Cationic bactericidal surfactant used as a topical antiseptic for skin, wounds, mucous membranes, instruments, etc.; and also as a component in mouthwash and lozenges.
Solutions for rinsing the mouth, possessing cleansing, germicidal, or palliative properties. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)
Substances used on humans and other animals that destroy harmful microorganisms or inhibit their activity. They are distinguished from DISINFECTANTS, which are used on inanimate objects.
Pyridinium compounds are organic salts formed when pyridine, a basic heterocyclic organic compound, reacts with acids, resulting in a positively charged nitrogen atom surrounded by aromatic rings.
Acids derived from monosaccharides by the oxidation of the terminal (-CH2OH) group farthest removed from the carbonyl group to a (-COOH) group. (From Stedmans, 26th ed)
A mucopolysaccharide constituent of chondrin. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
A plant genus of the family MALVACEAE, order Malvales, subclass Dilleniida. The common name of 'Mallow' may sometimes get confused with other plants.
Heteropolysaccharides which contain an N-acetylated hexosamine in a characteristic repeating disaccharide unit. The repeating structure of each disaccharide involves alternate 1,4- and 1,3-linkages consisting of either N-acetylglucosamine or N-acetylgalactosamine.
Hexosamines are amino sugars that are formed by the substitution of an amino group for a hydroxyl group in a hexose sugar, playing crucial roles in various biological processes such as glycoprotein synthesis and protein folding.
A disinfectant and topical anti-infective agent used also as mouthwash to prevent oral plaque.
A natural high-viscosity mucopolysaccharide with alternating beta (1-3) glucuronide and beta (1-4) glucosaminidic bonds. It is found in the UMBILICAL CORD, in VITREOUS BODY and in SYNOVIAL FLUID. A high urinary level is found in PROGERIA.
Agents that modify interfacial tension of water; usually substances that have one lipophilic and one hydrophilic group in the molecule; includes soaps, detergents, emulsifiers, dispersing and wetting agents, and several groups of antiseptics.
An enzyme that catalyzes the random hydrolysis of 1,4-linkages between N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosamine and D-glucuronate residues in hyaluronate. (From Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992) There has been use as ANTINEOPLASTIC AGENTS to limit NEOPLASM METASTASIS.
A naturally occurring glycosaminoglycan found mostly in the skin and in connective tissue. It differs from CHONDROITIN SULFATE A (see CHONDROITIN SULFATES) by containing IDURONIC ACID in place of glucuronic acid, its epimer, at carbon atom 5. (from Merck, 12th ed)
Inorganic salts of sulfuric acid.

Absorption of hyaluronan applied to the surface of intact skin. (1/77)

Hyaluronan has recently been introduced as a vehicle for topical application of drugs to the skin. We sought to determine whether hyaluronan acts solely as a hydrophilic reservoir on the surface of intact skin or might partly penetrate it. Drug-free hyaluronan gels were applied to the intact skin of hairless mice and human forearm in situ, with and without [3H] hyaluronan. [3H]hyaluronan was shown by autoradiography to disseminate through all layers of intact skin in mouse and human, reaching the dermis within 30 min of application in mice. Cellular uptake of [3H]hyaluronan was observed in the deeper layers of epidermis, dermis, and in lymphatic endothelium. Absorption through skin was confirmed in mice by chromatographic analysis of blood, urine, and extracts from skin and liver, which identified 3H as intact hyaluronan and its metabolites, free acetate and water. Hyaluronan absorption was similarly demonstrated without polyethylene glycol, which is usually included in the topical formulation. [3H]hyaluronan absorption was not restricted to its smaller polymers as demonstrated by the recovery of polymers of (360-400 kDa) from both blood and skin. This finding suggests that its passage through epidermis does not rely on passive diffusion but may be facilitated by active transport. This study establishes that hyaluronan is absorbed from the surface of the skin and passes rapidly through epidermis, which may allow associated drugs to be carried in relatively high concentration at least as far as the deeper layers of the dermis.  (+info)

Rapid determination of the amount of cetylpyridinium chloride bound by bacteria. (2/77)

A modification of the Colowick and Womack procedure for measuring ligand binding by macromolecules is described for drug binding by bacteria. This technique is based on the determination of drug concentration in the dialysate from a bacteria-drug mixture at equilibrium. The dialysis cell of the original procedure was replaced by a Minibeaker (Bio-Rad), which has a larger membrane surface area, and the dialysate was continuously monitored with a spectrophotometer equipped with a flow cell. With this system, only 3 min was required to determine the amount of cetylpyridinium chloride bound by Escherichia coli K-12 strain P678. Possible applications of the technique are discussed.  (+info)

Testing a degradable topical varnish of cetylpyridinium chloride in an experimental dental biofilm model. (3/77)

Dental biofilms are highly associated with the development of dental caries. Novel drug delivery systems are being developed in order to eliminate cariogenic bacteria from the dental biofilms. We formulated two degradable sustained release varnishes, based on acrylic resin, with cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) as the active agent. These formulations were tested in a dental biofilm model. The retention of CPC in the biofilm was dependent upon the pharmaceutical additives of the varnish. Both varnishes decreased bacterial adhesion, while also demonstrating marked antibacterial properties against the bacteria in the biofilm.  (+info)

A novel pharmacological probe links the amiloride-insensitive NaCl, KCl, and NH(4)Cl chorda tympani taste responses. (4/77)

Chorda tympani taste nerve responses to NaCl can be dissected pharmacologically into amiloride-sensitive and -insensitive components. It is now established that the amiloride-sensitive, epithelial sodium channel acts as a sodium-specific ion detector in taste receptor cells (TRCs). Much less is known regarding the cellular origin of the amiloride-insensitive component, but its anion dependence indicates an important role for paracellular shunts in the determination of its magnitude. However, this has not precluded the possibility that undetected apical membrane ion pathways in TRCs may also contribute to its origin. Progress toward making such a determination has suffered from lack of a pharmacological probe for an apical amiloride-insensitive taste pathway. We present data here showing that, depending on the concentration used, cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) can either enhance or inhibit the amiloride-insensitive response to NaCl. The CPC concentration giving maximal enhancement was 250 microM. At 2 mM, CPC inhibited the entire amiloride-insensitive part of the NaCl response. The NaCl response is, therefore, composed entirely of amiloride- and CPC-sensitive components. The magnitude of the maximally enhanced CPC-sensitive component varied with the NaCl concentration and was half-maximal at [NaCl] = 62 +/- 11 (SE) mM. This was significantly less than the corresponding parameter for the amiloride-sensitive component (268 +/- 71 mM). CPC had similar effects on KCl and NH(4)Cl responses except that in these cases, after inhibition with 2 mM CPC, a significant CPC-insensitive response remained. CPC (2 mM) inhibited intracellular acidification of TRCs due to apically presented NH(4)Cl, suggesting that CPC acts on an apical membrane nonselective cation pathway.  (+info)

PVC matrix membrane sensor for potentiometric determination of cetylpyridinium chloride. (5/77)

A novel cetylpyridinium chloride-selective membrane sensor consisting of cetylpyridinium-ferric thiocyanate ion pairs dispersed in a PVC matrix placticized with dioctylphthalate is described. The electrode shows a stable, near-Nernstian response for 1 x 10(-3)-1 x 10(-6) mol l-1 cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) at 25 degrees C over the pH range 1-6 with a cationic slope of 57.5 +/- 0.4. The lower detection limit is 8 x 10(-7) mol l-1 and the response time is 30-60 s. Selectivity coefficients for CPC relative to a number of interfering substances were investigated. There is negligible interference from many cations, anions and pharmaceutical excipients; however, cetyltrimethylammonim bromide (CTMAB) interfered significantly. The determination of 0.5-350 micrograms/ml of CPC in aqueous solutions shows an average recovery of 98.5% and a mean relative standard deviation of 1.6% at 56.0 micrograms/ml. The direct determination of CPC in Ezafluor mouthwash gave results that compare favorably with those obtained by the British Pharmacopoeia method. Precipitation titrations involving CPC as titrant are monitored with a CP sensor. The CP electrode has been utilized as an end point indicator electrode for the determination of anionic surfactants in some commercial detergents.  (+info)

Mucopolysaccharides associated with nuclei of cultured mammalian cells. (6/77)

Mucopolysaccharides have been isolated, fractionated, and characterized from the nuclei of cultured B16 mouse melanoma cells grown in the presence of (3-H)-glucosamine and (35-S)sulfate. Digestion of the nuclei with DNase followed by Pronase gave a mixture of complex carbohydrates from which the mucopolysaccharides were isolated by precipitation with cetylpyridinium chloride. After fractionation by differential salt extraction and chromatography on controlled pore glass bead columns, the components were identified by chemical and enzymatic methods. The major polysaccharide components were a family of high-molecular-weight chondroitin sulfates with different degrees of sulfation; a minor component has been characterized as heparan sulfate.  (+info)

Cetyl-pyridinium chloride is useful for isolation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from sputa subjected to long-term storage. (7/77)

Recovery of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from sputa treated with cetyl-pyridinium chloride (CPC) and stored for 20 +/- 9 days was significantly higher than that from sputa that were untreated and processed by the N-acetyl-L-cisteine-NaOH method. Addition of CPC is useful for isolation of M. tuberculosis from sputa subjected to long-term storage received from remote areas of the world.  (+info)

Effects of cetylpyridinium chloride resistance and treatment on fluconazole activity versus Candida albicans. (8/77)

Mouthwash antiseptic cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) has potent activity against Candida albicans; however, two of five azole-resistant strains showed reduced CPC susceptibility. To further examine the potential for cross-resistance, CPC-resistant mutants were selected in vitro and their fluconazole susceptibility was tested. MICs were unchanged, and trailing growth generally decreased. With CPC-fluconazole combinations, both antagonism and synergism were observed, which can be explained, in part, by CDR1-CDR2 multidrug transporter upregulation.  (+info)

Cetylpyridinium is an antimicrobial compound that is commonly used in oral healthcare products such as mouthwashes, toothpastes, and lozenges. It works by disrupting the bacterial cell membrane, leading to the death of the microorganism. Cetylpyridinium has been shown to be effective against a variety of bacteria, fungi, and viruses, making it a popular ingredient in products designed to maintain oral hygiene and prevent infection.

The chemical name for cetylpyridinium is cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC), and it has the molecular formula C16H37NClO. It is a cationic surfactant, which means that it contains positively charged ions that can interact with negatively charged bacterial cell membranes. This interaction disrupts the membrane's structure, leading to the leakage of cellular components and the death of the microorganism.

Cetylpyridinium is generally considered safe for use in oral healthcare products, although it can cause irritation in some people. It is important to follow the instructions on any product containing cetylpyridinium carefully, as overuse or improper use may lead to adverse effects. Additionally, it is always a good idea to consult with a healthcare professional before using any new medication or healthcare product, especially if you have any pre-existing medical conditions or are taking other medications.

A mouthwash is an antiseptic or therapeutic solution that is held in the mouth and then spit out, rather than swallowed. It is used to improve oral hygiene, to freshen breath, and to help prevent dental cavities, gingivitis, and other periodontal diseases.

Mouthwashes can contain a variety of ingredients, including water, alcohol, fluoride, chlorhexidine, essential oils, and other antimicrobial agents. Some mouthwashes are available over-the-counter, while others require a prescription. It is important to follow the instructions for use provided by the manufacturer or your dentist to ensure the safe and effective use of mouthwash.

Anti-infective agents, local, are medications that are applied directly to a specific area of the body to prevent or treat infections caused by bacteria, fungi, viruses, or parasites. These agents include topical antibiotics, antifungals, antivirals, and anti-parasitic drugs. They work by killing or inhibiting the growth of the infectious organisms, thereby preventing their spread and reducing the risk of infection. Local anti-infective agents are often used to treat skin infections, eye infections, and other localized infections, and can be administered as creams, ointments, gels, solutions, or drops.

Pyridinium compounds are organic salts that contain a positively charged pyridinium ion. Pyridinium is a type of cation that forms when pyridine, a basic heterocyclic organic compound, undergoes protonation. The nitrogen atom in the pyridine ring accepts a proton (H+) and becomes positively charged, forming the pyridinium ion.

Pyridinium compounds have the general structure of C5H5NH+X-, where X- is an anion or negatively charged ion. These compounds are often used in research and industry, including as catalysts, intermediates in chemical synthesis, and in pharmaceuticals. Some pyridinium compounds have been studied for their potential therapeutic uses, such as in the treatment of bacterial infections or cancer. However, it is important to note that some pyridinium compounds can also be toxic or reactive, so they must be handled with care.

Uronic acids are a type of organic compound that are carboxylic acids derived from sugars (carbohydrates). They are formed by the oxidation of the primary alcohol group (-CH2OH) on a pentose sugar, resulting in a carboxyl group (-COOH) at that position.

The most common uronic acid is glucuronic acid, which is derived from glucose. Other examples include galacturonic acid (derived from galactose), iduronic acid (derived from glucose or galactose), and mannuronic acid (derived from mannose).

Uronic acids play important roles in various biological processes, such as the formation of complex carbohydrates like glycosaminoglycans, which are major components of connective tissues. They also serve as important intermediates in the metabolism of sugars and other carbohydrates.

Chondroitin is a type of molecule known as a glycosaminoglycan, which is found in the connective tissues of the body, including cartilage. It is a major component of proteoglycans, which are complex molecules that provide structural support and help retain water within the cartilage, allowing it to function as a cushion between joints.

Chondroitin sulfate, a form of chondroitin, is commonly used in dietary supplements for osteoarthritis, a condition characterized by the breakdown of cartilage in joints. The idea behind using chondroitin sulfate as a treatment for osteoarthritis is that it may help to rebuild damaged cartilage and reduce inflammation in the affected joints. However, research on the effectiveness of chondroitin sulfate for osteoarthritis has had mixed results, with some studies showing modest benefits while others have found no significant effects.

It's important to note that dietary supplements containing chondroitin are not regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the same way that drugs are, so the quality and purity of these products can vary widely. As with any supplement, it's a good idea to talk to your doctor before starting to take chondroitin, especially if you have any medical conditions or are taking other medications.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Malva" is not a commonly used medical term. It is the name of a genus of plants that includes mallows, which have been used in traditional medicine for various purposes such as treating skin inflammation and digestive issues. However, it is not a standard term in modern clinical or pathological settings. If you have any specific concerns related to health or medical conditions, it would be best to consult with a healthcare professional.

Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are long, unbranched polysaccharides composed of repeating disaccharide units. They are a major component of the extracellular matrix and connective tissues in the body. GAGs are negatively charged due to the presence of sulfate and carboxyl groups, which allows them to attract positively charged ions and water molecules, contributing to their ability to retain moisture and maintain tissue hydration and elasticity.

GAGs can be categorized into four main groups: heparin/heparan sulfate, chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate, keratan sulfate, and hyaluronic acid. These different types of GAGs have varying structures and functions in the body, including roles in cell signaling, inflammation, and protection against enzymatic degradation.

Heparin is a highly sulfated form of heparan sulfate that is found in mast cells and has anticoagulant properties. Chondroitin sulfate and dermatan sulfate are commonly found in cartilage and contribute to its resiliency and ability to withstand compressive forces. Keratan sulfate is found in corneas, cartilage, and bone, where it plays a role in maintaining the structure and function of these tissues. Hyaluronic acid is a large, nonsulfated GAG that is widely distributed throughout the body, including in synovial fluid, where it provides lubrication and shock absorption for joints.

Hexosamines are amino sugars that are formed by the substitution of an amino group (-NH2) for a hydroxyl group (-OH) in a hexose sugar. The most common hexosamine is N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), which is derived from glucose. Other hexosamines include galactosamine, mannosamine, and fucosamine.

Hexosamines play important roles in various biological processes, including the formation of glycosaminoglycans, proteoglycans, and glycoproteins. These molecules are involved in many cellular functions, such as cell signaling, cell adhesion, and protein folding. Abnormalities in hexosamine metabolism have been implicated in several diseases, including diabetes, cancer, and neurodegenerative disorders.

Chlorhexidine is an antimicrobial agent used for its broad-spectrum germicidal properties. It is effective against bacteria, viruses, and fungi. It is commonly used as a surgical scrub, hand sanitizer, and healthcare disinfectant. Chlorhexidine is available in various forms, including solutions, gels, and sprays. It works by disrupting the microbial cell membrane, leading to the death of the organism. It is also used in mouthwashes and skin cleansers for its antimicrobial effects.

Hyaluronic acid is a glycosaminoglycan, a type of complex carbohydrate, that is naturally found in the human body. It is most abundant in the extracellular matrix of soft connective tissues, including the skin, eyes, and joints. Hyaluronic acid is known for its remarkable capacity to retain water, which helps maintain tissue hydration, lubrication, and elasticity. Its functions include providing structural support, promoting wound healing, and regulating cell growth and differentiation. In the medical field, hyaluronic acid is often used in various forms as a therapeutic agent for conditions like osteoarthritis, dry eye syndrome, and skin rejuvenation.

Surfactants, also known as surface-active agents, are amphiphilic compounds that reduce the surface tension between two liquids or between a liquid and a solid. They contain both hydrophilic (water-soluble) and hydrophobic (water-insoluble) components in their molecular structure. This unique property allows them to interact with and stabilize interfaces, making them useful in various medical and healthcare applications.

In the medical field, surfactants are commonly used in pulmonary medicine, particularly for treating respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in premature infants. The lungs of premature infants often lack sufficient amounts of natural lung surfactant, which can lead to RDS and other complications. Exogenous surfactants, derived from animal sources or synthetically produced, are administered to replace the missing or dysfunctional lung surfactant, improving lung compliance and gas exchange.

Surfactants also have applications in topical formulations for dermatology, as they can enhance drug penetration into the skin, reduce irritation, and improve the spreadability of creams and ointments. Additionally, they are used in diagnostic imaging to enhance contrast between tissues and improve visualization during procedures such as ultrasound and X-ray examinations.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Hyaluronoglucosaminidase" appears to be a made-up term or a typographical error. The correct term related to hyaluronic acid metabolism is "hyaluronidase," which is an enzyme that degrades hyaluronic acid, a component of the extracellular matrix in various tissues. If you meant to ask about this enzyme or its functions, I'd be happy to provide more information on that. However, if "Hyaluronoglucosaminidase" is intended to represent another medical term, could you please clarify so I can provide an accurate and helpful response?

Dermatan sulfate is a type of glycosaminoglycan, which is a long, unbranched sugar chain found on the proteoglycan core protein in the extracellular matrix of animal tissues. It is composed of repeating disaccharide units of iduronic acid and N-acetylgalactosamine, with alternating sulfation at the 4-position of the iduronic acid and the 6-position of the galactosamine.

Dermatan sulfate is found in various tissues, including skin, heart valves, and blood vessels, where it plays important roles in regulating cell behavior, tissue development, and homeostasis. It also binds to a variety of growth factors, cytokines, and enzymes, modulating their activities and contributing to the regulation of various biological processes.

Abnormalities in dermatan sulfate metabolism can lead to several genetic disorders, such as Hunter syndrome and Hurler-Scheie syndrome, which are characterized by skeletal abnormalities, cardiac defects, and neurological impairment.

In the context of medicine and biology, sulfates are ions or compounds that contain the sulfate group (SO4−2). Sulfate is a polyatomic anion with the structure of a sphere. It consists of a central sulfur atom surrounded by four oxygen atoms in a tetrahedral arrangement.

Sulfates can be found in various biological molecules, such as glycosaminoglycans and proteoglycans, which are important components of connective tissue and the extracellular matrix. Sulfate groups play a crucial role in these molecules by providing negative charges that help maintain the structural integrity and hydration of tissues.

In addition to their biological roles, sulfates can also be found in various medications and pharmaceutical compounds. For example, some laxatives contain sulfate salts, such as magnesium sulfate (Epsom salt) or sodium sulfate, which work by increasing the water content in the intestines and promoting bowel movements.

It is important to note that exposure to high levels of sulfates can be harmful to human health, particularly in the form of sulfur dioxide (SO2), a common air pollutant produced by burning fossil fuels. Prolonged exposure to SO2 can cause respiratory problems and exacerbate existing lung conditions.

The LD50 of cetylpyridinium chloride has been measured at 30 mg/kg in rats and 36 mg/kg in rabbits when the chemical is ... Cetylpyridinium chloride is known to cause tooth staining in approximately 3 percent of users. The Crest brand has noted that ... 8. The molecular formula of cetylpyridinium chloride is C21H38NCl. In its pure form it is a solid at room temperature. It has a ... Cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) is a cationic quaternary ammonium compound used in some types of mouthwashes, toothpastes, ...
One example is cetylpyridinium chloride. It is also used in the textile industry to improve network capacity of cotton. ... Cetylpyridinium and laurylpyridinium, which can be produced from pyridine with a Zincke reaction, are used as antiseptic in ...
Cetylpyridinium chloride and chlorhexidine can temporarily stain teeth. If gum disease and cavities are present, it is ... Tentative evidence supports the use of mouthwash containing chlorhexidine or cetylpyridinium chloride. While there is tentative ... Mouthwashes often contain antibacterial agents including cetylpyridinium chloride, chlorhexidine, zinc gluconate, zinc chloride ...
Chlorhexidine or cetylpyridinium chloride may also be tried. Surgical treatment may include partial or complete tonsil removal ... Chlorhexidine or cetylpyridinium chloride may also be tried. Surgical treatment may include partial or complete tonsil removal ...
The major active ingredients of the sugar-free lozenges are cetylpyridinium chloride, benzocaine (which produces the numbing ... In the US, the Cēpacol lozenges have benzocaine while the mouthwash has Cetylpyridinium chloride. "CEPACOL SORE THROAT". ... They were originally recognized for their yellow mouthwash, the active ingredient of which is Ceepryn (cetylpyridinium chloride ... In Australia, Cēpacol lozenges contain cetylpyridinium chloride and benzyl alcohol. Cepacaine lozenges contains lignocaine and ...
Goldberg, S; Konis, Y; Rosenberg, M (1990). "Effect of Cetylpyridinium Chloride on Microbial Adhesion to Hexadecane and ...
2,4-Dichlorobenzyl alcohol Hexylresorcinol Cetylpyridinium chloride Dequalinium Haberfeld H, ed. (2020). Austria-Codex (in ...
Alternatively, anionic surfactants such as sodium lauryl sulfate can be titrated with cetyl pyridinium chloride. When an excess ...
Quat salts such as benzalkonium chloride/Lidocaine (trade name Bactine among others), cetylpyridinium chloride, or cetrimide. ...
Cetylpyridinium chloride mouthwash has less anti-plaque effect than chlorhexidine and may cause staining of teeth, or sometimes ... 209 Cetylpyridinium chloride containing mouthwash (e.g. 0.05%) is used in some specialized mouthwashes for halitosis. ...
"Development of resistance to chlorhexidine diacetate and cetylpyridinium chloride in Pseudomonas stutzeri and changes in ...
Cetylpyridinium Chloride, or CPC, is a common ingredient in several over-the-countermouthwashes that may cause tooth staining ... Cetylpyridinium chloride, which is found in many antimicrobial mouthwashes, can result in staining due to dead bacterial ...
Oral analgesic solutions, the active ingredient is usually phenol, but also less commonly benzocaine, cetylpyridinium chloride ...
Dentyl contains the powerful antimicrobial agent cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC), which disrupts the membrane - the fatty outer ...
CPC containing mouthwash contains cetyl pyridinium chloride, found in brands such as Colgate Plax, Crest Pro Health, Oral B Pro ...
Permanently charged quaternary ammonium salts: cetrimonium bromide (CTAB), cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC), benzalkonium ...
Examples are benzalkonium chloride, benzethonium chloride, methylbenzethonium chloride, cetalkonium chloride, cetylpyridinium ...
Mouthrinses containing chlorhexidine was with maximum antibacterial activity, while cetylpyridinium chloride mouthrinses were ...
Along with zinc oxide or zinc salts, these products also commonly contain other active ingredients, such as cetylpyridinium ...
The active ingredients of Scope Outlast are cetylpyridinium chloride, domiphen bromide, and denatured alcohol. Inactive ...
... cetylpyridinium chloride and zinc lactate on the microflora of oral halitosis patients: a dual-centre, double-blind placebo- ...
... cetylpyridinium chloride, activated lactoferrin, sodium or potassium lactate, or bacteriocins such as nisin. Antioxidants ...
... cetylpyridinium chloride, essential oils, hinokitiol, and zinc ions. As alcohol is frequently a prime ingredient of breath ...
... cetylpyridinium chloride (INN) Cevi-Bid cevimeline (INN) cevipabulin (USAN, INN) cevoglitazar (INN) (Articles with short ...
... cetylpyridinium MeSH D03.383.725.762.300 - desmosine MeSH D03.383.725.762.352 - diquat MeSH D03.383.725.762.500 - isodesmosine ...
Trometamol B05BB04 Electrolytes in combination with other drugs B05BC01 Mannitol B05BC02 Carbamide B05CA01 Cetylpyridinium ...
... cetylpyridinium chloride etc. b) Acidic mordant : React with basic dyes e.g. picric acid, tannic acid etc. Direct Staining: ...
D08AH02 Chlorquinaldol D08AH03 Oxyquinoline D08AH30 Clioquinol D08AJ01 Benzalkonium D08AJ02 Cetrimonium D08AJ03 Cetylpyridinium ...
... acid D09AA03 Nitrofural D09AA04 Phenylmercuric nitrate D09AA05 Benzododecinium D09AA06 Triclosan D09AA07 Cetylpyridinium ...
The use of cationic micelles of cetrimonium chloride, benzethonium chloride, and cetylpyridinium chloride can accelerate ...
The LD50 of cetylpyridinium chloride has been measured at 30 mg/kg in rats and 36 mg/kg in rabbits when the chemical is ... Cetylpyridinium chloride is known to cause tooth staining in approximately 3 percent of users. The Crest brand has noted that ... 8. The molecular formula of cetylpyridinium chloride is C21H38NCl. In its pure form it is a solid at room temperature. It has a ... Cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) is a cationic quaternary ammonium compound used in some types of mouthwashes, toothpastes, ...
CETYLPYRIDINIUM CHLORIDE (UNII: D9OM4SK49P) (CETYLPYRIDINIUM - UNII:CUB7JI0JV3) CETYLPYRIDINIUM CHLORIDE. 0.7 mg in 1 mL. ... ANTISEPTIC- cetylpyridinium chloride rinse. To receive this label RSS feed. Copy the URL below and paste it into your RSS ... ANTISEPTIC- cetylpyridinium chloride rinse. If this SPL contains inactivated NDCs listed by the FDA initiated compliance action ...
Your search for CETYLPYRIDINIUM did not return any results. Your search may be too specific. Try using fewer or broader search ...
... [ ... Pharmaceutical Agent Cetylpyridinium Chloride Inhibits Immune Mast Cell Function by Interfering with Calcium Mobilization. ... Abstract Pharmaceutical Agent Cetylpyridinium Chloride Inhibits Immune Mast Cell Function by Interfering with Calcium ... Mobilization] [Synopsis Pharmaceutical Agent Cetylpyridinium Chloride Inhibits Immune Mast Cell Function by Interfering with ...
ALSO CALLED 1-Cetylpyridinium chloride, 1-Hexadecyl-Pyridinium Chloride, 1-hexadecylpyridin-1-ium chloride, 1-He... View all ... Is anyone else interested in sharing the cost of a GreenScreen assessment of Cetylpyridinium chloride [123-03-5]? ... Hi! Can I get a quote for a GreenScreen Assessment of Cetylpyridinium chloride [123-03-5]?. ...
People are widely exposed to high (mM) doses of the positively-charged antibacterial agent cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) via ...
... such as cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) and benzalkonium chloride (BAK), are frequently used in antiseptic formulations, ... Figure 2. Mitochondriotoxic effects of cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC). (A) Inhibition of mitochondrial O. 2. consumption by CPC ... In Vitro Evaluation of Mitochondrial Function and Estrogen Signaling in Cell Lines Exposed to the Antiseptic Cetylpyridinium ... Figure 3. The cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC)-dependent respiration defect was overcome by complex II substrate succinate, but ...
Send your inquiry to Cetyl Pyridinium Bromide supplier. Enter your inquiry here and then click Send. Enter between 20 to 3,000 ... CETYLPYRIDINIUM BROMIDE;hexadecylpyridine bromide;HEXADECYLPYRIDINIUM BROMIDE;1-HEXADECYLPYRIDINUM BROMIDE;1- ...
Papain-cetylpyridinium chloride and pepsin-cetylpyridinium chloride; two novel, highly sensitive, concentration, digestion and ... Cetyl-pyridinium chloride is useful for isolation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from sputa subjected to long-term storage ... Cetyl-pyridinium chloride is useful for isolation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from sputa subjected to long-term storage ... Pancreatin-Cetyl Pyridinium Chloride Digestion and Decontamination Method; A Novel, Sensitive, Cost-Effective Method for ...
Titrant - cetylpyridinium chloride] Conference Selig, W Work is in progress at this Laboratory on the detonation calorimetry of ...
DINIZ, Pamela Aparecida et al. Perception of patients with use mouthwashes: essential oils and cetylpyridinium chloride. Rev. ... based and cetylpyridinium chloride. Methods: 2 groups ( n = 15 ) who underwent 2 mouthwash daily for 3 weeks were formed: G1 - ...
Cetylpyridinium Chloride Mouthwash to Reduce Shedding of Infectious SARS-CoV-2: A Double-Blind Randomized Clinical Trial. * ... Cetylpyridinium Chloride Mouthwash to Reduce Shedding of Infectious SARS-CoV-2: A Double-Blind Randomized Clinical Trial. Nov ... Cetylpyridinium Chloride Mouthwash to Reduce Shedding of Infectious SARS-CoV-2: A Double-Blind Randomized Clinical Trial. ... Cetylpyridinium Chloride Mouthwash to Reduce Shedding of Infectious SARS-CoV-2: A Double-Blind Randomized Clinical Trial. ...
For some unknown reason, the cetylpyridinium chloride is labeled as an inactive ingredient. 2 examples: ACT Alcohol-Free ... Why arent fluoride mouthwashes with cetylpyridinium chloride labeled as both anticavity and antibacterial?. February 20, 2019 ... Questions › Why arent fluoride mouthwashes with cetylpyridinium chloride labeled as both anticavity and antibacterial? ... there was a common misconception that fluoride interferes with the antibacterial activity of cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) - ...
An investigation of diclofenac sodium release from cetylpyridinium chloride-modified natural zeolite as a pharmaceutical ... with cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) at the three different levels, i.e., 10, 20 and 30 mmol/100 g (ZCPC-10, ZCPC-20 and ZCPC-30 ... with cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) at the three different levels, i.e., 10, 20 and 30 mmol/100 g (ZCPC-10, ZCPC-20 and ZCPC-30 ... with cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) at the three different levels, i.e., 10, 20 and 30 mmol/100 g (ZCPC-10, ZCPC-20 and ZCPC-30 ...
Cetylpyridinium Chloride; EO: Essential Oils; FAS: Full Analysis Set; MGI: Modified Gingival Index; MOH: Mechanical oral ...
Rahardjo, A, Ramadhani, A, Adiatman, M, Wimardhani, YS & Maharani, DA 2016, Efficacy of mouth rinse formulation based on cetyl pyridinium ... Efficacy of mouth rinse formulation based on cetyl pyridinium chloride in the control of plaque as an early onset of dental ... Efficacy of mouth rinse formulation based on cetyl pyridinium chloride in the control of plaque as an early onset of dental ... title = "Efficacy of mouth rinse formulation based on cetyl pyridinium chloride in the control of plaque as an early onset of ...
A Mouthwash with Cetylpyridinium Chlorideis reducing salivary SARS-CoV-2 viral load in +COVID-19 / Un enjuague con Cloruro de ... Both groups rinsed and gargled for one minute with either distilled water (Placebo) or with 0.05% Cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC ... A Mouthwash with Cetylpyridinium Chlorideis reducing salivary SARS-CoV-2 viral load i ...
Coronavirus mouthwash: Which mouthwash contains cetylpyridinium chloride amid new study? [INSIGHT]. How to live longer: Kalonji ...
Cetylpyridinium Chloride; Vitamin C (Ascorbic Acid). Therapin Hustenloser. Ambroxol Hydrochloride. Therapin Schnupfentropfen. ...
Princeton South Corporate Center. 500 Charles Ewing Blvd.. Ewing, NJ 08628. 1 (800) 833-9532. ...
cetylpyridinium. chew. chewable. chl. chloride. chlordiazepoxid. chlordiazepoxide. chlophed. chlophedianol. chlophedian. ...
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The proven: basic toothbrush; interdental brush; water pick; chlorhexidine gluconate (CHX), cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) and ...
Pharmaceutical agent cetylpyridinium chloride inhibits immune mast cell function by interfering with calcium mobilization. ... Cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) reduces zebrafish mortality from influenza infection: Super-resolution microscopy reveals CPC ...
Antimicrobial activity of cetylpyridinium chloride washes against pathogenic bacteria on beef surfaces. A Stomacher® 400 was ... used to help test antimicrobial activity of cetylpyridinium chloride washes against pathogenic bacteria on beef surfaces. The ...
Examples of ophthalmic preservatives are benzalkonium chloride (BAK), cetylpyridinium chloride, chlorobutanol, methylparaben, ...
Cetylpyridinium chloride is an ingredient in several mouthwashes (eg, Cepacol, Scope) that can cause dental staining. [7] Iron- ...
3. Sarma et al conducted an in vitro evaluation of the efficacy of cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC)-containing mouthrinses in ... Mouthrinses containing 0.12% chlorhexidine gluconate (Colgate PerioGard), 0.075% cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC; Plax) or 2% ...
  • OTC (over the counter) products containing cetylpyridinium chloride include oral wash, oral rinse, and ingestable products, such as lozenges and over-the-counter cough syrup. (wikipedia.org)
  • The effectiveness of a preprocedural mouthrinse containing cetylpyridinium chloride in reducing bacteria in the dental office. (harvard.edu)
  • Swish with a rinse containing Cetylpyridinium Chloride (CPC), like Crest Pro-Health Multi-Protection Mouthwash which helps protect your mouth from gingivitis and plaque with 0% alcohol. (oralb.com)
  • Rinses containing cetylpyridinium chloride can rarely stain teeth. (familydentistry-springfield.com)
  • Though one study seems to indicate cetylpyridinium chloride does not cause brown tooth stains, at least one mouthwash containing CPC as an active ingredient bears the warning label "In some cases, antimicrobial rinses may cause surface staining to teeth," following a failed class-action lawsuit brought by customers whose teeth were stained. (wikipedia.org)
  • The use of Cetylpyridinium Chloride is used to Mouthwash, Toothpaste. (chemicalbull.com)
  • Objective: Evaluate the perceptions of patients about the effects of the use of mouthwash based on essential oils and alcohol -based and cetylpyridinium chloride. (bvsalud.org)
  • I started using Crest Scope Classic mouthwash at home a while back after reading that it contained cetylpyridinium chloride, which can kill covid viruses. (diabetesdaily.com)
  • Mouth rinses and washes containing chlorhexidine and cetylpyridinium chloride can also stain teeth. (drsunildental.com)
  • The researchers examined whether these bacteria could be killed by exposing them to concentrations of oral antiseptics, like those found in mouthwashes, particularly 0.01% chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG), 0.004% cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC), or 0.1% 1,8-cineole. (asm.org)
  • Some products are formulated instead with the bromide salt cetylpyridinium bromide, the properties of which are virtually identical. (wikipedia.org)
  • Clinical and microbiological effects of the use of a cetylpyridinium chloride dentifrice and mouth rinse in orthodontic patients: a 3-month randomized clinical trial. (bvsalud.org)
  • To assess the clinical, microbiological, and patient -based effects of using a cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) toothpaste and mouth rinse in orthodontic patients . (bvsalud.org)
  • Cetylpyridinium Chloride is a cationic surfactant and an antimicrobial agent. (biomaterialsusa.com)
  • Cetylpyridinium chloride has a wide of antimicrobial spectrum even in very low concentration. (biomaterialsusa.com)
  • In addition to cetylpyridinium chloride, ethyl lauroyl arginate, another ingredient in some mouthwashes, also kills the virus. (diabetesdaily.com)
  • The active ingredient in Crest Pro-Health Rinse's formula is 0.07% Cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC). (crest.com)
  • Efficacy of a high bioavailable cetylpyridinium chloride mouthrinse over a 24-hour period: a plaque imaging study. (thejcdp.com)
  • Amylmetacresol, cetylpyridinium chloride, dichlorobenzyl alcohol and hexylresorcinol are antibacterial agents that help fight against disease-causing bacteria. (choice.com.au)
  • Cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) is a cationic quaternary ammonium compound used in some types of mouthwashes, toothpastes, lozenges, throat sprays, breath sprays, and nasal sprays. (wikipedia.org)
  • The molecular formula of cetylpyridinium chloride is C21H38NCl. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ko te Cetylpyridinium chloride CAS 123-03-5 he tote pyridinium he N-hexadecylpyridinium hei cation me te chloride hei anion.Kei a ia nga taonga antiseptic, ka whakamahia ki roto i nga rongoā, i nga lozenges ranei mo te maimoatanga o nga mate iti o te waha me te korokoro.He mahi hei rongoa whakaahuru me te surfactant.He tote pūhaumāota me te tote pūhaumāota waro.He cetylpyridinium kei roto. (theoremchem.com)
  • Leading Manufacturer of cetylpyridinium chloride powder, thiopental sodium sterile bp, permethrin api liquid, carprofen usp api, ketoconazole api powder and ethyl oleate bp from Valsad. (chemland.co.in)
  • Cetylpyridinium chloride may cause brown stains between the teeth and on the surface of teeth. (wn.com)
  • Active ingredients: Lidocaine Hydrochloride 0.9% w/w, Chlorocresol 0.1% w/w, Cetylpyridinium Chloride 0.02% w/w. (superdrug.com)
  • Cetylpyridinium Chloride is used in manufacturing of various types of mouthwashes and other breath related items. (chemland.co.in)
  • There is in-vitro evidence that cetylpyridinium chloride interferes with mitochondrial function at levels "that may be relevant to human exposures. (wikipedia.org)
  • Also there was strong evidence for a moderate effect of cetylpyridinium chloride(CPC). (nih.gov)
  • The information below refers to products available in the United States that contain cetylpyridinium . (drugs.com)
  • Cetylpyridinium Chloride solution, used for decontamination of sputum specimens that are in transport for more than 24 hours. (volusol.com)
  • Impact of brief exposure to balanced salts solution or cetylpyridinium chloride on the surface appearance of the rabbit corneal epithelium--a scanning electron microscopy study. (medscape.com)
  • The melting point of the product is 80 °C. Chemical Bull deals in a Cetylpyridinium Chloride in all major Pharma industries. (chemicalbull.com)
  • We conducted a multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial to assess the virucidal activity of cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) mouthwashes. (uab.cat)
  • I recall just a few years ago, there was a common misconception that fluoride interferes with the antibacterial activity of cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) - in fact, I've often seen instructions on antibacterial CPC rinses specifying that you should thoroughly rinse the toothpaste (which they probably assume contains fluoride) out of your mouth before using them. (wyckoffhospital.net)
  • A Stomacher® 400 was used to help test antimicrobial activity of cetylpyridinium chloride washes against pathogenic bacteria on beef surfaces. (seward.co.uk)
  • Some products are formulated instead with the bromide salt cetylpyridinium bromide, the properties of which are virtually identical. (wikipedia.org)
  • Quaternary ammonium salts (QUATS), such as cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) and benzalkonium chloride (BAK), are frequently used in antiseptic formulations, including toothpastes, mouthwashes, lozenges, throat and nasal sprays, and as biocides. (nih.gov)
  • In searching and summarizing the literature on the use of preprocedural mouthwashes with different antiseptic agents-particularly those containing chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX), cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC), or essential oils (EO)-researchers summarized they can "serve as part of a bundle of measures for protection of dental personnel" despite some remaining unknowns. (dentistryiq.com)
  • Cetylpyridinium Chloride, Green Tea Extract, Zinc Gluconate. (chewy.com)
  • There is in-vitro evidence that cetylpyridinium chloride interferes with mitochondrial function at levels "that may be relevant to human exposures. (wikipedia.org)
  • People are widely exposed to high (mM) doses of the positively-charged antibacterial agent cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) via janitorial and personal care products and foods treated with CPC, yet little is known about its toxicology in humans, especially below the critical micelle concentration (~900 µM). (nih.gov)
  • Cetylpyridinium chloride is known to cause tooth staining in approximately 3 percent of users. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cecure's active ingredient, cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC), is the active ingredient used in many mouth rinses and throat lozenges and has been safely consumed in a number of over-the-counter oral hygiene products for more than 55 years. (provisioneronline.com)
  • For that purpose, after adsorption of the model drug - diclofenac sodium (DS) onto composites obtained by the modification of natural zeolite (NZ) with cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) at the three different levels, i.e., 10, 20 and 30 mmol/100 g (ZCPC-10, ZCPC-20 and ZCPC-30, respectively), the release of the drug, at pH 6.8, was studied. (ac.rs)