to prevent the spread of the infection and to avoid complications such as scarring, difficulty urinating, and infertility.

Prevention measures for chancroid include practicing safe sex, limiting the number of sexual partners, and getting regular STI screenings. If you suspect that you may have chancroid or any other STI, it is important to seek medical attention promptly.

Haemophilus ducreyi is a gram-negative, oxidase-negative, facultatively anaerobic coccobacillus that is the causative agent of chancroid, a sexually transmitted genital ulcer disease. It requires factors X and V for growth, which makes it fastidious and difficult to culture. The organism primarily infects the epithelial cells of the skin and mucous membranes, causing painful, necrotic ulcers with ragged borders and suppurative inguinal lymphadenopathy. Chancroid is a significant co-factor in the transmission of HIV. Infections caused by H. ducreyi are more common in tropical and developing regions, where it remains an important public health concern.

A medical definition of an ulcer is:

A lesion on the skin or mucous membrane characterized by disintegration of surface epithelium, inflammation, and is associated with the loss of substance below the normal lining. Gastric ulcers and duodenal ulcers are types of peptic ulcers that occur in the gastrointestinal tract.

Another type of ulcer is a venous ulcer, which occurs when there is reduced blood flow from vein insufficiency, usually in the lower leg. This can cause skin damage and lead to an open sore or ulcer.

There are other types of ulcers as well, including decubitus ulcers (also known as pressure sores or bedsores), which are caused by prolonged pressure on the skin.

Genital diseases in males refer to various medical conditions that affect the male reproductive and urinary systems, including the penis, testicles, epididymis, vas deferens, seminal vesicles, prostate, and urethra. These conditions can be infectious, inflammatory, degenerative, or neoplastic (cancerous) in nature. Some common examples of male genital diseases include:

1. Balanitis: Inflammation of the foreskin and glans penis, often caused by infection, irritants, or poor hygiene.
2. Prostatitis: Inflammation of the prostate gland, which can be acute or chronic, bacterial or non-bacterial in origin.
3. Epididymitis: Inflammation of the epididymis, a coiled tube at the back of the testicle that stores and carries sperm. It is often caused by infection.
4. Orchitis: Inflammation of the testicle, usually resulting from infection or autoimmune disorders.
5. Testicular torsion: A surgical emergency characterized by twisting of the spermatic cord, leading to reduced blood flow and potential tissue damage in the testicle.
6. Varicocele: Dilated veins in the scrotum that can cause pain, discomfort, or fertility issues.
7. Peyronie's disease: A connective tissue disorder causing scarring and curvature of the penis during erections.
8. Penile cancer: Malignant growths on the penis, often squamous cell carcinomas, which can spread to other parts of the body if left untreated.
9. Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH): Non-cancerous enlargement of the prostate gland that can cause lower urinary tract symptoms such as difficulty initiating or maintaining a steady stream of urine.
10. Sexually transmitted infections (STIs): Infectious diseases, like chlamydia, gonorrhea, syphilis, and human papillomavirus (HPV), that can be transmitted through sexual contact and affect the male genital region.

Thiamphenicol is an antibiotic that belongs to the class of medications called amphenicols. It works by preventing the growth of bacteria. Thiamphenicol is used to treat various infections caused by bacteria. This medication may also be used to prevent bacterial endocarditis (inflammation of the lining of the heart and valves) in people having certain dental or surgical procedures.

Please note that this definition is for informational purposes only and should not be used as a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. If you have any questions about your medication, always consult with your healthcare provider.

Genital diseases in females refer to various medical conditions that affect the female reproductive system, including the vulva, vagina, cervix, uterus, and ovaries. These conditions can be caused by bacterial, viral, or fungal infections, hormonal imbalances, or structural abnormalities. Some common examples of genital diseases in females include bacterial vaginosis, yeast infections, sexually transmitted infections (STIs) such as chlamydia, gonorrhea, and human papillomavirus (HPV), pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), endometriosis, uterine fibroids, ovarian cysts, and vulvar or vaginal cancer. Symptoms of genital diseases in females can vary widely depending on the specific condition but may include abnormal vaginal discharge, pain or discomfort during sex, irregular menstrual bleeding, painful urination, and pelvic pain. It is important for women to receive regular gynecological care and screenings to detect and treat genital diseases early and prevent complications.

A skin ulcer is a defined as a loss of continuity or disruption of the skin surface, often accompanied by inflammation and/or infection. These lesions can result from various causes including pressure, venous or arterial insufficiency, diabetes, and chronic dermatological conditions. Skin ulcers are typically characterized by their appearance, depth, location, and underlying cause. Common types of skin ulcers include pressure ulcers (also known as bedsores), venous leg ulcers, arterial ulcers, and diabetic foot ulcers. Proper evaluation, wound care, management of underlying conditions, and prevention strategies are crucial in the treatment of skin ulcers to promote healing and prevent complications.

'Calymmatobacterium' is a genus of Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria that are typically found as part of the normal microbiota in the skin and mucous membranes of some animals. The most well-known species in this genus is Calymmatobacterium granulomatis, which is the causative agent of granuloma inguinale (also known as donovanosis), a sexually transmitted infection that primarily affects the genital area and causes painful ulcers and granulomas.

Calymmatobacterium species are fastidious organisms, meaning they have specific growth requirements and can be difficult to culture in the laboratory. They are typically transmitted through direct contact with infected tissue or bodily fluids, and infection can lead to a range of symptoms depending on the site of infection and the immune status of the host.

In addition to granuloma inguinale, Calymmatobacterium species have also been associated with other diseases in animals, including respiratory tract infections and skin lesions in dogs and cats. However, their role as primary pathogens in these contexts is not well-established.

Lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV) is a sexually transmitted infection caused by certain strains of the bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis. It primarily affects the lymphatic system, leading to inflammation and swelling of the lymph nodes, particularly in the genital area.

The progression of LGV typically occurs in three stages:
1. Primary stage: A small painless papule or ulcer forms at the site of infection, usually on the genitals, within 3-30 days after exposure. This stage is often asymptomatic and resolves on its own within a few weeks.
2. Secondary stage: Within a few weeks to months after the initial infection, patients may develop painful inguinal or femoral lymphadenopathy (swollen lymph nodes) in the groin area, which can sometimes break open and drain. Other possible symptoms include fever, chills, malaise, headache, and joint pain.
3. Tertiary stage: If left untreated, LGV can lead to chronic complications such as fibrosis (scarring) and strictures of the lymphatic vessels, genital elephantiasis (severe swelling of the genitals), and rectovaginal fistulas (abnormal connections between the rectum and vagina).

LGV is more common in tropical and subtropical regions but has been increasingly reported in industrialized countries, particularly among men who have sex with men. Diagnosis typically involves laboratory testing of fluid from an infected lymph node or a sample from the genital ulcer. Treatment consists of antibiotics such as doxycycline, azithromycin, or erythromycin, which can effectively cure the infection if administered promptly.

I believe there might be a misunderstanding. "Mississippi" is typically associated with the state in the United States or the river that flows through several states including Minnesota, Wisconsin, Iowa, Illinois, Missouri, Kentucky, Tennessee, Arkansas, Mississippi, and Louisiana. It is not a medical term or condition. If you have any medical terms or conditions you would like me to define, please let me know and I'd be happy to help.

Syphilis is a sexually transmitted infection (STI) caused by the bacterium Treponema pallidum. It progresses in several stages if left untreated, with symptoms varying in each stage. The primary stage involves the appearance of a single, painless sore or multiple sores at the site where the bacteria entered the body, often on the genitals or around the mouth. During the secondary stage, individuals may experience rashes, fever, swollen lymph nodes, and other flu-like symptoms. In later stages, syphilis can lead to severe complications affecting the heart, brain, and other organs, known as tertiary syphilis. Neurosyphilis is a form of tertiary syphilis that affects the nervous system, causing various neurological problems. Congenital syphilis occurs when a pregnant woman with syphilis transmits the infection to her unborn child, which can result in serious birth defects and health issues for the infant. Early detection and appropriate antibiotic treatment can cure syphilis and prevent further complications.

Trimethoprim is an antibiotic medication that is primarily used to treat bacterial infections. It works by inhibiting the bacterial enzyme dihydrofolate reductase, which is necessary for the synthesis of DNA and protein. This leads to bacterial cell death. Trimethoprim is often combined with sulfamethoxazole (a sulfonamide antibiotic) to create a more effective antibacterial therapy known as co-trimoxazole or TMP-SMX.

Medical Definition:
Trimethoprim is a synthetic antibacterial drug that selectively inhibits bacterial dihydrofolate reductase, an enzyme required for the synthesis of tetrahydrofolate, a cofactor involved in the biosynthesis of thymidine and purines. By blocking this essential pathway, trimethoprim disrupts bacterial DNA and protein synthesis, leading to bacteriostatic activity against many gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Trimethoprim is often combined with sulfamethoxazole (a sulfonamide antibiotic) to create a more effective antibacterial therapy known as co-trimoxazole or TMP-SMX, which inhibits two consecutive steps in the bacterial folate synthesis pathway.

Fleroxacin is a fluoroquinolone antibiotic that is used to treat various types of bacterial infections, including respiratory, urinary tract, and skin infections. It works by inhibiting the DNA gyrase enzyme in bacteria, which is necessary for their replication and survival.

Fleroxacin has a broad spectrum of activity against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, making it useful for treating a variety of infections caused by these organisms. However, like other fluoroquinolones, fleroxacin carries a risk of serious side effects, including tendinitis, tendon rupture, nerve damage, and other central nervous system effects. Therefore, its use is generally reserved for situations where other antibiotics are not effective or appropriate.

Fleroxacin is available in oral tablet form and is typically taken twice daily with a full glass of water. It should be taken on an empty stomach, at least one hour before or two hours after meals. The dosage and duration of treatment will depend on the type and severity of the infection being treated, as well as the patient's overall health status.

It is important to note that fleroxacin, like all antibiotics, should only be used under the guidance of a healthcare professional, and should not be used for viral infections such as the common cold or flu. Misuse of antibiotics can lead to antibiotic resistance, which makes it more difficult to treat bacterial infections in the future.

Herpes genitalis is a sexually transmitted infection caused by the herpes simplex virus (HSV), specifically HSV-2, and occasionally HSV-1. It primarily affects the genital area, but can also involve the anal region, thighs, and buttocks. The infection presents as painful fluid-filled blisters or lesions that may be accompanied by symptoms such as itching, tingling, or burning sensations in the affected area. After the initial outbreak, the virus remains dormant in the body and can reactivate periodically, causing recurrent episodes of genital herpes. It's important to note that while there is no cure for herpes genitalis, antiviral medications can help manage symptoms and reduce transmission risks.

"Treponema pallidum" is a species of spiral-shaped bacteria (a spirochete) that is the causative agent of syphilis, a sexually transmitted infection. The bacterium is very thin and difficult to culture in the laboratory, which has made it challenging for researchers to study its biology and develop new treatments for syphilis.

The bacterium can infect various tissues and organs in the body, leading to a wide range of symptoms that can affect multiple systems, including the skin, bones, joints, cardiovascular system, and nervous system. The infection can be transmitted through sexual contact, from mother to fetus during pregnancy or childbirth, or through blood transfusions or shared needles.

Syphilis is a serious disease that can have long-term health consequences if left untreated. However, it is also curable with appropriate antibiotic therapy, such as penicillin. It is important to diagnose and treat syphilis early to prevent the spread of the infection and avoid potential complications.

Erythromycin is a type of antibiotic known as a macrolide, which is used to treat various types of bacterial infections. It works by inhibiting the bacteria's ability to produce proteins, which are necessary for the bacteria to survive and multiply. Erythromycin is often used to treat respiratory tract infections, skin infections, and sexually transmitted diseases. It may also be used to prevent endocarditis (inflammation of the lining of the heart) in people at risk of this condition.

Erythromycin is generally considered safe for most people, but it can cause side effects such as nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. It may also interact with other medications, so it's important to tell your doctor about all the drugs you are taking before starting erythromycin.

Like all antibiotics, erythromycin should only be used to treat bacterial infections, as it is not effective against viral infections such as the common cold or flu. Overuse of antibiotics can lead to antibiotic resistance, which makes it harder to treat infections in the future.

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"Chancroid". Lecturio. Retrieved 27 August 2021. "Chlamydia". The Lecturio Medical Concept Library. Retrieved 27 August 2021. " ... Chancroid (Haemophilus ducreyi) Chlamydia (Chlamydia trachomatis) Gonorrhea (Neisseria gonorrhoeae) Granuloma inguinale or ( ...
... whereas chancroid are typically painful Chancres are typically single, whereas chancroid are typically multiple Chancres cause ... "What's the Difference Between a Chancre and a Chancroid?". NURX. Retrieved 7 July 2021. medterms.com[full citation needed] Ayto ... doi:10.1016/B978-1-4377-1604-7.00569-8. ISBN 978-1-4377-1604-7. "Chancroid". The Lecturio Medical Concept Library. Retrieved 7 ... whereas chancroid have a soft base with undermined edges Chancres heal spontaneously within three to six weeks, even in the ...
Chancroid: an update. Infect in Med 2002; 19:4 Montero JA, Herman B, Bartels LJ, Sinnott JT. Tuberculous otitis. Infect in Med ...
... es are also symptoms of other diseases, such as chancroid and lymphogranuloma venereum. In these conditions, a two-week ... doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(01)42126-X. Lewis, D. A. (2003-02-01). "Chancroid: clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management". ...
Chancroid List of cutaneous conditions O'Farrell, N (2002). "Donovanosis". Sexually Transmitted Infections. 78 (6): 452-7. doi: ...
Chancroid starts as an erythematous papular lesion that breaks down into a painful bleeding ulcer with a necrotic base and ... "Haemophilus ducreyi (Chancroid) - Infectious Disease and Antimicrobial Agents". Haemophilus ducreyi at the NCBI Taxonomy ... This species causes the sexually transmitted disease chancroid, a major cause of genital ulceration in developing countries ... This pyogenic inflammation causes regional lymphadenitis in the sexually transmitted disease chancroid. Although antigen ...
July 1983). "Single-dose therapy of chancroid with trimethoprim-sulfametrole". N. Engl. J. Med. 309 (2): 67-71. doi:10.1056/ ...
Consistent and correct use of latex condoms reduces the risk of genital herpes, syphilis, and chancroid only when the infected ... No conclusive studies have specifically addressed the transmission of chancroid and condom use, although several studies have ... and chancroid. These diseases are transmitted primarily through "skin-to-skin" contact from sores/ulcers or infected skin that ... and chancroid) and human papillomavirus (HPV) infection are primarily transmitted through contact with infected skin or mucosal ...
Murphy TF (2020). "Haemophilus Species, Including H. influenzae and H. ducreyi (Chancroid)". Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett's ...
Bacterial infections include: chancroid - characterised by genital ulcers known as chancres; granuloma inguinale showing as ...
Basta-Juzbašić, A; Čeović, R (March 2014). "Chancroid, lymphogranuloma venereum, granuloma inguinale, genital herpes simplex ...
Le Chancre mou, symptomatologie, complications, diagnostic, traitement, 1931 - The chancroid, symptoms, complications, ...
Before this, many cases of early syphilis were either diagnosed as chancroid or missed altogether. To come to a diagnosis, ... Other sexually transmitted infections studied in the field include chancroid, lymphogranuloma venereum, granuloma inguinale, ... chancroid, lymphogranuloma venereum, and granuloma inguinale (donovanosis). The history of virology shows that, in the first ...
He is particularly known for his studies of the chancroid and the coccobacillus haemophilus ducreyi. He was the father of ...
The genus Haemophilus is a notorious human pathogen associated with bacteremia, pneumonia, meningitis and chancroid. Other ...
II: 542-3. Weiss HA, Thomas SL, Munabi SK, Hayes RJ (April 2006). "Male circumcision and risk of syphilis, chancroid, and ... A 2006 systematic review concluded that the evidence "strongly indicates that circumcised men are at lower risk of chancroid ...
Weiss HA, Thomas SL, Munabi SK, Hayes RJ (April 2006). "Male circumcision and risk of syphilis, chancroid, and genital herpes: ... A 2006 meta-analysis found that circumcision was associated with lower rates of syphilis, chancroid, and possibly genital ...
... the result of chancroids. The autopsy showed the deceased was in good health; a death mask was made of his face. The body was ...
Chancroid experiments were also conducted simultaneously on about 80 soldiers, in which doctors would scratch soldiers' arms ... Through intentional exposure to gonorrhea, syphilis, and chancroid, a total of 1,308 people were involved in the experiments. ... As a result, around 696 Guatemalans were intentionally infected with syphilis, gonorrhea and chancroids. The study also aimed ... and chancroid, without the informed consent of the subjects. Only 700 of them received treatment. In total, 5,500 people were ...
A number of diseases cause infectious lesions including herpes genitalis, human papillomavirus, syphilis, chancroid, granuloma ...
... chancroid, of Third World countries. Tankeshwar, Acharya (April 11, 2016). "Gram-Negative Cocci and Coccobacilli of Medical ...
It is a second-line treatment for otitis media, prophylaxis of rheumatic fever, chancroid, chlamydia, and infections by ...
... but in Cairo contracted the venereal disease chancroid. The following month he was sent back to Australia with 274 other VD- ...
He was the first to separate chancroid and indurated syphilitic chancre and established that the incubation period for syphilis ...
Following syphilis and genital herpes infections, a chancroid is the third most common cause but tends to occur in focused ... syphilis or chancroid). However, this is not always the case, as a genital ulcer may have noninfectious causes as well. A ... and chancroid the third. These common causes of genital ulcer disease (HSV-1, HSV-2 and treponema pallidum) can all be ... while the most common cause in other parts of the world is chancroid. Most sexually active adolescents with genital ulcers have ...
... he went to Kenya in response to a request from the University of Nairobi for assistance in managing an outbreak of chancroid. ... the increased risk of HIV infection in men associated with previous chancroid infection and of male circumcision in reducing ...
In addition, prostituted children who have an STD that causes genital ulcers such as syphilis or chancroid are four times more ...
... and 37 percent of patients had other venereal diseases such as chancroid (chancre blando). A Ministry of Health report showed ...
... chancroid, naevi, warts, varicose leg ulcers, carbuncles, carcinomas and epitheliomas. De Quervain successfully used of ...
Chancroid, caused by H. ducreyi has infrequently been associated with cases of Genital Ulcer Disease in the US but has been ... Chancroid is known to spread from one individual to another solely through sexual contact. However, there have been reports of ... Chancroid (/ˈʃæŋkrɔɪd/ SHANG-kroyd) is a bacterial sexually transmitted infection characterized by painful sores on the ... Approximately 10% of people with chancroid will have a co-infection with syphilis and/or HIV. H. ducreyi enters skin through ...
Chancroid is a bacterial infection that is spread through sexual contact. ... Chancroid is a bacterial infection that is spread through sexual contact. ... Soft chancre; Ulcus molle; Sexually transmitted disease - chancroid; STD - chancroid; Sexually transmitted infection - ... Chancroid is caused by a bacterium called Haemophilus ducreyi.. The infection is found in many parts of the world, such as ...
Chancroid was once endemic in many areas of the world, but social awareness of the disease and subsequent changes in ... Chancroid is a sexually transmitted disease (STD) characterized by painful necrotizing genital ulcers that may be accompanied ... encoded search term (Chancroid) and Chancroid What to Read Next on Medscape ... have eradicated chancroid as an endemic disease in industrialized countries. [2] In 2000, the proportion of chancroid among ...
Chancroid is a genital ulcerative disease and sexually transmitted infection characterized by soft (nonindurated) ulcers with ... encoded search term (Chancroid in Emergency Medicine) and Chancroid in Emergency Medicine What to Read Next on Medscape ... Chancroid in Emergency Medicine Medication. Updated: Jan 04, 2023 * Author: Kristine Song, MD; Chief Editor: Barry E Brenner, ... CDC treatment guidelines for chancroid recommend one of the following options [13] :. * Azithromycin 1 g orally as a single ...
Chancroid - Acute, localized autoinoculable infectious disease usually acquired through sexual contact. Caused ... ... CHANCROID \t͡ʃˈankɹɔ͡ɪd], \t‍ʃˈankɹɔ‍ɪd], \tʃ_ˈa_n_k_ɹ_ɔɪ_d]\ ...
McBride, William J H, Hannah, Rory C S, Le Cornec, Genevera M, and Bletchly, Cheryl (2008) Cutaneous chancroid in a visitor ... This report adds further evidence that cutaneous chancroid should be considered in the evaluation of skin ulcers in the south ... confirming the diagnosis of cutaneous chancroid. The lesion responded to intramuscular benzathine penicillin. ...
Chancroid, Lymphogranuloma Venereum (LGV), Mycoplasma genitalium, Pubic Lice, and Scabies ... Chancroid. *2021 STI Treatment Guidelines - Chancroid - Includes diagnosis, treatment, and special considerations for chancroid ...
... is an STD that is spread from one person to another throughvaginal, anal, or oral sex. About 3 to 10 days after ... Risk Factors Chancroid is a sexually transmitted disease, or STD, caused by thebacteria Haemophilus ducreyi.What is going on in ... Overhalf the people with chancroid have more than one ulcer.. What are the causes and risks of the infection?. Chancroid is a ... Chancroid is an STD that is spread from one person to another throughvaginal, anal, or oral sex. About 3 to 10 days after ...
Chancroid Data Accuracy Disease Notification Haemophilus Ducreyi Humans Population Surveillance STD STI Surveillance United ... Chancroid has been a nationally notifiable condition in the United States since 1944, with cases reported to Centers Disease ... 2023). A Sore Subject?: An Examination of National Case-Based Chancroid Surveillance. 50(8). Ogale, Yasmin P. et al. "A Sore ... Chancroid diagnostic testing is limited, which affects the surveillance case definition. National case-based surveillance has ...
1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 Basta-Juzbašić A, Čeović R. Chancroid, lymphogranuloma venereum, granuloma inguinale, genital herpes simplex ... Retrieved from "https://www.wikem.org/w/index.php?title=Chancroid&oldid=351566" ...
Access Chancroid (Haemophilus ducreyi) case definitions; uniform criteria used to define a disease for public health ...
Chancroid - Learn about the causes, symptoms, diagnosis & treatment from the MSD Manuals - Medical Consumer Version. ... Prevention of Chancroid The following general measures can help prevent chancroid (and other sexually transmitted infections): ... Specific tests for chancroid are not readily available, but blood tests may be done to exclude other causes, such as syphilis ... Symptoms of Chancroid Symptoms begin 3 to 7 days after infection. Small, painful blisters form on the genitals or around the ...
Chancroid is a genital ulcerative disease and sexually transmitted infection characterized by soft (nonindurated) ulcers with ... encoded search term (Chancroid in Emergency Medicine) and Chancroid in Emergency Medicine What to Read Next on Medscape ... Chancroid in Emergency Medicine Medication. Updated: Feb 12, 2014 * Author: Andrew D Nguyen, MD; Chief Editor: Barry E Brenner ... Since treatment of chancroid may accompany treatment of gonorrhea, it is important to be aware of the updated CDC guidelines ...
The first sign of Chancroid infection is one or more sores or raised bumps on the genital area. The sores are surrounded by a ... What happens if chancroid is left untreated?. If chancroid is not treated it can cause damage to skin and genitals. As soon as ... Symptoms of chancroid. With chancroid, the first sign of infection is one or more sores or raised bumps on the genital area. ... How long does it take for symptoms of chancroid to appear?. Once a person has been infected with chancroid, symptoms usually ...
Chancroid. The gram-negative bacterium Haemophilus ducreyi causes chancroid, which is rarely diagnosed in the U.S., with less ... Chancroid--Reported Cases and Rates of Reported Cases by State/Territory in Alphabetical Order, United States, 2015-2019. https ...
Topic: Chancroid. (Please note that the documents listed below are sorted by date.). HIV Prevention Through Early Detection and ...
Causes: Chancroid (common) *HIV may alter the natural history of this infection ...
Chancroid Pictures Pictures of the effects of Chancroid Warning some of the photos are extremely graphic in nature. The ...
Chancroid. Haemophilus ducreyi. Regional (Africa, Asia, Caribbean). Irregular, painful genital ulcer. Tender, suppurative ... Correct and consistent use of latex condoms also reduces the risk of chancroid, genital herpes, HPV infection, and syphilis. ...
Chancroid. Toxoplasmosis as adjunctive therapy with pyrimethamine. Malaria due to chloroquine-resistant strains of Plasmodium ...
Chancroid in Emergency Medicine * 2001/viewarticle/new-practice-guidelines-postdural-puncture-headache-2023a1000j9y ...
sloughing u. SYN: phagedenic u.. soft u. SYN: chancroid. stasis u. SYN: varicose u.. stercoral u. an u. of the colon due to ... SEE ALSO: gravitational u.. SYN: stasis u., venous u.. venereal u. SYN: chancroid. venous u. SYN: varicose u.. Zambesi u. an u ...
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Unlocking Potentials: Rethinking Strategies in the Evolving Chancroid Testing Market Landscape In recent years, the market ... landscape for testing chancroid, a bacterial sexually transmitted infection, has been undergoing significant alterations. This ...
Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae Chancroid Chlamydia Trachomatis Communicable Diseases/epidemiology Data Collection ... Chancroid" 201934, no. 7 (2019). Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.). Center for Surveillance, Epidemiology, and ... Chancroid. 201934(7). Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.). Center for Surveillance, Epidemiology, and Laboratory ... Chancroid Corporate Authors(s) : Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.). Center for Surveillance, Epidemiology, and ...
Chancroid. Chlamydia trachomatis infection. Current week. Previous 52 weeks Max †. Cum YTD 2020 †. Cum YTD 2019 †. Current week ...
chancroid: …area, caused by the bacillus Haemophilus ducreyi. It is characterized by the appearance, 3-5 days after exposure, ...
Chancroid caused by Haemophilus ducreyi. *Plague due to Yersinia pestis. *Tularemia due to Francisella tularensis. ...
  • Labia minora Fourchette Vestibule Clitoris Perineal area Inner thighs Chancroid is a bacterial infection caused by the fastidious Gram-negative streptobacillus Haemophilus ducreyi. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chancroid is caused by a bacterium called Haemophilus ducreyi . (medlineplus.gov)
  • Haemophilus species including H. influenzae and H. ducreyi (chancroid). (medlineplus.gov)
  • Chancroid is a bacterial sexually transmitted infection (STI) caused by infection with Haemophilus ducreyi . (medscape.com)
  • Haemophilus ducreyi was detected and the gene product was subsequently sequenced, confirming the diagnosis of cutaneous chancroid. (edu.au)
  • The Haemophilus ducreyi bacteria that cause chancroid can only be grown on a special culture medium.That medium is not always available, and the test is only 80% sensitive for thebacteria. (healthiack.com)
  • Chancroid is a sexually transmitted infection caused by the bacteria Haemophilus ducreyi , which causes painful genital sores. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Spinola SM, Bauer ME, Munson RS Jr. Immunopathogenesis of Haemophilus ducreyi infection (chancroid). (medscape.com)
  • The gram-negative bacterium Haemophilus ducreyi causes chancroid, which is rarely diagnosed in the U.S., with less than 10 cases reported annually. (health.mil)
  • The initial ulcer may be mistaken as a "hard" chancre, the typical sore of primary syphilis, as opposed to the "soft chancre" of chancroid. (wikipedia.org)
  • Approximately 10% of people with chancroid will have a co-infection with syphilis and/or HIV. (wikipedia.org)
  • People with chancroid should also be checked for other sexually transmitted infections, including but not limited to syphilis , HIV , and genital herpes . (medlineplus.gov)
  • People with chancroid are at high risk of syphilis and HIV infection, so if initial test results for these other infections are negative, doctors recommend that people with chancroid come back in 3 months to be tested again. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Although clinical diagnosis is possible, ulcers may be hard to differentiate from those associated with syphilis, chancroid, HIV-associated herpes, amoebiasis, and carcinoma. (health.mil)
  • It may be confused with other rash illnesses/STIs including Varicella Zoster, Chancroid, Lymphogranuloma venereum, or Syphilis. (govdelivery.com)
  • Chancroid was once highly prevalent in many areas of the world, but collaborated efforts to increase social awareness and subsequent changes in sexual practices, along with improved diagnosis and treatment options, have eradicated chancroid as an endemic disease in industrialized countries. (medscape.com)
  • 2021 STI Treatment Guidelines - Chancroid - Includes diagnosis, treatment, and special considerations for chancroid. (cdc.gov)
  • Diagnosis of chancroid begins with a medical history and physicalexam. (healthiack.com)
  • Chancroid (/ˈʃæŋkrɔɪd/ SHANG-kroyd) is a bacterial sexually transmitted infection characterized by painful sores on the genitalia. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] Chancroid is a risk factor for contracting HIV, due to their ecological association or shared risk of exposure, and biologically facilitated transmission of one infection by the other. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chancroid is a bacterial infection that is spread through sexual contact. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Most people in the United States who are diagnosed with chancroid get it outside the country in areas where the infection is more common. (medlineplus.gov)
  • 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 Basta-Juzbašić A, Čeović R. Chancroid, lymphogranuloma venereum, granuloma inguinale, genital herpes simplex infection, and molluscum contagiosum. (wikem.org)
  • Chancroid is a sexually transmitted infection (STI) that is rare in the United States and other high-resource countries, occurring primarily in low-resource countries in occasional, local epidemics. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Doctors suspect chancroid in people with one or more painful genital sores (ulcers) that have no obvious cause, especially if they are or have been in areas of the world where the infection is common. (msdmanuals.com)
  • With chancroid, the first sign of infection is one or more sores or raised bumps on the genital area. (confidantetest.com)
  • Since treatment of chancroid may accompany treatment of gonorrhea, it is important to be aware of the updated CDC guidelines for treating STDs. (medscape.com)
  • Chancroid, caused by H. ducreyi has infrequently been associated with cases of Genital Ulcer Disease in the US but has been isolated in up to 10% of genital ulcers diagnosed from STD clinics in Memphis and Chicago. (wikipedia.org)
  • Recently, the etiologic agent of chancroid, H ducreyi , has been isolated among chronic limb ulcers in the Asia Pacific region. (medscape.com)
  • This report adds further evidence that cutaneous chancroid should be considered in the evaluation of skin ulcers in the south Pacific. (edu.au)
  • Chancroid is a common cause of genital ulcers in areas of Asia, Africa, and the Caribbean. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Chancroid is caused by H ducreyi , a small, gram-negative, facultative anaerobic bacillus that is highly infective. (medscape.com)
  • You have symptoms of chancroid. (medlineplus.gov)
  • If sex partners have had sexual contact with the infected person during the 10 days before the person's symptoms began, they are examined and treated regardless of whether they have symptoms of chancroid. (msdmanuals.com)
  • How long does it take for symptoms of chancroid to appear? (confidantetest.com)
  • Once a person has been infected with chancroid, symptoms usually appear 4 to 10 days later with the development of sores. (confidantetest.com)
  • Antibiotics are used to treat chancroid. (healthiack.com)
  • Several antibiotics, given either by mouth or as an injection, are effective for chancroid. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Chancroid can be easily treated with antibiotics. (confidantetest.com)
  • Chancroid has been a nationally notifiable condition in the United States since 1944, with cases reported to Centers Disease Control and Prevention through the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System (NNDSS). (cdc.gov)
  • Overhalf the people with chancroid have more than one ulcer. (healthiack.com)
  • Chancroid/Chlamydial urethritis: 1 g single dose Prophylaxis of disseminated MAC infections 1.2 g once weekly. (medindia.net)
  • Soixante-dix pour cent des sages-femmes ont mentionné qu'elle avaient été formées à la prise en charge de toutes les infections sexuellement transmissibles durant leurs études universitaires. (who.int)
  • This photograph shows an early chancroid on the penis, along with accompanying regional lymphadenopathy. (medscape.com)
  • People with chancroid also should be testedfor other STDs andtreated as needed. (healthiack.com)
  • An Examination of National Case-Based Chancroid Surveillance Personal Author(s) : Ogale, Yasmin P.;Ridpath, Alison D.;Torrone, Elizabeth;Quilter, Laura A. S.;Grey, Jeremy A. (cdc.gov)
  • Chancroid Corporate Authors(s) : Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.). Center for Surveillance, Epidemiology, and Laboratory Services. (cdc.gov)
  • citation needed] Most individuals diagnosed with chancroid have visited countries or areas where the disease is known to occur frequently, although outbreaks have been observed in association with crack cocaine use and prostitution. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) gives three criteria for adiagnosis of chancroid. (healthiack.com)
  • About one half of the people who are infected with a chancroid develop enlarged lymph nodes in the groin. (medlineplus.gov)
  • In people with HIV, chancroid may take much longer to heal. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Individuals with immunodeficiency disorders, such asHIV, are at higher riskfor chancroid. (healthiack.com)
  • Chancroid is spread by sexual contact with an infected person. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Chancroid is an STD that is spread from one person to another throughvaginal, anal, or oral sex. (healthiack.com)
  • Chancroid is known to spread from one individual to another solely through sexual contact. (wikipedia.org)
  • For some reason, men are morecommonly infected with chancroid than women are. (healthiack.com)
  • Pictures of the effects of Chancroid Warning some of the photos are extremely graphic in nature. (herpes-coldsores.com)
  • Chancroid is a bacterial condition that causes open sores on or around the genitals. (healthline.com)
  • Chancroid sores may heal without noticeable scarring if all medications are taken as prescribed by your healthcare provider. (healthline.com)
  • The classical bacteria that cause venereal diseases (e.g. gonorrhea, syphilis, chancroid, and Granuloma inguinale) only account for a small proportion of all known STDs today. (publisso.de)
  • There are four antibiotics that are typically used to treat chancroid. (healthline.com)
  • Several antibiotics, given either by mouth or as an injection, are effective for chancroid. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Chancroid can be easily treated with antibiotics. (confidantetest.com)
  • It's important to note that chancroid can sometimes be difficult to diagnose on visual examination alone due to its similar appearance to STIs such as genital herpes and syphilis. (healthline.com)
  • If you're diagnosed with chancroid, you're also at risk for other STIs so you should be tested for them as well. (healthline.com)
  • The initial ulcer may be mistaken as a "hard" chancre, the typical sore of primary syphilis, as opposed to the "soft chancre" of chancroid. (wikipedia.org)
  • McBride WJ, Hannah RC, Le Cornec GM, Bletchly C. Cutaneous chancroid in a visitor from Vanuatu. (medscape.com)
  • Although primary and secondary syphilis and genital herpes infections have been hyperendemic in Orange County, chancroid has never before been documented there at such high levels. (cdc.gov)
  • In addition, 2 cases of culture-proven chancroid were identified in 1 week at the OCSDC for patients whose lesions were described as 'typical herpes,' although HSV was not isolated. (cdc.gov)
  • Editorial Note: Chancroid is a sexually transmitted disease that is rarely reported in temperate climates and may be confused with primary syphilis and genital herpes infections. (cdc.gov)
  • People with chancroid should also be checked for other sexually transmitted infections, including syphilis , HIV , and genital herpes . (medlineplus.gov)
  • Patients with chancroid should also be checked for syphilis, HIV, and genital herpes. (health32.com)
  • [ 1 ] has been shown to reduce incidence of chancroid in men. (medscape.com)
  • Examination of 2 prostitutes from that area, who presumably had multiple contacts with male chancroid patients but for whom no direct contact could be established, showed no lesions. (cdc.gov)
  • An Examination of National Case-Based Chancroid Surveillance. (bvsalud.org)
  • CDC currently recommends 500 mg erythromycin by mouth 4 times a day for 10 days as the treatment of choice for chancroid. (cdc.gov)
  • If you're a heterosexual male, your risk for chancroid increases. (healthline.com)
  • Chancroid may be successfully treated with medication or surgery. (healthline.com)
  • Additionally, people who are HIV positive who contract chancroid tend to heal more slowly. (healthline.com)
  • In people with HIV, chancroid may take much longer to heal. (medlineplus.gov)