A disease of the CARDIAC MUSCLE developed subsequent to the initial protozoan infection by TRYPANOSOMA CRUZI. After infection, less than 10% develop acute illness such as MYOCARDITIS (mostly in children). The disease then enters a latent phase without clinical symptoms until about 20 years later. Myocardial symptoms of advanced CHAGAS DISEASE include conduction defects (HEART BLOCK) and CARDIOMEGALY.
The agent of South American trypanosomiasis or CHAGAS DISEASE. Its vertebrate hosts are man and various domestic and wild animals. Insects of several species are vectors.
Diseases that do not exhibit symptoms.
A form of CARDIAC MUSCLE disease that is characterized by ventricular dilation, VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION, and HEART FAILURE. Risk factors include SMOKING; ALCOHOL DRINKING; HYPERTENSION; INFECTION; PREGNANCY; and mutations in the LMNA gene encoding LAMIN TYPE A, a NUCLEAR LAMINA protein.
A form of CARDIAC MUSCLE disease, characterized by left and/or right ventricular hypertrophy (HYPERTROPHY, LEFT VENTRICULAR; HYPERTROPHY, RIGHT VENTRICULAR), frequent asymmetrical involvement of the HEART SEPTUM, and normal or reduced left ventricular volume. Risk factors include HYPERTENSION; AORTIC STENOSIS; and gene MUTATION; (FAMILIAL HYPERTROPHIC CARDIOMYOPATHY).
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Brazil" is not a medical term or concept, it is a country located in South America, known officially as the Federative Republic of Brazil. If you have any questions related to health, medicine, or science, I'd be happy to help answer those!
A group of diseases in which the dominant feature is the involvement of the CARDIAC MUSCLE itself. Cardiomyopathies are classified according to their predominant pathophysiological features (DILATED CARDIOMYOPATHY; HYPERTROPHIC CARDIOMYOPATHY; RESTRICTIVE CARDIOMYOPATHY) or their etiological/pathological factors (CARDIOMYOPATHY, ALCOHOLIC; ENDOCARDIAL FIBROELASTOSIS).
A form of CARDIAC MUSCLE disease in which the ventricular walls are excessively rigid, impeding ventricular filling. It is marked by reduced diastolic volume of either or both ventricles but normal or nearly normal systolic function. It may be idiopathic or associated with other diseases (ENDOMYOCARDIAL FIBROSIS or AMYLOIDOSIS) causing interstitial fibrosis.
A transient left ventricular apical dysfunction or ballooning accompanied by electrocardiographic (ECG) T wave inversions. This abnormality is associated with high levels of CATECHOLAMINES, either administered or endogenously secreted from a tumor or during extreme stress.

Alterations in cardiac beta-adrenergic receptors in chagasic mice and their association with circulating beta-adrenoceptor-related autoantibodies. (1/382)

OBJECTIVE: Cardiac tissue from chagasic mice was studied to evaluate the expression and biological activity of beta-adrenoceptors in association with circulating beta-adrenoceptor-related autoantibodies. METHODS: BALB/c inbred mice that were either treated or not treated with atenolol (2.5 mg/kg) and infected or not infected with 1 x 10(4) trypomastigotes (CA-1 strain) were sacrificed weekly up to week nine. Morphological, binding and contractility studies were performed on the four different groups of animals. The effect of their serum antibodies was also assayed in binding and contractility studies on normal heart preparations. RESULTS: Hearts from chagasic myocarditis mice showed a beta-adrenoceptor-related dysfunction, with a decrease in heart contractility, impaired response to exogenous beta-adrenoceptor agonist and a significant reduction in beta-adrenergic binding sites. Those effects were maximum at eight-nine weeks post-infection and were improved by treating infected mice with atenolol. In addition, serum or IgG from chagasic myocarditis mice was capable of interacting with cardiac beta-adrenoceptors, reducing the number of binding sites and inhibiting the contractile response to exogenous norepinephrine. IgG effects that were observed in normal myocardium, were highest in sera from mice eight-nine weeks post-infection and correlate with the degree of myocarditis. Moreover, chagasic autoantibodies from infected mice recognized a peptide corresponding to the sequence of the second extracellular loop of the human beta 1-adrenoceptor. CONCLUSIONS: (1) The development of alterations in beta-adrenergic receptors, related to cardiac dysfunction, may be associated with the presence of circulating antibodies against these receptors and (2) it is possible that the chronic deposits of these autoantibodies in cardiac beta-adrenoceptors could lead to a progressive blockade with sympathetic denervation, a phenomenon that has been described in the course of chagasic myocarditis.  (+info)

Myocardial parasite persistence in chronic chagasic patients. (2/382)

The persistence of Trypanosoma cruzi tissue forms was detected in the myocardium of seropositive individuals clinically diagnosed as chronic chagasic patients following endomyocardial biopsies (EMBs) processed by immunohistochemical (peroxidase-anti-peroxidase [PAP] staining) and molecular (polymerase chain reaction [PCR]) techniques. An indirect immunofluorescent technique revealed antigenic deposits in the cardiac tissue in 24 (88.9%) of 27 patients. Persistent T. cruzi amastigotes were detected by PAP staining in the myocardium of 22 (84.6%) of 26 patients. This finding was confirmed with a PCR assay specific for T. cruzi in 21 (91.3%) of 23 biopsy specimens from the same patients. Statistical analysis revealed substantial agreement between PCR and PAP techniques (k = 0.68) and the PCR and any serologic test (k = 0.77). The histopathologic study of EMB specimens from these patients revealed necrosis, inflammatory infiltrates, and fibrosis, and made it possible to detect heart abnormalities not detected by electrocardiogram and/or cineventriculogram. These indications of myocarditis were supported by the detection of T. cruzi amastigotes by the PAP technique or its genome by PCR. They suggest that although the number of parasites is low in patients with chronic Chagas' disease, their potential for heart damage may be comparable with those present during the acute phase. The urgent necessity for testing new drugs with long-term effects on T. cruzi is discussed in the context of the present results.  (+info)

Parasite persistence correlates with disease severity and localization in chronic Chagas' disease. (3/382)

The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi infects up to 20 million people in Latin America, and the resulting disease (Chagas' disease) is a leading cause of heart disease and death in young adults in areas endemic for the parasite. The clinical symptoms of Chagas' disease have been attributed to autoimmune reactivity to antigens shared by the parasite and host muscle or neuronal tissue. In the present study, in situ polymerase chain reaction analysis was used in murine models of Chagas' disease to demonstrate an absolute correlation between the persistence of parasites and the presence of disease in muscle tissue. Clearance of parasites from tissues, presumably by immunologic mechanisms, correlated with the abatement of inflammatory responses and the resolution of disease. These data provide strong evidence for parasite persistence as a primary cause of Chagas' disease and argue for efforts to eliminate T. cruzi from the host as a means for prevention and treatment of Chagas' disease.  (+info)

Cardiac M(2) muscarinic cholinoceptor activation by human chagasic autoantibodies: association with bradycardia. (4/382)

OBJECTIVE: To assess whether exposure of cardiac muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) to activating chagasic antimyocardial immunoglobulins results in bradycardia and other dysautonomic symptoms associated with the regulation of heart rate. METHODS: Trypanosoma cruzi infected patients with bradycardia and other abnormalities in tests of the autonomic nervous system were studied and compared with normal subjects. Antipeptide antibodies in serum were demonstrated by an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay using a synthetic 24-mer-peptide corresponding antigenically to the second extracellular loop of the human heart M(2) mAChR. The functional effect of affinity purified antipeptide IgG from chagasic patients on spontaneous beating frequency and cAMP production of isolated normal rat atria was studied. RESULTS: There was a strong association between the finding of antipeptide antibodies in chagasic patients and the presence of basal bradycardia and an altered Valsalva manoeuvre (basal bradycardia: chi(2) = 37.5, p < 0. 00001; Valsalva manoeuvre: chi(2) = 70.0, p < 0.00001). The antipeptide autoantibodies also showed agonist activity, decreasing the rate of contraction and cAMP production. The effects on rat atria resembled the effects of the authentic agonist and those of the total polyclonal chagasic IgG, being selectively blunted by atropine and AF-DX 116, and neutralised by the synthetic peptide corresponding in amino acid sequence to the second extracellular loop of the human M(2) mAChR. CONCLUSIONS: There is an association between circulating antipeptide autoantibodies in chagasic patients and the presence of bradycardia and other dysautonomic symptoms. Thus these autoantibodies are a marker of autoimmune cardiac autonomic dysfunction. The results support the hypothesis that autoimmune mechanisms play a role in the pathogenesis of chagasic cardioneuromyopathy.  (+info)

Different microcirculatory and interstitial matrix patterns in idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy and Chagas' disease: a three dimensional confocal microscopy study. (5/382)

OBJECTIVE: To analyse the morphological aspects of the extracellular matrix and microcirculation to clarify whether chronic Chagas' cardiopathy (CCC) is an accurate model to study the pathogenesis of idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDCM). DESIGN: Thick histological myocardial sections were prepared to analyse collagen, and microcirculation was examined during confocal laser and light microscopy. SETTING: The specimens were prepared at the pathology service of the Heart Institute of Sao Paulo, Brazil. PATIENTS: Nine control hearts, eight IDCM hearts, and 10 CCC hearts were studied after necropsy. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The number of collagen struts per 100x field, the area of fibrosis (%), and the diameters of arterioles and capillaries were measured in each heart to establish outcome. RESULTS: A smaller number (mean (SD)) of collagen struts was seen in the hearts in the IDCM group (9.1 (4.1)) than in the control (22.4 (3.2)) (p < 0.05) or CCC (15.7 (7.4)) (p > 0.05) groups. Fibrosis was greater in the CCC hearts (13.8 (10.5)%) than in the IDCM hearts (5.9 (6.6)%) (p > 0.05). Major increases in arteriole (65.4 (9.9) microm) and capillary (9.9 (1.7) microm) diameters were seen in the CCC hearts but not in the IDCM hearts (arteriole diameter 40.3 (7.9) microm; capillary diameter 7.9 (1.3) microm). CONCLUSIONS: Hearts demonstrating CCC and IDCM present different extracellular and microvessel alterations. This suggests that distinct pathogenic mechanisms are responsible for each condition and that CCC is not an effective model to study IDCM.  (+info)

Application of cardiac gated magnetic resonance imaging in murine Chagas' disease. (6/382)

To evaluate the role of gated cardiac magnetic imaging resonance (MRI) in Chagas' disease, we infected mice with Trypanosoma cruzi (Brazil strain). Two models were chosen for study, the CD1 and the inducible nitric oxide synthase knockout (NOS2-/-) mice. Infection of CD1 mice was associated with a significant increase in the right ventricular inner diameter (RVID) that was reversed in some mice by verapamil. Expression of cardiac NOS2 has been associated with myocardial dysfunction. Therefore, we evaluated chagasic cardiomyopathy in NOS2-/- and syngeneic wild type (WT) mice. Infected WT mice exhibited an increase in RVID in the acute phase (< 60 days postinfection) that was more marked during chronic infection (>100 days postinfection). Chronically infected NOS2-/- mice had an increase in RVID. The RVID in infected WT mice was greater than in NOS2-/- mice. These data demonstrate that MRI is a useful tool in the serial evaluation of the heart in murine Chagas' disease. In addition, it supports the notion that the NOS2-/-/NO pathway may contribute to the pathogenesis of murine chagasic cardiomyopathy.  (+info)

Chronic Chagas' heart disease in a Japanese-Brazilian traveler. A case report. (7/382)

A 57-year-old Japanese-Brazilian man, visiting Japan for only 9 days, was admitted to our hospital due to syncope and frequent ventricular premature beats. He grew up in a rural area of Brazil and moved to Sao Paulo in 1959 when he was 20 years old. We suspected chronic Chagas' heart disease, i.e., dilated cardiomyopathy with apical ventricular aneurysm, right bundle branch block with left anterior fascicular block, and various arrhythmias including supraventricular premature beats, ventricular premature beats and non-sustained ventricular tachycardia because he showed typical echo- and electrocardiographic features of the disease. Coronary arteriograms were normal, and left ventriculogram confirmed the existence of apical ventricular aneurysm. A left ventricle biopsy specimen showed hypertrophic cardiac muscle with mild fibrosis. The diagnosis of chronic Chagas' disease was finally confirmed by the demonstration of Trypanosoma cruzi itself in the blood as well as Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies.  (+info)

Immunopathology of Chagas disease. (8/382)

The main clinical forms of Chagas disease (acute, indeterminate and chronic cardiac) present strong evidences for the participation of the immune system on pathogenesis. Although parasite multiplication is evident during acute infection, the intense acute myocarditis of this phase exhibits clear ultrastructural signs of cell-mediated immune damage, inflicted to parasitized and non-parasitized myocardiocytes and to the endothelium of myocardial capillaries (microangiopathy). Inflammation subsides almost completely when immunity decreases parasite load and suppressor factors modulate host reaction, but inflammation does not disappear when the disease enters the indeterminate phase. Inflammation becomes mild and focal and undergoes cyclic changes leading to complete resolution. However, the process is maintained because the disappearance of old focal lesions is balanced by the upsurge of new ones. This equilibrium allows for prolonged host survival in the absence of symptoms or signs of disease. The chronic cardiac form is represented by a delayed-type, cell-mediated diffuse myocarditis, that probably ensues when the suppressive mechanisms, operative during the indeterminate phase, become defaulted. The mechanism responsible for the transition from the indeterminate to the cardiac form, is poorly understood.  (+info)

Chagas cardiomyopathy is a specific type of heart disease that is caused by infection with the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, which is spread through the feces of infected triatomine bugs (also known as "kissing bugs"). The disease is named after Carlos Chagas, who discovered the parasite in 1909.

In Chagas cardiomyopathy, the infection can lead to inflammation of the heart muscle (myocarditis), which can cause damage to the heart over time. This damage can lead to a range of complications, including:

* Dilated cardiomyopathy: This is a condition in which the heart muscle becomes weakened and stretched, leading to an enlarged heart chamber and reduced pumping ability.
* Arrhythmias: These are abnormal heart rhythms that can cause symptoms such as palpitations, dizziness, and fainting.
* Heart failure: This is a condition in which the heart is unable to pump blood effectively, leading to symptoms such as shortness of breath, fatigue, and fluid buildup in the body.
* Cardiac arrest: In severe cases, Chagas cardiomyopathy can lead to sudden cardiac arrest, which is a medical emergency that requires immediate treatment.

Chagas cardiomyopathy is most commonly found in Latin America, where the parasite that causes the disease is endemic. However, due to increased travel and migration, cases of Chagas cardiomyopathy have been reported in other parts of the world, including the United States. Treatment for Chagas cardiomyopathy typically involves medications to manage symptoms and prevent further complications, as well as lifestyle changes such as diet and exercise modifications. In some cases, more invasive treatments such as surgery or implantable devices may be necessary to treat severe complications of the disease.

Trypanosoma cruzi is a protozoan parasite that causes Chagas disease, also known as American trypanosomiasis. It's transmitted to humans and other mammals through the feces of triatomine bugs, often called "kissing bugs." The parasite can also be spread through contaminated food, drink, or from mother to baby during pregnancy or birth.

The life cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi involves two main forms: the infective metacyclic trypomastigote that is found in the bug's feces and the replicative intracellular amastigote that resides within host cells. The metacyclic trypomastigotes enter the host through mucous membranes or skin lesions, where they invade various types of cells and differentiate into amastigotes. These amastigotes multiply by binary fission and then differentiate back into trypomastigotes, which are released into the bloodstream when the host cell ruptures. The circulating trypomastigotes can then infect other cells or be taken up by another triatomine bug during a blood meal, continuing the life cycle.

Clinical manifestations of Chagas disease range from an acute phase with non-specific symptoms like fever, swelling, and fatigue to a chronic phase characterized by cardiac and gastrointestinal complications, which can develop decades after the initial infection. Early detection and treatment of Chagas disease are crucial for preventing long-term health consequences.

The term "asymptomatic disease" refers to a medical condition or infection that does not cause any obvious symptoms in an affected individual. Some people with asymptomatic diseases may never develop any signs or symptoms throughout their lives, while others may eventually go on to develop symptoms at a later stage. In some cases, asymptomatic diseases may still be detected through medical testing or screening, even if the person feels completely well. A classic example of an asymptomatic disease is a person who has a positive blood test for a latent viral infection, such as HIV or HSV (herpes simplex virus), but does not have any symptoms related to the infection at that time.

Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a type of cardiomyopathy characterized by the enlargement and weakened contraction of the heart's main pumping chamber (the left ventricle). This enlargement and weakness can lead to symptoms such as shortness of breath, fatigue, and fluid retention. DCM can be caused by various factors including genetics, viral infections, alcohol and drug abuse, and other medical conditions like high blood pressure and diabetes. It is important to note that this condition can lead to heart failure if left untreated.

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a genetic disorder characterized by the thickening of the heart muscle, specifically the ventricles (the lower chambers of the heart that pump blood out to the body). This thickening can make it harder for the heart to pump blood effectively, which can lead to symptoms such as shortness of breath, chest pain, and fatigue. In some cases, HCM can also cause abnormal heart rhythms (arrhythmias) and may increase the risk of sudden cardiac death.

The thickening of the heart muscle in HCM is caused by an overgrowth of the cells that make up the heart muscle, known as cardiomyocytes. This overgrowth can be caused by mutations in any one of several genes that encode proteins involved in the structure and function of the heart muscle. These genetic mutations are usually inherited from a parent, but they can also occur spontaneously in an individual with no family history of the disorder.

HCM is typically diagnosed using echocardiography (a type of ultrasound that uses sound waves to create images of the heart) and other diagnostic tests such as electrocardiogram (ECG) and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Treatment for HCM may include medications to help manage symptoms, lifestyle modifications, and in some cases, surgical procedures or implantable devices to help prevent or treat arrhythmias.

I apologize, but "Brazil" is not a medical term or condition. It is the largest country in both South America and Latin America by land area and population. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health concerns, please provide more information and I will do my best to help.

Cardiomyopathies are a group of diseases that affect the heart muscle, leading to mechanical and/or electrical dysfunction. The American Heart Association (AHA) defines cardiomyopathies as "a heterogeneous group of diseases of the myocardium associated with mechanical and/or electrical dysfunction that usually (but not always) exhibit inappropriate ventricular hypertrophy or dilatation and frequently lead to heart failure."

There are several types of cardiomyopathies, including:

1. Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM): This is the most common type of cardiomyopathy, characterized by an enlarged left ventricle and impaired systolic function, leading to heart failure.
2. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM): In this type, there is abnormal thickening of the heart muscle, particularly in the septum between the two ventricles, which can obstruct blood flow and increase the risk of arrhythmias.
3. Restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM): This is a rare form of cardiomyopathy characterized by stiffness of the heart muscle, impaired relaxation, and diastolic dysfunction, leading to reduced filling of the ventricles and heart failure.
4. Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC): In this type, there is replacement of the normal heart muscle with fatty or fibrous tissue, primarily affecting the right ventricle, which can lead to arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death.
5. Unclassified cardiomyopathies: These are conditions that do not fit into any of the above categories but still significantly affect the heart muscle and function.

Cardiomyopathies can be caused by genetic factors, acquired conditions (e.g., infections, toxins, or autoimmune disorders), or a combination of both. The diagnosis typically involves a comprehensive evaluation, including medical history, physical examination, electrocardiogram (ECG), echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and sometimes genetic testing. Treatment depends on the type and severity of the condition but may include medications, lifestyle modifications, implantable devices, or even heart transplantation in severe cases.

Restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM) is a type of heart muscle disorder characterized by impaired relaxation and filling of the lower chambers of the heart (the ventricles), leading to reduced pump function. This is caused by stiffening or rigidity of the heart muscle, often due to fibrosis or scarring. The stiffness prevents the ventricles from filling properly with blood during the diastolic phase, which can result in symptoms such as shortness of breath, fatigue, and fluid retention.

RCM is a less common form of cardiomyopathy compared to dilated or hypertrophic cardiomyopathies. It can be idiopathic (no known cause) or secondary to other conditions like amyloidosis, sarcoidosis, or storage diseases. Diagnosis typically involves a combination of medical history, physical examination, echocardiography, and sometimes cardiac MRI or biopsy. Treatment is focused on managing symptoms and addressing underlying causes when possible.

Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, also known as Takotsubo syndrome or stress-induced cardiomyopathy, is a temporary heart condition usually triggered by emotional or physical stress. It's named after the Japanese word for "octopus pot" because of the shape of the left ventricle during the contraction phase, which resembles this pot.

In Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, a part of the heart muscle becomes weakened and doesn't pump well, often following a surge of stress hormones. The condition can be misdiagnosed as a heart attack because it has similar symptoms and test results. However, unlike a heart attack, there's no evidence of blocked heart arteries in Takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

The symptoms of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy include chest pain, shortness of breath, irregular heartbeat, and sometimes fluid retention. Treatment typically includes medication to manage symptoms and support the heart while it recovers. Most people with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy make a full recovery within a few weeks. However, in rare cases, complications such as heart failure or arrhythmias can occur.

Chagas disease represents a parasitic nonischemic cardiomyopathy targeting parasympathetic inflow to the heart. Chagas ... May 2001). "Partial left ventriculectomy for dilated cardiomyopathy: is this an alternative to transplantation?". J. Thorac. ... Many of his patients were victims of Chagas disease. ... cardiomyopathy thus represents a unique method of study of ... heart procedure that proposed the reversal of the effects of remodeling in cases of end-stage dilated cardiomyopathy refractory ...
"Cross-talk between anti-beta1-adrenoceptor antibodies in dilated cardiomyopathy and Chagas' heart disease". Autoimmunity. 41 (6 ... "Berlin Cures Announces Successful Completion of Phase 1 Study of BC 007 for the Treatment of Cardiomyopathy". BioSpace. 22 ... June 2020). "The aptamer BC 007 for treatment of dilated cardiomyopathy: evaluation in Doberman Pinschers of efficacy and ... 2009-07-09). "Effects of protein A immunoadsorption in patients with advanced chronic dilated cardiomyopathy". Journal of ...
The treatment of Chagas cardiomyopathy is similar to that of other forms of heart disease. Beta blockers and ACE inhibitors may ... Chagas disease at Curlie Chagas information at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control Chagas information from the Drugs for ... September 2018). "Chagas cardiomyopathy: an update of current clinical knowledge and management: a scientific statement from ... Chagas disease results in the loss of over 800,000 disability-adjusted life years each year. The endemic area of Chagas disease ...
Another cardiomyopathy found in nearly all cases of chronic Chagas' disease is thromboembolic syndrome. Thromboembolism ... Researchers of Chagas' disease have demonstrated several processes that occur with all cardiomyopathies. The first event is an ... Chagas disease undergoes two phases, which are the acute and the chronic phase. The acute phase can last from two weeks to two ... Chagas, C. (1909). "Nova especie morbida do homem, produzida por um Trypanozoma (Trypanozoma cruzi): nota prévia" [New morbid ...
... cardiomyopathy among Trypanosoma cruzi-infected individuals". Molecular Immunology. 45 (1): 283-8. doi:10.1016/j.molimm.2007.04 ... "Variants in the promoter region of IKBL/NFKBIL1 gene may mark susceptibility to the development of chronic Chagas' ...
... dilated cardiomyopathies, Chagas, cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure, as well as in heart transplant rejection and ...
... that the parasite was responsible for a deadly heart disease now known as Chagas heart disease or Chagas cardiomyopathy. In ... Chagas was the son of José Justiniano das Chagas, a coffee farmer at Juiz de Fora in Minas Gerais, and Mariana Cândida Chagas ( ... Carlos Justiniano Ribeiro Chagas. WhoNamedIt. Dr. Carlos Chagas Historical aspects of Chagas disease. Instituto Oswaldo Cruz. ( ... Chagas died in Rio de Janeiro from a heart attack in 1934 at 55 years of age. Chagas was elected to the National Academy of ...
His fields of research covered the biochemistry of parasitic cells in malaria and in Chagas disease-induced cardiomyopathy as ...
... chagas disease MeSH C03.752.700.500.935.200.190 - chagas cardiomyopathy MeSH C03.752.700.500.935.226 - dourine MeSH C03.752. ...
Council of Cardiomyopathies and Chagas Disease Council of Electrocardiography and Electrophysiology Alliance Against Sudden ...
Other causes include: Chagas disease, due to Trypanosoma cruzi. This is the most common infectious cause of dilated ... Tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy should be considered in all patients with a dilated cardiomyopathy of uncertain origin and ... "What Is Cardiomyopathy?". NHLBI. 22 June 2016. Retrieved 10 November 2017. "Types of Cardiomyopathy". NHLBI. 22 June 2016. ... Tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy is a reversible cause of heart failure and dilated cardiomyopathy. ...
"Chagas Disease: What U.S. Clinicians Need to Know". Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. CDC. Retrieved 3 October 2023. ... cardiomyopathy, or hypertension.[citation needed] Causes for incomplete right bundle branch block are exercise-induced right ... In addition, a right bundle branch block may also result from Brugada syndrome, Chagas disease, pulmonary embolism, rheumatic ... "Electrocardiographic abnormalities in Chagas disease in the general population: A systematic review and meta-analysis". PLOS ...
"Dilated Cardiomyopathy". The Lecturio Medical Concept Library. Retrieved 25 August 2021. "Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy". The ... Bestetti, Reinaldo B. (Nov 2016). "Chagas Heart Failure in Patients from Latin America". Card Fail Rev. 2 (2): 90-94. doi: ... Cardiomyopathy is also associated with cardiomegaly. Cardiomegaly can be serious and can result in congestive heart failure. ... "Overview of Cardiomyopathies". The Lecturio Medical Concept Library. Retrieved 25 August 2021. Tavora F; et al. (2012). " ...
... cardiomyopathy, restrictive MeSH C14.280.238.190 - chagas cardiomyopathy MeSH C14.280.238.281 - endocardial fibroelastosis MeSH ... cardiomyopathy, alcoholic MeSH C14.280.238.070 - cardiomyopathy, dilated MeSH C14.280.238.100 - cardiomyopathy, hypertrophic ... cardiomyopathy, dilated MeSH C14.280.434.313 - dyspnea, paroxysmal MeSH C14.280.434.482 - edema, cardiac MeSH C14.280.470.475 ... cardiomyopathy, hypertrophic MeSH C14.280.484.150.070.210 - discrete subaortic stenosis MeSH C14.280.484.275 - heart murmurs ...
DR16 is associated with Chaga's cardiomyopathy, rheumatic heart disease, coronary artery ectasia, and chronic discoid lupus ... "MHC class I and class II genes in Mexican patients with Chagas disease". Hum Immunol. 65 (1): 60-5. doi:10.1016/j.humimm. ...
Specific kinds of dilated cardiomyopathy are listed below, and other causes include Chagas disease, chemotherapeutic agents (e. ... Nonischemic cardiomyopathy - Cardiomyopathy caused by something other than ischemia. Amyloid cardiomyopathy - Cardiomyopathy ... Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (Transient apical ballooning, stress-induced cardiomyopathy) - A type of dilated cardiomyopathy caused ... Alcoholic cardiomyopathy - A type of dilated cardiomyopathy caused by chronic abuse of alcohol and results from direct toxicity ...
Cardiomyopathy due to autoimmune dysregulation and production of autoantibodies has been seen in humans and reproduced in ... While the exact pathophysiology of Chagas disease is not completely understood, some models have shown that an overstimulation ... Soares, Milena B. P.; Pontes-De-Carvalho, Lain; Ribeiro-Dos-Santos, Ricardo (December 2001). "The pathogenesis of Chagas' ... "Levels of anti-M2 and anti-β1 autoantibodies do not correlate with the degree of heart dysfunction in Chagas' heart disease". ...
Chagas Disease and African Trypanosomiasis Chapter 223: Toxoplasma Infections Chapter 224: Protozoal Intestinal Infections and ... Cardiomyopathy and Myocarditis Chapter 255: Cardiac Transplantation and Prolonged Assisted Circulation Chapter 256: Aortic ...
2000). "Beta1-adrenoceptor gene variations: a role in idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy?". Journal of Molecular Medicine. 78 (2 ... "Structural and functional analysis of the B cell epitopes recognized by anti-receptor autoantibodies in patients with Chagas' ...
... , also known as inflammatory cardiomyopathy, is an acquired cardiomyopathy due to inflammation of the heart muscle. ... Worldwide, however, the most common cause is Chagas disease, an illness endemic to Central and South America that results from ... Schölmerich P (1983). "Myocarditis - Cardiomyopathy Historic Survey and Definition". Myocarditis Cardiomyopathy. International ... In 2015 cardiomyopathy, including myocarditis, resulted in 354,000 deaths up from 294,000 in 1990. The initial descriptions of ...
Cardiomyopathy, familial dilated Cardiomyopathy due to anthracyclines Cardiomyopathy hearing loss type t RNA lysine gene ... ribs sprengel anomaly polydactyly Cervical spinal stenosis Cervical vertebral fusion Cervicooculoacoustic syndrome Chagas ... familial Cardiomyopathy hypogonadism metabolic anomalies Cardiomyopathy spherocytosis Cardiomyopathy, fatal fetal, due to ... right ventricular cardiomyopathy Cardiomyopathic lentiginosis Cardiomyopathy cataract hip spine disease Cardiomyopathy diabetes ...
"Chagas Disease Represents New Challenge for Blood Supply Safety". Kimura A, Kitamura H, Date Y, Numano F (August 1996). " ... B39 appears to be protective against cardiomyopathy in Chaga's disease indicating a possible selective factor in its rise in ... "MHC class I and class II genes in Mexican patients with Chagas disease". Hum. Immunol. 65 (1): 60-5. doi:10.1016/j.humimm. ...
Na tarde deste sábado (23), o infectologista do Instituto Nacional de Infectologia Evandro Chagas da Fiocruz (INI/Fiocruz), ... pulmonary hypertension Hypertensive heart disease Coronary syndromes Valvular heart diseases Cardiomyopathies, pericardial ...
... , European Journal of Heart Failure, April 2015, Wiley, DOI: 10.1002/ejhf.261 ...
... suggesting that inhibition of ER stress may be a valuable strategy to combat the progression of cardiomyopathy in Chagas ... which is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in the endemic regions of Chagas disease (CD). The pathogenesis of Chagasic ... we examined whether treating infected mice with an ER stress inhibitor can modify the pathogenesis of cardiomyopathy during ... cardiomyopathy (CCM) has been intensely studied as a chronic inflammatory disease until recent observations reporting the role ...
Dilated cardiomyopathy is a progressive disease of heart muscle that is characterized by ventricular chamber enlargement and ... Chagas cardiomyopathy. Chagas disease caused by Trypanosoma cruzi. The acute presentation is characterized by dyspnea, fever, ... hypertensive cardiomyopathy, tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy, Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, or ischemic cardiomyopathy after ... Chagas cardiomyopathy in New Orleans and the Southeastern United States. Ochsner J. 2016 Fall. 16(3):304-8. [QxMD MEDLINE Link] ...
... and other echocardiographic parameters to predict adverse outcomes in chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCM). Prospective cohort ... tracking and echocardiographic parameters as predictors of adverse cardiovascular outcomes in chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy. ... tracking and echocardiographic parameters as predictors of adverse cardiovascular outcomes in chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy. ... tracking and echocardiographic parameters as predictors of adverse cardiovascular outcomes in chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy. ...
The most common findings in patients with Chagas cardiomyopathy include cardiac rhythm abnormalities, myocardial abnormalities ... In addition, "dilated Chagas cardiomyopathy refers to the hemodynamic pattern of the Chagas cardiomyopathy that is ... Chagas cardiomyopathy is known as Chagas disease with cardiac involvement, with ≥1 electrocardiographic abnormality in patients ... More Variants in Dilated Cardiomyopathy-Tied Genes in Alcoholic Cardiomyopathy. *Racial, Ethnic Differences in Cardiomyopathy ...
Direct evidence gap on fixed versus adjusted-dose benznidazole for adults with chronic Chagas disease without cardiomyopathy: ... We searched (December 2021) Cochrane, MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS and trial registries and contacted Chagas experts. Selection, ... dose for Trypanosoma cruzi-seropositive adults without cardiomyopathy. METHODS:. We conducted a systematic review and ... cruzi-seropositive adults without cardiomyopathy were included. ...
doi: 10.1111/tmi.13831 Summary: Benznidazole is registered for the treatment of Chagas disease caused by Trypanosoma cruzi in ... Direct evidence gap on fixed versus adjusted-dose benznidazole for adults with chronic Chagas disease without cardiomyopathy: ... Direct evidence gap on fixed versus adjusted-dose benznidazole for adults with chronic Chagas disease without cardiomyopathy: ... Summary: Benznidazole is registered for the treatment of Chagas disease caused by Trypanosoma cruzi in adjusted-dose schemes. ...
Materials and methods: Ten patients with severe Chagas cardiomyopathy performed 8 months of exercise training in a cardiac ... Conclusion: Exercise may benefit patients with severe Chagas cardiomyopathy by curbing the production of pro-inflammatory ... Instituto Nacional de Infectologia Evandro Chagas. Laboratório de Pesquisa Clínica em Doença de Chagas. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, ... Instituto Nacional de Infectologia Evandro Chagas. Laboratório de Pesquisa Clínica em Doença de Chagas. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, ...
Chagas disease, also known as American trypanosomiasis, is caused by infection with the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. ... Long-term Survival Following Heart Transplantation for Chagas Versus Non-Chagas Cardiomyopathy: A Single-center Experience in ... Chagas disease among school students from Chiapas, Mexico: Two cases of Chagasic cardiomyopathy. J Vector Borne Dis. 2021 Apr- ... Randomized Trial of Benznidazole for Chronic Chagas Cardiomyopathy. N Engl J Med. 2015 Oct. 373 (14):1295-306. [QxMD MEDLINE ...
... which progresses to Chagas cardiomyopathy in 20-30% of infected individuals over decades. The pathogenesis of Chagas ... Association of caspase-1 polymorphisms with Chagas cardiomyopathy among individuals in Santa Cruz, Bolivia Major Article. Fu, ... Cardiac status was classified (I, II, III, IV) based on Chagas cardiomyopathy-associated electrocardiogram findings and ... Caspase-1 polymorphisms may play a role in Chagas cardiomyopathy development and could serve as markers to identify individuals ...
Chagas disease represents a parasitic nonischemic cardiomyopathy targeting parasympathetic inflow to the heart. Chagas ... May 2001). "Partial left ventriculectomy for dilated cardiomyopathy: is this an alternative to transplantation?". J. Thorac. ... Many of his patients were victims of Chagas disease. ... cardiomyopathy thus represents a unique method of study of ... heart procedure that proposed the reversal of the effects of remodeling in cases of end-stage dilated cardiomyopathy refractory ...
Categories: Chagas Cardiomyopathy Image Types: Photo, Illustrations, Video, Color, Black&White, PublicDomain, ...
Chagas disease (CD), with associated conduction abnormalities, is a common indication for pacemaker implantation in Latin ... Randomized trial of benznidazole for chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy. N Engl J Med 373: 1295-1306. ... Chagas disease. Lancet 375: 1388-1402.. Rassi. A. Marin-Neto. JA. , 2010. . Chagas disease. . Lancet 375. : 1388. -. 1402. . ... Chagas disease. Lancet 375: 1388-1402.. Rassi. A. Marin-Neto. JA. , 2010. . Chagas disease. . Lancet 375. : 1388. -. 1402. . ...
Chagas Cardiomyopathy Manifestations and Trypanosoma cruzi Genotypes Circulating in Chronic Chagasic Patients. PLOS Neglected ... An overview of Chagas disease and the role of Triatomines on its distribution in Brazil. Vector-Borne and Zoonotic diseases, 9 ... Doenca de Chagas: notificacao de triatomineos no Estado de Sao Paulo na decada de 1990. Revista da Sociedade Brasileira de ... Chagas disease. What is know and what should be improved: a systematic review. Revista da Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina ...
Nearly a third of the people sickened by Chagas can develop potentially fatal cardiomyopathy.. Aug 29 FDA news release ... FDA approves first drug for Chagas disease. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced yesterday that it has granted ... is approved for use in children ages 2 to 12 years old who have Chagas disease. Its safety and efficacy were shown in two ... accelerated approval for the nations first treatment for Chagas disease, a parasitic infection caused by Trypanosoma cruzi ...
Chagas cardiomyopathy is the most serious and frequent manifestation of Chagas disease. Clinical manifestations vary widely ... Chagas disease is a risk factor for stroke regardless of the severity of cardiomyopathy, which is a leading cause of chronic ... Both pharmaceutical care and exercise training have a positive effect on the HRQoL of patients with Chagas cardiomyopathy, and ... The CUIDA Chagas Project: towards the elimination of congenital transmission of Chagas disease in Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, ...
Chagas disease, also known as American trypanosomiasis, is caused by infection with the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. ... Long-term Survival Following Heart Transplantation for Chagas Versus Non-Chagas Cardiomyopathy: A Single-center Experience in ... Chagas disease among school students from Chiapas, Mexico: Two cases of Chagasic cardiomyopathy. J Vector Borne Dis. 2021 Apr- ... Randomized Trial of Benznidazole for Chronic Chagas Cardiomyopathy. N Engl J Med. 2015 Oct. 373 (14):1295-306. [QxMD MEDLINE ...
Direct evidence gap on fixed versus adjusted-dose benznidazole for adults with chronic Chagas disease without cardiomyopathy: ...
BACKGROUND: Chagas disease is a parasitic infection that can insidiously cause non-ischemic cardiomyopathy. Given the largely ... We evaluated this test against the CDC algorithm for chronic Chagas disease. We tested several sets of serum specimens: 104 ... In conclusion, the Ortho T. cruzi ELISA Test System compares well against the CDC diagnostic algorithm for chronic Chagas ... The serologic diagnosis of chronic Chagas disease, caused by infection with the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is challenging and ...
The pathogenesis of Chagas disease cardiomyopathy (CCC), an endemic disease affecting millions of patients in Latin America, is ... Project title: Mitochondria, interferon-gamma and genetics in Chagas disease cardiomyopathy: Pathogenesis, therapeutic targets ...
The term inflammatory cardiomyopathy (ICM) refers to a group of disorders for which an acute or chronic myocardial inflammation ... Inflammatory cardiomyopathy can also occur in connection with autoimmune inflammatory diseases. Typical manifestations of ... The most common cause of inflammatory cardiomyopathy is lymphocytic myocarditis, which is most usually triggered by a viral ... Therefore, the identification of inflammatory cardiomyopathy is elusive and the true incidence of the condition remains unknown ...
... levels of macrophage migration inhibitory factor are associated with progressive chronic cardiomyopathy in patients with Chagas ...
Chagas cardiomyopathy is a late complication that happens years to a long time after the preliminary an infection. The reply is ...
... the Hallmarks of Chronic Chagas Cardiomyopathy, in A Mouse Model of Trypanosoma cruzi Infection ...
... arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, inherited cardiomyopathies, Chagas disease, Takotsubo cardiomyopathy and more ... Chapters cover different kinds of cardiomyopathies: hypertrophic cardiomyopathies, pediatric cardiomyopathies, ... The first volume of this series, Septic Cardiomyopathy: from bench-to-bedside, integrates new and old information about the ... Compendium on Cardiomyopathies provides an easily readable source of material for practicing physicians, clinicians, ...
Dilated cardiomyopathy is a progressive disease of heart muscle that is characterized by ventricular chamber enlargement and ... Chagas cardiomyopathy. Chagas disease caused by Trypanosoma cruzi. The acute presentation is characterized by dyspnea, fever, ... hypertensive cardiomyopathy, tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy, Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, or ischemic cardiomyopathy after ... Chagas cardiomyopathy in New Orleans and the Southeastern United States. Ochsner J. 2016 Fall. 16 (3):304-8. [QxMD MEDLINE Link ...
Genome-wide association study for Chagas Cardiomyopathy identify a new risk locus on chromosome 18 associated with an immune- ... Direct evidence gap on fixed versus adjusted-dose benznidazole for adults with chronic Chagas disease without cardiomyopathy: ... cruzi Infection in hiPSC-Derived Cardiomyocytes From Chagas Disease Patients With and Without Chronic Cardiomyopathy. Front ... The agent of South American trypanosomiasis or CHAGAS DISEASE. Its vertebrate hosts are man and various domestic and wild ...
SEROPREVALENCE OF T. cruzi INFECTION IN BLOOD DONORS AND CHAGAS CARDIOMYOPATHY IN PATIENTS FROM THE COAL MINING REGION OF ...
... treatment for adults aged 50 years or younger with chronic infection who do not already have advanced Chagas cardiomyopathy. ... Additionally, the CDC recommends antiparasitic treatment for all cases of acute (ie, congenital) or reactivated Chagas disease ... Treatment of children aged 2-12 years with Chagas disease (American trypanosomiasis) caused by Trypanosoma cruzi. ...
  • Trypanosoma cruzi infection results in debilitating cardiomyopathy, which is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in the endemic regions of Chagas disease (CD). (preprints.org)
  • Chagas cardiomyopathy is known as Chagas disease with cardiac involvement, with ≥1 electrocardiographic abnormality in patients who test positive for T cruzi . (thecardiologyadvisor.com)
  • Benznidazole is registered for the treatment of Chagas disease caused by Trypanosoma cruzi in adjusted-dose schemes. (dndial.org)
  • The authors conducted a systematic review and individual participant data meta-analysis to compare the efficacy and safety of fixed and adjusted doses for T. cruzi -seropositive adults without cardiomyopathy. (dndial.org)
  • To determine the comparative efficacy and safety of a fixed dose of benznidazole (BZN) with an adjusted- dose for Trypanosoma cruzi -seropositive adults without cardiomyopathy . (bvsalud.org)
  • Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) allocating participants to fixed or adjusted doses of BZN for T. cruzi-seropositive adults without cardiomyopathy were included. (bvsalud.org)
  • Chagas disease, also known as American trypanosomiasis, is caused by infection with the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi . (medscape.com)
  • The organism T cruzi and infection in humans were first described in 1909 by the Brazilian physician Carlos RJ Chagas. (medscape.com)
  • A minority of persons with long-standing T cruzi infection develop the serious cardiac and gastrointestinal problems that characterize chronic symptomatic Chagas disease. (medscape.com)
  • Caracterizacao de cepas do Trypanosoma cruzi isoladas no Reconcavo Baiano (contribuicao ao estudo geral da doenca de Chagas em nosso meio). (degruyter.com)
  • The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced yesterday that it has granted accelerated approval for the nation's first treatment for Chagas disease, a parasitic infection caused by Trypanosoma cruzi spread by kissing bugs that has increasingly been found in the United States, especially in Texas's Rio Grande Valley area. (umn.edu)
  • Human Trypanosoma cruzi chronic infection leads to individual level steady-state parasitemia: Implications for drug-trial optimization in Chagas disease. (harvard.edu)
  • Different Transcriptomic Response to T. cruzi Infection in hiPSC-Derived Cardiomyocytes From Chagas Disease Patients With and Without Chronic Cardiomyopathy. (harvard.edu)
  • Treatment of children aged 2-12 years with Chagas disease (American trypanosomiasis) caused by Trypanosoma cruzi . (medscape.com)
  • Additionally, the CDC recommends antiparasitic treatment for all cases of acute (ie, congenital) or reactivated Chagas disease and for chronic T cruzi in children up to age 18 years. (medscape.com)
  • Trypansosoma cruzi is the parasite that is transmitted from the Kissing Bug that causes Chagas disease. (donorbox.org)
  • According to the last epidemiological report of the World Health Organization in 2015, in Argentina there are 1.5 million people infected with Trypanosoma cruzi and around 370,000 patients with different manifestations of Chagas disease. (scielo.org.ar)
  • Chagas disease, an infection caused by a protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi , is a major public health problem with a considerable global disease burden and costs. (revportcardiol.org)
  • Chagas disease (CD) is a disease caused by the protozoan flagellates of the Kinetoplastid order Trypanosoma cruzi . (bvsalud.org)
  • Chagas disease (CD) is a disease caused by the protozoan flagellate of the Kinetoplastid order Trypanosoma cruzi , whose vector is an insect belonging to the Reduviidae family and subfamily Triatominae popularly known as barber 1 . (bvsalud.org)
  • Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi) causes Chagas disease. (fapesp.br)
  • Chagas disease (American trypanosomiasis) is a tropical parasitic disease caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi transmitted by blood sucking triatomine insects, also known as "kissing" bugs for their habit of feeding on people's faces while they sleep. (medscape.com)
  • The pathogenesis of Chagas disease cardiomyopathy (CCC), an endemic disease affecting millions of patients in Latin America, is the focus of Dr. Cunha-Neto's group at the Heart Institute (InCor) of Hospital das Clínicas (HC), the hospital complex run by the Medical School of the University of São Paulo (FM-USP) in Brazil. (fapesp.br)
  • With Chagas disease cardiomyopathy can occur. (donorbox.org)
  • The pathogenesis of Chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCM) has been intensely studied as a chronic inflammatory disease until recent observations reporting the role of cardio-metabolic dysfunctions. (preprints.org)
  • In the present study, we examined whether treating infected mice with an ER stress inhibitor can modify the pathogenesis of cardiomyopathy during chronic stages of infection. (preprints.org)
  • Treatment of dilated cardiomyopathy is essentially the same as treatment of chronic heart failure (CHF). (medscape.com)
  • Echeverría LE, Rojas LZ, Rueda-Ochoa OL, Gómez-Ochoa SA, Mayer MA, Becerra-Motta LP, Luengas C, Chaves AM, Rodríguez JA, Morillo CA. Longitudinal strain by speckle tracking and echocardiographic parameters as predictors of adverse cardiovascular outcomes in chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy. (upf.edu)
  • To analyze the prognostic value of left ventricular global longitudinal strain (LV-GLS) and other echocardiographic parameters to predict adverse outcomes in chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCM). (upf.edu)
  • The parasite-driven immune response and autoreactivity that is triggered by the infection are 2 mechanisms that may be responsible for initiating acute and chronic myocarditis in Chagas heart disease. (thecardiologyadvisor.com)
  • Chronic Chagas heart disease usually develops several decades after the disease first appears, which implies an imbalance between the parasite and the host immune response. (thecardiologyadvisor.com)
  • Changes such as right branch-bundle block (with or without left anterior hemiblock) can signal the transition from the indeterminate form to the chronic cardiac form, and the presence of a typical electrocardiographic abnormality has been associated with an increased risk for progressing to a more severe cardiomyopathy. (thecardiologyadvisor.com)
  • The term inflammatory cardiomyopathy (ICM) refers to a group of disorders for which an acute or chronic myocardial inflammation is the central cause of abnormal cardiac structure or impaired cardiac function. (intechopen.com)
  • The CDC also strongly recommends treatment for adults aged 50 years or younger with chronic infection who do not already have advanced Chagas cardiomyopathy. (medscape.com)
  • The symptoms of chronic Chagas Disease are irregular heartbeat, congestive heart failure, and difficulty swallowing. (novusbio.com)
  • During the chronic stage, it cannot be treated with medications, but the symptoms of Chagas disease can be treated by targeting that specific problem. (novusbio.com)
  • Nine cases of Chagas disease (CD), although rare in normal. (cdc.gov)
  • It is typically used as the first-line of treatment in cases of chagas disease (a form of cardiomyopathy caused by a. (computerwise.com)
  • These included 1 case of acute Chagas myocarditis (ACM), hyperexcitability in 2 patients). (cdc.gov)
  • The most common cause of inflammatory cardiomyopathy is lymphocytic myocarditis, which is most usually triggered by a viral infection, and occasionally by other infectious agents. (intechopen.com)
  • Rare causes of specific inflammatory cardiomyopathies include cardiac sarcoidosis, giant cell myocarditis and eosinophilic myocarditis. (intechopen.com)
  • The acute phase of Chagas diseases can last 8 to 12 weeks, but is often not diagnosed because many patients are asymptomatic or only present with mild or nonspecific symptoms (eg, fever, malaise, and splenomegaly). (thecardiologyadvisor.com)
  • Chagas Disease is most common in children and starts in an acute stage. (novusbio.com)
  • When in the acute stage, Chagas Disease can be treated with medications that focus on killing the parasite. (novusbio.com)
  • It is named after the Brazilian physician Carlos Chagas, who discovered the parasite. (edu.au)
  • Since 2007, all potential blood donors in the U.S. are screened for exposure to the Chagas parasite. (medscape.com)
  • In a study of Texas blood donors between 2008 and 2012, about one in 6,500 tested positive for the Chagas parasite, reported Melissa N. Garcia, epidemiologist at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. (medscape.com)
  • The Baylor team followed 17 Houston-area blood donors infected with the Chagas parasite and found that seven (41%) had undiagnosed electrocardiographic abnormalities consistent with Chagas cardiomyopathy. (medscape.com)
  • While it's unclear how many triatomine bugs in the United States may carry the Chagas parasite, a pilot study conducted by the Baylor team may shed some light on the issue. (medscape.com)
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy is myocardial dysfunction causing heart failure in which ventricular dilation and systolic dysfunction predominate. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Chagas disease represents a parasitic nonischemic cardiomyopathy targeting parasympathetic inflow to the heart. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chagas Disease is a parasitic disease caused by coming in contact with the feces of an infected triatomine bug. (novusbio.com)
  • Epidemiology, control and surveillance of Chagas disease - 100 years after its discovery. (degruyter.com)
  • Importantly, cardiac ultrasound imaging showed amelioration of ventricular enlargement, suggesting that inhibition of ER stress may be a valuable strategy to combat the progression of cardiomyopathy in Chagas patients. (preprints.org)
  • Determining which patients will develop Chagas heart disease remains an ongoing challenge and an important area of research. (thecardiologyadvisor.com)
  • Materials and methods: Ten patients with severe Chagas cardiomyopathy performed 8 months of exercise training in a cardiac rehabilitation program. (fiocruz.br)
  • Conclusion: Exercise may benefit patients with severe Chagas cardiomyopathy by curbing the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in this disease characterized by a continuous state of inflammation. (fiocruz.br)
  • The Batista procedure was invented by Brazilian physician and cardiac surgeon Randas Batista in 1994 for use in patients with non-ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many of his patients were victims of Chagas disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • ABSTRACT Chagas disease (CD) is a neglected tropical disease associated with poverty in which patients are surrounded by stigma. (scielo.br)
  • Both pharmaceutical care and exercise training have a positive effect on the HRQoL of patients with Chagas cardiomyopathy, and the mental component can be a prognostic marker in this population. (scielo.br)
  • Similarly, new molecular-based methods and therapies tailored to specific pathogeneses have a potential to improve diagnosis and outcomes in patients with inflammatory cardiomyopathy. (intechopen.com)
  • Dr. Schoondyke, from Karing Hearts, will be traveling to Bolivia to implant pacemakers with patients who have cardiac complications due to Chagas Disease. (donorbox.org)
  • More effective prediction of mortality in Chagas heart disease patients? (revportcardiol.org)
  • Cardiac involvement is found in 25-30% of cases, 4 and it is reported that a third of infected patients in Brazil have Chagas cardiomyopathy. (revportcardiol.org)
  • The high rate of infectious bugs, combined with the high rate of feeding on humans, should be a cause of concern and should prompt physicians to consider the possibility of Chagas disease in U.S. patients with heart rhythm abnormalities and no obvious underlying conditions," Dr. Kristy Murray, associate professor of tropical medicine at Baylor, said in a statement. (medscape.com)
  • The drug benznidazole, made by Chemo Research, SL, of Madrid, is approved for use in children ages 2 to 12 years old who have Chagas disease. (umn.edu)
  • But the CDC provided only 422 courses of benznidazole or nifurtimox used to treat Chagas during this period. (medscape.com)
  • Although Chagas disease is typically regarded as a tropical disease found primarily in Central and South America, it now affects ≥300,000 residents in the United States and its prevalence is growing elsewhere. (thecardiologyadvisor.com)
  • Traditionally, when physicians think of Chagas disease they think of someone from Latin or South America. (medscape.com)
  • In many cases of cardiomyopathy, endomyocardial biopsy is class II (uncertain efficacy and may be controversial) or class III (generally not indicated). (medscape.com)
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy is 1 of the 3 traditional classes of cardiomyopathy, along with hypertrophic and restrictive cardiomyopathy. (medscape.com)
  • Without successful treatment, infection can persist for a lifetime and can result in serious cardiovascular conditions including dilated cardiomyopathy with heart failure, ventricular arrhythmias and conduction disturbances, stroke, and other systemic or pulmonary embolisms. (thecardiologyadvisor.com)
  • 1,3 These mechanisms lead to dilated cardiomyopathy and ventricular arrhythmias that may be malignant, sudden death, heart failure and thromboembolic phenomena. (revportcardiol.org)
  • Angiotensin Receptor-Neprilysin Inhibition in Chagas Cardiomyopathy With Reduced Ejection Fraction: ANSWER-HF. (who.int)
  • The American Heart Association (AHA) has released an update of clinical knowledge and management of Chagas cardiomyopathy, which has been endorsed by the Inter-American Society of Cardiology and published in Circulation . (thecardiologyadvisor.com)
  • The agent of South American trypanosomiasis or CHAGAS DISEASE. (harvard.edu)
  • Various explanations have been put forward for this cardiomyopathy, including the neurogenic theory (development of parasympathetic disautonomy leading to sympathetic predominance and catecholamine toxicity), microvascular dysfunction, autoimmune reactions, and immune responses to surviving parasites, with lymphocyte infiltration into cardiac tissues. (revportcardiol.org)
  • In addition, "dilated Chagas cardiomyopathy refers to the hemodynamic pattern of the Chagas cardiomyopathy that is characterized by left ventricular enlargement with segmental or global systolic function impairment, regardless of electrocardiographic findings. (thecardiologyadvisor.com)
  • Typical manifestations of inflammatory cardiomyopathy include chest pain, heart failure, and arrhythmias, but these symptoms and signs are unspecific. (intechopen.com)
  • Inflammatory cardiomyopathy can also occur in connection with autoimmune inflammatory diseases. (intechopen.com)
  • Secondary Cardiomyopathy are due to extrinsic/systemic causes (e.g. (fpnotebook.com)
  • Laboratório de Pesquisa Clínica em Doença de Chagas. (fiocruz.br)
  • More recently, there is evidence that the persistence of high parasitemia and tissue parasitism, a proinflammatory immunological profile with sustained oxidative stress, and genes related to natural killer/CD8 + T-cell cytotoxicity may be determinant in the development of Chagas cardiomyopathy, although the exact mechanism remains to be elucidated," the authors wrote. (thecardiologyadvisor.com)
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy is a progressive disease of heart muscle that is characterized by ventricular chamber enlargement and contractile dysfunction. (medscape.com)
  • However, the classification of cardiomyopathies continues to evolve, based on the rapid evolution of molecular genetics as well as the introduction of recently described diseases. (medscape.com)
  • Nearly a third of the people sickened by Chagas can develop potentially fatal cardiomyopathy. (umn.edu)
  • The overall goal of this study is to understand the risk of Chagas disease in hunters, a potentially high-risk population. (bcm.edu)
  • There are very specific cardiac abnormalities associated with Chagas. (medscape.com)
  • Researchers from the National School of Tropical Medicine are offering educational material and free screening for Chagas disease at hunting conventions and gatherings across Texas. (bcm.edu)
  • We were astonished to not only find such a high rate of individuals testing positive for Chagas in their blood, but also high rates of heart disease that appear to be Chagas-related," Garcia said in a conference statement. (medscape.com)
  • About one-third of people with Chagas disease will develop heart disease from it," she noted in an interview with Reuters Health. (medscape.com)
  • Garcia and her colleagues have been working with physicians in Texas to increase awareness and diagnosis of Chagas disease. (medscape.com)
  • We've actually had a long history of Chagas in the state of Texas and in the United States," said Garcia, adding that the first case of locally acquired infection dates back to 1955. (medscape.com)
  • What is the place of partial left ventriculectomy in the treatment of delated cardiomyopathy? (rbccv.org.br)
  • Elimination of Chagas disease transmission: perspectives. (degruyter.com)
  • Evolucao fatal da co-infeccao doenca de Chagas/Aids: dificuldades diagnosticas entre a reagudizacao da miocardite e a miocardiopatia chagasica cronica. (degruyter.com)
  • Anyone that doesn't have diabetes or hypertension and is otherwise in pretty good health, but has heart problems, that's the kind of person you think of for Chagas. (medscape.com)