A genus of ascomycetous fungi of the family Chaetomiaceae, order SORDARIALES. Many members are cellulolytic and some mycotoxic. They occur naturally on paper and cotton fabric.
An endosymbiont that is either a bacterium or fungus living part of its life in a plant. Endophytes can benefit host plants by preventing pathogenic organisms from colonizing them.
A mitosporic fungal genus that causes MYCETOMA in humans. Madurella grisea and M. mycetomatis are the etiological agents.
A plant division. They are simple plants that lack vascular tissue and possess rudimentary rootlike organs (rhizoids). Like MOSSES, liverworts have alternation of generations between haploid gamete-bearing forms (gametophytes) and diploid spore-bearing forms (sporophytes).
A kingdom of eukaryotic, heterotrophic organisms that live parasitically as saprobes, including MUSHROOMS; YEASTS; smuts, molds, etc. They reproduce either sexually or asexually, and have life cycles that range from simple to complex. Filamentous fungi, commonly known as molds, refer to those that grow as multicellular colonies.
A large and heterogenous group of fungi whose common characteristic is the absence of a sexual state. Many of the pathogenic fungi in humans belong to this group.

Chaetoatrosin A, a novel chitin synthase II inhibitor produced by Chaetomium atrobrunneum F449. (1/53)

Chaetoatrosin A, a novel chitin synthase II inhibitor, was isolated from the culture broth of fungus F449, which was identified as Chaetomium atrobrunneum F449. Chaetoatrosin A was purified by solvent partition, silica gel, ODS, preparative TLC, and Sephadex LH-20 column chromatographies, consecutively. The structure of chaetoatrosin A was assigned as 1,8-dihydroxy-3(2-hydroxypropionyl)-6-methoxynaphthalene on the basis of various spectroscopic analyses including UV, IR, mass spectral, and NMR. Its molecular weight and formula were found to be 262 and C14H14O5, respectively. ,Chaetoatrosin A inhibited chitin synthase II by 50% at the concentration of 104 microg/ml in an enzyme assay system. This compound showed antifungal activities against Rhizoctonia solani, Pyricularia oryzae, Botrytis cinerea, Cryptococcus neoformans and Trichophyton mentagrophytes.  (+info)

Identification of a series of tricyclic natural products as potent broad-spectrum inhibitors of metallo-beta-lactamases. (2/53)

This work describes the discovery and characterization of a novel series of tricyclic natural product-derived metallo-beta-lactamase inhibitors. Natural product screening of the Bacillus cereus II enzyme identified an extract from a strain of Chaetomium funicola with inhibitory activity against metallo-beta-lactamases. SB236050, SB238569, and SB236049 were successfully extracted and purified from this extract. The most active of these compounds was SB238569, which possessed K(i) values of 79, 17, and 3.4 microM for the Bacillus cereus II, Pseudomonas aeruginosa IMP-1, and Bacteroides fragilis CfiA metallo-beta-lactamases, respectively, yet none of the compounds exhibited any inhibitory activity against the Stenotrophomonas maltophilia L-1 metallo-beta-lactamase (50% inhibitory concentration > 1,000 microM). The lack of activity against angiotensin-converting enzyme and serine beta-lactamases demonstrated the selective nature of these compounds. The crystal structure of SB236050 complexed in the active site of CfiA has been obtained to a resolution of 2.5 A. SB236050 exhibits key polar interactions with Lys184, Asn193, and His162 and a stacking interaction with the indole ring of Trp49 in the flap, which is in the closed conformation over the active site groove. SB236050 and SB238569 also demonstrate good antibacterial synergy with meropenem. Eight micrograms of SB236050 per ml gave rise to an eightfold drop in the MIC of meropenem for two clinical isolates of B. fragilis producing CfiA, making these strains sensitive to meropenem (MIC < or = 4 microg/ml). Consequently, this series of metallo-beta-lactamase inhibitors exhibit the most promising antibacterial synergy activity so far observed against organisms producing metallo-beta-lactamases.  (+info)

Thielavins as glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) inhibitors: producing strain, fermentation, isolation, structural elucidation and biological activities. (3/53)

High-throughput screening of microbial extracts using rat hepatic microsomal glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) led us to find thielavin B as a G6Pase inhibitor with inhibition of glucose output from glucagon-stimulated hepatocytes. Further searching for more potent analogs identified 11 new thielavins F-P in addition to the known thielavins A and B from a fungus Chaetomium carinthiacum ATCC 46463. Thielavin G showed the strongest activity as a G6Pase inhibitor (IC50=0.33 microM), while the IC50 of thielavin B was 5.5 microM. According to the structure-activity relationship, including authentic thielavins C, D and 3 partial hydrolysates from thielavins A and B, 3 benzoic acid-units and carboxylic acid functions are essential for G6Pase inhibition.  (+info)

Microbial community composition affects soil fungistasis. (4/53)

Most soils inhibit fungal germination and growth to a certain extent, a phenomenon known as soil fungistasis. Previous observations have implicated microorganisms as the causal agents of fungistasis, with their action mediated either by available carbon limitation (nutrient deprivation hypothesis) or production of antifungal compounds (antibiosis hypothesis). To obtain evidence for either of these hypotheses, we measured soil respiration and microbial numbers (as indicators of nutrient stress) and bacterial community composition (as an indicator of potential differences in the composition of antifungal components) during the development of fungistasis. This was done for two fungistatic dune soils in which fungistasis was initially fully or partly relieved by partial sterilization treatment or nutrient addition. Fungistasis development was measured as restriction of the ability of the fungi Chaetomium globosum, Fusarium culmorum, Fusarium oxysporum, and Trichoderma harzianum to colonize soils. Fungistasis did not always reappear after soil treatments despite intense competition for carbon, suggesting that microbial community composition is important in the development of fungistasis. Both microbial community analysis and in vitro antagonism tests indicated that the presence of pseudomonads might be essential for the development of fungistasis. Overall, the results lend support to the antibiosis hypothesis.  (+info)

Six new constituents from an Ascomycete, Chaetomium quadrangulatum, found in a screening study focused on monoamine oxidase inhibitory activity. (5/53)

A screening study focusing on monoamine oxidase inhibitory activity on the EtOAc extract of an Ascomycete Chaetomium quadrangulatum, which previously gave five unique chromones possessing this activity (chaetoquadrins A-E (1-5)), this time afforded six new constituents termed chaetoquadrins F-K (6-11) in addition to 1-5. The structures of 6-11 have been deduced on the basis of spectral and chemical data, and 7 and 8 have shown appreciable monoamine oxidase inhibitory activity.  (+info)

Three-dimensional structures of thermophilic beta-1,4-xylanases from Chaetomium thermophilum and Nonomuraea flexuosa. Comparison of twelve xylanases in relation to their thermal stability. (6/53)

The crystal structures of thermophilic xylanases from Chaetomium thermophilum and Nonomuraea flexuosa were determined at 1.75 and 2.1 A resolution, respectively. Both enzymes have the overall fold typical to family 11 xylanases with two highly twisted beta-sheets forming a large cleft. The comparison of 12 crystal structures of family 11 xylanases from both mesophilic and thermophilic organisms showed that the structures of different xylanases are very similar. The sequence identity differences correlated well with the structural differences. Several minor modifications appeared to be responsible for the increased thermal stability of family 11 xylanases: (a) higher Thr : Ser ratio (b) increased number of charged residues, especially Arg, resulting in enhanced polar interactions, and (c) improved stabilization of secondary structures involved the higher number of residues in the beta-strands and stabilization of the alpha-helix region. Some members of family 11 xylanases have a unique strategy to improve their stability, such as a higher number of ion pairs or aromatic residues on protein surface, a more compact structure, a tighter packing, and insertions at some regions resulting in enhanced interactions.  (+info)

In vitro toxicity of indoor Chaetomium Kunze ex Fr. (7/53)

Microscopic fungi in the indoor environment present a serious health risk for people living in affected buildings. The potentially toxic ascomycete genus Chaetomium is supposed to be the third most frequent indoor fungal contaminant. Its brief mycological, toxicological and ecological characterization is given. The work was aimed at in vitro study of toxicity of endo- and exometabolites of 14 strains of Chaetomium spp., including 4 strains of Ch. globosum, isolated from mouldy buildings in Slovakia and Denmark, and 3 Ch. globosum strains from the Czechoslovak Collection of Microorganisms (CCM). The endometabolites of 10 isolates of Chaetomium spp. were active: 7 isolates (41% of total strain number) stopped tracheal ciliary movement of 1-d-old chickens after 24 h, 9 isolates (53%) after 48 h and 10 strains (59%) after 72 h. In the case of exometabolites, the extracts of 6 Chaetomium strains showed some ciliostatic activity: 2 isolates (12% of strains tested) after 24 h, 5 isolates (29%) after 48 h and 6 isolates (35%) after 72 h. In general, 5 isolates of Danish origin (83%) produced ciliostatically active exometabolites and 2 isolates (33%) produced such endometabolites, while only 4 strains isolated in Slovakia (50%) and 3 strains (37%) respectively did the same under experimental conditions. Most toxic metabolites were produced by Chaetomium spp. isolated from dwellings, whereas hospital isolates were not able to produce active compounds. Chaetomia as indoor contaminants can contribute to ill health of occupants of mouldy damp buildings.  (+info)

In vitro activities of new antifungal agents against Chaetomium spp. and inoculum standardization. (8/53)

Chaetomium is an unusual etiological agent of human infections, but the mortality rate among immunocompromised patients is considerably greater than that among nonimmunocompromised individuals. We investigated the in vitro antifungal susceptibilities to novel antifungal agents of 19 strains belonging to three species of Chaetomium which have been involved in human infections, i.e., Chaetomium globosum, C. atrobrunneum, and C. nigricolor, and one strain of the closely related species Achaetomium strumarium. A modification of the NCCLS reference microdilution method (M38-A) was used to evaluate the in vitro activities of ravuconazole, voriconazole, albaconazole, and micafungin. Micafungin was not active at all, while the geometric mean MICs and minimum effective concentrations of the three triazoles were less than 0.5 and 0.4 micro g/ml, respectively.  (+info)

Chaetomium is a genus of saprophytic fungi that are commonly found in soil, decaying plant and animal matter, and dung. The name "Chaetomium" comes from the Greek words "chaete," meaning "long hair," and "tomi," meaning "to cut." This refers to the characteristic long, bristle-like hairs on the ascospores (sexual spores) of these fungi.

Chaetomium species are known for their ability to produce a wide range of enzymes and secondary metabolites, including various pigments, antibiotics, and mycotoxins. Some Chaetomium species have been reported to cause infections in humans, particularly in individuals with weakened immune systems. However, such infections are relatively rare.

In a medical context, the term "Chaetomium" typically refers to the fungal genus as a whole or to specific species within it, rather than to any particular medical definition or condition. If you have any concerns about Chaetomium or other fungi, I would recommend consulting with a healthcare professional or mycologist for further information and advice.

Endophytes are microorganisms, typically bacteria or fungi, that live inside the tissues of plants without causing any visible disease or harm to the plant. They can be found in almost all plant species and are known to exist in a mutualistic relationship with their host plants. Endophytes can provide various benefits to the plants such as growth promotion, increased resistance to pathogens, and protection against herbivores. Some endophytic fungi also produce bioactive compounds that have potential applications in medicine, agriculture, and industry.

"Madurella" is not a medical term itself, but it is the name of a genus of fungi that can cause certain types of infections in humans. This genus is part of the family "Bipolarisaceae" and order "Chaetothyriales." The most common species that affects humans is "Madurella mycetomatis," which is known to cause a chronic subcutaneous infection called mycetoma. Mycetoma is a slowly progressive, granulomatous disease characterized by the formation of multiple sinuses and grains in the affected tissues. It primarily affects the feet but can also involve other parts of the body. The fungus enters the body through traumatic implantation, usually from contaminated soil or thorn pricks.

In summary, "Madurella" is a genus of fungi that includes species capable of causing mycetoma, a chronic subcutaneous infection in humans.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Hepatophyta" is not a valid medical or scientific term in modern usage. It appears to be a combination of the Greek word "hepar" meaning "liver" and the suffix "-phyta" which is used to denote a plant or group of plants in taxonomy. However, it is not a term that is recognized or used in modern biology or medicine.

It's possible that you may be thinking of "Hepatica," which is a genus of flowering plants in the family Ranunculaceae. These plants are also known as liverworts, although they should not be confused with actual liverworts, which are non-vascular plants in the division Marchantiophyta.

If you have any further questions or if there is another term you would like me to define, please let me know!

Fungi, in the context of medical definitions, are a group of eukaryotic organisms that include microorganisms such as yeasts and molds, as well as the more familiar mushrooms. The study of fungi is known as mycology.

Fungi can exist as unicellular organisms or as multicellular filamentous structures called hyphae. They are heterotrophs, which means they obtain their nutrients by decomposing organic matter or by living as parasites on other organisms. Some fungi can cause various diseases in humans, animals, and plants, known as mycoses. These infections range from superficial, localized skin infections to systemic, life-threatening invasive diseases.

Examples of fungal infections include athlete's foot (tinea pedis), ringworm (dermatophytosis), candidiasis (yeast infection), histoplasmosis, coccidioidomycosis, and aspergillosis. Fungal infections can be challenging to treat due to the limited number of antifungal drugs available and the potential for drug resistance.

Mitosporic fungi, also known as asexual fungi or anamorphic fungi, are a group of fungi that produce mitospores (also called conidia) during their asexual reproduction. Mitospores are produced from the tip of specialized hyphae called conidiophores and are used for dispersal and survival of the fungi in various environments. These fungi do not have a sexual reproductive stage or it has not been observed, making their taxonomic classification challenging. They are commonly found in soil, decaying organic matter, and water, and some of them can cause diseases in humans, animals, and plants. Examples of mitosporic fungi include Aspergillus, Penicillium, and Fusarium species.

... atrobrunneum Chaetomium carinthiacum Chaetomium cupreum Chaetomium cellulolyticum Chaetomium elatum Chaetomium ... funicola Chaetomium globosum Chaetomium grande Chaetomium interruptum Chaetomium iranianum Chaetomium jatrophae Chaetomium ... Chaetomium perlucidum Chaetomium rectangulare Chaetomium strumarium Chaetomium subspirale Chaetomium thermophilum Chaetomium ... Chaetomium is a genus of fungi in the Chaetomiaceae family. It is a dematiaceous (dark-walled) mold normally found in soil, air ...
... is a fungus species in the Chaetomium genus, first isolated from Iran. It shares features such as ... "Chaetomium rectangulare" at the Encyclopedia of Life MycoBank v t e (Articles with short description, Short description is ... Asgari, B.; Zare, R. (2011). "The genus Chaetomium in Iran, a phylogenetic study including six new species". Mycologia. 103 (4 ... 2013). "Method for rapid detection and identification of Chaetomium and evaluation of resistance to peracetic acid". Journal of ...
... is a fungus species in the Chaetomium genus, first isolated from Iran. It shares features such as ... "Chaetomium truncatulum" at the Encyclopedia of Life MycoBank v t e (Articles with short description, Short description is ... Asgari, B.; Zare, R. (2011). "The genus Chaetomium in Iran, a phylogenetic study including six new species". Mycologia. 103 (4 ... 2013). "Method for rapid detection and identification of Chaetomium and evaluation of resistance to peracetic acid". Journal of ...
... is a fungus in the genus Chaetomium. It is associated with the production of cellulase. Leisola, ... v t e (Articles with short description, Short description matches Wikidata, Articles with 'species' microformats, Chaetomium, ... Matti; Ulmer, Duane; Pitkänen, Kari; Fiechter, Armin (1985-10-01). "Induction of Cellulases in chaetomium cellulolyticumby ...
... is a thermophilic filamentous fungus. It grows on dung or compost (rotten organics). It is notable for ... Chaetomium thermophilum genome resource Encyclopedia of Life overview (Articles with short description, Short description ... "An integrated approach for genome annotation of the eukaryotic thermophile Chaetomium thermophilum". Nucleic Acids Research. 42 ... matches Wikidata, Articles with 'species' microformats, Chaetomium, Fungi described in 1950). ...
... is a fungus species in the Chaetomium genus, first isolated from Iran. It shares features such as ... "Chaetomium interruptum" at the Encyclopedia of Life MycoBank v t e (Articles with short description, Short description is ... Asgari, B.; Zare, R. (2011). "The genus Chaetomium in Iran, a phylogenetic study including six new species". Mycologia. 103 (4 ... 2013). "Method for rapid detection and identification of Chaetomium and evaluation of resistance to peracetic acid". Journal of ...
... is a well-known mesophilic member of the mold family Chaetomiaceae. It is a saprophytic fungus that ... Chaetomium globosum produce emodins, chrysophanols, chaetoglobosins A, B, C D, E and F, as well as chetomin, and the ... Like most Chaetomium species, C. globosum decomposes plant cells using hyphal cellulase activity. Even though they are known to ... Chaetomium globosum colonies are potential allergens, and when residing on damp buildings, they are usually the casual agents ...
... is pigmented and dark in colour, appearing hairy and wooly, with a growth rate of 4-5 mm/day. Chaetomium ... Chaetomium perlucidum Sergeeva. GBIF. Chaetomium perlucidum Sergeeva 1956. Uniprot. Barron, M. A.; Sutton, D. A.; Veve, R.; ... Chaetomium perlucidum ascospores can be cultured and grown in the lab through incubation on potato flake agar at 25°C for 6-10 ... Most Chaetomium fungal diseases are without known cure and in one case of death from 1996, antifungal therapy through ...
... is a fungus in the family Chaetomiaceae. It is able to decay in manufactured cellulosic materials, and is ... Chaetomium cupreum was described by Lawrence Marion Ames in 1949 as part of a military effort to identify the organisms ... Chaetomium cupreum is mesophilic and known to occur in harsh environments and can rapidly colonize organic substrates in soil. ... Chaetomium cupreum is intermediate between the species: C. trilaterale Chivers and C. aureum Chivers. C. aureum and C. cupreum ...
... is similar to various other species in the genus Chaetomium. However it is possible to distinguish ... Chivers recognized Chaetomium subspirale in 1912 in America through the course of his work on the genus Chaetomium. Through the ... Chaetomium subspirale is a fungus from the phylum Ascomycota. It was described by A. H. Chivers in 1912 in America. The species ... Chaetomium subspirale has been recognized for having a daily growth rate of 2.5-3.5 µm for colonies. Canadian mycologist Dr. ...
rhizo Chaetomium elatum is a very common and widely distributed species of Chaetomium, with it being found all over the world. ... "Mycobank:Chaetomium elatum". Retrieved 12 October 2018. Chivers, A.H. (10 June 1915). "A monograph of the genera Chaetomium and ... "Global Biotic Interactions:Chaetomium elatum". Retrieved 12 October 2018. Violi, HA; Menge, JA; Beaver, RJ (2007). "Chaetomium ... "Diversity and taxonomy of Chaetomium and chaetomium-like fungi from indoor environments". Studies in Mycology. 84 (1): 145-224 ...
... is a fungus species in the Chaetomium genus, first isolated from Iran. It shares features such as ... "Chaetomium undulatulum" at the Encyclopedia of Life MycoBank v t e (Articles with short description, Short description is ... Asgari, B.; Zare, R. (2011). "The genus Chaetomium in Iran, a phylogenetic study including six new species". Mycologia. 103 (4 ... 2013). "Method for rapid detection and identification of Chaetomium and evaluation of resistance to peracetic acid". Journal of ...
... is distinct from other Chaetomium species by its smaller perithecia, its ability to grow at relatively ... Chaetomium atrobrunneum in MycoBank. Chaetomium atrobrunneum in Index Fungorum (Articles with short description, Short ... Chaetomium atrobrunneum grows more slowly at 25 °C (77 °F) than most other species of the genus, reaching a colony diameter of ... Chaetomium atrobrunneum is a rare pathogen of humans that tends to infect the tissues of the central nervous system. Its ...
... is a fungus species in the Chaetomium genus, first isolated from Iran. It shares features such as peridium ... "Chaetomium iranianum" at the Encyclopedia of Life MycoBank v t e (Articles with short description, Short description is ... Doveri, F (2013). "An additional update on the genus Chaetomium with descriptions of two coprophilous species, new to Italy". ... Asgari, B.; Zare, R. (2011). "The genus Chaetomium in Iran, a phylogenetic study including six new species". Mycologia. 103 (4 ...
... is a fungus species in the Chaetomium genus, first isolated from Iran. It shares features such as peridium ... "Chaetomium grande" at the Encyclopedia of Life MycoBank v t e (Articles with short description, Short description is different ... Asgari, B.; Zare, R. (2011). "The genus Chaetomium in Iran, a phylogenetic study including six new species". Mycologia. 103 (4 ... 2013). "Method for rapid detection and identification of Chaetomium and evaluation of resistance to peracetic acid". Journal of ...
"Diversity and taxonomy of Chaetomium and chaetomium-like fungi from indoor environments". Studies in Mycology. 84: 145-224. doi ... Chaetomium murorum was first discovered by August Carl Joseph Corda in 1837 when he sampled the fungus from a wall in Prague. ... Vit Hubka (2015). "Chaetomium". In Russell, R.; Paterson, M.; Lima, Nelson (eds.). Molecular Biology of Food and Water Borne ... Chaetomium murorum, together with the genus Emilmuelleria, were then transferred to the genus Botryotrichum as the phylogenetic ...
In 1912, A. H. Chivers identified Chaetomium aureum while attempting to classify Chaetomium specimens in his herbarium. Ch. ... "Diversity and taxonomy of Chaetomium and chaetomium-like fungi from indoor environments". Studies in Mycology. 84: 145-224. doi ... Chaetomium species have been specifically recognized in the decay of cotton, and as the agent of fruit and wood rot. Arcopilus ... The genus Chaetomium first characterized in 1817 by Gustav Kunze based on the globular morphology of the perithecia. However, ...
Some coprophilous fungi are also known to grow from the dung of omnivores (such as Chaetomium globisporum from rat droppings) ... II; Chaetomium". Antonie van Leeuwenhoek. 30 (1): 163-167. doi:10.1007/BF02046722. PMID 14195246. S2CID 34479763. Amandeep K, ... or even carnivores (such as Chaetomium rajasthanense, from tiger feces). Although not all coprophilous fungi produce mushrooms ...
Other suggested mycorrhizal partners include Alternaria sp., Ceratorhiza sp., Chaetomium sp., Cylindrocarpon sp., Epicoccum ...
"Diversity and taxonomy of Chaetomium and chaetomium-like fungi from indoor environments". Studies in Mycology. 84: 145-224. doi ... The teleomorph, Chaetomium piluliferum was named by J. Daniels in 1961 from a culture of B. piluliferum on cellulose film. The ... It was discovered to be the asexual state of a member of the ascomycete genus, Chaetomium. The name B. piluliferum now applies ... von Arx, J.A.; Guarro, J.; Figueras, M.J. (1986). The Ascomycete genus Chaetomium. Berlin: J. Cramer. p. 45. ISBN 978-3-443- ...
In 2001, a molecular phylogenetic study using rRNA sequence data did not support the separation of Farrowia and Chaetomium. ... Barbosa, Flavia R.; Raja, Huzefa A.; Shearer, Carol A.; Gusmão, Luis F. P. (2012-06-07). "Três espécies de Chaetomium ( ... Decock, C.; Hennebert, G. L. (1997-03-01). "A new species of Chaetomium from Ecuador". Mycological Research. 101 (3): 309-310. ... These species were distinguished from other Chaetomium species by their long-necked ascomata and production of anamorphs ...
Chaetomium cochliodes Strain:CCM F-232, soil fungus (2016) Chaetomium globosum Strain:CBS 148.51, soil fungus (2005) Chaetomium ... "Chaetomium globosum Genome Project". broadinstitute.org. 15 May 2015. Retrieved 24 November 2018. Amlacher S, Sarges P, ... "Genome sequence of the filamentous soil fungus Chaetomium cochliodes reveals abundance of genes for heme enzymes from all ...
It was discovered in 1981 in Chaetomium gracile fungi, and its interaction with the insulin receptor was identified in 2014. ... "Mycotoxin production by Chaetomium spp. And related fungi". Canadian Journal of Microbiology. 27 (8): 766-72. doi:10.1139/m81- ...
He described the fungus as part of the genus Chaetomium and initially being named as Chaetomium bostrychodes. C. bostrychodes ... "Diversity and taxonomy of Chaetomium and chaetomium-like fungi from indoor environments". Studies in Mycology. 84: 145-224. doi ... Chaetomium convolutum can have a disposition to develop into some forms of C. bostrychodes, developing narrowly ellipsoidal or ... The fungus was described as unique in the genus Chaetomium for possessing banded spores that are characteristic of no species ...
1977) Coleroa chaetomium (Kunze) Rabenh. (1850) Coleroa circinans (Fr.) G. Winter (1885) Coleroa coffeicola Saccas (1953) ...
and its Endophytic Fungus Chaetomium fusiforme". Molecules. 13 (9): 2114-2125. doi:10.3390/molecules13092114. ISSN 1420-3049. ...
Sexually reproducing ascomycetes, especially Chaetomium spp., have developed resilience by growing thick, dark perithecia. ...
1903) = Coleroa caulicola V. chaetomium Ces. & De Not. (1863) = Niesslia exosporioides, Niessliaceae V. chlorospora f. pruni- ...
Trotter 1913 Chaetendophragmia ellisii (Piroz.) B. Sutton & Hodges 1978 Chaetomium ellisianum Sacc. & P. Syd. Chaetoplea ...
The species Aureobasidium pullulans, Chaetomium gracile and Penicillium brevicompactum have been found in association with ... Other fungi reported are Acremonium charticola, Chaetomium sp., Cryptococcus, Mucor and Penicillium. Global Volcanism Program, ...
Chaetomium atrobrunneum Chaetomium carinthiacum Chaetomium cupreum Chaetomium cellulolyticum Chaetomium elatum Chaetomium ... funicola Chaetomium globosum Chaetomium grande Chaetomium interruptum Chaetomium iranianum Chaetomium jatrophae Chaetomium ... Chaetomium perlucidum Chaetomium rectangulare Chaetomium strumarium Chaetomium subspirale Chaetomium thermophilum Chaetomium ... Chaetomium is a genus of fungi in the Chaetomiaceae family. It is a dematiaceous (dark-walled) mold normally found in soil, air ...
Potentially harmful secondary metabolites produced by indoor Chaetomium species on artificially and naturally contaminated ... globosum and Chaetomium elatum and are thus candidates as Chaetomium biomarkers. No sterigmatocystin was produced by Chaetomium ... globosum and Chaetomium elatum and are thus candidates as Chaetomium biomarkers. No sterigmatocystin was produced by Chaetomium ... AgarAir Pollution, IndoorChaetomiumChromatography, LiquidConstruction MaterialsHumansMass SpectrometryWood ...
Chaetomium globosum was cultured from the resected right lower lobe. Histology showed branching hyphae negative for common ... Previous reports of invasive disease caused by Chaetomium and some applications of immunohistochemical staining for Aspergillus ...
Novel DNA barcodes for detection, idenfication and tracking of stachybotrys and chaetomium species. Proceedings of Indoor Air ... Novel DNA barcodes for detection, idenfication and tracking of stachybotrys and chaetomium species. / Lewinska, Anna Malgorzata ... Dive into the research topics of Novel DNA barcodes for detection, idenfication and tracking of stachybotrys and chaetomium ... evaluates commonly used sequences in DNA barcoding for fungal species identification Chaetomium and Stachybotrys. The existing ...
Chaetomium elatum. A rapidly-growing fungus that produces a yellow-green colony, within five days, when incubated at 25oC (77oF ... It is the most widely distributed of the Chaetomium species. It is found worldwide, mainly in the temperate zone. It is found ...
Discover the dangerous truth behind Chaetomium Mold and how to protect yourself. Read on for the ultimate guide to prevention ... Preventing Chaetomium Mold Growth. Preventing the growth of chaetomium mold is crucial for keeping your home and loved ones ... Here are some of the potential risks associated with exposure to chaetomium mold:. * Allergies: Exposure to chaetomium mold can ... Steps for Safe Chaetomium Mold Removal. To safely remove the mold from your home, youll need to follow a series of steps that ...
Note: These kits are not intended for diagnosing or treatment.
While mold is found virtually everywhere you go and is not always harmful, there are certain types of mold or fungi that can pose a serious health risk to you. ...
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This fungi culture (rank: Ascomycetes), a cellulose-destroying fungus, is a filamentous ascomycete found in soil, plant debris, and many other locations. It requires a cellulose-rich medium for sporulation; optimal growth medium is V8® juice agar and sterile paper. Optimal growth temperature is 25° C. Fungi cultures ar
Rechercher les articles sur "Chaetomium globosum" sur le forum MycoDB. ...
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1 definitions found for Chaetomium medusarum. Chaetomium medusarum belongs to:. Chaetomium. Search Chaetomium medusarum in ...
1 definitions found for Chaetomium reflexum. Chaetomium reflexum belongs to:. Chaetomium. Search Chaetomium reflexum in Google ...
Chaetomium. There are many species of Chaetomium mold. Most can cause infections or allergic reactions in humans. C. ...
... Q. Zhang, H.-Q. Li, S.-C. Zong, J.-M. Gao, A ... Chemical and Bioactive Diversities of the Genus Chaetomium Secondary Metabolites. , Mini-Reviews in Medicinal Chemistry, ...
There are several species of Chaetomium. The most ... Chaetomium is a cellulose degrading mould commonly found in ... The most common ones are Chaetomium atrobrunneum, Chaetomium funicola, Chaetomium globosum, and Chaetomium murorum. In indoor ... Chaetomium may occur together with other water-loving moulds such Fusarium, Stachybotrys and Ulocladium. Species of Chaetomium ... environment the most common species of Chaetomium is Chaetomium globosum. Presence of Chaetomium species in indoor environment ...
Chaetomium. in Mold Types & Images /by Carolyn Willbanks. A mold commonly found in water-damaged homes and buildings. ... Chaetomium has a cotton-like texture and usually changes colors from white to grey to brown and eventually to black over time. ... Chaetomium mold is usually found in a damp or leaking roof, basement or stink and may be recognizable by its musty odor. ...
Its best to also remove chaetomium mold sooner than later because it can cause health problems like skin and nail infections, ...
1), Chaetomium sp. (1), coelomycete fungus (1), Epicoccum nigrum (1), Paecilomyces (1), Penicillium sp. (1), Scopulariopsis ...
Chaetomium globosum. Cunninghamella spp.. Curvularia geniculata. Curvularia pallescens. Fusarium moniliforme. Fusarium spp. ... Chaetomium globosum. Drechslera maydis. Curvularia oryzae. Curvularia pallescens. Curvularia penniseti. Curvularia siddiquii. ... Chaetomium brasiliense. Cladosporium oxysporum. Curvularia lunata. Drechslera australiensis. Fusarium moniliforme. Fusarium ...
The Ascomycete Genus Chaetomium. 1986. (Nova Hedwigia. Beihefte, Bd. 84). 62 figs. 92 pls. VI, 162 p. gr8vo. Paper bd. ...
Chaetomium thermophilum 6g7e_b G0S6C0 99.70 5.20E-23 5.60E-27 279.20 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ...
Chaetomium globosum is a common plant endophytic fungi that exhibits great biocontrol potential in plant disease. Fusarium ... Chaetomium globosum; Fusarium crown rot of wheat; Fusarium pseudograminearum; biological control; rhizosphere microorganisms ... Biological control of Fusarium crown rot of wheat with Chaetomium globosum 12XP1-2-3 and its effects on rhizosphere ... Biological control of Fusarium crown rot of wheat with ,i,Chaetomium globosum,/i, 12XP1-2- ...
Dextranase from Chaetomium erraticum. 50 mL. 85.50. D-xylose ketol-isomerase Sweetzyme® IT Extra. Glucose Isomerase from ...
A highly antagonistic Chaetomium globosum strain, Cg-2 that inhibited the mycelial growth of B. sorokiniana was selected for ... Reduced disease severity coupled with enhanced enzyme production elicited by Chaetomium globosum in glasshouse experiments by ... by Chaetomium globosum, J. Pure Appl. Microbiol., 2016; 10(3): 2071-2078. ...
Production of xylanase from pomegranate peel wastes using Chaetomium globosum under optimum conditions. Testing crude xylanase ... The main objective of the present study was production of xylanase from different agricultural wastes using Chaetomium globosum ... Atalla, S.M.M., El Gamal, N.G. Production and characterization of xylanase from pomegranate peel by Chaetomium globosum and its ... The main objective of the present study was production of xylanase from different agricultural wastes using Chaetomium globosum ...
Structural characterisation of the Chaetomium thermophilum Chl1 helicase. Authors (8)*Zuzana Hodakova ...
CHAETOMIUM. Chaetomium is a mold usually found in water-damaged homes and buildings. Chaetomium has a cotton-like fiber and ... Chaetomium mold is generally found in a damp or leaking roof, basement, or sink and maybe recognizable by its famous musty odor ... Chaetomium mold causes many health effects, such as skin and nail diseases. In some cases, it can produce mycotoxins that are ... Chaetomium mold can develop in places such as your roof, basement foundation, or leaky pipes. Cutting off the damp problem at ...
  • In 1817 Gustav Kunze established the genus Chaetomium (the plume of the helmet) to classify the species C. globosum and C. elatum. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chaetomium atrobrunneum Chaetomium carinthiacum Chaetomium cupreum Chaetomium cellulolyticum Chaetomium elatum Chaetomium funicola Chaetomium globosum Chaetomium grande Chaetomium interruptum Chaetomium iranianum Chaetomium jatrophae Chaetomium megalocarpum Chaetomium perlucidum Chaetomium rectangulare Chaetomium strumarium Chaetomium subspirale Chaetomium thermophilum Chaetomium truncatulum Chaetomium olivaceum Chaetomium undulatulum Kirk PM, Cannon PF, Minter DW, Stalpers JA (2008). (wikipedia.org)
  • Cochliodones were detected for the first time on all building materials infected by both C. globosum and Chaetomium elatum and are thus candidates as Chaetomium biomarkers. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • Chaetomium globosum was cultured from the resected right lower lobe. (bmj.com)
  • The most common ones are Chaetomium atrobrunneum , Chaetomium funicola , Chaetomium globosum , and Chaetomium murorum . (moldbacteriaconsulting.com)
  • In indoor environment the most common species of Chaetomium is Chaetomium globosum . (moldbacteriaconsulting.com)
  • Biological control of Fusarium crown rot of wheat with Chaetomium globosum 12XP1-2-3 and its effects on rhizosphere microorganisms. (bvsalud.org)
  • Chaetomium globosum is a common plant endophytic fungi that exhibits great biocontrol potential in plant disease . (bvsalud.org)
  • A highly antagonistic Chaetomium globosum strain, Cg-2 that inhibited the mycelial growth of B. sorokiniana was selected for assessing spot blotch and leaf rust control by pot culture experiments in the greenhouse. (microbiologyjournal.org)
  • Reduced disease severity coupled with enhanced enzyme production elicited by Chaetomium globosum in glasshouse experiments by foliar spray indicate that its mode of action for spot blotch and leaf rust suppression in wheat is through induced resistance. (microbiologyjournal.org)
  • The main objective of the present study was production of xylanase from different agricultural wastes using Chaetomium globosum on pomegranate waste, isolation of fungi associated with some legumes seeds, and studied the effect of safe product which obtained from xylanse under laboratory and greenhouse conditions on bean seeds. (springeropen.com)
  • Production of xylanase from pomegranate peel wastes using Chaetomium globosum under optimum conditions. (springeropen.com)
  • Germination of Lenzites trabea and Chaetomium globosum spores was observed directly on wood blocks, on water soluble extracts and on organic solvent soluble extracts from pine wood. (irg-wp.com)
  • An extract from Chaetomium globosum used in allergy testing. (drugbank.com)
  • Chaetomium may occur together with other water-loving moulds such Fusarium , Stachybotrys and Ulocladium . (moldbacteriaconsulting.com)
  • evaluates commonly used sequences in DNA barcoding for fungal species identification Chaetomium and Stachybotrys. (dtu.dk)
  • Previous reports of invasive disease caused by Chaetomium and some applications of immunohistochemical staining for Aspergillus are discussed. (bmj.com)
  • Chaetomium mold is a type of fungus that commonly grows in damp and humid environments, such as basements, bathrooms, and crawl spaces. (healthida.com)
  • Chaetomium mold is a type of fungus that thrives in damp and humid environments. (healthida.com)
  • The fungus Chaetomium cupreum isolated from wild-harvested A. californica yielded a new antimicrobial spirolactone, chaetocuprum (1). (uncg.edu)
  • Coupling proteomics and metabolomics for the unsupervised identification of protein-metabolite interactions in Chaetomium thermophilum. (embl.org)
  • It is the most widely distributed of the Chaetomium species. (edlab.org)
  • Toxicity: Some species of chaetomium mold produce mycotoxins, which are toxic substances that can cause a range of health problems. (healthida.com)
  • There are several species of Chaetomium . (moldbacteriaconsulting.com)
  • Presence of Chaetomium species in indoor environment is a sign of serious water problem. (moldbacteriaconsulting.com)
  • Species of Chaetomium are known to produce mycotoxins but to what extent these toxins contribute to poor indoor air quality or affect human health is not documented. (moldbacteriaconsulting.com)
  • Isolated from Chaetomium species. (enzolifesciences.com)
  • Chaetomium is a genus of fungi in the Chaetomiaceae family. (wikipedia.org)
  • To identify chaetomium mold in your home, look for signs such as a cotton-like texture, a grey or brownish color, and a distinct musty odor. (healthida.com)
  • Chaetomium mold is usually found in a damp or leaking roof, basement or stink and may be recognizable by its musty odor. (mold-help.org)
  • Chaetomium mold is generally found in a damp or leaking roof, basement, or sink and maybe recognizable by its famous musty odor. (e-architect.com)
  • endophytic microorganisms, arbuscular mycorrhiza, Chaetomium sp. (left-bank.com)
  • The presence of the fungal genus Chaetomium and its secondary metabolites in indoor environments is suspected to have a negative impact on human health and well-being. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • A few cases of fatal deep infections due to Chaetomium atrobrunneum have been reported in immunocompromised people. (wikipedia.org)
  • If left untreated, chaetomium mold can spread quickly and cause damage to your home's structure and possessions. (healthida.com)
  • It's important to understand how to identify and prevent chaetomium mold growth, as well as safely remove it if it's already present in your home. (healthida.com)
  • Infections: In rare cases, exposure to chaetomium mold may lead to infections, particularly in people with weakened immune systems. (healthida.com)
  • Respiratory problems: Chaetomium mold can also cause respiratory problems, particularly in people with asthma or other respiratory conditions. (healthida.com)
  • One possible culprit could be chaetomium mold, which typically grows in damp or moist areas such as basements, bathrooms, or kitchens. (healthida.com)
  • Chaetomium is a mold usually found in water-damaged homes and buildings. (e-architect.com)
  • There is a very toxic type of mold called the Chaetomium you need to be aware of. (cleanairplus.com)
  • While the risk of toxicity from chaetomium mold is generally low, it's still important to take steps to prevent exposure. (healthida.com)
  • Chaetomium is an allergic mold that generally starts as a fluffy white growth. (hogsback.ca)
  • Chaetomium has a cotton-like texture and usually changes colors from white to grey to brown and eventually to black over time. (mold-help.org)
  • Chaetomium mold can develop in places such as your roof, basement foundation, or leaky pipes. (e-architect.com)
  • If you suspect that you have chaetomium mold, it's important to have it professionally tested and removed, as attempting to clean it yourself can actually spread the spores and make the problem worse. (healthida.com)
  • While chaetomium mold isn't as well-known as other types, it can still cause health issues. (healthida.com)
  • Do you know what chaetomium mold is and how it can affect your health and home? (healthida.com)
  • In this article, we will guide you through the steps to protect your home and health from chaetomium mold. (healthida.com)
  • To protect yourself from the potential health risks associated with chaetomium mold, it's important to take steps to prevent its growth in your home. (healthida.com)
  • Chaetomium mold causes many health effects, such as skin and nail diseases. (e-architect.com)
  • Allergies: Exposure to chaetomium mold can cause allergic reactions in some people. (healthida.com)