Infection with the protozoan parasite TRYPANOSOMA CRUZI, a form of TRYPANOSOMIASIS endemic in Central and South America. It is named after the Brazilian physician Carlos Chagas, who discovered the parasite. Infection by the parasite (positive serologic result only) is distinguished from the clinical manifestations that develop years later, such as destruction of PARASYMPATHETIC GANGLIA; CHAGAS CARDIOMYOPATHY; and dysfunction of the ESOPHAGUS or COLON.
The agent of South American trypanosomiasis or CHAGAS DISEASE. Its vertebrate hosts are man and various domestic and wild animals. Insects of several species are vectors.
A disease of the CARDIAC MUSCLE developed subsequent to the initial protozoan infection by TRYPANOSOMA CRUZI. After infection, less than 10% develop acute illness such as MYOCARDITIS (mostly in children). The disease then enters a latent phase without clinical symptoms until about 20 years later. Myocardial symptoms of advanced CHAGAS DISEASE include conduction defects (HEART BLOCK) and CARDIOMEGALY.
A genus of the subfamily TRIATOMINAE. Several species are vectors of TRYPANOSOMA CRUZI.
A subfamily of assassin bugs (REDUVIIDAE) that are obligate blood-suckers of vertebrates. Included are the genera TRIATOMA; RHODNIUS; and PANSTRONGYLUS, which are vectors of TRYPANOSOMA CRUZI, the agent of CHAGAS DISEASE in humans.
The reduction or regulation of the population of noxious, destructive, or dangerous insects through chemical, biological, or other means.
Agents destructive to the protozoal organisms belonging to the suborder TRYPANOSOMATINA.
A genus of the subfamily TRIATOMINAE. Rhodnius prolixus is a vector for TRYPANOSOMA CRUZI.
Insects that transmit infective organisms from one host to another or from an inanimate reservoir to an animate host.
A nitrofuran thiazine that has been used against TRYPANOSOMIASIS.
The geographic area of Latin America in general and when the specific country or countries are not indicated. It usually includes Central America, South America, Mexico, and the islands of the Caribbean.
A method for diagnosing a disease in one organism by inoculating the putative causative organism in a second animal of a different species. It has been used for the detection of parasites (Trypanosoma cruzi and Trichinella spiralis) when peripheral blood smears are negative. (Segen, Current Med Talk, 1995)
Dilatation of the COLON, often to alarming dimensions. There are various types of megacolon including congenital megacolon in HIRSCHSPRUNG DISEASE, idiopathic megacolon in CONSTIPATION, and TOXIC MEGACOLON.
Invertebrates or non-human vertebrates which transmit infective organisms from one host to another.
Immunoglobulins produced in a response to PROTOZOAN ANTIGENS.
Living facilities for humans.
A genus of cone-nosed bugs of the subfamily TRIATOMINAE. Its species are vectors of TRYPANOSOMA CRUZI.
Bodies preserved either by the ancient Egyptian technique or due to chance under favorable climatic conditions.
The constant presence of diseases or infectious agents within a given geographic area or population group. It may also refer to the usual prevalence of a given disease with such area or group. It includes holoendemic and hyperendemic diseases. A holoendemic disease is one for which a high prevalent level of infection begins early in life and affects most of the child population, leading to a state of equilibrium such that the adult population shows evidence of the disease much less commonly than do children (malaria in many communities is a holoendemic disease). A hyperendemic disease is one that is constantly present at a high incidence and/or prevalence rate and affects all groups equally. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 3d ed, p53, 78, 80)
WHO regional office for the Americas acting as a coordinating agency for the improvement of health conditions in the hemisphere. The four main functions are: control or eradication of communicable diseases, strengthening of national and local health services, education and training, and research.
EPIDEMIOLOGIC STUDIES based on the detection through serological testing of characteristic change in the serum level of specific ANTIBODIES. Latent subclinical infections and carrier states can thus be detected in addition to clinically overt cases.
Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)
The immature stage in the life cycle of those orders of insects characterized by gradual metamorphosis, in which the young resemble the imago in general form of body, including compound eyes and external wings; also the 8-legged stage of mites and ticks that follows the first moult.
DNA of kinetoplasts which are specialized MITOCHONDRIA of trypanosomes and related parasitic protozoa within the order KINETOPLASTIDA. Kinetoplast DNA consists of a complex network of numerous catenated rings of two classes; the first being a large number of small DNA duplex rings, called minicircles, approximately 2000 base pairs in length, and the second being several dozen much larger rings, called maxicircles, approximately 37 kb in length.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of protozoa.
Substances that are destructive to protozoans.
The presence of parasites in food and food products. For the presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in food, FOOD MICROBIOLOGY is available.
The study of disease in prehistoric times as revealed in bones, mummies, and archaeologic artifacts.
Diseases that are underfunded and have low name recognition but are major burdens in less developed countries. The World Health Organization has designated six tropical infectious diseases as being neglected in industrialized countries that are endemic in many developing countries (HELMINTHIASIS; LEPROSY; LYMPHATIC FILARIASIS; ONCHOCERCIASIS; SCHISTOSOMIASIS; and TRACHOMA).
The active insecticidal constituent of CHRYSANTHEMUM CINERARIIFOLIUM flowers. Pyrethrin I is the pyretholone ester of chrysanthemummonocarboxylic acid and pyrethrin II is the pyretholone ester of chrysanthemumdicarboxylic acid monomethyl ester.
The general name for NORTH AMERICA; CENTRAL AMERICA; and SOUTH AMERICA unspecified or combined.
Pesticides designed to control insects that are harmful to man. The insects may be directly harmful, as those acting as disease vectors, or indirectly harmful, as destroyers of crops, food products, or textile fabrics.
The co-occurrence of pregnancy and parasitic diseases. The parasitic infection may precede or follow FERTILIZATION.
Individual members of South American ethnic groups with historic ancestral origins in Asia.
The relationship between an invertebrate and another organism (the host), one of which lives at the expense of the other. Traditionally excluded from definition of parasites are pathogenic BACTERIA; FUNGI; VIRUSES; and PLANTS; though they may live parasitically.
The presence of parasites (especially malarial parasites) in the blood. (Dorland, 27th ed)
Sensitive assay using radiolabeled ANTIGENS to detect specific ANTIBODIES in SERUM. The antigens are allowed to react with the serum and then precipitated using a special reagent such as PROTEIN A sepharose beads. The bound radiolabeled immunoprecipitate is then commonly analyzed by gel electrophoresis.
Infestations by PARASITES which live on, or burrow into, the surface of their host's EPIDERMIS. Most ectoparasites are ARTHROPODS.
Infection with protozoa of the genus TRYPANOSOMA.
Suspensions of attenuated or killed protozoa administered for the prevention or treatment of infectious protozoan disease.
A genus of large OPOSSUMS in the family Didelphidae, found in the Americas. The species Didelphis virginiana is prominent in North America.
The transmission of infectious disease or pathogens from one generation to another. It includes transmission in utero or intrapartum by exposure to blood and secretions, and postpartum exposure via breastfeeding.
An immunoassay utilizing an antibody labeled with an enzyme marker such as horseradish peroxidase. While either the enzyme or the antibody is bound to an immunosorbent substrate, they both retain their biologic activity; the change in enzyme activity as a result of the enzyme-antibody-antigen reaction is proportional to the concentration of the antigen and can be measured spectrophotometrically or with the naked eye. Many variations of the method have been developed.
Infections with the protozoa of the phylum EUGLENOZOA.
Any part or derivative of any protozoan that elicits immunity; malaria (Plasmodium) and trypanosome antigens are presently the most frequently encountered.
A genus of flagellate protozoans found in the blood and lymph of vertebrates and invertebrates, both hosts being required to complete the life cycle.
People who leave their place of residence in one country and settle in a different country.
Disease having a short and relatively severe course.
A type of affinity chromatography where ANTIBODIES are used in the affinity capture reaction on the solid support, in the mobile phase, or both.
Diagnostic procedures involving immunoglobulin reactions.
Bites and stings inflicted by insects.
Tests that demonstrate the relative effectiveness of chemotherapeutic agents against specific parasites.
Proteins found in any species of protozoan.
A family of winged insects of the suborder HETEROPTERA, called assassin bugs, because most prey on other insects. However one subfamily, TRIATOMINAE, attacks humans and other vertebrates and transmits Chagas disease.
The systematic surveying, mapping, charting, and description of specific geographical sites, with reference to the physical features that were presumed to influence health and disease. Medical topography should be differentiated from EPIDEMIOLOGY in that the former emphasizes geography whereas the latter emphasizes disease outbreaks.
Animate or inanimate sources which normally harbor disease-causing organisms and thus serve as potential sources of disease outbreaks. Reservoirs are distinguished from vectors (DISEASE VECTORS) and carriers, which are agents of disease transmission rather than continuing sources of potential disease outbreaks.
The process of leaving one's country to establish residence in a foreign country.
The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.
Cytochromes of the b group that have alpha-band absorption of 563-564 nm. They occur as subunits in MITOCHONDRIAL ELECTRON TRANSPORT COMPLEX III.
Compounds that specifically inhibit STEROL 14-DEMETHYLASE. A variety of azole-derived ANTIFUNGAL AGENTS act through this mechanism.
A genus of gram-positive BACTERIA in the family Gordoniaceae, isolated from soil and from sputa of patients with chest disorders. It is also used for biotransformation of natural products.
The complete genetic complement contained in a set of CHROMOSOMES in a protozoan.
Animals considered to be wild or feral or not adapted for domestic use. It does not include wild animals in zoos for which ANIMALS, ZOO is available.
Infestations with arthropods of the subclass ACARI, superorder Acariformes.
An NADPH-dependent P450 enzyme that plays an essential role in the sterol biosynthetic pathway by catalyzing the demethylation of 14-methyl sterols such as lanosterol. The enzyme acts via the repeated hydroxylation of the 14-methyl group, resulting in its stepwise conversion into an alcohol, an aldehyde and then a carboxylate, which is removed as formic acid. Sterol 14-demethylase is an unusual cytochrome P450 enzyme in that it is found in a broad variety of organisms including ANIMALS; PLANTS; FUNGI; and protozoa.
The branch of medicine concerned with diseases, mainly of parasitic origin, common in tropical and subtropical regions.
Structures within the CELL NUCLEUS of insect cells containing DNA.
In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.
Sensitive tests to measure certain antigens, antibodies, or viruses, using their ability to agglutinate certain erythrocytes. (From Stedman, 26th ed)
The normal process of elimination of fecal material from the RECTUM.
The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.
The palm family of order Arecales, subclass Arecidae, class Liliopsida.
Number of individuals in a population relative to space.
A genus of large, brightly colored SPONGES in the family Agelasidae, possessing a skeleton of spongin fibers with a core of large spicules (megascleres).
Animals which have become adapted through breeding in captivity to a life intimately associated with humans. They include animals domesticated by humans to live and breed in a tame condition on farms or ranches for economic reasons, including LIVESTOCK (specifically CATTLE; SHEEP; HORSES; etc.), POULTRY; and those raised or kept for pleasure and companionship, e.g., PETS; or specifically DOGS; CATS; etc.
A plant genus of the family PIPERACEAE that includes species used for spicy and stimulating qualities.
Behavioral responses or sequences associated with eating including modes of feeding, rhythmic patterns of eating, and time intervals.
Inflammatory processes of the muscular walls of the heart (MYOCARDIUM) which result in injury to the cardiac muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC). Manifestations range from subclinical to sudden death (DEATH, SUDDEN). Myocarditis in association with cardiac dysfunction is classified as inflammatory CARDIOMYOPATHY usually caused by INFECTION, autoimmune diseases, or responses to toxic substances. Myocarditis is also a common cause of DILATED CARDIOMYOPATHY and other cardiomyopathies.
The continuous sequence of changes undergone by living organisms during the post-embryonic developmental process, such as metamorphosis in insects and amphibians. This includes the developmental stages of apicomplexans such as the malarial parasite, PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM.
A discipline or occupation concerned with the study of INSECTS, including the biology and the control of insects.
A mammalian order which consists of 29 families and many genera.
Drugs used to treat or prevent parasitic infections.
Recording of the moment-to-moment electromotive forces of the HEART as projected onto various sites on the body's surface, delineated as a scalar function of time. The recording is monitored by a tracing on slow moving chart paper or by observing it on a cardioscope, which is a CATHODE RAY TUBE DISPLAY.
Parliamentary democracy located between France on the northeast and Portugual on the west and bordered by the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea.
Testing or screening required by federal, state, or local law or other agencies for the diagnosis of specified conditions. It is usually limited to specific populations such as categories of health care providers, members of the military, and prisoners or to specific situations such as premarital examinations or donor screening.
A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
The study of parasites and PARASITIC DISEASES.
Infections or infestations with parasitic organisms. They are often contracted through contact with an intermediate vector, but may occur as the result of direct exposure.
The period of history before 500 of the common era.
A motility disorder of the ESOPHAGUS in which the LOWER ESOPHAGEAL SPHINCTER (near the CARDIA) fails to relax resulting in functional obstruction of the esophagus, and DYSPHAGIA. Achalasia is characterized by a grossly contorted and dilated esophagus (megaesophagus).
A disease caused by any of a number of species of protozoa in the genus LEISHMANIA. There are four major clinical types of this infection: cutaneous (Old and New World) (LEISHMANIASIS, CUTANEOUS), diffuse cutaneous (LEISHMANIASIS, DIFFUSE CUTANEOUS), mucocutaneous (LEISHMANIASIS, MUCOCUTANEOUS), and visceral (LEISHMANIASIS, VISCERAL).
Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.
An infant during the first month after birth.
The functional hereditary units of protozoa.
Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)
Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.
The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)
The science dealing with the earth and its life, especially the description of land, sea, and air and the distribution of plant and animal life, including humanity and human industries with reference to the mutual relations of these elements. (From Webster, 3d ed)
A field of study concerned with the principles and processes governing the geographic distributions of genealogical lineages, especially those within and among closely related species. (Avise, J.C., Phylogeography: The History and Formation of Species. Harvard University Press, 2000)

Candidate parasitic diseases. (1/1819)

This paper discusses five parasitic diseases: American trypanosomiasis (Chagas disease), dracunculiasis, lymphatic filariasis, onchocerciasis and schistosomiasis. The available technology and health infrastructures in developing countries permit the eradication of dracunculiasis and the elimination of lymphatic filariasis due to Wuchereria bancrofti. Blindness due to onchocerciasis and transmission of this disease will be prevented in eleven West African countries; transmission of Chagas disease will be interrupted. A well-coordinated international effort is required to ensure that scarce resources are not wasted, efforts are not duplicated, and planned national programmes are well supported.  (+info)

Induction of CD8+ T cell-mediated protective immunity against Trypanosoma cruzi. (2/1819)

Trypanosoma cruzi was transformed with the Plasmodium yoelii gene encoding the circum-sporozoite (CS) protein, which contains the well-characterized CD8+ T cell epitope, SYVPSAEQI. In vivo and in vitro assays indicated that cells infected with the transformed T. cruzi could process and present this malaria parasite-derived class I MHC-restricted epitope. Immunization of mice with recombinant influenza and vaccinia viruses expressing the SYVPSAEQI epitope induced a large number of specific CD8+ T cells that strongly suppressed parasitemia and conferred complete protection against the acute T. cruzi lethal infection. CD8+ T cells mediated this immunity as indicated by the unrelenting parasitemia and high mortality observed in immunized mice treated with anti-CD8 antibody. This study demonstrated, for the first time, that vaccination of mice with vectors designed to induce CD8+ T cells is effective against T. cruzi infection.  (+info)

Chagas' disease diagnosis: comparative analysis of parasitologic, molecular, and serologic methods. (3/1819)

During the course of chronic chagasic infection, low parasitemia levels prevent parasite detection by current techniques such as hemoculture and xenodiagnosis. Since serologic tests have sensitivity but lack specificity, molecular assays based on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) have been proposed as alternative tools for parasite detection in individuals with chronic Chagas' disease. A variable degree of PCR efficiency has been reported in the literature and illustrates the need for further evaluation of large numbers of chagasic patients. In this study, we compared an optimized PCR technique with hemoculture and complement-mediated lysis (CoML) in 113 individuals from or living in endemic areas of Brazil who had conventional serologic results that were either positive, negative, or inconclusive. The PCR amplification yielded positive results in 83.5% (66 of 79) of individuals with positive serology, 47.6% (10 of 21) with negative serology, and 46.2% (6 of 13) with inconclusive serology. Of 10 patients with negative serology and positive PCR result, eight (80%) had positive CoML, indicating that they could have been chagasic but were not mounting immune responses. The PCR results were also positive for all individuals who had positive hemoculture, for 37 individuals with negative hemoculture and positive serology, and for two of six individuals with inconclusive serology and negative hemoculture. Thirteen individuals living in nonendemic areas who had negative serology were used as a negative control group: 100% had negative PCR results. Our results show that the optimized PCR protocol used here was very sensitive in detecting the presence of Trypanosoma cruzi in chronic chagasic patients. The PCR and CoML results were well correlated in all of the groups studied, which suggests that our PCR protocol may be effective in the evaluation of cure in patients who receive anti-parasite treatment.  (+info)

Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for IgA antibodies to Trypanosoma cruzi in congenital infection. (4/1819)

With the aim of achieving earlier diagnosis of congenital Trypanosoma cruzi infection, we assessed the usefulness of detecting specific IgA antibody by an ELISA. We evaluated 12 pregnant women chronically infected with T. cruzi, their newborn infants, and three additional neonates with parasitemia at birth. The IgA-specific antibody was detected by adapting the procedure for use of a commercial IgG ELISA, the Hemagen Chagas' Kit (Hemagen Diagnostics, Inc., Waltham, MA). Trypanosoma cruzi-specific IgA was detected in 10 (83%) of 12 mothers at delivery, in one of three parasitemic infants, and one of 12 newborns of the chronically infected women. Testing of 13 infants at six months of age revealed IgA in seven infants (54%), of whom four also had persistent T. cruzi-specific IgG. Detection of T. cruzi-specific IgA could provide a criterion for diagnosis of congenital infection in the absence of detectable parasitemia.  (+info)

Acute Chagas' disease in western Venezuela: a clinical, seroparasitologic, and epidemiologic study. (5/1819)

A clinical, parasitologic, and serologic study carried out between 1988 and 1996 on 59 acute-phase patients in areas of western Venezuela where Chagas' disease is endemic showed 19 symptomatic patterns or groups of symptoms appearing in combination with different frequencies. The symptomatic pattern with the highest frequency was that showing simultaneously fever, myalgia, headache, and Romana's sign, which was detected in 20% of the acute-phase patients. Asymptomatic individuals and patients with fever as the only sign of the disease made up 15% and 11.9% of the total acute cases, respectively. Statistical correlation analysis revealed that xenodiagnosis and hemoculture were the most reliable and concordant of the five parasitologic methods used; these two methods also showed the highest proportions in detecting any clinical symptomatic pattern in acute-phase patients. A similar high reliability and concordance was obtained with a direct agglutination test, an indirect immunofluorescent antibody test, and an ELISA as serologic tests, which also showed a higher proportion of positive detection of clinical patterns than parasitologic methods (P < 0.001). It is recommended that individuals coming from endemic areas showing mild and/or severe clinical manifestations should be suspected of being in contact or having been in contact with Trypanosoma cruzi, be referred for parasitologic and serologic evaluations to confirm the presumptive clinical diagnosis of acute Chagas' disease, and start specific treatment. The epidemiologic implications of the present findings are discussed and the use of similar methodology to evaluate other areas where Chagas' disease is endemic is suggested.  (+info)

CD40 ligation prevents Trypanosoma cruzi infection through interleukin-12 upregulation. (6/1819)

Because of the critical role of the CD40-CD40 ligand (CD40L) pathway in the induction and effector phases of immune responses, we investigated the effects of CD40 ligation on the control of Trypanosoma cruzi infection. First, we observed that supernatants of murine spleen cells stimulated by CD40L-transfected 3T3 fibroblasts (3T3-CD40L transfectants) prevent the infection of mouse peritoneal macrophages (MPM) by T. cruzi. This phenomenon depends on de novo production of nitric oxide (NO) as it is prevented by the addition of N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, a NO synthase inhibitor. NO production requires interleukin (IL)-12-mediated gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) synthesis as demonstrated by inhibition experiments using neutralizing anti-IL-12, anti-IFN-gamma, and anti-TNF-alpha monoclonal antibodies (MAb). We found that an activating anti-CD40 MAb also directly stimulates IFN-gamma-activated MPM to produce NO and thereby to control T. cruzi infection. To determine the in vivo relevance of these in vitro findings, mice were injected with 3T3-CD40L transfectants or 3T3 control fibroblasts at the time of T. cruzi inoculation. We observed that in vivo CD40 ligation dramatically reduced both parasitemia and the mortality rate of T. cruzi-infected mice. A reduced parasitemia was still observed when the injection of 3T3-CD40L transfectants was delayed 8 days postinfection. It was abolished by injection of anti-IL-12 MAb. Taken together, these data establish that CD40 ligation facilitates the control of T. cruzi infection through a cascade involving IL-12, IFN-gamma, and NO.  (+info)

A multi-epitope synthetic peptide and recombinant protein for the detection of antibodies to Trypanosoma cruzi in radioimmunoprecipitation-confirmed and consensus-positive sera. (7/1819)

Peptide epitopes of Trypanosoma cruzi have been identified through expression cloning. A tripeptide (2/D/E) containing three epitopes (TcD, TcE, PEP-2) was used in ELISA to detect antibodies to T. cruzi in 239 of 240 consensus-positive sera and 41 of 42 sera confirmed positive by radioimmunoprecipitation assay. The 1 discrepant consensus-positive serum was used to expression-clone a novel gene that contained a repeat sequence. A peptide corresponding to this sequence, TcLo1.2, was specific for T. cruzi. This antigen detected the discrepant consensus-positive serum and enhanced reactivity of low-positive sera in the tripeptide assay. A branched synthetic peptide, 2/D/E/Lo1.2, or a linear recombinant, r2/D/E/Lo1.2, realized all of the diagnostic features of the four epitopes, including the ability to boost reactivity of low-reactive sera. These studies show that peptides and recombinants containing multiple repeat epitopes are powerful tools for developing assays for T. cruzi antibody detection and have direct application in blood screening.  (+info)

Chagas' disease and the autoimmunity hypothesis. (8/1819)

The notion that the pathology of Chagas' disease has an autoimmune component was initially based on the finding of circulating antibodies binding heart tissue antigens in patients and mice chronically infected with Trypanosoma cruzi. Later, T lymphocytes reactive with heart or nerve tissue antigens were found in chagasic mice and patients, extending the concept to include cell-mediated immunity. However, there is disagreement about whether the observed immunologic autoreactivities are triggered by T. cruzi epitopes and then affect host tissue antigens by virtue of molecular mimicry or are elicited by host antigens exposed to lymphocytes after tissue damage caused by the parasite. There is also disagreement about the relevance of immunologic autoreactivities to the pathogenesis of Chagas' disease because of the lack of reproducibility of some key reports supporting the autoimmunity hypothesis, conflicting data from independent laboratories, conclusions invalidated by advances in our understanding of the immunologic mechanisms underlying cell lysis, and, last but not least, a lack of direct, incontrovertible evidence that cross-reacting antibodies or autoreactive cells mediate the typical pathologic changes associated with human Chagas' disease. The data and views backing and questioning the autoimmunity hypothesis for Chagas' disease are summarized in this review.  (+info)

Hayes, M M. and Kierszenbaum, F, Experimental chagas disease: kinetics of lymphocyte responses and immunological control of the transition from acute to chronic trypanosoma cruzi infection. (1981). Subject Strain Bibliography 1981. 1540 ...
Chagas Disease (American Trypanosomiasis) - Pipeline Review, H2 2015 Chagas Disease (American Trypanosomiasis) - Pipeline Review, H2 2015 Summary Global Markets Directs, Chagas Disease (American Trypanosomiasis) - - Market research report and industry analysis - 9535876
JARDIM, Edymar. Sweating in patients with chronic Chagas disease. Arq. Neuro-Psiquiatr. [online]. 1967, vol.25, n.3, pp.214-220. ISSN 0004-282X. https://doi.org/10.1590/S0004-282X1967000300006.. The sweating in patients with chronic Chagas disease by using thermic stimulus (Minor test) is studied. The loss of water was significantly lower in the patients with Chagas disease when compared with the loss in non chagasic patients.. ...
Headline: Bitcoin & Blockchain Searches Exceed Trump! Blockchain Stocks Are Next!. Chagas Disease Therapeutics market report covers research informatics related to Chagas Disease Therapeutics clinical trials, such as a listing of industry and sponsored clinical trials as well as new drug therapies.. Designed to be a resource both for patients interested in participating in Chagas Disease Therapeutics clinical trials and for research professionals.. The report, Chagas Disease Therapeutics Global Clinical Trials Review, H2, 2016″ provides an overview of Chagas Disease Therapeutics clinical trials scenario. This report provides top line data relating to the clinical trials on Chagas Disease Therapeutics. Report includes an overview of trial numbers and their average enrolment in top countries conducted across the globe. The report also offers coverage of disease clinical trials by region, country (G7 & E7), phase, trial status, end points status and sponsor type.. Browse Detailed TOC, Tables, ...
W Apt. University of Chile, Santiago, Chile. Chapter Outline. Introduction 751. Drugs which inhibit protein or purine synthesis 752 Inhibitors of ergoesterol 753 Ofloxacine 755. Inhibitors of trypanothione metabolism 756 Inhibitors of cysteine protease (CPI) 758 Inhibitors of phospholipids 758 Inhibitors of pyrophosphate metabolism 758 Natural drugs 759 Other drugs 760. Treatment of human infection 760. Current drug therapy 760 Acute cases 762 Congenital infection 762 Accidental Chagas disease 764 Organ transplants 764. Reactivations of chronic Chagas disease and treatment of Chagas disease in immunosuppressed patients 764. Evaluation and follow-up of specific therapy 765 Resistance of T. cruzi to drugs 765 Critical comments 766 Glossary 767 References 767. Introduction. Chagas disease has existed for at least 9000 years. Of the desiccated human mummies from coastal valley sites in northern Chile and Peru, 41% were found to be positive by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and hybridization probes ...
CHAGAS DISEASE - AMERICAN TRYPANOSOMIASIS: Promising Treatment for Chagas Disease: Caryophyllene Oxide (a cannabinoid-based preparation)...
DISCUSSION. The decentralization of health interventions that occurred in Brazil and the intense natural environmental transformation have had important consequences for the evaluation and actions of the CDCP. The Municipality of Açucena, Rio Doce Valley studied here was located near two large industries where there was intense deforestation and planting of eucalyptus. This municipality is under the supervision of the HRM of Coronel Fabriciano, where the ES implanted in 2001 was not maintained as recommended. Studies of the prevalence in young age groups present a significant indicator of the success of control measures for Chagas disease related to vectorial transmission9. During the first phase of the study, serological testing for T. cruzi infection in schoolchildren, no children in the selected sample was seropositive. These results confirm those of other studies in different endemic areas in Minas Gerais and reveal the benefits attributed to the CDCP implemented in vast areas of the ...
You may have heard about the kissing bug that is making its way across southern regions of the U.S. Major news outlets such as TIME, CNN, and Forbes recently featured stories about this trending topic. Kissing bugs can carry the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, which can cause Chagas disease. Its important to know that not all kissing bugs are infected with the parasite, and the likelihood of contracting Chagas disease is low.. The Kissing bug received its name because it typically bites the face of humans around the lips and eyes. They are similar to bed bugs; they are primarily nocturnal, and feed on the blood of mammals, including dogs and people. Feedings typically occur while hosts are asleep, and a meal can last 20-30 minutes. Hosts are unaware they are being bitten, because kissing bugs inject an anesthetizing agent during feeding.. About Chagas disease. Chagas disease is not new, but until recently, it was more commonly found in Mexico, Central America and South America. The disease is ...
Although low-grade parasite persistence is a fundamental aspect of chronic Chagas disease, current parasitological assays have low sensitivity and are not quant...
This study investigated the efficacy and tolerability of low and high dose posaconazole versus benznidazole in patients with chronic Chagas disease. The primary
While many studies have found associations between climate change and factors affecting Chagas disease transmission, the future impact of climate change on the global spread of Chagas disease remains debatable. A qualitative, systematic review was conducted to assess the impact of climate change on Chagas disease transmission in the Americas (Central America, South America, and North America). The literature search was performed in January 2019 using the keywords climate, Chagas, and
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Chronic Chagas disease presents different clinical manifestations ranging from asymptomatic (namely indeterminate) to severe cardiac and/or digestive. Previous results have shown that the immune response plays an important role, although no all mechanisms are understood. Immunoregulatory mechanisms such as apoptosis are important for the control of Chagas disease, possibly affecting the morbidity in chronic clinical forms. Apoptosis has been suggested to be an important mechanism of cellular response during T. cruzi infection. We aimed to further understand the putative role of apoptosis in Chagas disease and its relation to the clinical forms of the disease. Apoptosis of lymphocytes, under antigenic stimuli (soluble T. cruzi antigens - TcAg) where compared to that of non-stimulated cells. Apoptosis was evaluated using the expression of annexin and caspase 3+ by T cells and the percentage of cells positive evaluated by flow cytometry. In addition activation and T cell markers were used for the
The study investigated 100 subjects, both genders, with chronic Chagas disease, confirmed by at least two distinct serological tests, and classified according to Los Andes classification in a long term follow-up aiming at identifying the predictive value of the signal-averaged electrocardiogram for cardiac death and ventricular tachycardia.. All subjects admitted to the study were submitted to clinical history taking, physical examination, and noninvasive assessment, including blood pressure measurement, resting 12-lead surface electrocardiogram, 24h ambulatory electrocardiogram monitoring, M-Mode/two-dimensional echocardiogram, signal-averaged electrocardiogram in both time and frequency domains. Selected subjects were further submitted to treadmill stress test and coronary angiography to rule out coronary heart disease.. Subjects were followed by non-investigational primary care assistance at three to six months scheduled clinical visits on an outpatients basis. Both noninvasive and invasive ...
Progress in control in each country is reported as follows:. Argentina. The area of transmission covered 60% of the country north of parallel 44 degrees. The main vector is T. infestans. In 1980 the average house infestation rate for the country as a whole was 30%; in 1998 it was 1.2%; and in 2002 it dropped to 1.0% which is equivalent to 98% reduction in house infestation by the main vector.. The seroprevalence rates for the whole country for the age group 0-4 years is 0.9% which confirms the very low number of acute cases among children in this age group. In the age group 0-14 years the rate is 1.9%. In the age group of 18-year-old males the seroprevalence rates have dropped from 5.8% in 1981 to 1.0% in 1993 and 0.5% in 2002. The interruption of vectorial transmission has been achieved in 10 of the 13 endemic provinces of the country.52. Finally, there is 100% coverage of the blood donations screened against Chagas disease in the blood banks of the public sector and 80% coverage in the ...
Chagas disease and leishmaniasis, caused by the kinetoplastid protozoans Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania spp., respectively, affect millions of people worldwide, most of them belonging to neglected populations. Diagnostic tests for Chagas disease are employed during epidemiological surveys of vectorial and oral transmission, blood bank screening, analysis of pregnant women and their newborns, and in individual cases. However, the currently available assays need improvement. The different phases of the disease, the transmission mode and the high genetic variability of the parasite increase the difficulties of making diagnostic kits with different markers suitable for the diverse scenarios of T. cruzi infection. Different Leishmania species cause diverse clinical features and sequelae and require different clinical management. In contrast to Chagas disease diagnosis, molecular diagnosis for leishmaniasis requires not only confirmation of the infection but also the genotyping of complexes, species ...
It is reported that 165,000 people in Paraguay suffer from the usually chronic disease. Itaguá, Cordillera and Paraguarí departments were identified as at-risk areas (Itaguá was once declared disease-free by the WHO).. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), Chagas disease, also known as American trypanosomiasis, is a potentially life-threatening illness caused by the protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi). It is found mainly in endemic areas of 21 Latin American countries.. About 7 million to 8 million people worldwide are estimated to be infected with the parasite. For more infectious disease news and information, visit and like the Infectious Disease News Facebook page.. Chagas disease slideshow. T. cruzi parasites are mainly transmitted by the infected feces of blood-sucking triatomine bugs. In addition, the parasite can be transmitted via food contaminated with T. cruzi through for example thecontact with triatomine bug feces, blood transfusions using blood from ...
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A little-known but deadly disease is making its presence felt in the southwestern United States. Chagas disease, sometimes called the silent killer, has long been known in Central and South America but rarely diagnosed in the United States. Now, the number of cases is growing in Texas, while the bugs that carry the disease are turning up in Arizona and California.. All About Chagas. American trypanosomiasis, commonly called Chagas disease after the Brazilian physician who first identified it, is an infection by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Kissing bugs, which spread the T. cruzi parasite to humans, are nocturnal bugs that earned their nickname for their predilection to bite humans around the mouth (or sometimes eyes) at night. Unfortunately for the sleeping human providing the nighttime meal, the bug is simultaneously depositing feces infected with T. cruzi on the skin. The human host later scratches the itchy bug-bite and inadvertently rubs the infected bug feces into the mouth or eye, ...
American trypanosomiasis (Chagas disease) is an important cause of heart disease, megaesophagus and megacolon among people in Mexico, Central and South America. Many mammals can be infected with the parasite that causes this disease; however, among animals, clinical cases have been reported mainly in dogs. Chagas disease is transmitted by the bites of triatomine insects, or
Symptoms of Chagas disease including 49 medical symptoms and signs of Chagas disease, alternative diagnoses, misdiagnosis, and correct diagnosis for Chagas disease signs or Chagas disease symptoms.
Background Chagas disease induced by (invasion and in sponsor tissue fibrosis. become inhibited by this compound. Interestingly we further shown that administration of type:entrez-nucleotide attrs :text:GW788388″ term_id :293585730″ term_text :GW788388″GW788388 at the end of the acute phase (20 dpi) still significantly increased survival and decreased cardiac fibrosis (evaluated by Massons trichrome staining and collagen type I manifestation) inside a stage when parasite growth is no more central to this event. Summary/Significance This work confirms that inhibition of TGF? signaling pathway can be considered like a potential alternate strategy for the treatment of the symptomatic cardiomyopathy found in the acute and chronic phases of Chagas disease. Author Summary Cardiac damage and dysfunction are prominent features in individuals with chronic Chagas disease which is definitely caused by illness with the protozoan parasite (invasion and growth and in sponsor tissue fibrosis. ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Risedronate in the treatment of Murine Chagas disease. AU - Bouzahzah, Boumediene. AU - Jelicks, Linda A.. AU - Morris, Stephen A.. AU - Weiss, Louis M.. AU - Tanowitz, Herbert B.. PY - 2005/6/1. Y1 - 2005/6/1. N2 - Risedronate, a bisphosphonate, was used to treat CD-1 mice infected with the Brazil strain of Trypanosoma cruzi. When given by subcutaneous injection 3 times/week, there was a significant reduction in mortality, however, the myocardial pathology and right ventricular dilation was unchanged in these mice compared to control animals. In C57BL/6 mice infected with the Tulahuen strain, there was no change in mortality in response to risedronate treatment. These data suggest that this class of compounds has activity against T. cruzi in vivo and illustrate the utility of imaging and pathologic studies as adjuncts in the evaluation of therapeutic compounds as treatments for experimental Chagas disease. In addition, it underscores the need to use different strains of T. ...
In most instances of acute T cruzi infection, a specific diagnosis is not made because of the nonspecific nature of the signs and symptoms and because most cases occur in poor people who have limited ... more
The heart is the most commonly affected organ in persons with chronic Chagas disease.{ref55}{ref56}{ref57}{ref58} Autopsy may reveal marked bilateral ventricular enlargement, often involving the right... more
Despite current beliefs that Chagas disease is a recently emerging disease, we report historical references dating as far back as 1935. Both imported cases and autochthonous transmission contribute to the historical disease burden in Texas. http://journals.plos.org/plosntds/article?id=10.1371/journal.pntd.0003981
The etiological treatment of Chagas disease is recommended for all patients with acute or recent chronic infection, but controversies remain regarding the benefit of chemotherapy and interpretations of the parasitological cure after etiological treatment. This study compares the laboratory and clinical evaluations of Chagas disease patients who were diagnosed 13 years earlier. Fifty-eight Chagas disease patients (29 treated with benznidazole and 29 untreated) were matched at the time of treatment based on several variables. Conventional serology revealed the absence of seroconversion in all patients. However, lower serological titres were verified in the treated group, primarily among patients who had the indeterminate form of the disease. Haemoculture performed 13 years after the intervention was positive for 6.9% and 27.6% of the treated and untreated patients, respectively. Polymerase chain reaction tests were positive for 44.8% and 13.8% of the treated and untreated patients, respectively. ...
In Yucatan state, Mexico, health officials are reporting an increase in the parasitic disease during the month of Feb. 2019.. According to the epidemiological bulletin, between the Feb. 3rd and 9th, 24 new cases of Chagas disease have been confirmed in the state. In the month of February, 27 cases have been reported in total to date.. January 2019 saw just three cases and in all of 2018, 62 Chagas cases were reported in Yucatan.. According to the World Health Organization(WHO), Chagas disease, also known as American trypanosomiasis, is a potentially life-threatening illness caused by the protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi). It is found mainly in endemic areas of 21 Latin American countries.. About 7 million to 8 million people worldwide are estimated to be infected with the parasite.. ...
Dr. Peter Hotez and co-authors discuss the tragedy of Chagas disease in North America. In North America, Chagas disease (American trypanosomiasis caused by Trypanosoma cruzi) was first reported in Mexico in 1940 and in the United States in Texas in 1955. However, based on ancient mummified remains discovered in the Rio Grande Valley, human T. cruzi infection has been present in North America since prehistoric times.. Continue reading. ...
Chagas Disease, also known as American Trypanosomiasis, is a protozoan infection transmitted by the Triatoma insect (known as vinchuca in Spanish or barbeiro in Portuguese) which bites humans most commonly on the face at night. The Triatoma insect sheds feces containing the Trypanosoma cruzi protozoa at the site of the bite which are rubbed or crushed into the bite wound to alleviate itching. The parasite then enters the bloodstream and affects organ tissues, typically the heart and the intestines. The disease largely spreads with the rise of migration from rural areas to urban and suburban areas as well as increasing deforestation. Chagas Disease affects between 6 and 7 million people and is a Neglected Tropical Disease (NTD)*. Many countries affected by the disease have active health education and eradication programs.. * Neglected Tropical Diseases are chronic infections that are typically endemic in low income countries. They prevent affected adults and children from going to school, ...
Chagas disease affects 8 to 10 million people living in endemic Latin American countries, with an additional 300,000-400,000 living in nonendemic countries, including Spain and the United States. An estimated 41,200 new cases occur annually in endemic countries, and 14,400 infants are born with congenital Chagas disease annually.[5][15] in 2010 it resulted in approximately 10,300 deaths up from 9,300 in 1990.[45] The disease is present in 18 countries on the American continents, ranging from the southern United States to northern Argentina.[6] Chagas exists in two different ecological zones. In the Southern Cone region, the main vector lives in and around human homes. In Central America and Mexico, the main vector species lives both inside dwellings and in uninhabited areas. In both zones, Chagas occurs almost exclusively in rural areas, where triatomines breed and feed on the more than 150 species from 24 families of domestic and wild mammals, as well as humans, that are the natural reservoirs ...
Chagas disease affects 8 to 10 million people living in endemic Latin American countries, with an additional 300,000-400,000 living in nonendemic countries, including Spain and the United States. An estimated 41,200 new cases occur annually in endemic countries, and 14,400 infants are born with congenital Chagas disease annually.[5][15] in 2010 it resulted in approximately 10,300 deaths up from 9,300 in 1990.[45] The disease is present in 18 countries on the American continents, ranging from the southern United States to northern Argentina.[6] Chagas exists in two different ecological zones. In the Southern Cone region, the main vector lives in and around human homes. In Central America and Mexico, the main vector species lives both inside dwellings and in uninhabited areas. In both zones, Chagas occurs almost exclusively in rural areas, where triatomines breed and feed on the more than 150 species from 24 families of domestic and wild mammals, as well as humans, that are the natural reservoirs ...
Rick Tarleton of the Center for Tropical and Emerging Global Diseases at the University of Georgia and the Chagas Disease Foundation, and colleagues provide background on Chagas disease and discuss the Chagas-related milestones identified by the London Declaration on Neglected Tropical Diseases, as well as the actions necessary to control and eventually eliminate the disease (10/9).. ...
Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiologic agent of Chagas disease. The contributions of parasite and immune system for disease pathogenesis remain unresolved and controversial. The possibility that Chagas disease was an autoimmune progression triggered by T. cruzi infection led some to question the benefit of treating chronically T. cruzi-infected persons with drugs. Furthermore, it provided the rationale for not investing in research aimed at a vaccine which might carry a risk of inducing autoimmunity or exacerbating inflammation. This viewpoint was adopted by cash-strapped health systems in the developing economies where the disease is endemic and has been repeatedly challenged by researchers and clinicians in recent years and there is now a considerable body of evidence and broad consensus that parasite persistence is requisite for pathogenesis and that antiparasitic immunity can be protective against T. cruzi pathogenesis without eliciting autoimmune pathology. Thus, treatment of chronically ...
Chagas disease is diagnosed using blood tests, but different kinds of blood tests are needed for acute and chronic Chagas disease.
M. Rolón, D.R. Serrano, A. Lalatsa, E. de Pablo, J.J. Torrado, M.P. Ballesteros, A.M. Healy, C. Vega, C. Coronel, F. Bolás-Fernández and M.A. Dea-Ayuela, M.A. Engineering Oral and Parenteral Amorphous Amphotericin B Formulations against Experimental Trypanosoma cruzi Infections. Molecular Pharmaceutics, 14(4) (2017) 1095-1106 ...
Neglected parasitic infections, including Chagas disease, toxocariasis, cysticercosis, and toxoplasmosis, affect millions of persons in the United States. Relatively few resources have been devoted to surveillance, prevention, and treatment of these diseases. Chagas disease primarily affects Latin American immigrants and can cause heart failure and death if not treated. Immediate antiparasitic treatment is indicated for most patients with acute Chagas disease. Treatment is recommended for patients younger than 18 years who have chronic Chagas disease and is generally recommended for adults younger than 50 years who do not have advanced cardiomyopathy; treatment decisions for other patients should be made on an individual basis. Toxocariasis primarily affects children and can cause gastrointestinal, respiratory, and ophthalmologic disease. Treatment options include albendazole and mebendazole. Patients with ocular infection require referral to an ophthalmologist. Neurocysticercosis, a form of
Over 80% of Chagas infections in Latin America are passed on by domestic insect vectors. Dr. Chris Schofield outlines how eliminating these on a very large scale would stop disease transmission, as well as the risk of insect vectors spreading elsewhere in the world. Early disease detection and treatment combined with continued surveillance for insect re-infestation are also essential to meet the challenge of eliminating Chagas disease as a public health problem.. Be an expert! Click here for full article.. Dr. Christopher Schofield is Coordinator of ECLAT at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. He is a world renowned researcher of Chagas Disease. We are privileged to have Dr. Schofield as a member of our Kids for World Health Advisory Board.. ...
A specific test is necessary for the diagnosis of Chagas disease. The test detects the presence of the infection through analysis of a blood sample. Anyone who suspects that they may have Chagas disease should ask their doctor to order this test.. Patients who test positive for the infection should have a cardiac check-up. This is done using radiography, an electrocardiogram and occasionally an echocardiogram. Depending on whether or not the patient reports digestive symptoms, the doctor will decide if a digestive tract assessment is needed.. To find out whether you should be tested for Chagas infection, we recommend you take the following test.. ...
In this study, we were able to achieve a 4-fold reduction in the amount of benznidazole required to significantly reduce blood and tissue parasite burdens by combining the low-dose benznidazole with a recombinant vaccine candidate, Tc24 C4, formulated with a synthetic Toll-like 4 receptor agonist, E6020, in a squalene oil-in-water emulsion. Additionally, vaccination induced a robust parasite-speci...
A new antigen preparation useful in immunoprecipitin diagnostic testing for Chagas disease is prepared by growing Trypanosoma cruzi in tissue culture to form essentially only the trypomastigote and a
Admission:. Longitudinal prospective study, with a cohort of 100 consecutive outpatient subjects (34 to 74 years old; 31 females) with Chagas disease followed-up for at least 10 years at the cardiomyopathy outpatient clinic of University Hospital, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil, a tertiary care center. Enrollment was from 1995 to 1999. Subjects were born in endemic regions of Minas Gerais, Goias or Bahia States of Brazil and Chagas disease was diagnosed on basis of two positive serum tests, hemagglutination cruzipain-ELISA and indirect immunofluorescence. All subjects were referred to the arrhythmia for risk stratification. At the time of admission none had received nitroderivative therapy. Subjects were classified according to the severity of heart involvement according to Los Andes classification, and divided into three groups: class I - 28 subjects (group 1), class II - 48 subjects (group 2), and class III - 24 subjects (group 3). Clinical and laboratory data were assessed during a personal ...
In North America, Chagas disease (American trypanosomiasis caused by Trypanosoma cruzi) was first reported in Mexico in 1940 [1] and in the United States in Texas in 1955 [2]. However, based on ancient mummified remains discovered in the Rio Grande Valley, human T. cruzi infection has been present in North America since prehistoric times [3].…
Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) has called on the Brazilian government to ensure its state-owned drug company steps up production of the only drug for Chagas disease, which affects 10 million people in Latin America, Guardian Health Editor Sarah Boseley writes in her Global Health Blog (10/6). Thousands of people with Chagas disease will go untreated in coming months due to a shortage of benznidazole, the first-line drug used in most endemic countries, according to a MSF press release and a related article published by the organization. According to the press release, MSF has stopped diagnosing Chagas in Paraguay and has suspended new projects in endemic areas of Bolivia due to the shortage (10/5).. There is only one pharmaceutical company in the world making benznidazole and only one supplier of the active ingredient - and they are in Brazil, where the ministry of health effectively took over responsibility for the production of this drug from the Big Pharma company, the Swiss firm ...
Chagas disease, also known as American trypanosomiasis, is a potentially life-threatening illness caused by the protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi or (T. cruzi). It is found mainly in 21 Latin American countries1, where it is mostly vector-borne. The main vector involved in the transmission of the parasite to
Abstract. To contribute to a better understanding of the molecular bases of the circadian biological rhythms in Chagas disease vectors, in this work we identified functional domains in the sequences of the clock protein PERIOD (PER) in Rhodnius prolixus and Triatoma infestans and analyzed the expression of the PER gene at mRNA level in T. infestans. The PER protein sequences comparison among these species and those from other insects revealed that the most similar regions are the PAS domains and the most variable is the COOH-terminal. On the other hand, the per gene expression in nervous tissue of adult T. infestans varies with a daily canonical rhythm in groups of individuals maintained under photoperiod (light/dark, LD) and constant dark (DD), showing a significant peak of expression at sunset. The pattern of expression detected in LD persists under the DD condition. As expected, in the group maintained in constant light (LL), no daily increase was detected in per transcript level. Besides, the
TY - JOUR. T1 - Evidence for Trypanosoma cruzi in adipose tissue in human chronic Chagas disease. AU - Matos Ferreira, Adaliene Versiani. AU - Segatto, Marcela. AU - Menezes, Zélia. AU - Macedo, Andréa Mara. AU - Gelape, Cláudio. AU - de Oliveira Andrade, Luciana. AU - Nagajyothi, Fnu. AU - Scherer, Philipp E.. AU - Teixeira, Mauro Martins. AU - Tanowitz, Herbert B.. PY - 2011/11/1. Y1 - 2011/11/1. N2 - Trypanosoma cruzi the cause of Chagas disease persists in tissues of infected experimental animals and humans. Here we demonstrate the persistence of the parasite in adipose tissue from of three of 10 elderly seropositive patients with chronic chagasic heart disease. Nine control patients had no parasites in the fat. We also demonstrate that T. cruzi parasitizes primary adipocytes in vitro. Thus, in humans as in mice the parasite may persist in adipose tissue for decades and become a reservoir of infection.. AB - Trypanosoma cruzi the cause of Chagas disease persists in tissues of infected ...
The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi) circulates in the blood upon infection and invades a variety of cells. Parasites intensively multiply during the acute phase of infection and persist lifelong at low levels in tissues and blood during the chronic phase. Natural killer (NK) and NKT cells play an important role in the immune control of T. cruzi infection, mainly by releasing the cytokine IFN-γ that activates the microbicidal action of macrophages and other cells and shapes a protective type 1 immune response. The mechanisms by which immune cells are regulated to produce IFN-γ during T. cruzi infection are still incompletely understood. Here, we show that urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) is induced early upon T. cruzi infection, and remains elevated until day 20 post inoculation. We previously demonstrated that the inhibitory receptor Ly49E, which is expressed, among others, on NK and NKT cells, is triggered by uPA. Therefore, we compared wild type (WT) to Ly49E knockout (KO) mice
Chagas disease, also known as American trypanosomiasis, is caused by infection with the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. The organism T cruzi and infection in humans were first described in 1909 by the Brazilian physician Carlos R.
Chronic Chagas Disease (CD) diagnosis is based on serological methods employing crude, semipurified or recombinant antigens, which may result in low sensitivity or cross-reactivity. To reduce these restrictions, we developed a strategy involving use of molecules containing repetitive fragments of Trypanosoma cruzi conserved proteins. Diagnostic performance of IBMP-8.1 and IBMP-8.4 chimeric antigens (Molecular Biology Institute of Paraná - IBMP in Portuguese acronym) was assessed to diagnose T. cruzi-infected and non-infected immigrants living in Barcelona (Spain), a non-endemic setting for Chagas disease. Reactivity of IBMP-8.1 and IBMP-8.4 was assessed using an in-house automated ELISA with 347 positive and 331 negative individuals to Chagas disease. Antigenic cross-reactivity was measured with sera samples from pregnant women with Toxoplasma gondii (n = 98) and Zika virus (n = 75) antibodies. The area under the curve values was 1 and 0.99 for the IBMP-8.1 and IBMP-8.4 proteins, respectively,
Abstract. Chagas disease has the highest prevalence of any parasitic disease in the Americas, affecting 6-7 million people. Conventional diagnosis requires a well-equipped laboratory with experienced personnel. The development of new diagnostic tools that are easy to use and adapted to the reality of affected populations and health systems is still a significant challenge. The main objective of this study was to measure Trypanosoma cruzi infection status using saliva samples of infected subjects. Blood and saliva samples from 20 T. cruzi-seropositive individuals and 10 controls were tested for T. cruzi infection using two different commercial serological tests. We have shown that detection of T. cruzi infection is possible using saliva samples, supporting the potential use of saliva to diagnose Chagas disease in humans. This method could provide a simple, low-cost but effective tool for the diagnosis of T. cruzi infection. Its noninvasive nature makes it particularly well suited for endemic areas.
TY - JOUR. T1 - Structurally simple inhibitors of lanosterol 14α-demethylase are efficacious in a rodent model of acute Chagas disease. AU - Suryadevara, Praveen Kumar. AU - Olepu, Srinivas. AU - Lockman, Jeffrey W.. AU - Ohkanda, Junko. AU - Karimi, Mandana. AU - Verlinde, Christophe L.M.J.. AU - Kraus, James M.. AU - Schoepe, Jan. AU - Van Voorhis, Wesley C.. AU - Hamilton, Andrew D.. AU - Buckner, Frederick S.. AU - Gelb, Michael H.. N1 - Copyright: Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.. PY - 2009/6/25. Y1 - 2009/6/25. N2 - We report structure-activity studies of a large number of dialkyl imidazoles as inhibitors of Trypanosoma cruzi lanosterol-14α-demethylase (L14DM). The compounds have a simple structure compared to posaconazole, another L14DM inhibitor that is an anti-Chagas drug candidate. Several compounds display potency for killing T. cruzi amastigotes in vitro with values of EC 50 in the 0.4-10 nM range. Two compounds were selected for efficacy studies in a mouse model ...
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Biology professor Lori Stevens spends a lot of time wearing a lab coat as she sleuths out DNA sequences found in the gut of the reduviid bug, often called the kissing bug, which is responsible for the spread of Chagas disease, an affliction that affects 8-10 million people in Latin America. Almost as often, shes wearing a t-shirt in the hot Guatemalan sun, helping rural villagers who are most vulnerable to the disease learn to retrofit their homes against the insect. Chagas is a parasitic disease caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi which is transmitted by the kissing bugs.. The insect lies low during the day and emerges at night. Kissing bugs infected with T. cruzi transmit the parasite to humans by piercing the skin-often near areas like the eyes, nose or mouth-and then defecating near the wound. The parasite, present in the feces, enters the hosts bloodstream through an opening in the skin when the person scratches the itchy bite. The parasite can also be passed from mother to fetus, ...
Chagas disease is caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, which is transmitted to animals and people by an insect called a triatomine bug. Infection is most commonly acquired through contact with the feces of an infected triatomine bug (or kissing bug), a blood-sucking insect that feeds on humans and animals.
We report the discovery of nontoxic fungicide fenarimol (1) as an inhibitor of Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi), the causative agent of Chagas disease, and the results of structure-activity investigations leading to potent analogues with low nM IC50s in a T. cruzi whole cell in vitro assay. Lead compounds suppressed blood parasitemia to virtually undetectable levels after once daily oral dosing in mouse models of T. cruzi infection. Compounds are chemically tractable, allowing rapid optimization of target biological activity and drug characteristics. Chemical and biological studies undertaken in the development of the fenarimol series toward the goal of delivering a new drug candidate for Chagas disease are reported. ...
Title:Computational Drug Repositioning by Target Hopping: A Use Case in Chagas Disease. VOLUME: 22 ISSUE: 21. Author(s):V. Joachim Haupt, Jesús E. Aguilar Uvalle, Sebastian Salentin, Simone Daminelli, Franziska Leonhardt, Janez Konc and Michael Schroeder. Affiliation:BIOTEC, TU Dresden, Tatzberg 47/49, 01307 Dresden, Germany.. Keywords:Drug repositioning, drug re-purposing, structural bioinformatics, structure alignment, drug discovery, Chagas disease, target hopping.. Abstract:Background: Drug repositioning aims to identify novel indications for existing drugs. One approach to repositioning exploits shared binding sites between the drug targets and other proteins. Here, we review the principle and algorithms of such target hopping and illustrate them in Chagas disease, an in Latin America widely spread, but neglected disease. Conclusion: We demonstrate how target hopping recovers known treatments for Chagas disease and predicts novel drugs, such as the antiviral foscarnet, which we predict to ...
The pathogenesis of megaesophagus in chronic Chagas disease, which is caused by infection with the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi is compelling. Individuals with megaesophagus often present achalasia and disturbances of peristalsis and neuronal loss. Esophageal samples were obtained from 6 T. cruzi infected individuals with megaesophagus, 6 T. cruzi infected individuals without megaesophagus, and 6 noninfected individuals who underwent necropsy procedures.
Author Summary Chagas disease (American trypanosomiasis) is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi and represents a major public health problem in Latin America. Furthermore, growing human population movements extend the disease distribution to regions outside the South American continent. Accurate diagnosis is crucial in patient care and in preventing transmission through blood transfusion, organ transplantation, or vertical transmission from mother to child. Routine diagnosis of Trypanosoma cruzi infection generally is based on detection of the hosts antibodies against the parasite. However, antibody detection tests are liable to specificity problems and are of limited use in assessing treatment outcome and congenital infections. The introduction of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify specific DNA sequences opened promising diagnostic perspectives. Despite its reported high sensitivity and specificity, broad use of the PCR technique in diagnosis of Chagas disease is hampered by
International migration has changed the epidemiologic patterns of Chagas disease. Recently, 2 cases of Chagas disease transmitted from Latin American women to their newborns were diagnosed in Geneva, Switzerland. A retrospective study to detect Chagas disease showed a prevalence of 9.7% among 72 Latin American women tested during pregnancy in Switzerland ...
Author Summary Chagas disease, a Latin American illness caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, has only rare spontaneous cure, and in most patients a small number of parasites persists for life in the blood and tissues, leading to chronic disorders such as cardiomyopathy. In a murine model of chronic T. cruzi infection we observed that the liver plays an important role in the clearance of blood-circulating parasites. Moreover, parasite accumulation in this organ is followed by their elimination, an effect that is not immediate but seems to depend on the recruitment of leukocytes and on the local production of IFN-γ, a cytokine known to increase the T. cruzi-killing capacity of phagocytes. Our findings contribute to the knowledge of T. cruzi-host interaction, showing the participation of a non-lymphoid organ in parasite control. In addition, they contribute to understanding the multifaceted role the liver plays in the immune response.
Trypanosoma cruzi is an intracellular protozoan parasite that causes Chagas disease. The parasite life cycle involves hematophagous reduviid bugs as vectors. Once parasites enter the host body, they invade diverse host cells including cardiomyocytes. Establishment of infection depends on various parasite molecules such as cruzipain, oligopeptidase B, and trans-sialidase that activate Ca2+ signaling. Internalized parasites escape from the parasitophorous vacuole using secreted pore-forming TcTOX molecule and replicate in the cytosol. Multiplied parasites eventually lyse infected host cells and are released in the circulation. During these events, the parasites manipulate host innate immunity and elicit cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. T lymphocyte responses are also disturbed ...
Trypanosoma cruzi is an intracellular protozoan parasite that causes Chagas disease. The parasite life cycle involves hematophagous reduviid bugs as vectors. Once parasites enter the host body, they invade diverse host cells including cardiomyocytes. Establishment of infection depends on various parasite molecules such as cruzipain, oligopeptidase B, and trans-sialidase that activate Ca2+ signaling. Internalized parasites escape from the parasitophorous vacuole using secreted pore-forming TcTOX molecule and replicate in the cytosol. Multiplied parasites eventually lyse infected host cells and are released in the circulation. During these events, the parasites manipulate host innate immunity and elicit cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. T lymphocyte responses are also disturbed ...
Here we provide evidence for a critical role of PP2As (protein phosphatase 2As) in the transformation of Trypanosoma cruzi. In axenic medium at pH 5.0, trypomastigotes rapidly transform into amastigotes, a process blocked by okadaic acid, a potent PP2A inhibitor, at concentrations as low as 0.1 μM. 1-Norokadaone, an inactive okadaic acid analogue, did not affect the transformation. Electron microscopy studies indicated that okadaic acid-treated trypomastigotes had not undergone ultrastructural modifications, reinforcing the idea that PP2A inhibits transformation. Using a microcystin-Sepharose affinity column we purified the native T. cruzi PP2A. The enzyme displayed activity against 32P-labelled phosphorylase a that was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by okadaic acid. The protein was also submitted to MS and, from the peptides obtained, degenerate primers were used to clone a novel T. cruzi PP2A enzyme by PCR. The isolated gene encodes a protein of 303 amino acids, termed TcPP2A, which ...
Between 1999-2002, Médécins Sans Frontières-Spain implemented a project seeking to determine the efficacy and safety of benznidazole in the treatment of recent chronic Chagas disease in a cohort of seropositive children in the Yoro Department, Honduras. A total of 24,471 children were screened for Trypanosoma cruzi IgG antibodies through conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) on filter paper. Recombinant ELISA (0.93% seroprevalence) showed 256 initially reactive cases, including 232 confirmed positive cases. Of these, 231 individuals were treated with benznidazole (7.5 mg/kg/day) for 60 days and were followed with a strict weekly medical control and follow-up protocol. At the end of the project, 229 patients were examined by the Honduras Secretariat of Health for post-treatment serological assessments; 88.2% seroconverted after 18 months and 93.9% seroconverted after three years. No differences were found in the seroconversion rates according to age or sex. Most of the side ...
Dogs are domestic reservoir hosts of Trypanosoma cruzi, the aetiological agent of Chagas disease. Using an experimental set-up mimicking rural mud-and-thatch houses, we evaluated the effect of deltamethrin-treated dog collars on the feeding success and survival of Triatoma infestans, the main T. cruzi vector in Latin America. Seven collared and three uncollared control dogs were exposed to colonized T. infestans at day 0 (i.e. before attachment of collars), at 15 days, and then monthly for 3 months post collar attachment. Following overnight exposure to uncollared dogs, 96% (1473/1538) of bugs fed, of which 51% (746/1473) fully engorged. Feeding rates were significantly reduced on collared dogs for up to 1 month post collar attachment with the lowest rates of 91% (551/604) observed at day 30 (P,0.05). Amongst those bugs that fed, engorgement rates were significantly reduced on collared dogs throughout the trial, during which average rates were 31% (543/1768) (P,0.001). No collar effect on ...
New formulation for weight-adjusted treatment of pediatric Chagas patients age 0-18 targets most vulnerable patient group / Submission based on results of CHICO (CHagas disease In Children treated with NifurtimOx) phase III clinical study of nifurtimox in pediatric patients with Chagas disease as well as pre-clinical data / Fight against Neglected Tropical Diseases part of Bayers Sustainability Strategy
New formulation for weight-adjusted treatment of pediatric Chagas patients age 0-18 targets most vulnerable patient group / Submission based on results of CHICO (CHagas disease In Children treated with NifurtimOx) phase III clinical study of nifurtimox in pediatric patients with Chagas disease as well as pre-clinical data / Fight against Neglected Tropical Diseases part of Bayers Sustainability Strategy
Definition : Molecular assay reagents intended to identify Trypanosoma cruzi, a species of protozoon of the suborder Trypanosomatina, by detecting specific genetic information of the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of the target parasite. Trypanosoma cruzi parasites cause Chagas disease (American trypanosomiasis) in humans, characterized by an erythematous nodule (i.e., chagoma) appearing within a few days at the site of the inoculation. These parasites are transmitted to humans via insects, either from other humans or from animals (e.g., cats, dogs, rodents).. Entry Terms : Trypanosoma cruzi Reagents, Identification , Trypanosoma cruzi Detection/Identification Reagents , Trypanosoma Species Reagents, Identification , American Trypanosomiasis Diagnostic Reagents , Sleeping Sickness Diagnostic Reagents , Trypanosomosis Diagnostic Reagents , Trypanosoma Species Detection/Identification Reagents , Chagas Disease Diagnostic Reagents , Reagents, Molecular Assay, Infection, Parasite, ...
Chagas disease: Chagas disease, infection with the flagellate protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. It is transmitted to humans by bloodsucking reduviid bugs and is endemic in most rural areas of Central and South America. The disease is most often transmitted by contact with the feces of infected insects, commonly through
CD8+ T cells are essential for controlling Trypanosoma cruzi infection. During Brazil strain infection, C57BL/6 mice expand parasite-specific CD8+ T cells recognizing the dominant TSKB20 (ANYKFTLV) and subdominant TSKB74 (VNYDFTLV) trans-sialidase gene (TS)-encoded epitopes with up to 40% of all CD8+ T cells specific for these epitopes. Although this is one of the largest immunodominant T cell responses described for any infection, most mice fail to clear T. cruzi and subsequently develop chronic disease. To determine if immunodominant TS-specific CD8+ T cells are necessary for resistance to infection, we epitope-tolerized mice by high-dose i.v. injections of TSKB20 or TSKB74 peptides. Tolerance induction led to deletion of TS-specific CD8+ T cells but did not prevent the expansion of other effector CD8+ T cell populations. Mice tolerized against either TSKB20 or TSKB74, or both epitopes simultaneously, exhibited transient increases in parasite loads, although ultimately they controlled the ...
La enfermedad de Chagas en Argentina. Investigación científica, problemas sociales y políticas sanitarias [Chagas disease in Argentina. Scientific research, social problems and health policies]. By Juan Pablo Zabala. Universidad Nacional de Quilmes, Argentina. 2010. 360 pages.. Mal de Chagas is a disease that affects 2.5 million people in Argentina and 8 million in Latin America. Caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, it generates heart, digestive and/or nervous system problems that may lead to death. The main vector of contagion is an insect (in Argentina, called vinchuca, in Brazil, barbeiro), which nests in the walls and roofs of dilapidated huts. Chagas disease is effectively a disease of poverty, as its transmission is associated with deficient housing, insufficient material conditions and sanitation facilities, malnutrition, and lack of access to sanitary information.. Chagas is considered a neglected disease. This is due to: the lack of overt symptoms; the lack of ...
Case 1. In December 2005, a man aged 64 years with idiopathic cardiomyopathy received a heart transplant. In January 2006, he was treated with enhanced immunosuppression for suspected organ rejection. In February 2006, he was readmitted to the hospital with anorexia, fever, and diarrhea of 2 weeks duration. A peripheral blood smear revealed T. cruzi trypomastigotes, blood cultures were positive for T. cruzi, and endomyocardial biopsy specimens contained amastigotes. The patient was interviewed about natural exposures, and organ procurement and transplantation records were reviewed. He had no identifiable risk factors for T. cruzi infection (e.g., travel to a country endemic for Chagas disease). He was seronegative for T. cruzi antibodies but positive for T. cruzi DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), indicating recent infection. After initiation of nifurtimox therapy, his parasitemia rapidly cleared. However, in April 2006, the patient died from complications attributed to acute rejection of ...
Background: TSSA (Trypomastigote Small Surface Antigen) is an antigenic, adhesion molecule displayed on the surface of Trypanosoma cruzi trypomastigotes. TSSA displays substantial sequence identity to members of the TcMUC gene family, which code for the trypomastigote mucins (tGPI-mucins). In addition, TSSA bears sequence polymorphisms among parasite strains; and two TSSA variants expressed as recombinant molecules (termed TSSA-CL and TSSA-Sy) were shown to exhibit contrasting features in their host cell binding and signaling properties. Methods/Principle findings: Here we used a variety of approaches to get insights into TSSA structure/function. We show that at variance with tGPI-mucins, which rely on their extensive O-glycoslylation to achieve their protective function, TSSA seems to be displayed on the trypomastigote coat as a hypo-glycosylated molecule. This has a functional correlate, as further deletion mapping experiments and cell binding assays indicated that exposition of at least two ...
The mechanisms by which Trypanosoma cruzi causes cardiomyopathy and induces neuronal destruction are discussed in this paper. The results suggest that autoimmunity in the chronic phase is the main cause of the progressive cardiac destruction, and that autoreactivity is restricted to the CD4+ T cell compartment. During the acute phase, the neuronal and cardiac fiber destruction occurs when ruptured parasite nests release T. cruzi antigens that bind to the cell surface in the vicinity which become targets for the cellular and humoral immune response against T. cruzi. The various factors involved in the genesis of autoimmunity in chronic T. cruzi infection include molecular mimicry, presentation of self-antigens and imbalance of immune regulation ...
Title:Proteomic and Bioinformatic Analysis of Trypanosoma cruzi Chemotherapy and Potential Drug Targets: New Pieces for an Old Puzzle. VOLUME: 15 ISSUE: 3. Author(s):Rubem Figueiredo Sadok Menna-Barreto, Kele Teixeira Belloze, Jonas Perales and Floriano Paes Silva-Jr. Affiliation:Laboratorio de Bioquimica de Proteinas e Peptideos, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, FIOCRUZ, Av. Brasil 4365 - 21040-360, Manguinhos, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.. Keywords:Bioinformatics, chagas disease, chemotherapy, (chemo) proteomics, drug targets, Trypanosoma cruzi.. Abstract:Chagas disease is endemic in Latin America and is caused by the protozoan hemoflagellate parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Nowadays, it has also been disseminated to non-endemic countries due to the ease of global mobility. The nitroheterocycle benznidazole is currently used to treat this neglected tropical disease, although this drug causes severe side effects and has limited efficacy during the chronic phase of the disease. Proteomics and bioinformatics have ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Genomic variation of Trypanosoma cruzi. T2 - Involvement of multicopy genes. AU - Wagner, W.. AU - So, M.. PY - 1990/1/1. Y1 - 1990/1/1. N2 - By using improved pulsed field gel conditions, the karyotypes of several strains of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi were analyzed and compared with those of Leishmania major and two other members of the genus Trypanosoma. There was no difference in chromosome migration patterns between different life cycle stages of the T. cruzi strains analyzed. However, the sizes and numbers of chromosomal bands varied considerably among T. cruzi strains. This karyotype variation among T. cruzi strains was analyzed further at the chromosomal level by using multicopy genes as probes in Southern hybridizations. The chromosomal location of the genes encoding α- and β-tubulin, ubiquitin, rRNA, spliced leader RNA, and an 85-kilodalton protein remained stable during developmental conversion of the parasite. The sizes and numbers of chromosomes ...
The presence of lytic antibodies in the circulation of patients with chronic Chagas disease might lead to their cure. It has been shown that amastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi activate complement and accumulate large amounts of the terminal complement components, but without killing the parasites. One plausible explanation for this observation is that the insertion of the membrane attack complex of complement is prevented by inhibitors present in the parasite membrane. To explore this possibility, we raised a panel of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the surface molecules of T. cruzi amastigotes. One of these, MAb M4C12, induced complement-mediated lysis of amastigotes as detected with a 86Rb-release assay. The antigen molecule from the membrane lysate of amastigotes that was recognized by MAb M4C12 was purified, characterized, and designated M4C12Ag. It is a 92-kD molecule structurally related to Ssp4, a previously characterized amastigote surface molecule. However, M4C12Ag is more basic (pI 6.9-7.1
Chagas disease (American trypanosomiasis), a zoonosis caused by the protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi (1-3), is a typical exotic disease in that it is a major cause of morbidity and death among the poor in less developed countries but is little known among physicians in the industrialized nations where it rarely occurs. In this issue Grant and colleagues (4) and Nickerson and associates (5) describe two cases of acute Chagas disease that occurred in the United States and Canada as a result of transfusion of blood donated by asymptomatic Latin American immigrants chronically infected with T. cruzi. In view of these ...
Author: Correa-de-Santana, E. et al.; Genre: Journal Article; Published in Print: 2009; Keywords: Growth hormone; Mammosomatotrophic cells; Prolactin; Trypanosoma cruzi; Title: Modulation of Growth Hormone and Prolactin Secretion in Trypanosoma cruzi-Infected Mammosomatotrophic Cells
UZCANGA, GRACIELA; GALAN-CARIDAD, JOSÉ MANUEL; SUAREZ, KAREM NORIS y BUBIS, JOSÉ. Divalent cation hinder the solubilization of a tubulin kinase activity from Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes. Biol. Res. [online]. 2003, vol.36, n.3-4, pp.367-379. ISSN 0716-9760. http://dx.doi.org/10.4067/S0716-97602003000300008.. Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes were extracted under various conditions in order to examine the role of divalent cations in the solubilization of microtubule proteins. When epimastigotes were homogenized in the presence of 5 mM Mg+2 and 5 mM Ca+2, a protein kinase responsible for phosphorylating tubulin, as well as the tubulin that became phosphorylated, remained tightly associated with the parasite particulate and detergent-resistant fractions. On the contrary, tubulin kinase and its substrate were predominantly released into the parasite cytosolic and detergent-soluble fractions, when epimastigotes were extracted in the presence of 5 mM EDTA and 5 mM EGTA. These evidences demonstrated ...
Chagas disease is one of the most imperative health problems in Latin America. It is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi (Rassi Jr et a...
BACKGROUND: Blood transfusion is one of the most important transmission routes of Chagas disease, a major parasitic infection in Latin America. Therefore, screening for antibodies to Trypanosoma cruzi is mandatory in blood banks in South America. Most of the commercial serologic tests employ epimastigote antigens and show a high number of inconclusive and false-positive results, with high economic and social costs.STUDY DESIGN and METHODS: An ELISA using a mixture of three T. cruzi recombinant antigens, B13, 1F8, and H49 (mix-ELISA), was evaluated, first with a panel of well-characterized sera from 617 patients with Chagas disease and 277 nonchagasic individuals, living in nine countries of South and Central America. Subsequently, the mix-ELISA was evaluated with 451 samples, from an endemic area of Brazil (Goias), that were rejected from several blood banks because they presented discrepant results by two commercially available kits (indirect immunofluorescence assay, indirect ...
Feasability and suitability for field research of a whole-blood preservation method was evaluated through the screening of anti-Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies in 1209 samples under different conditions. Antibody reactivity of paired samples from preser
The intracellular protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi causes Chagass disease in humans[1]. About 5 million to 8 million people are infected by T. cruzi around the world[2]. Chagas disease has acquired global relevance because is spreading to non-endemic countries[3], representing a significant economic global burden[4]. The parasite infects many tissues and the presence of the parasite in peripheral neurons and heart muscle cells may be related to some of the pathological findings in the acute and chronic infection[5]. The systemic and tissue-localized immune responses induced during the acute infection are not sufficient to eradicate the pathogen, resulting in chronic infection[6]. Approximately 30 to 40% of the infected patients may develop megacolon, heart failure and cardiomegaly during the chronic phase of the disease, even many years after the acute infection[1]. Yet, the majority (about 60 to 70%) of the patients that progresses to the chronic phase of the infection remains clinically ...
Chagas disease is one of the most deadly parasitic diseases in the world. It affects more than 10 million people, primarily in the Americas. In South America alone it kills 50 000 people each year. A reliable and rapid diagnosis is the key in the battle against infection but until now, this has been next to impossible. Dr. Momar Ndao and his team at the Research Institute of the MUHC have developed a new diagnostic approach that will help in the fight against Chagas disease.Their results were recently published in the Journal of Clinical Microbiology. Endemic in South America, the American trypanosomiasis, or Chagas disease, is transmitted to humans via the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. The disease is usually transmitted through the bite of an infected insect or kissing bug. The symptoms are variable, but as the disease progresses serious chronic symptoms can appear, such as heart disease and malformation of the intestines. Most people affected may remain without symptoms for years, making ...
The etiologic diagnosis of Chagas disease has presented up to now a continuous and progressive development, with more and more precise, sensitive and practical procedures. Since when Carlos Chagas described Trypanosoma cruzi,and next its role as the agent of the disease he also discovered and carries his name, a large amount of research has been done with the purpose of ensuring its diagnosis.. In this meeting we will have the opportunity and the pleasure of hearing from experts, and changing experiences, on the present aspects of this diagnosis, either parasitological, biomolecular or serological. Complementing coordination on the parasitological diagnosis in this round-table, by Dr Alejandro Luquetti, I should like to introduce the presentation on serodiagnosis by Professor Eufrosina Setsu Umezawa, and following discussions, by summarizing the main aspects of the work on serodiagnosis which have been developed at the Instituto de Medicina Tropical de São Paulo.. Chagas disease serodiagnosis, ...
An estimated 8 million persons, mainly in Latin America, are infected with Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease. Existing antiparasitic drugs for Chagas disease have significant toxicities and suboptimal effectiveness, hence new therapeutic strategies need to be devised to address this neglected tropical disease. Due to the high research and development costs of bringing new chemical entities to the clinic, we and others have investigated the strategy of repurposing existing drugs for Chagas disease. Screens of FDA-approved drugs (described in this paper) have revealed a variety of chemical classes that have growth inhibitory activity against mammalian stage Trypanosoma cruzi parasites. Aside from azole antifungal drugs that have low or sub-nanomolar activity, most of the active compounds revealed in these screens have effective concentrations causing 50% inhibition (EC50s) in the low micromolar or high nanomolar range. For example, we have identified an antihistamine ...
"Parasites - American Trypanosomiasis (also known as Chagas Disease)". U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). ... "Safety Profile of Nifurtimox for Treatment of Chagas Disease in the United States". Clinical Infectious Diseases. 63 (8): 1056- ... "Tolerance and Safety of Nifurtimox in Patients with Chronic Chagas Disease". Clinical Infectious Diseases. 51 (10): e69-e75. ... In Chagas disease it is a second-line option to benznidazole. It is given by mouth. Common side effects include abdominal pain ...
"Chagas disease". World Health Organization. March 2016. Archived from the original on 27 February 2014. Retrieved 7 December ... "FDA approves first U.S. treatment for Chagas disease". U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) (Press release). 29 August 2017 ... Benznidazole is an antiparasitic medication used in the treatment of Chagas disease. While it is highly effective in early ... Benznidazole has a significant activity during the acute phase of Chagas disease, with a success rate of up to 80%. Its ...
Lalloo, David (2014). "South American trypanosomiasis (Chagas' disease)". In Beeching, Nick; Gill, Geoff (eds.). Lecture Notes: ... In South American trypanosomiasis (Chagas' disease), the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi forms pseudocysts, particularly within ... "Pancreatic Pseudocysts". Center for Pancreatic and Biliary Diseases; USC Department of Surgery. Komtong, Sanpoj; ...
His laboratory also works on a suite of neglected tropical diseases (or diseases of poverty) including Chagas disease, dengue, ... Chagas Disease Risk in Texas. PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases 4 (10): e836. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0000836. Gardner, L., ... PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases 4 (1): e585. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0000585. Illoldi-Rangel, P. Rivaldi, C. -L., Sissel, B ... Species Distribution Models and Ecological Suitability Analysis for Potential Tick Vectors of Lyme Disease in México. Journal ...
Prevention, CDC - Centers for Disease Control and. "CDC - Chagas Disease - Detailed Fact Sheet". www.cdc.gov. Retrieved 3 ... Chagas disease, can be transmitted to the nursing infant via cracked nipples. Women with hepatitis C are advised to abstain ... Because cracked nipples can result in the infant being exposed to blood, women with certain blood-borne diseases may be advised ...
... also known as Chagas Disease)". Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved 2018-07-28. CS1 maint: discouraged ... "Triatoma sanguisuga Blood Meals and Potential for Chagas Disease, Louisiana, USA". Emerging Infectious Diseases. 20 (12): 2141- ... In the United States, documented vectorborne cases of Chagas disease are rare. There have been a total of 7 cases of human ... An estimated 6 to 8 million people are currently infected with Chagas disease, primarily in South America. There are currently ...
Chagas disease) Other neurologic, systemic and metabolic diseases Also called Hirschsprung's disease, it is a congenital ... of patients affected with Chagas disease. Chagas is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, a flagellate protozoan transmitted by the ... Megacolon can be associated with Chagas disease. In Central and South America, the most common incidence of chronic megacolon ... Koeberle F (1963). "Enteromegaly and cardiomegaly in Chagas disease". Gut. 4 (4): 399-405. doi:10.1136/gut.4.4.399. PMC 1413478 ...
Among them, Malaria and Chagas disease. Under the government of Nilo Peçanha, Meriti had a timid improvement in the area of ... With this work, the rivers ceased to be mosquito breeding sites, greatly reducing the number of diseases in the region. When ... The sanitation works were abandoned, there was a delay in the conditions conducive to health and several diseases arose. ... The still and polluted waters led to the spread of disease-carrying mosquitoes. The location was rendered practically ...
This behaviour causes disease or the likelihood of disease that varies with the organism: Chagas disease in humans, dourine and ... Chagas disease undergoes two phases, which are the acute and the chronic phase. The acute phase can last from two weeks to two ... "Vector Blood Meals and Chagas Disease Transmission Potential, United States". Emerging Infectious Diseases. 18 (4): 646-649. ... Researchers of Chagas' disease have demonstrated several processes that occur with all cardiomyopathies. The first event is an ...
Chagas disease - Also known as American trypanosomiasis. Young patients, often in an acute phase of the disease, manifest ...
Chagas disease is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi. About seven to eight million people are estimated to have Chagas disease in ... TrV is a known pathogen to Triatoma infestans, the major vector of Chagas disease in Argentina which makes triatoma virus a ... antibodies in Chagas disease patients". Parasites & Vectors. 8 (1): 29. doi:10.1186/s13071-015-0632-9. ISSN 1756-3305. PMC ... cruzi and are less likely to shed the pathogen for Chagas disease. Agirre, Jon; Aloria, Kerman; Arizmendi, Jesus M.; Iloro, ...
He researched tropical diseases from 1930 to 1960 in Northern Argentina, particularly Chagas disease. His description of his ... Dias JC (1997). "[Cecílio Romaña, Romaña's sign and Chagas' disease]". Rev. Soc. Bras. Med. Trop. (in Portuguese). 30 (5): 407- ... Romaña's sign is a medical term for the unilateral painless periorbital swelling associated with the acute stage of Chagas' ... disease. Romaña's Sign should not be confused with a chagoma. ... 1935 allowed for earlier and easier diagnosis of this disease ...
Carter, YL; Juliano, JJ; Montgomery, SP; Qvarnstrom, Y (2012). "Acute chagas disease in a returning traveler". The American ... Sande/Pfizer Fellowship Award in International Diseases and the Terry Lee Award from the North Carolina Infectious Disease ... Following this, he completed his Infectious Disease Fellowship at University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC in 2008. He is ... Jonathan Juliano has led research efforts in infectious diseases and genetics, with the goal of improving our understanding of ...
February 2004). "A 9,000-year record of Chagas' disease". Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States ... Insoll T, Hutchins E (2005). "The archaeology of disease: Molluscs as potential disease indicators in Bahrain" (PDF). World ... Sandison AT (1967). "Parasitic diseases". In Brothwell DR, Sandison AT (eds.). Diseases in Antiquity. Springfield, IL: Charles ... Nozais JP (2003). "The origin and dispersion of human parasitic diseases in the old world (Africa, Europe and Madagascar)". Mem ...
Miles MA, de Souza AA, Póvoa M (1981). "Chagas' disease in the Amazon basin III. Ecotopes of ten triatomine bug species ( ... Valente VC, Valente SA, Noireau F, Carrasco HJ, Miles MA (1998). "Chagas disease in the Amazon Basin: association of ... However, currently P. geniculatus is receiving attention as a potential vector of Chagas disease (American trypanosomiasis) due ... which causes Chagas disease. The insect is described as sylvatic; subsisting primarily in humid forests, and is also known to ...
Parasites - American Trypanosomiasis (also known as Chagas Disease). United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ( ... This species and other "kissing bugs" are vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan that causes Chagas disease. This species ...
"VNI Cures Acute and Chronic Experimental Chagas Disease". The Journal of Infectious Diseases. 208 (3): 504-11. doi:10.1093/ ... VNI is an experimental drug for treating Chagas disease currently being studied at Vanderbilt University. The molecule acts by ... The efficacy of VNI provides additional compelling support for efficacious antiparasitic treatment of chronic Chagas disease, ... "VNI cures the acute and chronic forms of Chagas disease in mice, with 100% survival and no observable side effects. Low cost ...
parks, seema yasmin,scott friedman,eva (2015-11-16). "Hidden Threat: The Kissing Bug and Chagas disease". interactives. ... The Kissing Bug and Chagas Disease 2017 John S. Knight Fellow in Journalism. "Seema Yasmin". John S. Knight Journalism ... "Brit 'Disease Detective' Helps Ebola-Hit Dallas". Sky News. Retrieved 2018-11-01. "Ebola Survivors". Pulitzer Center. 2016-02- ... In 2011, Yasmin joined the Epidemic Intelligence Service as an officer at the United States Centers for Disease Control and ...
Epidemiology of Chagas disease Sudhi Ranjan Garg (2013). Rabies in Man and Animals. Springer Science & Business Media. p. 15. ... Examples of pathogens that contain a sylvatic cycle include trichinosis, dengue viruses, Yersinia pestis, Chagas disease, and ...
... discoverer of the neurogenic mechanism of the chronic phase of Chagas disease, a human parasitic disease caused by Trypanosoma ... view of the etiopathogeny of Chagas disease, characterizing it as a disease of the autonomic nervous system, which establishes ... By making good use of the extensive caseload of fatalities due to Chagas disease in the region of Ribeirão Preto and Southern ... Koeberle, F. Enteromegaly and cardiomegaly in Chagas disease. Gut. 1963 Dec;41:399-405. Rezende, J.M.: Fritz Köberle and his ...
It is effective against both first and second stage disease. Some evidence also supports its use in Chagas disease. It is taken ... McNeil, Jr., Donald (8 January 2008). "Jump-Start on Slow Trek to Treatment for a Disease". The New York Times. "CHMP Summary ... Though less effective than nifurtimox with eflornithine in severe disease, fexinidazole has the benefit that it can be taken by ... Development for sleeping sickness was funded by the Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative in collaboration with Sanofi. A ...
Centers For Disease Control And Prevention: Parasites - American Trypanosomiasis (also known as Chagas Disease). 2016-09-07. ... are blood-sucking insects that can transmit serious diseases, such as Chagas disease. Their saliva may also trigger allergic ... n., a potential Chagas disease vector (Hemiptera, Reduviidae, Triatominae)". ZooKeys. Pensoft (820): 51-70. doi:10.3897/zookeys ...
"Chagas Disease Represents New Challenge for Blood Supply Safety". Kimura A, Kitamura H, Date Y, Numano F (August 1996). " ... "MHC class I and class II genes in Mexican patients with Chagas disease". Hum. Immunol. 65 (1): 60-5. doi:10.1016/j.humimm. ... Chaga's disease is caused by a trypanosome carried by a blood sucking insect found in tropical, palm growing regions. Southern ... B*3906, common in indigenous Mesoamericans has been found associated with the same disease. Marsh, S. G.; Albert, E. D.; Bodmer ...
Many of his patients were victims of Chagas disease. Chagas disease represents a parasitic nonischemic cardiomyopathy targeting ... Chagas cardiomyopathy thus represents a unique method of study of diastolic heart failure. It may be addressed by removal of a ... and it is no longer considered a recommended treatment for the disease. The Batista procedure was invented by Brazilian ...
Chagas disease is caused by the parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. Infection with Chagas disease occurs after Rhodnius ... "Challenges of Chagas disease vector control in Central America : position paper". World Health Organization. Wigglesworth, V.B ... Rhodnius prolixus is the principal triatomine vector of the Chagas parasite due to both its sylvatic and domestic populations ... William C Marquardt et al (2004), Chapter 5: Kissing Bugs and Bedbugs the Heteroptera, Biology of Disease Vectors (2nd edition ...
... such as the transmission of Chagas disease by Triatome kissing bugs. Symbiotic bacteria in legume roots provide the plants with ... "Bacterial symbiosis and paratransgenic control of vector-borne Chagas disease". International Journal for Parasitology. 31 (5-6 ... A use for symbiotic bacteria is in paratransgenesis for controlling important vectors for disease, ...
Parasites - including: Babesiosis, Chagas disease, Leishmaniasis, Malaria, and Scrub typhus. White blood cells - due to the ... This method reduces the infectious levels of disease-causing agents that may be found in donated blood components, while still ... In this way the process prevents viruses, bacteria, parasites and white blood cells, from replicating and causing disease. UV ... a risk of disease transmission still exists. Consequently, the development of pathogen inactivation/reduction technologies for ...
Chagas disease and sleeping sickness. These three diseases are caused by related kinetoplastid parasites, which share similar ... September 2016). "Proteasome inhibition for treatment of leishmaniasis, Chagas disease and sleeping sickness". Nature. 537 ( ... GNF6702 acts as allosteric proteasome inhibitor which was effective against infection with any of the three protozoal diseases ... Proteasome inhibitor US 2015175613, Biggart A, et al., "Compounds and compositions for the treatment of parasitic diseases", ...
Chagas disease is endemic to the Santander Department and nearby areas. Other diseases such as Leishmania, rabies, Venezuelan ... Other than homicide, heart disease is the main cause of premature death, followed by strokes, respiratory diseases, road ... Tropical diseases are important issues in Colombia because they are major causes of death. Malaria affects nearly 85% of the ... Waterborne diseases such as cerebral malaria and leishmaniasis are prevalent in lowland and coastal areas. Child immunization ...
Etiologic Agent of Chagas Disease". Science. 309 (5733): 409-415. Bibcode:2005Sci...309..409E. doi:10.1126/science.1112631. ...
Chagas disease Trypanosoma cruzi armadillos, Triatominae (kissing bug) Contact of mucosae or wounds with feces of kissing bugs ... Infectious disease. Major modern diseases such as Ebola virus disease and salmonellosis are zoonoses. HIV was a zoonotic ... Many modern diseases, even epidemic diseases, started out as zoonotic diseases. It is hard to establish with certainty which ... Lists of diseasesEdit. Disease[28]. Pathogen(s) Animals involved Mode of transmission Emergence ...
"Center for Disease Control and Prevention. March 2012. Arquivado dende o orixinal o 01 de maio de 2013. Consultado o 29 de xuño ... e chagas na boca ou xenitais.[13][15] As erupcións cutáneas, que aparecen nun 20-50% dos casos, preséntanse no tronco e son de ... "Center for Disease Control and Prevention. April 2012. Arquivado dende o orixinal o 13 de outubro de 2012. Consultado o 29 de ... "Current opinion in infectious diseases 25 (1): 51-7. PMC 3266126. PMID 22156901. doi:10.1097/QCO.0b013e32834ef5ef.. ...
Chagas disease. *Cardiomyopathy *Dilated *Alcoholic. *Hypertrophic. *Tachycardia-induced. *Restrictive. *Loeffler endocarditis ...
The most notable is American trypanosomiasis, known as Chagas disease, which occurs in South America, caused by Trypanosoma ... This disease is invariably fatal unless treated but can almost always be cured with current medicines, if the disease is ... The disease can be managed by controlling the vector and thus reducing the incidence of the disease by disrupting the ... Another tactic to manage the disease is to target the disease directly using surveillance and curative or prophylactic ...
Neglected diseases. *Cholera. *Chagas disease. *African sleeping sickness. *Schistosomiasis. *Dracunculiasis. *River blindness ...
B57.) Chagas' disease. *(B58.) Toxoplasmosis. *(B59.) Pneumocystosis. *(B60.) Other protozoal diseases, not elsewhere ... B20.7) HIV disease resulting in multiple infections. *(B20.8) HIV disease resulting in other infectious and parasitic diseases ... B20.) Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) disease Resulting in infectious and parasitic diseases *(B20.0) HIV disease resulting ... B22.) Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) disease Resulting in other specified diseases *(B22.0) HIV disease resulting in ...
Neglected diseases. *Cholera. *Chagas disease. *African sleeping sickness. *Schistosomiasis. *Dracunculiasis. *River blindness ... John TJ, Rajappan K, Arjunan KK (2004). "Communicable diseases monitored by disease surveillance in Kottayam district, Kerala ... Oceans, Climate, and Health: Cholera as a Model of Infectious Diseases in a Changing Environment. Rice University: James A ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 1999. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2017-06-23. Retrieved 2017-06-30.. ...
Chagas disease. *Cardiomyopathy: Dilated (Alcoholic), Hypertrophic, and Restrictive *Loeffler endocarditis. *Cardiac ...
High blood pressure, valvular heart disease, coronary artery disease, cardiomyopathy, congenital heart disease, COPD, obesity, ... coronary artery disease, cardiomyopathy, and congenital heart disease.[5] In the developing world, valvular heart disease often ... In men, coronary disease is more frequent, while in women, high systolic blood pressure and valvular heart disease are more ... Familial AF as a monogenic disease. *Familial AF presenting in the setting of another inherited cardiac disease (hypertrophic ...
Fungal diseasesEdit. Collar rot disease is caused by the fungus Fusarium solani. It is characterized by necrotic lesions at the ... its name was flor das cinco chagas or "flower of the five wounds" to illustrate the crucifixion of Christ, with other plant ... DiseasesEdit. VirusesEdit. Passion fruit woodiness virus is one of the most well-known viruses to the passion fruit. It belongs ... "Plant Disease. 94 (6): 786. doi:10.1094/PDIS-94-6-0786C. PMID 30754330.. CS1 maint: uses authors parameter (link) ...
Life cycle of Rhodnius brethesi Matta, 1919 (Hemiptera, Reduviidae, Triatominae), a potential vector of Chagas disease in the ... This plant is also a natural habitat of the Rhodnius brethesi, which is a potential vector of Chagas disease, and it is cited ...
Neglected diseases. *Cholera. *Chagas disease. *African sleeping sickness. *Schistosomiasis. *Dracunculiasis. *River blindness ...
Chagas disease. Trypanosoma cruzi. armadillos, Triatominae (kissing bug). bite. Clamydiosis / Enzootic abortion. Chlamydophila ... Major modern diseases such as Ebola virus disease and salmonellosis are zoonoses. HIV was a zoonotic disease transmitted to ... Many modern diseases, even epidemic diseases, started out as zoonotic diseases. It is hard to establish with certainty which ... Lists of diseasesEdit. Disease[18]. Pathogen(s). Animals involved. Mode of transmission. ...
See also: Intestinal infectious diseases *^ Tropical diseases include Chagas disease, dengue fever, lymphatic filariasis, ... Sexual transmission, with the resulting disease being called sexually transmitted disease. *Oral transmission, Diseases that ... An infectious disease, also known as a transmissible disease or communicable disease, is an illness resulting from an infection ... and spread of vector-borne diseases,[60] see also globalization and disease and wildlife disease: *Encroachment on wildlife ...
၁.၀၀ ၁.၀၁ ၁.၀၂ ၁.၀၃ ၁.၀၄ ၁.၀၅ ၁.၀၆ ၁.၀၇ ၁.၀၈ ၁.၀၉ ၁.၁၀ ၁.၁၁ ၁.၁၂ ၁.၁၃ ၁.၁၄ ၁.၁၅ Chagas disease (American trypanosomiasis) Fact ... Rassi A, Jr (June 2012). "American trypanosomiasis (Chagas disease).". Infectious disease clinics of North America 26 (2): 275- ... Rassi A, Rassi A, Marin-Neto JA (April 2010). "Chagas disease". Lancet 375 (9723): 1388-402. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(10)60061-X ... November 2007). "Evaluation and treatment of chagas disease in the United States: a systematic review". JAMA 298 (18): 2171-81 ...
Parasitic diseases[edit]. *Malaria vaccine[30]. *Schistosomiasis vaccine[31]. *Chagas disease vaccine[32] ... Viral diseases[edit]. Virus. Diseases or conditions. Vaccine(s). Brands Hepatitis A virus. Hepatitis A. Hepatitis A vaccine. ... Bacterial diseases[edit]. Bacterium. Diseases or conditions. Vaccine(s). Brands Bacillus anthracis. Anthrax. Anthrax vaccines. ... "Lyme Disease Vaccine". Lyme Info. Retrieved April 24, 2013.. *^ Bagnoli, F.; Bertholet, S.; Grandi, G. (2012). "Inferring ...
Pages in category "Diseases spread by insects". The following 11 pages are in this category, out of 11 total. ... Retrieved from "https://simple.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Category:Diseases_spread_by_insects&oldid=2679077" ...
Chagas disease. Diseases caused by proteins[change , change source]. *Prions are proteins which act as infectious diseases. ... So it is important to avoid getting these diseases. Some infectious disease goes away on its own. These mild diseases do not ... Common infectious diseases[change , change source]. Diseases caused by bacteria[change , change source]. *Tuberculosis - also ... Stopping infectious disease[change , change source]. People can stop disease by: *Covering the mouth every time during coughing ...
T. brucei (African trypanosomiasis) · T. cruzi (Chagas disease). Leishmaniasis. Leishmania major/L. mexicana/L. aethiopica/L. ... Infectious diseases - Parasitic disease: protozoan infection: Excavata (A06-A07, B55-B57, 007, 085-086) ... "Principles of Infectious Disease Epidemiology /" (PDF). EPI 220. UCLA Department of Epidemiology. Retrieved 2007-06-15.. ... Abu-Raddad L, Patnaik P, Kublin J (2006). "Dual infection with HIV and malaria fuels the spread of both diseases in sub-Saharan ...
The disease cannot be cured in this phase, however. Chronic heart disease caused by Chagas disease is now a common reason for ... Chagas information at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control. *Chagas information from the Drugs for Neglected Diseases ... See also: Timeline of Chagas disease. The disease was named after the Brazilian physician and epidemiologist Carlos Chagas, who ... UNHCO site on Chagas Disease. *Chagas Disease information for travellers from IAMAT (International Association for Medical ...
American Trypanosomiasis Chagas Disease (One Hundred Years of Research). [s.l.] : Elsevier, 2017. 844 s. ISBN 978-0-12-801069-3 ...
Chagas disease. *Cardiomyopathy *Dilated *Alcoholic. *Hypertrophic. *Tachycardia-induced. *Restrictive. *Loeffler endocarditis ...
Chagas' disease, and leishmaniasis". Amino Acids 33 (2): 359-66. doi:10.1007/s00726-007-0537-9 . PMID 17610127 . ... Lourenço R, Camilo ME (2002). "Taurine: a conditionally essential amino acid in humans? An overview in health and disease". ... DOPA treatment of Parkinson's disease". Amino Acids 28 (2): 157-64. doi:10.1007/s00726-005-0162-4 . PMID 15750845 . ...
Chagas disease. *Cardiomyopathy *Dilated *Alcoholic. *Hypertrophic. *Restrictive. *Loeffler endocarditis. *Cardiac amyloidosis ...
In people without underlying heart disease and who do not have any symptoms, bigeminy in itself does not require any treatment ...
1.00 1.01 1.02 1.03 1.04 1.05 1.06 1.07 1.08 1.09 1.10 1.11 1.12 1.13 1.14 1.15 "Chagas disease (American trypanosomiasis) Fact ... Chagas disease).". Infectious disease clinics of North Americஉa 26 (2): 275-91. doi:10.1016/j.idc.2012.03.002. பப்மெட்:22632639 ... 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 Rassi A, Rassi A, Marin-Neto JA (April 2010). "Chagas disease". Lancet 375 (9723): 1388-402. doi:10.1016/ ... இரத்த ஒட்டுண்ணி நோய் (Chagas disease), அல்லது அமெரிக்கன் டிரைபநோசோமியாசிஸ் , என்பது ஒரு வெப்ப மண்டலம் சார்ந்த ஒட்டுண்ணி நோய். ...
Infectious disease. African trypanosomiasis • Ascariasis • Buruli ulcer • Cellulitis • Chagas disease • Common cold • ... Coronary artery disease • Heart failure • Mirina masûlkeyên dil • Peripheral artery disease • Pulmonary embolism • Rheumatic ... Cysticercosis • Drancunculiasis • Ebola virus disease • Zerika zer • Zerika reş • Hepatitis C • AIDS • Belweşîn • Lyme disease ... Addison's disease • Cushing's syndrome • Delirium tremens • Diabetes • DM type 1 • DM type 2 • Gestational diabetes • Graves' ...
Chagas disease and the US blood supply. Curr. Opin. Infect. Dis. 21: 476-482. CrossRef, PubMed Triatoma indictiva at the ... Chagas disease and the US blood supply. Curr. Opin. Infect. Dis. 21: 476-482. CrossRef, PubMed (WHO) World Health Organization ... Chagas disease. Lancet 375: 1388-1402. CrossRef, PubMed "ITIS Standard Report." ITIS Standard Report. N.p., 04 Nov. 2013. Web. ... T. indictiva is one of the main vectors of T. cruzi, the hemoflagellate protozoan that causes Chagas disease. T. cruzi is ...
For the parasite disease, see Chagas disease.. This article has multiple issues. Please help improve it or discuss these issues ... The Chagas are arguably one of the most economically successful people in East Africa. Unlike many societies in Africa, the ...
... Fact Sheet. What is Chagas disease?. What are the symptoms?. A disease that can cause serious heart and stomach ... How does someone get Chagas disease?. Usually from contact with a kissing bug. Why should I get tested for Chagas disease?. ... cause Chagas disease are in the bugs feces. People Chagas disease can be life threatening even though will usually scratch the ... For more information on Chagas disease, please visit www.cdc.gov/parasites/chagas and click "General Information" or call ...
Treatment for Chagas disease is recommended for people diagnosed early in the course of infection (acute phase), babies with ... Your health-care provider can talk with CDC staff about treatment options for Chagas disease. ... Article (MMWR - July 6, 2012): Congenital Transmission of Chagas Disease � Virginia, 2010 ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. CDC twenty four seven. Saving Lives, Protecting People ...
CDC website: www.cdc.gov/parasites/chagas. BIBLIOGRAPHY. *Bern C. Antitrypanosomal therapy for chronic Chagas disease. N Engl ... In the United States, Chagas disease is primarily a disease of immigrants from endemic areas of Latin America. The risk to ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. CDC twenty four seven. Saving Lives, Protecting People Centers for Disease Control ... Trypanosomiasis, American (Chagas Disease). Susan Montgomery, Sharon L. Roy, Christine Dubray. INFECTIOUS AGENT. The protozoan ...
The disease cannot be cured in this phase, however. Chronic heart disease caused by Chagas disease is now a common reason for ... Chagas information at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control. *Chagas information from the Drugs for Neglected Diseases ... See also: Timeline of Chagas disease. The disease was named after the Brazilian physician and epidemiologist Carlos Chagas, who ... UNHCO site on Chagas Disease. *Chagas Disease information for travellers from IAMAT (International Association for Medical ...
Important It is possible that the main title of the report Chagas Disease is not the name you expected. Please check the ... Chagas Disease. Important It is possible that the main title of the report Chagas Disease is not the name you expected. Please ... Chagas Disease occurs primarily in Central and South America.. Resources. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 1600 ... about 10 to 30 percent of people with Chagas Disease develop the more severe symptoms associated with "chronic" Chagas Disease ...
... is a disease caused by a parasite. It is mainly spread by kissing bugs, which are common in Latin America. It is important to ... Can Chagas disease be prevented?. There are no vaccines or medicines to prevent Chagas disease. If you travel to areas where it ... What causes Chagas disease?. Chagas disease is caused by the Trypanosoma cruzi parasite. It is usually spread by infected blood ... What is Chagas disease?. Chagas disease, or American trypanosomiasis, is an illness that can cause serious heart and stomach ...
For emergencies (for example, acute Chagas disease with severe manifestations, Chagas disease in a newborn, or Chagas disease ... The Kissing Bug Disease. Chagas disease (T. cruzi) was named after a Brazilian physician, Carlos Chagas, who first discovered ... It may not be safe to breastfeed if the mother has Chagas disease. However, Chagas disease is currently not known to be ... Chagas disease has two phases, an acute and chronic phase. Both phases can be symptom free or life threatening. ...
The disease is common in South and Central America. ... Chagas disease is an illness caused by tiny parasites and ... Chagas disease is an illness caused by tiny parasites and spread by insects. The disease is common in South and Central America ... Chagas disease is caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. It is spread by the bite of reduviid bugs, or kissing bugs, and is ... Chagas disease has two phases: acute and chronic. The acute phase may have no symptoms or very mild symptoms, including:. * ...
American trypanosomiasis Chagas disease is an important parasitic disease resulting from the infection with Trypanosoma cruzi ... In 1909, Carlos Chagas, from The Oswaldo Cruz Institute, announced the discovery of a new human disease. Chagas was the only ... Chagas disease is an important parasitic disease resulting from the infection with Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi), a ... Teixeira, A. R. L., Nascimento, R. J., & Sturm, N. R. (2006). Evolution and pathology in Chagas disease - A review. Memórias do ...
Chagas disease. American trypanosomiasis.. Kirchhoff LV1.. Author information. 1. Department of Internal Medicine, University ... Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi, is a major source of morbidity and death in Latin America ...
Drugs & Diseases , Infectious Diseases , Chagas Disease (American Trypanosomiasis) Q&A What causes Chagas disease (American ... are endemic for Chagas disease. Chagas disease is not endemic in any of the Caribbean Islands. Women who were born in Chagas ... encoded search term (What causes Chagas disease (American trypanosomiasis)?) and What causes Chagas disease (American ... American trypanosomiasis (Chagas disease)--a tropical disease now in the United States. N Engl J Med. 1993 Aug 26. 329 (9):639 ...
Drugs & Diseases , Infectious Diseases , Chagas Disease (American Trypanosomiasis) Q&A What causes Chagas disease (American ... are endemic for Chagas disease. Chagas disease is not endemic in any of the Caribbean Islands. Women who were born in Chagas ... American trypanosomiasis (Chagas disease)--a tropical disease now in the United States. N Engl J Med. 1993 Aug 26. 329 (9):639 ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Blood donor screening for chagas disease--United States, 2006-2007. MMWR Morb ...
CHAGAS DISEASE. I. Microbiology and epidemiology. *Caused by a flagellated protozoan, Trypanosoma cruzi ... As of 2012 the medications for Chagas disease are available only from CDC under investigational protocols ... Congenital disease can occur (may be asymptomatic or manifest with nonspecific signs e.g. low birth weight or prematurity; ... Peripheral blood smear may show circulating trypomastigotes but usually only in acute disease (requires special preparations, e ...
Partners set out strategy against the kissing bug disease. 3 July 2007 , Geneva - A new effort to eliminate Chagas disease by ... Chagas disease is a serious, potentially life-threatening illness caused by a protozoan parasite called T. cruzi. Early ... While Chagas disease is controlled in many countries in the Americas, commitment must be strengthened as elimination of the ... "PAHOs successes in Chagas control are a significant contribution to the global strategy to eliminate this debilitating disease ...
... Page Content. Overview. Chagas disease, a serious and potentially fatal infection, is caused by Trypanosoma ... Home , Advocacy , Regulatory Affairs , Blood Donor Screening and Testing , Chagas Disease Home , Advocacy , Regulatory Affairs ... AABB has established the Web-based Chagas Biovigilance Network to track the results of the testing (screening as well as ... More information is available by reading the Trypanosoma cruzi Fact Sheet located on the AABB Emerging Infectious Diseases web ...
... and clinical studies related to all aspects of infectious diseases. ... Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Infectious Diseases is a peer-reviewed, Open Access journal that publishes original research ... Cell Therapy in Chagas Disease. Antonio C. Campos de Carvalho,1,2,3 Regina C. S. Goldenberg,3 Linda A. Jelicks,4 Milena B. P. ... F. Kierszenbaum, "Where do we stand on the autoimmunity hypothesis of Chagas disease?" Trends in Parasitology, vol. 21, no. 11 ...
Chagas disease is caused by a parasite. It is transmitted to people through the feces of insects. It is common in South and ... Chagas Disease. Facebook Twitter Linkedin Pinterest Print. Infectious Diseases What is Chagas disease? Chagas disease is a ... Chagas disease is a disease caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi.. *Youre most at risk for Chagas disease if you have ... What causes Chagas disease? When people become infected by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, they can get Chagas disease. The ...
Chagas is a parasitic disease found almost exclusively on the American continent, though with increases in global travel cases ... What causes Chagas?. Chagas, or Trypanosoma cruzi, is a parasitic disease transmitted by an insect that lives in the walls and ... Symptoms of Chagas. Chagas disease has two stages: an acute stage, shortly after infection, and a chronic stage, developing ... Patients with Chagas disease may live for years without presenting any symptoms. If untreated, however, the disease can lead to ...
Infectious Diseases, Nephrology and Hypertension, Neurology, Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Womens Health, Oncology, Pediatrics, ... Chagas heart disease: Treatment and prognosis. Authors. J Antonio Marin-Neto, MD, PhD, FACC ...
La enfermedad de Chagas o tripanosomiasis americana es una enfermedad parasitaria sistémica causada por el protozoario ... General Information - Chagas Disease Chagas disease, or American trypanosomiasis, is a tropical parasitic disease caused by the ... There is no vaccine for the disease Chagas. Integrated vector control is the most effective method of preventing Chagas disease ... Chagas disease is the most prevalent communicable tropical disease in Latin America. The most important vectors are the ...
... but experts say the risk is still low of them spreading the disease to you. ... the parasite that causes Chagas disease.. Stigler-Granados said veterinarians are more aware of Chagas disease than medical ... "Chagas disease would not be on my worry-about list, especially compared to diseases like influenza and the measles," said ... However, as more people infected with Chagas disease move into the United States, the disease could spread, said Procop. ...
... according to a new study of Chagas disease, a parasitic infection transmitted by blood-sucking insects. Superbug blogger Maryn ... McKenna explains how Chagas has become so widespread while remaining largely unrecognized. ... Both diseases are also highly stigmatizing, a feature that for Chagas disease further complicates access to ... essential ... epidemiologists and infectious-disease specialists say thats not a hypothetical question. They argue that Chagas disease, a ...
... and Treatment Information for Chagas Disease here. Chagas Disease is a parasite disease spread to humans and animals by insects ... Chagas Disease. Chagas disease is a disease caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, which is transmitted to animals and ... Chagas disease is found only in the Americas (mainly, in rural areas of Latin America where poverty is widespread). ... Two phases occur in Chagas disease. During the first, or the acute phase, the patient may contract common symptoms such as ...
... , American Trypanosomiasis, Trypanosoma cruzi, Rowanas Sign. ... Chagas Disease, Disease, Chagas, Trypanosomiasis, South American, Disease, Chagas, Chagas Disease, CHAGAS DIS, Chagas disease ... Chagas Disease [Disease/Finding], chagas disease, infection by trypanosoma cruzi, disease chagas, south American ... chaga diseases, chagas disease, chagas diseases, South American Trypanosomiasis, Chagas disease, American trypanosomiasis, ...
Tayra, a weasel-like species, host and carry the protist parasite that causes the disease. ... Scientists have identified a new carrier of Chagas disease. ... Scientists identify new carrier of Chagas disease. Researchers ... New research found the tayra, a weasel-like predator from South America, serves as a reservoir for the Chagas-disease causing ... 19 (UPI) -- Scientists have identified a new carrier of Chagas disease. Tayra, a weasel-like species, host and carry the ...
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Chagas disease, also known as American trypanosomiasis, is caused by infection with the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. ... and Chagas Disease (American Trypanosomiasis) What to Read Next on Medscape. Related Conditions and Diseases. * Chagas Disease ... are endemic for Chagas disease. Chagas disease is not endemic in any of the Caribbean Islands. Women who were born in Chagas ... American trypanosomiasis (Chagas disease)--a tropical disease now in the United States. N Engl J Med. 1993 Aug 26. 329 (9):639 ...
TDR is profiling 5 Latin American countries that are looking at how to reduce the risks and transmission of dengue and Chagas ... disease. The research is investigating how communities and health services can work together to develop healthy solutions that ... Research to reduce the transmission of dengue and Chagas disease. Towards improved Chagas and dengue disease control through ... Chagas disease in Bolivia In Palmarito, Bolivia, a simple farming lifestyle has not changed much in hundreds of years. Water is ...
Population pharmacokinetics study of benznidazole in children with Chagas disease (pop PK Chagas). ... Chagas Disease. Fexinidazole adult dosing regimens Phase II. NCT02498782 , Bolivia Study to evaluate fexinidazole dosing ... Optimization of PCR technique to assess parasitological response for patients with chronic Chagas disease (PCR). ... Proof-of-concept study of E1224 to treat adult patients with Chagas disease.. ...
... developing an inflammatory heart condition similar to Chagas disease in humans. ... Researchers have shown that the Trypanosoma cruzi agent of Chagas disease invades host embryo cells and spreads its ... Parasite-induced genetically driven autoimmune chagas disease. PLOS. Journal. PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases. Keywords. * ... chronic Chagas disease kills many of those infected after they reach 40 years of age. The disease attacks the heart and is the ...
  • Chagas disease , also known as American trypanosomiasis , is a tropical parasitic disease caused by the protist Trypanosoma cruzi . (wikipedia.org)
  • Chagas Disease is a tropical infectious disease caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. (webmd.com)
  • Trypanosoma species (American trypanosomiasis, Chagas' disease): biology of trypanosomes. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Chagas disease is an important parasitic disease resulting from the infection with Trypanosoma cruzi ( T. cruzi ), a hemoflagellate protozoa whose vectors are triatomine insects, a type of reduviid bug known as the "barber bug. (springer.com)
  • Trypanosoma cruzi e doença de Chagas (2nd ed., pp. 201-230). (springer.com)
  • Chagas disease , also called American trypanosomiasis , infection with the flagellate protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi . (britannica.com)
  • Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi, is a major source of morbidity and death in Latin America. (nih.gov)
  • This mechanism of transmission contrasts with that of the two subspecies of African trypanosomes that cause human disease, Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense , which are transmitted via the saliva of their vectors, and with the mechanism by which the nonpathogenic trypanosome found in the Americas, Trypanosoma rangeli , is transmitted to its mammalian hosts. (medscape.com)
  • The genome sequence of Trypanosoma cruzi, etiologic agent of Chagas disease. (medscape.com)
  • Chagas disease, a serious and potentially fatal infection, is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, a blood-borne parasite. (aabb.org)
  • More information is available by reading the Trypanosoma cruzi Fact Sheet located on the AABB Emerging Infectious Diseases web page. (aabb.org)
  • When people become infected by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi , they can get Chagas disease. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • Chagas, or Trypanosoma cruzi , is a parasitic disease transmitted by an insect that lives in the walls and roofs of mud and straw housing, common in rural areas and urban slums in Latin America. (doctorswithoutborders.org)
  • Chagas disease, or American trypanosomiasi s, is a tropical parasitic disease caused by the flagellate protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi) . (paho.org)
  • Some triatomines carry in their feces a parasite called Trypanosoma cruzi, which causes Chagas disease . (healthline.com)
  • Researchers subsequently discovered that 60 to 70 percent of the triatomine bugs collected in Texas were infected with Trypanosoma cruzi , the parasite that causes Chagas disease. (healthline.com)
  • The disease originates with the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi , harbored in the guts of long-beaked Triatoma bugs such as the one above. (wired.com)
  • Chagas disease is a disease caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, which is transmitted to animals and humans through insects. (utah.gov)
  • It is primarily transmitted by insect vectors that carry the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi , the disease agent. (springer.com)
  • Animals can become infected with the disease-causing parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi , when the feces of kissing bugs enters the body through mucous membranes or skin lesions. (upi.com)
  • Researchers have shown that the Trypanosoma cruzi agent of Chagas Disease (CD) invades host embryo cells and spreads its mitochondrial DNA (kDNA) minicircles into the host's genome. (eurekalert.org)
  • 2011) Trypanosoma cruzi in the Chicken Model: Chagas-Like Heart Disease in the Absence of Parasitism. (eurekalert.org)
  • Chagas disease (American trypanosomiasis) is caused by infection with Trypanosoma cruzi , a protozoan parasite. (nature.com)
  • However, paleoparasitological data based on molecular tools showed that Trypanosoma cruzi infection and Chagas disease were commonly found both in South and North American prehistoric populations long before that time, suggesting that Chagas disease may be as old as the human presence in the American continent. (scielo.br)
  • The study of the origin and dispersion of Trypanosoma cruzi infection among prehistoric human populations may help in the comprehension of the clinical and epidemiological questions on Chagas disease that still remain unanswered. (scielo.br)
  • The Trypanosoma cruzi parasite causes American Trypanosomiasis, also known as Chagas disease, says Analía Toledano, a biochemist at the blood bank of Hospital de Clínicas José de San Martín, a teaching hospital operated by Universidad de Buenos Aires. (upi.com)
  • This paper reviews the evidence supporting the use of etiological treatment for Chagas disease that has changed the standard of care for patients with Trypanosoma cruzi infection in the last decades. (hindawi.com)
  • One hundred years after Carlos Chagas identified and described the Trypanosoma cruzi ( T. cruzi) infection, there are still millions of infected people and thousands of newly diagnosed cases each year with Chagas disease (CD). (hindawi.com)
  • Chagas disease is caused by a parasite called Trypanosoma cruzi, which is mostly found in Latin America and, occasionally, in southern parts of the United States. (news-medical.net)
  • The Chagas parasite is a protist called Trypanosoma cruzi , which has infected approximately 300,000 people in the U.S. Researchers have estimated that it costs the nation approximately $800 million each year in lost work time and medical bills. (speroforum.com)
  • Sometimes called American, or South American, trypanosomiasis, Chagas is an infection with the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi . (theconversation.com)
  • Chagas disease is spread by triatomines infected with Trypanosoma cruzi, a parasite that lives in the bug's digestive system. (mercola.com)
  • The parasite responsible for the disease, Trypanosoma cruzi, lives in the bug's digestive system, and researchers have found between 50 3 and 64 percent 4 of triatomines tested are infected with this parasite. (mercola.com)
  • Disturbingly, a 2014 study revealed 1 in 6,500 blood donors tested positive for Trypanosoma cruzi, the parasite responsible for Chagas. (mercola.com)
  • In April 2010, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved two screening tests to screen blood, tissue and organ donations for the presence of Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies 11 to prevent the spread of the disease. (mercola.com)
  • Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, continues to make inroads in the United States and physicians are both unprepared to diagnose and under equipped to treat cases of the disease in their patients. (discovermagazine.com)
  • His laboratory group has an active research program on parasitic diseases with a research focus on Toxoplasma gondii, the Microsporidia and Trypanosoma cruzi. (foyles.co.uk)
  • Trypanosoma cruzi is an intracellular protozoan parasite that causes Chagas disease. (genome.jp)
  • Chagas disease is endemic in Latin America where Trypanosoma cruzi infects about 7.5 million people. (redorbit.com)
  • A new antigen preparation useful in immunoprecipitin diagnostic testing for Chagas' disease is prepared by growing Trypanosoma cruzi in tissue culture to form essentially only the trypomastigote and amastigote growth stages, and releasing and purifying water soluble antigen therefrom. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • The American Trypanosoma cruzi causes Chagas' disease which is endemic in several countries of Central and South America, especially Mexico, Brazil, Chile, Argentina and Venezuela, as well as in parts of the southern United States. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • Authors: Bonney KM, Luthringer DJ, Kim SA, Garg NJ, Engman DM Abstract Chagas heart disease is an inflammatory cardiomyopathy that develops in approximately one-third of people infected with the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. (medworm.com)
  • Abstract The infection with the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi causes Chagas disease, a neglected tropical disease in Latin America and an imported emerging disease worldwide. (medworm.com)
  • It has been estimated that around 20 million people are infected and over 40 million individuals are facing the risk of infection by the hemoflagellates protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi , the responsible agent of Chagas' disease. (intechopen.com)
  • This book contains 11 chapters of significant and updated materials on what we know and what we lack and need in better understanding of Trypanosoma cruzi - a parasite that never dies - and the consequences of Chagas disease as one of the most important neglected parasitic diseases threatening the global health and wellbeing. (intechopen.com)
  • Chagas disease, caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi , has been associated with eight donors reported to the OPTN from 2008 through 2014. (unos.org)
  • Existing as an acute or chronic disease American Trypanosomiasis or Chagas' disease is caused by the hemoflagellate protozoa, Trypanosoma cruzi. (hpathy.com)
  • The parasite responsible for Chagas disease - Trypanosoma cruzi - is mainly transmitted through the bite of a bloodsucking insect known as the "vinchuca", which lives in crevices in the mud walls of houses in poor rural areas, where there is limited access to health services. (ipsnews.net)
  • The optimal time to diagnose Chagas disease is during the acute phase of the illness, when the chance of eradicating the Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi) infection with antitrypanosomal drugs is the highest. (verywellhealth.com)
  • Chagas disease is caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi , which is transmitted to animals and humans by members of the assassin bug subfamily called kissing bugs that feed on blood and are named for their tendency to bite people around the mouth. (news-medical.net)
  • The symptoms of Chagas disease , an infection caused by a protozoan parasite called Trypanosoma cruzi ( T. cruzi), resemble those of the flu-at least at first. (verywellhealth.com)
  • The disease is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi , which is spread to dogs through insects in the Reduviidae family, also commonly known as cone-nose or kissing bugs. (moderndogmagazine.com)
  • Chagas disease is caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi , which is transmitted to animals and people by insect vectors known as kissing bugs, or by blood transfusion, organ transplantation, tainted foods and juices, or congenitally. (utep.edu)
  • A study of aggregate data collected from the literature and official sources was undertaken to estimate expected and observed prevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi infection, annual incidence of congenital transmission and rate of underdiagnosis of Chagas disease among Latin American migrants in the nine European countries with the highest prevalence of Chagas disease. (eurosurveillance.org)
  • Chagas disease is caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi transmitted by triatomine vectors of the subfamily Reduviidae. (renalandurologynews.com)
  • The parasite Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi), which causes Chagas disease can be transmitted to humans by blood-sucking insects known as 'assassin bugs' or 'kissing bugs. (infectioncontroltoday.com)
  • Chagas disease is a zoonotic infection caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, which affects an estimated 8 -11 million people globally. (medworm.com)
  • Chagas disease caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi is endemic in 21 Latin American countries and the southern United States and now is spreading into several other countries due to migration. (medworm.com)
  • A series of trifluoromethylated pyrazole thiosemicarbazone, trifluromethylated pyrazole isothiosemicarbazone, and trifluoromethylated pyrazole 2-amino-1,3,4-thiadiazole hybrids were synthesized and evaluated in vitro against the promastigote form of Leishmania amazonensis and the epimastigote form of Trypanosoma cruzi, the pathogens causing the neglected tropical diseases leishmaniasis and Chagas disease, respectively. (medworm.com)
  • Chagas disease or American Trypanosomiasis is a vector-borne anthropozoonosis caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. (marketresearch.com)
  • Diagram showing the life cycle of the flagellate protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the cause of Chagas disease. (sciencephoto.com)
  • What causes Chagas disease? (medlineplus.gov)
  • The parasite that causes Chagas disease is called T. cruzi and is mainly transmitted by large blood-sucking insects, sometimes known as 'kissing bugs', that often colonize the homes of poorer rural communities in Latin America. (who.int)
  • If the protein is required for survival of a species, inhibiting that protein could be a potential mechanism of action for a drug with activity against the parasite that causes Chagas disease. (eurekalert.org)
  • Studies of these same bugs show that they not only carry the parasite that causes Chagas disease, but also that they are coming into uncomfortably close contact with humans, with genetic studies indicating bloody feasts of human origin. (discovermagazine.com)
  • From now on, hope of an early cure for infection with the parasite that causes Chagas disease is a wonderful reality," said Dr Mirta Roses Periago, head of the Pan American Health Organisation (PAHO). (ipsnews.net)
  • Solitary weasel-like animals called tayra might look pretty harmless, but some may actually be incubators for a parasite that causes Chagas disease, a chronic, debilitating condition that is spread by insects called kissing bugs and affects more than 8 million people worldwide. (news-medical.net)
  • But while the number of bugs hosting the single-cell parasite that causes Chagas disease is much higher in the southern Arizona city than earlier thought, no human infections have been traced to bites that occurred in the state. (azfamily.com)
  • A deadly parasite that causes Chagas disease is widespread in a common Texas insect, according to a new study by University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) researchers. (infectioncontroltoday.com)
  • Treatment for Chagas disease is recommended for people diagnosed early in the course of infection (acute phase), babies with congenital infection, and for those with suppressed immune systems. (cdc.gov)
  • An acute Chagas disease infection with swelling of the right eye (Romaña's sign). (wikipedia.org)
  • The human disease occurs in two stages: an acute stage, which occurs shortly after an initial infection , and a chronic stage that develops over many years. (wikipedia.org)
  • Rarely, young children, or adults may die from the acute disease due to severe inflammation/infection of the heart muscle ( myocarditis ) or brain ( meningoencephalitis ). (wikipedia.org)
  • However, you could get the disease if you receive blood, or an organ from a family member or anyone else with the infection. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • Chagas disease has two stages: an acute stage, shortly after infection, and a chronic stage, developing over many years. (doctorswithoutborders.org)
  • In the acute stage-the first few weeks after infection-only mild symptoms appear and they are common symptoms of many other diseases. (doctorswithoutborders.org)
  • Treatment must occur in the acute stage of the infection, and because people who have been treated can easily be re-infected, treatment is more effective in areas with active vector control (the vector in this case being the insect that transmits the disease). (doctorswithoutborders.org)
  • Experts stress, however, that the risk of Chagas infection remains low. (healthline.com)
  • It's no longer a hypothetical question, according to a new study of Chagas disease, a parasitic infection transmitted by blood-sucking insects. (wired.com)
  • They argue that Chagas disease, a parasitic infection transmitted by blood-sucking insects, has become so widespread and serious -- while remaining largely unrecognized -- that it deserves to be considered a public health emergency. (wired.com)
  • Voila, Chagas infection. (wired.com)
  • Up to 45% of people with chronic infection develop heart disease 10-30 years after the initial illness, which can lead to heart failure. (wikipedia.org)
  • The CDC also strongly recommends treatment for adults aged 50 years or younger with chronic infection who do not already have advanced Chagas cardiomyopathy. (medscape.com)
  • These led to a reduction in mortality rate during the acute phase of the disease, showing that it is possible to protect them partially against such infection. (innovations-report.com)
  • The results of this work as a whole demonstrate that this protein secreted by T. cruzi plays a key role in the development of the infection and the pathological manifestations of Chagas disease. (innovations-report.com)
  • Chagas Disease, also known as American Trypanosomiasis, is a protozoan infection transmitted by the Triatoma insect (known as 'vinchuca' in Spanish or 'barbeiro' in Portuguese) which bites humans most commonly on the face at night. (iamat.org)
  • For most people, however, Chagas Disease is a silent infection showing up many years later often mimicking chronic heart conditions or as gastro-intestinal complications. (iamat.org)
  • This insect-born infection can also be transmitted from mother to child and via blood transfusion, and while acute infections are usually acquired in infancy or childhood, chronic Chagas disease kills many of those infected after they reach 40 years of age. (eurekalert.org)
  • While the treatment of Chagas disease with anti-trypanosomal nitroderivatives curtails the parasitic infection, it does not abrogate the destructive heart lesions which can lead to death. (eurekalert.org)
  • Now, Dr Teixeira's research team describes the origin of the autoimmune rejection of the target heart cells in Chagas disease: "This chicken model was necessary to eliminate any residual active infection, because the birds are resistant to T. cruzi infection upon hatching. (eurekalert.org)
  • The long-term impact of oral transmission on infection dynamics and disease pathogenesis is unclear. (nature.com)
  • Current treatments are largely effective in the first phase (acute) of the infection but have significantly diminished efficacy in the subsequent phase (chronic) of Chagas disease. (eurekalert.org)
  • In this regard, etiological treatment has shown to be beneficial as an intervention for secondary prevention to successfully cure the infection or to delay, reduce, or prevent the progression to disease, and as primary disease prevention by breaking the chain of transmission. (hindawi.com)
  • The study reports on a family case of transmissions from mother to unborn children, raising questions over prevention and diagnosis of Chagas disease in Canada, where thousands of individuals live with potentially undetected infection. (news-medical.net)
  • Those infected by Chagas may be unaware of their infection since they may show no symptoms. (speroforum.com)
  • There are no drugs to cure a chronic condition of Chagas , but only to treat end-stage infection. (speroforum.com)
  • Chagas is a parasitic infection that is endemic in 21 countries in Central and South America and affects an estimated 6-7 million people worldwide. (theconversation.com)
  • This increase represents an opportunity for the medical community to learn about this disease and find ways to help patients who are infected and to thwart the risks of potential infection of others. (theconversation.com)
  • Maldonado hypothesizes that Chagas infection is probably underestimated in the U.S., as it's not well tracked and most doctors probably don't think to consider Chagas as a cause of related symptoms. (scienceblogs.com)
  • Chagas infection is contracted through a bite from a triatomine, a nocturnal insect that crawls around on your face while you're sleeping. (mercola.com)
  • THURSDAY, Aug. 31, 2017 -- Benznidazole has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat the tropical parasitic infection Chagas disease, in children aged 2 to 12. (drugs.com)
  • Chagas disease begins as an acute infection that can subside on its own. (disabled-world.com)
  • The dynamics of the disease are changing , however, and strong evidence continues to emerge indicating that local infection is occurring among the American population, particularly in the southern states. (discovermagazine.com)
  • According to the latest research presented this month at the annual gathering of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene , rates of Chagas infection among Americans are on the rise and are presenting a growing yet unappreciated public health threat to the United States. (discovermagazine.com)
  • This thematic volume provides authoritative, up-to-date reviews addressing recent advances as well as an overview for the research and clinical communities on the endemic infection of Chagas disease. (foyles.co.uk)
  • Chagas' disease cause cardiac and gastrointestinal tract autonomic de-efferentation years after primary infection. (hpathy.com)
  • Early myocarditis, meningoencephalitis or reactivated Chagas' disease suggests concurrent HIV infection. (hpathy.com)
  • Chronic Chagas' disease develops years or decades after initial infection with clinical features suggesting involvement of heart, gastrointestinal tract, and nervous systems. (hpathy.com)
  • RIO DE JANEIRO, Dec 8 2011 (IPS) - A new paediatric formulation developed in Brazil holds out hope for a cure for over 90 percent of newborn babies infected with Chagas disease, a parasitic infection endemic in 21 Latin American countries, where it kills more people every year than malaria. (ipsnews.net)
  • According to Ribeiro, in spite of the success of prevention policies in countries like Argentina and Brazil , Chagas disease infects between eight and 10 million people, mainly in Latin America, and kills 12,000 people a year, principally from heart problems caused by the infection, making it the principal cause of parasite-induced deaths in the Americas. (ipsnews.net)
  • The symptoms associated with acute Chagas disease-such as weakness, fever, sore throat, rash, and muscle pains-can be easily confused with those of other illnesses,   such as symptoms of infectious mononucleosis , or of acute HIV infection . (verywellhealth.com)
  • So when a person living in an area endemic for Chagas disease is being tested for either of these conditions, it is usually a good idea to test for T. cruzi infection as well. (verywellhealth.com)
  • Diagnosing chronic Chagas disease usually relies on detecting antibodies made by the body to fight off the infection. (verywellhealth.com)
  • An estimated 40,000 reproductive-age women living in the United States have chronic Chagas disease, and most are not aware of the infection. (springer.com)
  • One to 5% of mothers with chronic Chagas disease transmit infection to their newborns. (springer.com)
  • Once the acute phase of Chagas disease resolves (usually within 12 weeks of the initial infection), people infected with T. cruzi enter the chronic phase of the disease. (verywellhealth.com)
  • Virtually everyone infected with T. cruzi who is not treated during the acute phase of the infection will enter the indeterminate form of the disease for many years-at least 10 to 30 years. (verywellhealth.com)
  • Chagas' disease is a parasitic infection that has far reaching consequences for public health and national economies in Latin America. (bmj.com)
  • In terms of public health and economic impact, American trypanosomiasis (Chagas' disease) is the most important parasitic infection in Latin America. (bmj.com)
  • The critical element in controlling congenital Chagas disease, beyond reducing the prevalence of chronic T cruzi infection in women of childbearing age, is the thorough parasitologic and serologic evaluation of babies born to mothers with T cruzi infection. (medscape.com)
  • The overall prognosis among persons in the indeterminate phase of T cruzi infection is good, given that only 10-30% of infected persons ever develop signs and symptoms attributable to the disease, and those who do are generally asymptomatic for decades prior to developing cardiac or gastrointestinal problems. (medscape.com)
  • One of the main contributors to stroke incidence is the highly prevalent Chagas disease, a parasitic infection affecting an estimated 18 million individuals and a major cause of heart failure in Latin America. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • It also is known to be carried by kissing bugs in the southern U.S., although the disease is rare here, with only seven cases of locally acquired infection identified. (azfamily.com)
  • [2] Chronic disease is diagnosed by finding antibodies for T. cruzi in the blood. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chagas disease ( T. cruzi ) was named after a Brazilian physician, Carlos Chagas, who first discovered the disease (1909). (google.com)
  • Chagas disease is a serious, potentially life-threatening illness caused by a protozoan parasite called T. cruzi . (who.int)
  • C. Chagas, "Nova tripanosomíase humana: estudos sobre a morfologia e o ciclo evolutivo do Schizotrypanum cruzi n. gen., n.sp. (hindawi.com)
  • These triatomine bugs can also infect domesticated animals such as dogs and cat, and bring the T. cruzi (agent of the disease) inside human dwellings. (paho.org)
  • The CDC recommends antiparasitic treatment for all cases of acute (ie, congenital) or reactivated Chagas disease and for chronic T cruzi in children up to age 18 years. (medscape.com)
  • In Chagas disease, during its life-cycle in humans T. cruzi takes on two forms, an infective flagellate one (trypomastigote) which circulates and reproduces in the blood and another intracellular one without flagellum (amastigote), which in its turn multiplies to produce another batch of circulating forms. (innovations-report.com)
  • Although routine serologic testing of organ and blood donors is performed in areas of Latin America where Chagas disease is endemic, no T. cruzi screening test is licensed in the United States. (nih.gov)
  • The goal of etiological treatment against Chagas disease is to eliminate the parasite ( T. cruzi ) from the infected individual, to decrease the probability of developing clinical manifestations of the disease (e.g., cardiovascular or digestive diseases), and to break the chain of disease transmission [ 3 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • We reviewed the evidence supporting the use of anti- T. cruzi pharmacotherapy (etiological treatment) in order to reduce or avoid the morbidity and mortality of Chagas disease applied on different levels of prevention. (hindawi.com)
  • People in poor rural regions in Central and South America are particularly at risk for acquiring Chagas disease, especially if they live in substandard housing which allows entrance of the insects that carry T. cruzi . (theconversation.com)
  • One of our most significant findings is the importance of dogs in both the spread of the disease, and the potential to help control it," he says, explaining that dogs can make good sentinels for health officials monitoring T. cruzi transmission. (disabled-world.com)
  • Most recently, a study this year found that many canines in shelters carry T. cruzi , serving as a reservoir that brings the disease into even closer contact with humans. (discovermagazine.com)
  • On the other hand, there has been an exponential increase in the acute cases of Chagas disease in that region through oral transmission of T. cruzi , causing outbreaks of the disease. (nih.gov)
  • The epidemiology of T. cruzi and Chagas heart disease and the varied mechanisms leading to myocyte destruction, mononuclear cell infiltration, fibrosis, and edema in the heart have been extensively studied by hundreds of scientists for more than 100 years. (medworm.com)
  • Transplacental transmission of T. cruzi results in congenital Chagas' diseases with premature birth and developmental delay in the survivors. (hpathy.com)
  • During the acute phase of Chagas disease, the number of T. cruzi parasites in the bloodstream is usually quite high. (verywellhealth.com)
  • In chronic Chagas disease, the T. cruzi organism is usually no longer present in the bloodstream, so microscopic testing of a blood sample is almost always negative, as is the PCR test. (verywellhealth.com)
  • Up to 10 percent of babies born to mothers infected with T. cruzi will develop acute Chagas disease-a condition called congenital Chagas disease. (verywellhealth.com)
  • According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, kissing bugs become infected with T. cruzi by biting an infected animal or person and, once infected, they pass T. cruzi parasites in their feces. (news-medical.net)
  • When the acute phase of the disease resolves, however, the T. cruzi parasite can persist in the body for many years, even in people who appear entirely healthy. (verywellhealth.com)
  • Unless a person with acute-phase Chagas disease has received successful treatment with antitrypanosomal drugs, the T. cruzi parasite usually persists in the body for the life of the patient. (verywellhealth.com)
  • Up to 70 percent of people infected with T. cruzi will remain in this indeterminate form of Chagas disease for the rest of their lives, without ever developing any more symptoms. (verywellhealth.com)
  • After a decade or more of living with the indeterminate form of Chagas disease, up to 30 percent of people infected with T. cruzi will eventually manifest one of the "determinate forms" of the disease. (verywellhealth.com)
  • Lately, Chagas disease has shown exponential growth because European and African colonizers dwelling in huts infested by triatomines contaminated with T. cruzi were promptly infected. (eurekaselect.com)
  • Maldonado hopes her work brings more awareness to the often overlooked disease, which she calls an emerging infectious disease in the U.S. The biologist is currently investigating the prevalence of T. cruzi in kissing bugs, street dogs and cats found in El Paso, Texas, an urban city on the U.S.-Mexico border with more than 675,000 residents. (infectioncontroltoday.com)
  • [12] The disease was first described in 1909 by the Brazilian physician Carlos Chagas , after whom it is named. (wikipedia.org)
  • The name was a tribute to its discoverer, the Brazilian medical doctor, scientist, and researcher Carlos Chagas (1879-1934). (springer.com)
  • In 1909, Carlos Chagas, from The Oswaldo Cruz Institute, announced the discovery of a new human disease. (springer.com)
  • It is named for Carlos Chagas, the Brazilian doctor who first identified the disease in 1909. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • The disease - named after Carlos Chagas, a Brazilian doctor who first discovered it in the early 20th century - is caused by a parasite known as a trypanosome. (thestar.com)
  • The disease, the vector, and its clinical features were first described by the Brazilian physician Carlos Chagas (Figure 3). (renalandurologynews.com)
  • Carlos Chagas and a triatomine insect, vector of Chagas disease. (renalandurologynews.com)
  • Chagas disease, or American trypanosomiasis, is an illness that can cause serious heart and stomach problems. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Chagas disease - or American trypanosomiasis - is a parasitic illness which affects nearly 20 million people mainly in tropical regions of Central and South America. (innovations-report.com)
  • Treatment for Chagas , officially known as American trypanosomiasis, involves taking the drug Benznidazole for three months. (thestar.com)
  • American trypanosomiasis, also known as Chagas disease, is caused by a parasite. (cdc.gov)
  • Chagas' disease, or South American trypanosomiasis, is an endemic South American disease now being seen in Canada in both acute and chronic forms. (cmaj.ca)
  • The disease is American Trypanosomiasis, more commonly known as Chagas disease. (scienceblogs.com)
  • Chagas' disease or American trypanosomiasis is among the most prevalent parasitic diseases worldwide [ 1 , 2 , 3 ]. (intechopen.com)
  • The Chagas Disease (Infectious Disease) pipeline guide also reviews of key players involved in therapeutic development for Chagas Disease (American Trypanosomiasis) and features dormant and discontinued projects. (marketresearch.com)
  • In the United States and in other regions where Chagas disease is now found, control strategies are focusing on preventing transmission from blood transfusion, organ transplantation, and mother-to-baby (congenital transmission). (google.com)
  • Much remains to be done, however, to reduce the risk of transmission to recipients of blood or blood products obtained from migrants from Chagas endemic areas, and to ensure screening and diagnosis of congenital Chagas disease," said Dr Mirta Roses, Director of the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) and Regional Director of the WHO Americas Region. (who.int)
  • This book offers a comprehensive overview of Chagas disease, including its vectorial and congenital transmission, and molecular diagnosis, which is essential for screening, and developing and providing timely, effective anti-trypanosomal treatment. (springer.com)
  • Written by experts working with infected patients on a daily basis, it discusses the pathogenesis of congenital, cardiac, gastrointestinal and oral Chagas disease, as well as its treatment and the pharmacological aspects of drug development in this area. (springer.com)
  • It is important for a baby with congenital Chagas disease to be treated with antitrypanosomal therapy to prevent chronic complications. (verywellhealth.com)
  • The possibility of congenital Chagas disease should be considered in any newborn whose mother is from an area where the disease is endemic. (verywellhealth.com)
  • Ten to 40% of newborn infants with congenital Chagas disease have clinical signs at birth, but there are no features unique to or highly suggestive of Chagas disease. (springer.com)
  • Molecular testing is the most sensitive approach for establishing the diagnosis of congenital Chagas disease in the first 2 months of life. (springer.com)
  • Treatment of congenital Chagas disease is well tolerated in young infants and usually results in cure. (springer.com)
  • Oliveira I, Torrico F, Muñoz J, Gascon J. Congenital transmission of Chagas disease: a clinical approach. (springer.com)
  • Freilij H, Altcheh J. Congenital Chagas' disease: Diagnostic and clinical aspects. (springer.com)
  • Diagnosis and treatment of congenital Chagas disease in a premature infant. (springer.com)
  • An estimated 20 to 183 babies with congenital Chagas disease are born annually in the study countries. (eurosurveillance.org)
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (cdc.gov)
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) cannot attest to the accuracy of a non-federal website. (cdc.gov)
  • Saving Lives, Protecting People Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (cdc.gov)
  • A recent report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) casts new attention on the kissing bugs . (healthline.com)
  • According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the number of chikungunya cases among travelers visiting or returning to the United States from affected areas in the Caribbean and Latin American will probably increase. (speroforum.com)
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention considers it one of five neglected parasitic infections in need of targeted public health action. (scienceblogs.com)
  • According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), an estimated 300,000 Americans have Chagas disease, 5 including 40,000 pregnant women, 6 and prevalence is believed to be on the rise. (mercola.com)
  • The findings and conclusions in this report are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention of the Department of Health and Human Services. (springer.com)
  • This publication was supported by Cooperative Agreement Number 5NU2GGH001649-03, funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (springer.com)
  • An estimated 8 million to 11 million people in Central and South America and Mexico are infected, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (amren.com)
  • She co-authored the study, which is to be published in the March edition of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention journal Emerging Infectious Diseases. (azfamily.com)
  • It is estimated that 6.6 million people, mostly in Mexico , Central America and South America , have Chagas disease as of 2015. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is estimated that as many as 8 million people in Mexico, Central America, and South America have Chagas disease, with most not knowing they are infected. (google.com)
  • The disease is common in South and Central America. (medlineplus.gov)
  • The incidence of Chagas' disease in the United States has increased since the 1970s, possibly because of increased immigration from Mexico and Central America, where the incidence is very high. (factmonster.com)
  • Experts believe that as many as 11 million people in South and Central America and Mexico have the disease. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • Both triatomines and Chagas disease are more common in Mexico, Central America, and South America than in the United States. (healthline.com)
  • Chagas Disease is transmitted by the Triatoma insect in rural and suburban areas of Mexico, Central America, South America, and the southern United States. (iamat.org)
  • Chagas disease is spread by triatomine bugs in parts of Mexico, Central America, and South America, especially rural areas. (cdc.gov)
  • Chagas disease is endemic in parts of Latin America, Central America and in Mexico. (scienceblogs.com)
  • In South and Central America - where Chagas disease is most prevalent - an estimated 12 million people are infected, 10 and while it is not transmissible via person-to-person contact, you can contract it via blood transfusion, organ transplantation and/or eating food in which the insect has defecated. (mercola.com)
  • Chagas is transmitted primarily by bloodsucking triatomine insects, known as chinches in Central America and vinchucas in South American countries. (pharmpro.com)
  • The insect vectors known to carry Chagas are called triatomine bugs. (google.com)
  • Insect control with insecticides and houses that are less likely to have high insect populations will help control the spread of the disease. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Chagas disease occurs in two stages: an acute stage, which develops one to two weeks after the insect bite, and a chronic stage, which develops over many years. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chagas disease, which is caused by parasites transmitted to humans by a tiny insect called the "kissing bug", is "the New HIV/AIDS of the Americas", according to a leading expert in tropical diseases. (thestar.com)
  • Whereas residents of rural areas, where the insect that carries the parasite lives, consider Chagas disease to be normal, those infected in urban areas face stigma because of the disease's association with poverty. (upi.com)
  • An insect sometimes known as the kissing bug, or Rhodnius prolixus , transmits the Chagas parasite when it bites someone's face or lips, especially while victims are sleeping, and leaves behind its fecal matter. (speroforum.com)
  • It's called Chagas' disease, and it's transmitted by the so-called kissing bug, a bloodsucking insect that bites your face and lips. (nhpr.org)
  • While Chagas is not transmissible via person-to-person contact, you can contract it via blood transfusion, organ transplantation and/or eating food in which the insect has defecated. (mercola.com)
  • Stages of the triatomine insect or "kissing bug," the vector of Chagas disease. (discovermagazine.com)
  • The first systematic study of surveillance techniques for the insect vector of Chagas disease in Amazonia, conducted by researchers from the Fiocruz Instituto Leà ´nidas e Maria Deane, the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and colleagues, concludes that tall palm trees with large amounts of debris on their crowns and stems should be targets for disease surveillance and control. (redorbit.com)
  • The insect vectors of Chagas disease, triatomine bugs, usually infest low quality housing in rural and peri-urban areas. (redorbit.com)
  • People who live in endemic areas should pay attention to potential symptoms of acute Chagas disease , especially if they have noticed insect bites that are particularly prominent or long-lasting, or if they are aware of an outbreak of Chagas disease in their area. (verywellhealth.com)
  • Chagas disease is transmitted to people by the bite of an insect called the triatomine bug. (verywellhealth.com)
  • She also added that dogs can contract the disease without coming into contact with an insect. (moderndogmagazine.com)
  • Insect control is a major key in managing the disease since no vaccine currently exists. (moderndogmagazine.com)
  • For Chagas, the insect is a winged, blood-sucking creature commonly called a conenose, or kissing bug, because it feeds at night, often on uncovered faces. (amren.com)
  • The finding that only 45 children tested positive, coupled with the entomological findings, led the international commission to declare the interruption of insect transmission of Chagas. (pharmpro.com)
  • clinical signs include conduction system abnormalities, ventricular arrhythmias, and in late-stage disease, congestive cardiomyopathy. (cdc.gov)
  • As the disease progresses, the heart's ventricles become enlarged (dilated cardiomyopathy), which reduces its ability to pump blood. (wikipedia.org)
  • The disease can cause fatal heart disease - including cardiomyopathy and arrhythmias - as well as damage to the intestines and esophagus. (thestar.com)
  • Ventricular arrhythmias are important manifestations of Chagas cardiomyopathy. (scielo.br)
  • Curcumin exerts anti-inflammatory and vasoprotective effects in mice with acute Chagas cardiomyopathy. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • Chagas heart disease is a form of dilated cardiomyopathy , in which the heart enlarges to try to compensate for the weakness of the heart muscle. (verywellhealth.com)
  • The aim of this study was to compare the indications for pacemaker implantation, intraoperative measurements, and long-term follow-up of patients with Chagas' cardiomyopathy (ChCM) and ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM) referred for pacemaker implantation. (wiley.com)
  • Adults, young and old, who develop a secondary cardiomyopathy from Chagas are therefore at higher risk of cardioembolism and neurodegeneration. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Chronic Chagas disease should be suspected in any patient with a history of potential exposure such as living or traveling to endemic areas and who presents with manifestations such as idiopathic cardiomyopathy, arrhythmias, esophageal dysmotility, or megacolon. (renalandurologynews.com)
  • The overall risk of mother to fetus transmission of Chagas disease is only about 6 per cent but when the mother has a high number of parasites in her blood during pregnancy the risk of transmission has been described as high as 30 per cent,' explains Dr. Plourde. (news-medical.net)
  • The research is important because, despite its prevalence, relatively little is known about the transmission of Chagas disease, a deadly, incurable condition that is most common in Latin America. (news-medical.net)
  • Washington, D.C., May 17, 2011 (PAHO) - An international commission says that transmission of Chagas' disease by insects has been halted in Bolivia's most populous department, La Paz, marking an important milestone in the country's and Latin America's battle against this potentially lethal parasitic disease. (pharmpro.com)
  • PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, 6 (5), e1644. (springer.com)
  • In the latest issue of* PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases* , a distinguished group of virologists, epidemiologists and infectious-disease specialists say that's not a hypothetical question. (wired.com)
  • The results, published in the open-access journal PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases on March 29th, show that kDNA-mutated chickens undergo genotype alterations, developing an inflammatory heart condition similar to Chagas disease in humans. (eurekalert.org)
  • This press release refers to an upcoming article in PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases . (eurekalert.org)
  • In an editorial in the PloS Neglected Tropical Diseases journal, Dr. Peter Hotez warns of the serious consequences of the disease which is already widespread amongst the poor and indigenous groups in Latin America and parts of the United States, specifically Texas and the Gulf coast. (thestar.com)
  • PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases is the top Open Access tropical medicine journal, featuring an International Editorial Board and increased support for developing country authors. (plos.org)
  • There are no vaccines or medicines to prevent Chagas disease. (medlineplus.gov)
  • One of the most effective ways to prevent Chagas Disease is to sleep under a permethrin-treated bed net. (iamat.org)
  • What can travelers do to prevent Chagas disease? (cdc.gov)
  • There is no vaccine or medicine to prevent Chagas disease. (cdc.gov)
  • This project led to positive changes in the community, in terms of both culture and behavior, thus increasing the ability to prevent Chagas disease. (paho.org)
  • Dr. Pierre Plourde, Medical Officer of Health and Medical Director of Travel Health and Tropical Medicine Services with the Winnipeg Regional Health Authority (WRHA), was the study's corresponding author and worked in partnership with parasitic diseases laboratory specialists Dr. Kamran Kadkhoda, Clinical Microbiologist from Cadham Provincial Laboratory in Winnipeg, and Dr. Ndao, head of the National Reference Centre for Parasitology (NRCP) at the RI-MUHC. (news-medical.net)
  • Recognizing Chagas disease in organ donors and transplant recipients has been of specific interest to the CDC's Parasitic Diseases Branch. (unos.org)
  • Neglected parasitic diseases in the United States: Chagas disease. (springer.com)
  • It was first celebrated on April 14, 2020 and was named after Carlos Ribeiro Justiniano Chagas, the Brazilian doctor who diagnosed the first case on 14 April 1909. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chagas disease is the most prevalent communicable tropical disease in Latin America. (paho.org)
  • Over the last decade, however, the disease has spread to and is increasingly prevalent in other continents such as North America and Europe, with an estimated 7 million people infected worldwide. (springer.com)
  • Uruguay is one of the few countries in Latin America that does not have dengue, but its proximity to neighboring Brazil and Argentina where the disease is prevalent puts it at risk. (who.int)
  • While dogs are not actually spreading the disease directly to people, they are making the disease more prevalent in the southern United States. (speroforum.com)
  • Dogs may help collar Chagas disease - Researchers propose new ways to combat prevalent public health challenge. (disabled-world.com)
  • Like AIDS, Chagas disease, which is already prevalent in Central and South America, "has a long incubation time and is hard or impossible to cure," The New York Times reports. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • Chagas was the only researcher so far to completely describe a new infectious disease: its pathogen, vector (Triatominae), host, clinical manifestations, and epidemiology. (springer.com)
  • Epidemiology, control and surveillance of Chagas disease: 100 years after its discovery. (springer.com)
  • Current epidemiological trends for Chagas disease in Latin America and future challenges in epidemiology, surveillance and health policy. (medscape.com)
  • Oral transmission is an increasingly important aspect of Chagas disease epidemiology, typically involving food or drink products contaminated with triatomines. (nature.com)
  • The European Scientific Conference on Applied Infectious Disease Epidemiology (ESCAIDE) is going online. (eurosurveillance.org)
  • Chagas disease is endemic in most Latin American countries. (doctorswithoutborders.org)
  • According to an article in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), in a Los Angeles clinic treating patients with heart failure, about 20% of Latin American patients have Chagas disease. (theconversation.com)
  • This disease is endemic in Latin American countries, but the migration of individuals and blood transfusions have made possible the occurrence of the Chagas' disease in developed countries. (intechopen.com)
  • We really, really need to become more aware of the potential of this disease in our Latin American population because the long-term outcome is pretty horrific," said Dr. Sheba Meymandi, director of the new center at Olive View-UCLA Medical Center in Sylmar. (amren.com)
  • Chagas' disease is endemic in 21 Latin American countries, affecting an estimated 8-15 million people and causing some 12,000 deaths each year. (pharmpro.com)
  • Chagas disease is endemic in poor areas in Latin American countries, where an estimated 8 million to 11 million people are infected, according to the CDC. (azfamily.com)
  • Education and pesticide application around homes has helped reduce the impact of kissing bugs associated with homes and domestic animals, but now more and more cases of Chagas disease are driven by species most often associated with more rural hosts,' Gordon said. (news-medical.net)
  • a ) Enzootic transmission in the Amazon rainforest: no domestic colonies of triatomine bugs exist, but infrequent, sporadic cases of Chagas' disease may occur due to adult bugs flying to palm presses or houses, or when the triatomine species Rhodnius brethesi attacks workers sleeping in the forest to harvest piassaba palms. (bmj.com)
  • Formal and informal data sources were used to estimate the population from endemic countries resident in Europe in 2009, diagnosed cases of Chagas disease and births from mothers originating from endemic countries. (eurosurveillance.org)
  • Improved housing conditions and spraying insecticide inside to eliminate triatomine bugs has significantly decreased the spread of Chagas disease. (google.com)
  • In March, Science Daily reported that climate change may be a prime factor in the spread of Chagas disease and other tropical illnesses. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • Barcelona's four-time world player of the year Lionel Messi is a leading supporter of the fight against the spread of Chagas disease which currently infects six to eight million people. (manilatimes.net)
  • What are the symptoms of Chagas disease? (medlineplus.gov)
  • Symptoms of Chagas disease vary and might be hard to distinguish from another illness. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • The symptoms of Chagas disease may look like other medical conditions or problems. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • Global Markets Direct's latest Pharmaceutical and Healthcare disease pipeline guide Chagas Disease - Pipeline Review, H1 2017, provides an overview of the Chagas Disease (Infectious Disease) pipeline landscape. (marketresearch.com)
  • Global Markets Direct's Pharmaceutical and Healthcare latest pipeline guide Chagas Disease - Pipeline Review, H1 2017, provides comprehensive information on the therapeutics under development for Chagas Disease (Infectious Disease), complete with analysis by stage of development, drug target, mechanism of action (MoA), route of administration (RoA) and molecule type. (marketresearch.com)
  • The establishment of the WHO Global Network to combat Chagas disease occurs in the broader context of the WHO's renewed fight against neglected tropical diseases. (who.int)
  • BUENOS AIRES (GPI)-- Dr. Ana Cristina Pereiro frequently changes her position in her seat while talking about her work to combat Chagas disease, a parasitic illness that has spread in recent decades from Latin America to the rest of the world. (upi.com)
  • A new effort to eliminate Chagas disease by 2010 will be launched tomorrow at a WHO meeting of disease experts and partners. (who.int)
  • The efforts to eliminate Chagas disease are enhanced by the pharmaceutical industry which is providing financial support to the network, along with donations of one of the two drugs known to be effective for the treatment of the disease. (who.int)
  • Based on current evidence, etiological treatment has to be considered as an essential public health strategy useful to reduce disease burden and to eliminate Chagas disease altogether. (hindawi.com)
  • What are the complications of Chagas disease? (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • If you have Chagas disease, you have about a 30% chance of developing complications. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • If untreated, however, the disease can lead to serious health problems, mainly heart and intestinal complications, and even death. (doctorswithoutborders.org)
  • Up to one-third of those infected, 3 million, are at risk of Chagas' worst complications, enlarged heart and heart failure. (wired.com)
  • According to the National Institutes of Health, complications from Chagas disease can include inflammation of the heart, esophagus and colon, as well as irregular heartbeat and heart failure . (huffingtonpost.com)
  • In that region of the world, complications of Chagas disease are a major cause of cardiac death, as well as disability from both heart and gastrointestinal disease. (verywellhealth.com)
  • Chagas disease is transmitted to humans and animals by insects and is mainly found in the Americas. (google.com)
  • Chagas disease is an illness caused by tiny parasites and spread by insects. (medlineplus.gov)
  • The disease is most often transmitted by contact with the feces of infected insects , commonly through scratching of the skin at the site of the insects' bites, or through the mucous membranes of the eye and mouth . (britannica.com)
  • There have been reports of these insects in numerous states, but experts say the risk is still low of them spreading the disease to you. (healthline.com)
  • Chagas is a vector-borne disease in which the parasite is transmitted to animals and people by blood-sucking insects known as "assassin bugs" or "kissing bugs" ( here's what the bugs look like). (scienceblogs.com)
  • She had read studies finding that a significant number of dogs in Texas had tested positive for Chagas and so it made sense that insects must be carrying the parasite as well. (scienceblogs.com)
  • According to U.S. health officials, disease caused by these insects is on the rise, and in the long term can be quite serious. (mercola.com)
  • Chagas disease, a tropical illness that is transmitted by biting insects, may pose a major unseen threat to poor populations in the Americas and Europe, according to a report published May 29 in the journal PLoS . (huffingtonpost.com)
  • Unlike HIV, a sexually transmitted disease, Chagas disease is caused by a parasite spread through bites from reduviid insects commonly known as kissing bugs . (huffingtonpost.com)
  • The insects that spread Chagas disease are moving north along with their protozoan parasites that cause the condition. (peoplespharmacy.com)
  • Chagas, a potentially fatal disease transmitted to animals through insects, is a danger for both inside and outside dogs. (moderndogmagazine.com)
  • Dr. Ashley Saunders, associate professor of cardiology at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, explains how insects are effective at spreading the disease. (moderndogmagazine.com)
  • Like Lyme disease or malaria, Chagas is a vector-borne illness, meaning that it is transmitted by insects, not person-to-person contact. (amren.com)
  • Because the insects live in thatched roofs and adobe walls typically associated with poor-quality housing, Chagas is considered a disease of poverty. (pharmpro.com)
  • That may mean doctors are not looking for a disease that is rare in the U.S. But it is more likely that the triatomine insects don't act the same way as their cousins to the south, or that the disease is a different strain, said Carolina Reisenman, a University of Arizona research biologist. (azfamily.com)
  • Of the 164 insects turned over to researchers, DNA tests showed more than 40 percent carried Chagas disease. (azfamily.com)
  • Chagas diagnosis is always clinical, epidemiological and based on laboratory testing (parasitology and serology). (paho.org)
  • For chronic stage of the disease, Diagnosis is based on clinical assessment, serology and epidemiological history. (paho.org)
  • The kDNA-mutated chickens develop clinical signs of the heart disease and failure - their hearts are grossly enlarged and microscopic exams reveal that immune lymphocytes adhere to the target cells and lyses. (eurekalert.org)
  • The effect that transmission routes have on Chagas disease clinical outcomes is poorly understood. (nature.com)
  • Toledano, also a professor of clinical immunology and microbiology at the Universidad de Buenos Aires, explains that Chagas disease can spread several ways. (upi.com)
  • The objective of this study is to discuss the main clinical and epidemiological aspects of ventricular arrhythmias in Chagas disease, the specific workups and treatments for these abnormalities, and the breakthroughs needed to determine a more effective approach to these arrhythmias. (scielo.br)
  • Clinical management of patients with chronic Chagas disease begins with proper clinical stratification and the identification of individuals at a higher risk of sudden cardiac death. (scielo.br)
  • The clinical course of the disease is extremely variable, and although many individuals remain asymptomatic for long periods, approximately one-third of infected patients develop life-threatening heart disease, including malignant ventricular arrhythmias (3) (4) . (scielo.br)
  • In clinical testing, 55 to 60 percent of pediatric patients 6 to 12 years old treated with benznidazole had a negative antibody test for Chagas, the FDA said. (drugs.com)
  • The Baylor team has monitored a group of 17 people who tested positive for Chagas after donating blood in order to track their clinical outcomes. (discovermagazine.com)
  • Until recently, children's treatment had to be improvised rather haphazardly by dividing up adult-sized pills" available only in 100 milligram tablets, Dr Isabela Ribeiro, head of DNDi's Chagas Clinical Programme and manager of the paediatric formulation of benznidazole, told IPS. (ipsnews.net)
  • If clinical signs develop the disease can become even more fatal, causing sudden death or heart failure. (moderndogmagazine.com)
  • Almeida and his team are concurrently initiating an NIH-funded Phase 2 clinical trial in Bolivia to develop new chemotherapies and biomarkers for early assessment of therapeutic outcomes in Chagas disease. (utep.edu)
  • The clinical characteristics of chronic Chagas disease relate to the organs affected. (renalandurologynews.com)
  • A pair of scientists at the University of Texas at El Paso is one step closer to developing the first ever clinical Chagas disease vaccine. (infectioncontroltoday.com)
  • As of 2019[update], new drugs for Chagas disease are under development, and experimental vaccines have been studied in animal models. (wikipedia.org)
  • World Chagas Disease Day was approved for creation on May 24, 2019 at the 72nd session of the World Health Assembly, and officially created at the WHA plenary on May 28, 2019. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some patients may be referred to a specialist, such as a cardiologist, gastroenterologist, or infectious disease specialist. (cdc.gov)
  • To receive news and publication updates for Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Infectious Diseases, enter your email address in the box below. (hindawi.com)
  • According to the CDC, the bugs were first reported in the state of Georgia in 1855 and have been reported in many states across the southern United States ever since," Paula Eggers , RN, an infectious disease epidemiologist for the Delaware Division of Public Health, told Healthline. (healthline.com)
  • Chagas is one of the most lethal endemic infectious diseases in the Western Hemisphere, and although initially restricted to South America, it is now present in many parts of the world. (eurekalert.org)
  • Infectious diseases like malaria or Zika may have dominated recent headlines but Chagas - the 'Kissing Bug' disease - is in the spotlight following the publication of a new case study in the Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ). (news-medical.net)
  • Chagas disease is a real public health problem due to the transmission from mother to child (baby) up to at least three generations,' says co-author Dr. Momar Ndao, a scientist from the Infectious Diseases and Immunity in Global Health Program at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC), and an associate professor in the Department of Medicine at McGill University. (news-medical.net)
  • Anyone who lived in or visited those countries for an extended period of time and was bitten by a kissing bug, who received a blood transfusion in Chagas-endemic countries, or who was born to a mother diagnosed with Chagas disease should ask their healthcare providers to be tested for the disease,' states Dr. Ndao who has been an infectious disease researcher for more than 20 years. (news-medical.net)
  • The management of the disease requires ongoing evaluation and follow-up with a specialist in Tropical Medicine or Infectious Diseases. (news-medical.net)
  • This disease is one of several so-called neglected tropical infectious diseases that have significant worldwide morbidity (the incidence of a disease) and mortality. (theconversation.com)
  • Chagas costs the world about $7 billion annually, says the analysis just published in the The Lancet Infectious Diseases . (nhpr.org)
  • Kitron is collaborating with Ricardo Gurtler of the University of Buenos Aires on a research project funded through a joint NIH-NSF program on the ecology of infectious diseases. (disabled-world.com)
  • Louis M. Weiss M.D., M.P.H is Professor of Medicine (Division of Infectious Diseases) and Professor of Pathology (Division of Parasitology and Tropical Medicine) of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York. (foyles.co.uk)
  • He then completed a residency in Internal Medicine at the University of Chicago and a fellowship in Infectious Diseases at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. (foyles.co.uk)
  • He is a fellow of the American College of Physicians, Infectious Disease Society of America and the American Academy of Microbiology. (foyles.co.uk)
  • In it, Patricia Dorn, an expert on Chagas disease and co-author of a paper on the disease that was published in the March 14 online edition of Emerging Infectious Diseases , said that warmer climates would "absolutely" push the carriers of the disease further north. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • Chagas disease is an infectious illness rife in Central and South America. (hema-quebec.qc.ca)
  • Andy Miller, MD, is board-certified in internal medicine and infectious disease. (verywellhealth.com)
  • He is an associate professor at Weill Cornell Medicine, associate attending physician at the Hospital for Special Surgery and New York Presbyterian Hospital and a fellow of the Infectious Disease Society of America. (verywellhealth.com)
  • The grant, which is known as an R01, is awarded though the NIH's National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. (utep.edu)
  • Nowadays, Chagas disease affects 18 million people and is considered the most lethal endemic infectious disease in the Western Hemisphere. (eurekaselect.com)
  • Chagas Disease (Infectious Disease) pipeline guide helps in identifying and tracking emerging players in the market and their portfolios, enhances decision making capabilities and helps to create effective counter strategies to gain competitive advantage. (marketresearch.com)
  • The pipeline guide provides a snapshot of the global therapeutic landscape of Chagas Disease (Infectious Disease). (marketresearch.com)
  • The pipeline guide reviews pipeline therapeutics for Chagas Disease (Infectious Disease) by companies and universities/research institutes based on information derived from company and industry-specific sources. (marketresearch.com)
  • The pipeline guide reviews key companies involved in Chagas Disease (Infectious Disease) therapeutics and enlists all their major and minor projects. (marketresearch.com)
  • The pipeline guide evaluates Chagas Disease (Infectious Disease) therapeutics based on mechanism of action (MoA), drug target, route of administration (RoA) and molecule type. (marketresearch.com)
  • Find and recognize significant and varied types of therapeutics under development for Chagas Disease (Infectious Disease). (marketresearch.com)
  • Chagas Disease occurs primarily in Central and South America. (webmd.com)
  • New research found the tayra, a weasel-like predator from South America, serves as a reservoir for the Chagas-disease causing protist parasite carried by kissing bugs. (upi.com)
  • Soon after the mother received a positive diagnosis, three of her four adult children - two sisters and one brother, born in Canada but with family in South America - also tested positive for Chagas disease. (news-medical.net)
  • Chagas is a rare disease in the United States and has typically been associated with immigration from Central and South America, where the disease is endemic. (discovermagazine.com)
  • The disease already afflicts about 10 million people in Central and South America, and researchers are concerned that the disease could spread to the United States. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • The research, led by Anna Georgieva, an undergraduate majoring in biology, and Eric Gordon, a graduate student researcher in Weirauch's lab, will support efforts to control the disease, particularly in poor, rural populations in South America. (news-medical.net)
  • PHOENIX (AP) -- A new study shows that more than 40 percent of 'kissing bugs' collected by researchers in Tucson carry a parasite that can cause a disease that kills tens of thousands of people a year in Central and South America. (azfamily.com)
  • The disease is endemic in areas of Mexico, and throughout Central and South America. (renalandurologynews.com)
  • To prevent the spread of the disease, chikungunya sufferers should avoid all exposure to mosquitoes during the first week of illness. (speroforum.com)
  • Health economists have now put a price tag on the global cost of Chagas , and the illness is taking a heavier toll than previously appreciated. (nhpr.org)
  • Chagas disease is regarded as a children's illness because it is generally acquired in childhood, but it develops in adult life. (ipsnews.net)
  • The distribution of Chagas disease has changed over the years due to rural migration, and it has become an urban illness that is easy to find in the poor suburbs surrounding major cities, where the most common form of transmission is from mother to child. (ipsnews.net)
  • In a small proportion of individuals-fewer than 1 percent-the acute phase of Chagas disease can develop into a very serious illness. (verywellhealth.com)
  • A Los Angeles County hospital has opened the first clinic in the country devoted to studying and treating Chagas disease, a deadly parasitic illness that has long been the leading cause of heart failure in Latin America and is now being seen in immigrant communities in the United States. (amren.com)
  • Most of the morbitity and mortality due to Chagas disease is due to the chronic phase of the illness. (renalandurologynews.com)
  • Disease to that illness … in the name of the entire delegation. (ajtmh.org)
  • Kissing bugs in the United States: risk for vector-borne disease in humans. (medscape.com)
  • Households with fewer than two dogs are unlikely to become infected however dogs are 14 times more effective at spreading Chagas disease than humans. (disabled-world.com)
  • It turns out that dogs are 14 times more effective at spreading Chagas disease than humans. (disabled-world.com)
  • Kissing bugs transmit the disease as they drink blood from humans, typically at night, and spread the parasite through feces. (azfamily.com)
  • With its potential enzootic presence for over 90 million years, Chagas disease in humans has been documented in 9 thousand-year-old mummies from the Atacama Desert. (eurekaselect.com)
  • Chagas has also been known to be transmitted through blood transfusions, organ transplants, breastfeeding, and congenitally through a pregnant mother to her baby. (doctorswithoutborders.org)
  • Chagas disease can also be transmitted in several other ways, including via blood transfusions, organ transplants, from infected pregnant women to their babies, and by consuming uncooked food that's contaminated with triatomine feces. (healthline.com)
  • The disease can spread via transmission from mother to child during pregnancy and from infected blood transfusions or organ transplantation. (news-medical.net)
  • Hotez thinks of Chagas as "the new HIV of the Americas": They're both chronic conditions that require long-term treatment, and they get transmitted through blood transfusions and during pregnancy, he says. (nhpr.org)
  • The disease can also spread from mother to child and through blood transfusions, although blood banks in the United States have screened for it since 2007 , according to the NIH. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • Transmission of Chagas can also occur through blood transfusions, congenitally or orally. (pharmpro.com)
  • The disease is also transmitted by blood transfusions, organ transplants and in childbirth. (azfamily.com)
  • We're the first to actively follow up with positive blood donors to assess their cardiac outcomes and to determine where southeastern Texas donors may have been exposed to Chagas," says Melissa Nolan Garcia, the epidemiologist who led the Baylor team. (discovermagazine.com)
  • Their research finds that Chagas is a significant risk factor for life-threatening forms of cardiac disease and highlights the serious need for closer monitoring of transmission in Texas. (discovermagazine.com)
  • Cardiac involvement is commonest in chronic disease with congestive cardimyopathy, syncopal attacks, and systemic and CNS embolization from mural thrombi of a left ventricular apical aneurysm. (hpathy.com)
  • CNS involvement in chronic Chagas' disease is due to embolization of cerebral vessels from intramural cardiac thrombi or from formation of mass lesions with seizures, hemi paresis, cerebellar ataxia, or other focal deficit. (hpathy.com)
  • At the same time, testing should also be performed to look for any of the other potential causes for the kinds of cardiac and gastrointestinal problems associated with chronic Chagas disease . (verywellhealth.com)
  • Patients with clinically manifest cardiac or gastrointestinal Chagas disease should be managed by appropriate specialists (see Consultations). (medscape.com)
  • Chagas disease conveys stroke risk through two established mechanisms: structural cardiac disease and chronic inflammation. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Benznidazole is approved by FDA for use in children 2-12 years of age and is commercially available (see www.cdc.gov/parasites/chagas/health_professionals/tx.html for more information). (cdc.gov)
  • [7] The disease may also be spread through blood transfusion , organ transplantation , eating food contaminated with the parasites, and by vertical transmission (from a mother to her fetus). (wikipedia.org)
  • During the acute phase, Chagas disease can be diagnosed through parasitological methods, given the large number of parasites circulating in the blood. (paho.org)
  • The disease may also be spread through blood transfusion, organ transplantation, eating food contaminated with the parasites, and vertical transmission (from a mother to her baby). (wikipedia.org)
  • About 1 out of 3 people who get Chagas disease will develop more serious symptoms later in life, including heart conditions or gastrointestinal problems. (cdc.gov)
  • This leads to the destruction of host tissue, resulting in chronic inflammation and scarring of the heart and gastrointestinal tract that gives rise to the heart disease or gastrointestinal problems that occur in about 20%-30% of those infected. (theconversation.com)
  • There are two major determinate forms of Chagas disease: Chagas heart disease and Chagas gastrointestinal disease. (verywellhealth.com)
  • Specifically, researchers hope to identify and analyze the antigens responsible for the activation of T cells that are major sources of cytokines causing strong inflammation in the heart or gastrointestinal tract of patients with chronic Chagas disease. (utep.edu)
  • Acute Chagas Disease usually affects children and typically presents as the mild phase of the disease. (webmd.com)
  • Due to immigration, the disease also affects people in the United States. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Over several years or even decades, Chagas disease affects the central nervous system and the enteric nervous system, the digestion system and the heart. (paho.org)
  • However, over decades with chronic Chagas disease, 30-40% of people develop organ dysfunction (determinate chronic Chagas disease), which most often affects the heart or digestive system. (wikipedia.org)
  • Also common in chronic Chagas disease is damage to the digestive system, particularly enlargement of the esophagus or colon, which affects 10-21% of people. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chagas disease affects over 18 million people in Latin America. (innovations-report.com)
  • Chagas disease affects approximately one in four people who have contracted it at some point in their lifetime,' adds Dr. Plourde. (news-medical.net)
  • Chagas disease is a major medical and social problem in Latin America and affects 8-10 million people. (scielo.br)
  • Reactivation disease can occur in immunocompromised patients. (cdc.gov)
  • In immunosuppressed patients (see AIDS ) Chagas' disease can form a mass in the cranial cavity that mimics a tumor, presumably because the lymphocytes that guard against the parasite are the same that are depleted by the AIDS virus. (factmonster.com)
  • After patients are confirmed to have Chagas disease, they are given a medical check up and started on a two-month long treatment. (doctorswithoutborders.org)
  • Patients with Chagas disease may live for years without presenting any symptoms. (doctorswithoutborders.org)
  • Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has treated patients with Chagas disease since 1999 and has worked in Bolivia, Guatemala, Honduras , Mexico , Brazil, and Nicaragua . (doctorswithoutborders.org)
  • As with patients in the first two decades of the HIV/AIDS epidemic, most patients with Chagas disease do not have access to health care facilities. (wired.com)
  • Study to evaluate fexinidazole dosing regimens for the treatment of adult patients with Chagas disease. (dndi.org)
  • Optimization of PCR technique to assess parasitological response for patients with chronic Chagas disease (PCR). (dndi.org)
  • Proof-of-concept study of E1224 to treat adult patients with Chagas disease. (dndi.org)
  • Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DND i ) is a collaborative, patients' needs-driven, non-profit drug research and development (R&D) organization that is developing new treatments for neglected patients. (dndi.org)
  • Sudden death is one of the most characteristic phenomena of Chagas disease, and approximately one-third of infected patients develop life-threatening heart disease, including malignant ventricular arrhythmias. (scielo.br)
  • A literature review was performed via a search of the PubMed database from 1965 to May 31, 2014 for studies of patients with Chagas disease. (scielo.br)
  • More recently, with increased migration, it has also become a problem for developed countries, which now have hundreds of thousands of patients with this disease (3) . (scielo.br)
  • The PubMed database was searched for articles published from 1965 to May 31, 2014 to identify studies of patients with Chagas disease. (scielo.br)
  • Of those patients, over 40% went on to develop manifestations of severe Chagas disease, which included flabby, weakened hearts and abnormal heart rhythms such as arrhythmias. (discovermagazine.com)
  • Though Chagas is making its presence known in this country, American physicians are unprepared to meet the challenges of the disease in their patients. (discovermagazine.com)
  • Echocardiography shows enlargement of all four heart chambers in Chagas patients. (hpathy.com)
  • The disease has an early acute phase, during which patients can be treated and cured with antiparasitic medicines. (ipsnews.net)
  • Manuel Gutiérrez, head of the International Federation of Chagas Patients, said "Thousands of mothers with babies infected with Chagas disease will welcome this treatment as more than just a pill. (ipsnews.net)
  • Pacemaker implant is longer in patients with ChCM disease and is with higher pacing thresholds. (wiley.com)
  • Primary hypothesis is that silent brain infarcts, brain atrophy and white matter disease will be more common in patients with Chagas disease heart failure when compared to other etiologies of heart failure. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Igor Almeida, Ph.D., professor of biological sciences at The University of Texas at El Paso, will collaborate on a project that aims to understand the molecular mechanism by which T cells cause intense inflammation in patients with chronic Chagas disease. (utep.edu)
  • The project's aim is to understand the molecular mechanism by which T cells cause intense inflammation in patients with chronic Chagas disease. (utep.edu)
  • Doctors usually don't consider Chagas disease when they diagnose patients, so they need to be aware of its prevalence here,' says Maldonado. (infectioncontroltoday.com)
  • The World Health Organization reports 11,000 people die each year from Chagas disease. (google.com)
  • World Chagas Disease Day is one of 11 official global public health campaigns marked by the World Health Organization (WHO), along with World Tuberculosis Day, World Health Day, World Malaria Day, World Immunization Week, World No Tobacco Day, World Blood Donor Day, World Hepatitis Day, World Patient Safety Day, World Antimicrobial Awareness Week and World AIDS Day. (wikipedia.org)
  • Approximately 1/3 of those infected can develop heart disease or megacolon, and can die from what appears to be sudden heart attacks. (google.com)
  • Evaluation of adult chronic Chagas' heart disease diagnosis by molecular and serological methods. (medscape.com)
  • T. Paes, A. C. P. Lima, and A. J. Mansur, "Risk stratification in a Brazilian hospital-based cohort of 1220 outpatients with heart failure: role of Chagas' heart disease," International Journal of Cardiology , vol. 102, no. 2, pp. 239-247, 2005. (hindawi.com)
  • Chagasic heart disease has been reported in Brazilian immigrants of Japanese origin in Japan, and the seroprevalence of Chagas disease among Bolivian women in Barcelona has been determined to be 3.4 percent. (wired.com)
  • The most common manifestation is heart disease, which occurs in 14-45% of people with chronic Chagas disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • People with Chagas heart disease often experience heart palpitations and sometimes fainting due to irregular heart function. (wikipedia.org)
  • By electrocardiogram, people with Chagas heart disease most frequently have arrhythmias. (wikipedia.org)
  • In many cases the first sign of Chagas heart disease is heart failure, thromboembolism, or chest pain associated with abnormalities in the microvasculature. (wikipedia.org)
  • About 30 per cent of people with Chagas will develop heart disease - about 3 million of the 10 million infected with trypanosomes in the Western hemisphere. (thestar.com)
  • Can you imagine having 300,000 people in the suburbs with a serious case of heart disease caused by a bug? (thestar.com)
  • Ventricular arrhythmias associated with Chagas heart disease (ChD) have high rates of morbidity and mortality (3) . (scielo.br)
  • Researchers at Baylor University presented the results of a study of the emergence of Chagas disease in Texas which demonstrate not only a surprisingly high incidence of the parasite in the state of Texas, but also showing elevated rates of associated heart disease in afflicted individuals. (discovermagazine.com)
  • Chagas is still considered an exotic, foreign disease and, as such, the parasite is rarely considered as a viable diagnosis in a patient presenting with heart disease of idiopathic, or unknown, origin. (discovermagazine.com)
  • Betulinic acid derivative BA5 had a potent anti-inflammatory activity on a model of parasite-driven heart disease. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • Scar in Chagas heart disease (CHD) is thought to be predominantly epicardial and requires epicardial access for ventricular tachycardia (VT) ablation. (ahajournals.org)
  • Pathology and Pathogenesis of Chagas Heart Disease. (medworm.com)
  • In conclusion, BA5 had a potent anti-inflammatory activity on a model of parasite-driven heart disease related to IL-10 production and a switch from M1 to M2 subset of macrophages. (medworm.com)
  • Apical aneurysm of Chagas's heart disease. (bmj.com)
  • Maldonado adds that there's a high rate of heart disease along the border and one of the causes could be Chagas disease. (infectioncontroltoday.com)
  • Chagas disease has two phases, an acute and chronic phase. (google.com)
  • More particularly, this invention relates to an antigenic preparation suitable for use in immunoprecipitin diagnostic tests for both acute and chronic Chagas' disease. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • Chagas disease can be divided into acute and chronic phases. (renalandurologynews.com)
  • Lent H, Wygodzinsky P. Revision of the Triatominae (Hemiptera, Reduviidae), and their significance as vectors of Chagas' disease. (medscape.com)
  • The vectors of Chagas. (medscape.com)
  • As an enzooty of wild animals and vectors, and as an anthropozoonosis, Chagas disease cannot be eradicated, but it must be controlled by transmission elimination to man. (nih.gov)
  • Chagas disease is usually spread by triatomine bugs but can also be spread by an infected mother to her unborn baby. (cdc.gov)
  • The disease is spread through the faeces of triatomine bugs. (sciencephoto.com)
  • There are also an estimated 300,000 people living in the United States who carry the disease, but only a handful of cases of Chagas transmission have been reported in the States. (healthline.com)
  • The U.S. Centre for Disease Control estimates there are 300,000 cases in the U.S. But Hotez believes it's closer to one million cases in the U.S. overall. (thestar.com)
  • The overall number of people with Chagas in the US is estimated at approximately 300,000, most of whom acquired it outside the US in countries where Chagas is endemic. (theconversation.com)
  • CDC estimates that more than 300,000 people in the U.S. have the Chagas parasite, though most contracted it outside the U.S. in endemic countries and only rare cases of domestically acquired Chagas have been documented. (scienceblogs.com)
  • The researchers found that one in every 6,500 blood donors in Texas tested positive for the parasite, a finding that grossly undermines the CDC's national estimate that one in every 300,000 people may be infected with Chagas in this country. (discovermagazine.com)
  • The 'globalization' of Chagas translates to up to 1 million cases in the US alone, with an especially high burden of disease in Texas and along the Gulf coast," the PLoS paper states, "although other estimates suggest that there are approximately 300,000 cases in the U.S. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • In recent years, immigrants infected with Chagas have come to the U.S., and in 2009, the CDC estimated at least 300,000 migrants carried the disease. (azfamily.com)
  • [4] Most people with the disease are poor, [5] and most do not realize they are infected. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many years later, about 10 to 30 percent of people with Chagas Disease develop the more severe symptoms associated with "chronic" Chagas Disease. (webmd.com)
  • However, Chagas disease is currently not known to be transmitted from person-to-person, or through casual contact with infected people or animals. (google.com)
  • About one third of infected people who are not treated will develop chronic or symptomatic Chagas disease. (medlineplus.gov)
  • An estimated 1 billion people are affected by one or more of these diseases. (who.int)
  • However, the disease is spreading as people travel more widely. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • Chagas disease can be more severe in people with these conditions and may lead to earlier death. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • Millions of people with the disease, including those infected decades ago, go undetected and untreated. (doctorswithoutborders.org)
  • An estimated 8 million people living in those countries have Chagas disease. (healthline.com)
  • However, as more people infected with Chagas disease move into the United States, the disease could spread, said Procop. (healthline.com)
  • Both diseases are health disparities, disproportionately affecting people living in poverty. (wired.com)
  • But immigration has brought people who are unknowingly infected with Chagas into areas where doctors are unfamiliar with the disease. (wired.com)
  • Approximately 6 million people are infected and the disease causes ~13,000 deaths annually and a large morbidity burden in affected populations 1 . (nature.com)
  • The classical hypothesis proposes that Chagas disease has been originated in the Andean region among prehistoric people when they started domesticating animals, changing to sedentary habits, and adopting agriculture. (scielo.br)
  • The proposal for a World Chagas Disease Day was instituted by the International Federation of Associations of People Affected by Chagas Disease, and was supported by several health institutions, universities, research centres, organizations and foundations. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hotez and his co-authors believe there are striking similarities between the people living with Chagas and those living with HIV/AIDS, especially those who contracted the disease in the first 20 years of the epidemic. (thestar.com)
  • There are also cases in Canada, but a much smaller number of people have been exposed to the disease. (thestar.com)
  • It's a forgotten disease among forgotten people," Hotez said. (thestar.com)
  • Her greatest satisfaction as a member of Mundo Sano, which means "Healthy World" in Spanish, is offering people medication for Chagas disease, she says. (upi.com)
  • People typically have associated the disease with poverty and have doubted its treatability. (upi.com)
  • Chagas disease killed more than 10,000 people in 2008. (upi.com)
  • Nonetheless, much more research is still needed in order to improve care and answer many unknown questions regarding this debilitating and widespread disease, which has been estimated to affect about 8 million chronically infected people just in the Americas [ 2 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Most people get Chagas disease by unknowingly rubbing triatomine bug poop into the bug bite, for example, when they scratch the bite. (cdc.gov)
  • Dogs throughout the state of Texas are becoming infected with a parasite that spreads Chagas disease - a potentially fatal disease among people. (speroforum.com)
  • Most people in the U.S. infected with Chagas probably contracted the disease in Latin America, where about 8 million people are infected. (speroforum.com)
  • In the last 60 years, fewer than 30 people have been reported to have caught Chagas disease in the US. (theconversation.com)
  • Maldonado's study noted that an estimated 12 million people are infected with Chagas worldwide. (scienceblogs.com)
  • They're rough approximates based on computer models for how much it costs to treat Chagas and losses incurred when sick people can't work or die prematurely - two things that are really tough to nail down. (nhpr.org)
  • If caught early, Chagas is curable, and many people infected show few or no symptoms. (nhpr.org)
  • For instance, people viewing substances are generally most interested in viewing diseases that these substances have shown to have positive influences. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • The PLoS report found "a number of striking similarities between people living with Chagas disease and people. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • According to The New York Times , one quarter of people that contract Chagas disease eventually develop enlarged organs that can potentially burst, causing sudden death. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • These conditions place the resident populations of this area or its visitors - tourists, hunters, fishermen and especially the people whose livelihood involves plant extraction - at risk of being affected by Chagas disease. (nih.gov)
  • Finally, a characteristic that is greatly in evidence currently is the migration of people with Chagas disease from endemic areas of Latin America to non-endemic countries. (nih.gov)
  • People infected with the disease can be treated with an antiparisitic, for which they will need to be hospitalized. (hema-quebec.qc.ca)
  • This is because the symptoms caused by acute Chagas disease are usually mild and not particularly alarming, so people with acute Chagas typically do not seek medical help. (verywellhealth.com)
  • Most people with the acute form of Chagas disease have either no symptoms or relatively mild symptoms. (verywellhealth.com)
  • While these symptoms can persist for as long as a few months, most people with acute-phase Chagas disease never seek medical help and never know they have had Chagas. (verywellhealth.com)
  • Some people with acute Chagas disease develop an area of persistent swelling and inflammation at the site of the bite of the triatomine bug, often around the eyes or elsewhere on the face. (verywellhealth.com)
  • This means that people with the indeterminate form of Chagas disease who look and feel entirely healthy can still pass the disease on to others by blood donation or organ donation. (verywellhealth.com)
  • The disease has been endemic in Latin America, already affecting 6 million to 8 million people, but it is rapidly spreading throughout the United States, Europe and other nonendemic regions as a result of globalization. (utep.edu)
  • The UTEP scientists said that 6 million to 8 million people are chronically infected with the potentially life-threatening Chagas disease. (infectioncontroltoday.com)
  • The number of people infected, though, is underreported because symptoms may take decades to turn up and doctors don't regularly test for this tropical disease. (infectioncontroltoday.com)
  • 2020;62:e74 Authors: Ferreira ALDS, Santana MA, Santos LVBD, Monteiro DP, Campos JHF, Sena LLJ, Mendonça VJ Abstract Chagas disease is an important endemic morbidity in Latin America affecting millions of people in the American continent. (medworm.com)
  • Your health-care provider can talk with CDC staff about treatment options for Chagas disease. (cdc.gov)
  • Evaluation and treatment of Chagas disease in the United States: a systematic review. (cdc.gov)
  • Adults with chronic phase Chagas disease should talk to their health care provider to decide whether treatment is needed. (medlineplus.gov)
  • The strategy is designed to answer key questions about the treatment and control of Chagas disease, and to coordinate global efforts towards the prevention of transmission through a new Global Network for Chagas Elimination. (who.int)
  • The disease will not go away without treatment and can eventually lead to death. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • Early treatment for Chagas disease is the most successful. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • At the end 2009, MSF integrated Chagas screening and treatment into its primary healthcare services already carried out in Arauca, a conflict-affected region in Colombia bordering Venezuela. (doctorswithoutborders.org)
  • Without treatment, Chagas can eventually progress to fatally damaging the heart, and the nervous and digestive systems. (doctorswithoutborders.org)
  • There are few drugs that can effectively treat the disease and the current line of treatment can be toxic, taking one to two months to complete. (doctorswithoutborders.org)
  • Chapter "Chagas Disease Treatment Efficacy Biomarkers: Myths and Realities" is available open access under a via link.springer.com. (springer.com)
  • Approved by the FDA for treatment of Chagas disease in children aged 2-12 years. (medscape.com)
  • But the treatment often doesn't provide any relief and only works if the disease is caught early. (thestar.com)
  • This review highlights the absence of high-quality evidence regarding the treatment of ventricular arrhythmias in Chagas disease. (scielo.br)
  • Maldonado and her study co-authors Munir Buhaya and Steven Galvan write: "Currently, there are no vaccines against Chagas nor effective treatment for the chronic disease. (scienceblogs.com)
  • the combination of vitamin C with benznidazole could be considered as an alternative treatment for Chagas' disease. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • Among other similarities, the paper notes that both are chronic diseases that require prolonged treatment, and disproportionately affect those living in poverty. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • While the disease is curable if it is caught early, the treatment is expensive and often stigmatizing, according to the PLoS paper. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • Moreover, the development of a safer and more effective chemotherapeutic intervention is crucial for the treatment of Chagas disease. (intechopen.com)
  • There is no vaccination or preventive treatment against the disease. (hema-quebec.qc.ca)
  • I have seen many important and positive changes around Chagas disease awareness, diagnosis, and treatment over the past few years, but there is still much to do. (cdc.gov)
  • With no vaccine or treatment available, awareness and prevention is critical in protecting your pet from Chagas disease. (moderndogmagazine.com)
  • Expanded and improved diagnosis and treatment for Chagas throughout the Region. (pharmpro.com)
  • Chagas disease treatment is restricted only to two parasiticidal drugs, benznidazole and nifurtimox, which are effective during the acute and early infections but have not been found to be as effect. (medworm.com)
  • This has created a new dilemma for these countries: the risk of transmission through blood transfusion and the onus of controlling donors and treating migrants with the disease. (nih.gov)
  • Currently, no vaccine is available, so the control of the disease is limited to its detection, vector control, screening of blood banks and organ donors, and case finding of infected pregnant women. (intechopen.com)
  • Universal screening of blood donors for Chagas' disease in 19 of 21 endemic countries in Latin America. (pharmpro.com)
  • [1] After 8-12 weeks, individuals enter the chronic phase of disease and in 60-70% it never produces further symptoms. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the chronic phase of the disease, the parasite gets inside your heart muscle. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • After four to eight weeks, untreated individuals enter the chronic phase of disease, which in most cases does not result in further symptoms. (wikipedia.org)
  • The microscope test is almost never useful during the chronic phase of Chagas. (verywellhealth.com)
  • The chronic phase of Chagas disease is divided into two forms: The indeterminate form, and the determinate form. (verywellhealth.com)
  • Chagas disease can also spread through contaminated food, a blood transfusion, a donated organ, or from mother to baby during pregnancy. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Chagas disease after organ transplantation--Los Angeles, California, 2006. (nih.gov)
  • There are treatments for acute infections, but once the disease causes major organ damage, it cannot be reversed. (azfamily.com)
  • Most of those infected have mild symptoms, such as fever and swelling and redness around the eyes, but from 10% to 30% develop chronic disease that may result in serious or fatal inflammation of the brain and heart tissues persons with the disease also have an increased risk for stroke as they age as a result of heart problems. (factmonster.com)
  • In rare cases (less than 1-5%), infected individuals develop severe acute disease, which can cause life-threatening fluid accumulation around the heart, or inflammation of the heart or brain and surrounding tissues. (wikipedia.org)
  • rarely, the disease can cause severe inflammation in the heart or brain. (scienceblogs.com)
  • Inflammation and Chagas disease: some mechanisms and relevance. (indigo.ca)
  • I am very hopeful that this project will provide new insights into parasite-host interactions leading to inflammation, a pathological hallmark of Chagas disease , and establish the molecular basis for new therapeutic interventions. (utep.edu)
  • We have determined the inflammation in the heart and the parasitic load significantly decreased, and this vaccine is protecting the animals from the disease. (infectioncontroltoday.com)
  • New community and environmentally-based approaches tested in the state of Yucatan in Mexico are helping to reduce vector-borne disease transmission. (who.int)
  • This year World Health Day focuses on vector-borne diseases. (cdc.gov)
  • More than half the world is at risk from vector-borne diseases. (cdc.gov)
  • Sept. 19 (UPI) -- Scientists have identified a new carrier of Chagas disease. (upi.com)
  • If you were born outside of Canada or your mother or maternal grandmother was born outside of Canada, or if you have travelled or resided in Latin America, including Mexico, for 30 or more consecutive days, the blood you donate will be tested to determine whether you are a carrier of Chagas disease. (hema-quebec.qc.ca)
  • Population pharmacokinetics study of benznidazole in children with Chagas disease (pop PK Chagas). (dndi.org)
  • Altcheh J, Moscatelli G, Moroni S, Garcie-Bournissen F, Freilij H. Adverse events after the use of benznidazole in infants and children with Chagas disease. (springer.com)
  • The main purpose of the study is to determine noninvasive markers of brain involvement in Chagas disease. (clinicaltrials.gov)