Stable cesium atoms that have the same atomic number as the element cesium, but differ in atomic weight. Cs-133 is a naturally occurring isotope.
A member of the alkali metals. It has an atomic symbol Cs, atomic number 50, and atomic weight 132.91. Cesium has many industrial applications, including the construction of atomic clocks based on its atomic vibrational frequency.
Atomic species differing in mass number but having the same atomic number. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
Unstable isotopes of cesium that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Cs atoms with atomic weights of 123, 125-132, and 134-145 are radioactive cesium isotopes.
Techniques for labeling a substance with a stable or radioactive isotope. It is not used for articles involving labeled substances unless the methods of labeling are substantively discussed. Tracers that may be labeled include chemical substances, cells, or microorganisms.
Stable nitrogen atoms that have the same atomic number as the element nitrogen, but differ in atomic weight. N-15 is a stable nitrogen isotope.
Stable carbon atoms that have the same atomic number as the element carbon, but differ in atomic weight. C-13 is a stable carbon isotope.
Stable oxygen atoms that have the same atomic number as the element oxygen, but differ in atomic weight. O-17 and 18 are stable oxygen isotopes.
Ulceration of the GASTRIC MUCOSA due to contact with GASTRIC JUICE. It is often associated with HELICOBACTER PYLORI infection or consumption of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS).
A PEPTIC ULCER located in the DUODENUM.
Selenoproteins are proteins that specifically incorporate SELENOCYSTEINE into their amino acid chain. Most selenoproteins are enzymes with the selenocysteine residues being responsible for their catalytic functions.
An ulceration caused by prolonged pressure on the SKIN and TISSUES when one stays in one position for a long period of time, such as lying in bed. The bony areas of the body are the most frequently affected sites which become ischemic (ISCHEMIA) under sustained and constant pressure.
ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION or particle radiation (high energy ELEMENTARY PARTICLES) capable of directly or indirectly producing IONS in its passage through matter. The wavelengths of ionizing electromagnetic radiation are equal to or smaller than those of short (far) ultraviolet radiation and include gamma and X-rays.
Ulceration of the skin and underlying structures of the lower extremity. About 90% of the cases are due to venous insufficiency (VARICOSE ULCER), 5% to arterial disease, and the remaining 5% to other causes.
Ulcer that occurs in the regions of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT which come into contact with GASTRIC JUICE containing PEPSIN and GASTRIC ACID. It occurs when there are defects in the MUCOSA barrier. The common forms of peptic ulcers are associated with HELICOBACTER PYLORI and the consumption of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS).

Interacting populations affecting proliferation of leukemic cells in culture. (1/32)

Peripheral blood cells from three patients with acute leukemic have been studied using a suspension culture method previously described.1 Cytogenetic studies in two of the patients permitted the identification of the proliferating cells in the cultures as being derived from a leukemic population. Cell separation studies using velocity sedimentation supported the concept that growth of the leukemic cells in culture is dependent on an interaction between two populations of leukemic cells.  (+info)

Thallium-201 for medical use. I. (2/32)

Thallium-201 merits evaluation for myocardial visualization, kidney studies, and tumor diagnosis because of its physical and biologic properties. A method is described for preparation of this radiopharmaceutical for human use. A critical evaluation of 201Tl and other radiopharmaceuticals for myocardial visualization is given.  (+info)

Permeability of squid axon membrane to various ions. (3/32)

The permeability of the squid axon membrane was determined by the use of radioisotopes of Na, K, Ca, Cs, and Br. Effluxes of these isotopes were measured mainly by the method of intracellular injection. Measurements of influxes were carried out under continuous intracellular perfusion with an isotonic solution of potassium sulfate. The Na permeability of the resting (excitable) axonal membrane was found to be roughly equal to the K permeability. The permeability to anion was far smaller than that to cations. It is emphasized that the axonal membrane has properties of a cation exchanger. The physicochemical nature of the "two stable states" of the excitable membrane is discussed on the basis of ion exchange isotherms.  (+info)

EFFECT OF CHLOROTHIAZIDE ON CESIUM-137 EXCRETION IN HUMAN SUBJECTS. (4/32)

The therapeutic value of the diuretic, chlorothiazide (Diuril), in reducing the body burden of cesium-137 in human subjects was investigated. Two subjects were given chlorothiazide, 2 g./day, following a single oral intake of cesium-137. The urinary excretion and the per cent retention of cesium-137 were compared with similar data obtained from two control subjects. Although chlorothiazide produced a marked potassium diuresis, it had no significant effect in reducing the body burden of cesium.Analysis was made of the rate of turnover of cesium and potassium in the two control subjects, who were followed up for 320 days. The biological half-lives, T(b), of K were 42 and 41 days. In both subjects a small fraction of the cesium-137 was rapidly excreted. The remainder (88% and 83% in the two cases) was excreted at a slower constant rate. The concentrations further decreased to 44% and 41.5% in 90 and 155 days, respectively.  (+info)

Cs + ADC in rat brain decreases markedly at death. (5/32)

Spectroscopic resolution of intracellular and extracellular compartments can be used to probe the kinetic environment of those spaces and the compartment-specific changes that occur following injury. This is important for understanding the biophysical mechanisms that underlie the remarkable diffusion-weighted MRI contrast of injured central nervous system (CNS) tissue. Cesium-133 is a physiologic analog of potassium that is actively taken up by cells and resides primarily in the intracellular space. The (133)Cs(+) signal can, thus, be exploited to probe the kinetic environment of the intracellular space. Two principal (133)Cs(+) resonances were observed at 11.74 T. These resonances arise separately from (133)Cs(+) in brain and temporalis muscle. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of Cs(+) in brain decreased from 1.0 +/- 0.2 microm(2)/ms in healthy tissue to 0.24 +/- 0.04 microm(2)/ms following global ischemia (average ADC +/- average uncertainty), while there was no significant change in the ADC of Cs(+) in temporalis muscle after injury. This finding underscores the tissue-specific nature of the decrease in ADC that accompanies brain injury. Further, as the Cs(+) ADC should reflect water ADC in the intracellular space, these results strongly support the hypothesis that the decrease in water ADC associated with CNS injury arises largely from kinetic changes taking place in the intracellular space.  (+info)

Hippocampal neuron number is unchanged 1 year after fractionated whole-brain irradiation at middle age. (6/32)

 (+info)

Retention of potentially mobile radiocesium in forest surface soils affected by the Fukushima nuclear accident. (7/32)

 (+info)

Direct enzymatic repair of deoxyribonucleic acid single-strand breaks in dormant spores. (8/32)

With the alkaline sucrose gradient centrifugation method, it was found that dormant spores of Clostridium botulinum subjected to 300 krads of gamma radiation showed a distinct decrease in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) fragment size, indicating induction of single-strand breaks (SSB). A two- to threefold difference in radiation resistance of spores of two strains of C. botulinum, 33A (37% survival dose [D(37)] = 110 krads) and 51B (D(37) = 47 krads), was accompanied by relatively larger DNA fragments (molecular weight 7.9 x 10(7)) obtained during extraction from the radiation-resistant strain 33A and smaller DNA fragments (molecular weight 1.8 x 10(7)) obtained under identical conditions from radiation-sensitive strain 51B. The apparent number of DNA SSB produced by 300 krads in strains 33A and 51B was 0.37 and 3.50, respectively, per 10(8) daltons of DNA. Addition of 0.02 M ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) to spore suspensions during irradiation doubled the apparent number of SSB in strain 33A but had no effect on strain 51B. In vivo, 0.02 M EDTA present during irradiation to 100 to 300 krads decreased survival of spores of 33A by about 30% but had little or no effect on 51B. Survival of 33A was also reduced by about 45% when the spores were irradiated while frozen in dry ice (-75 C) and, after irradiation, immediately exposed to 0.03 M EDTA for 1 h to inhibit repair in the dormant spores. These results suggest that the highly radiation-resistant strain 33A may be able to accomplish repair of SSB during irradiation or after irradiation under nonphysiological conditions, i.e., in the dormant state. This repair can be inhibited by EDTA. Sedimentation patterns show that DNA from spores of both strains 33A and 51B did not show any postirradiation repair during the first 6 h of germination, as opposed to Bacillus subtilis spores, which exhibit repair immediately after germination. These observations suggest the existence of direct repair in physiological dormant spores of strain 33A in the cryptobiotic resting state in the absence of germination. The repair seems to be similar to that of polynucleotide ligase activity shown to be operative in some vegetative cells. Apparently radiation-sensitive strains such as 51B and B. subtilis are generally poor in DNA repair enzyme activity under conditions of spore dormancy, which may account for the approximately threefold difference in radiation sensitivity or DNA fragility of different strains, or both.  (+info)

Cesium is a chemical element with the atomic number 55 and the symbol Cs. There are several isotopes of cesium, which are variants of the element that have different numbers of neutrons in their nuclei. The most stable and naturally occurring cesium isotope is cesium-133, which has 78 neutrons and a half-life of more than 3 x 10^20 years (effectively stable).

However, there are also radioactive isotopes of cesium, including cesium-134 and cesium-137. Cesium-134 has a half-life of about 2 years, while cesium-137 has a half-life of about 30 years. These isotopes are produced naturally in trace amounts by the decay of uranium and thorium in the Earth's crust, but they can also be produced artificially in nuclear reactors and nuclear weapons tests.

Cesium isotopes are commonly used in medical research and industrial applications. For example, cesium-137 is used as a radiation source in cancer therapy and industrial radiography. However, exposure to high levels of radioactive cesium can be harmful to human health, causing symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and potentially more serious effects such as damage to the central nervous system and an increased risk of cancer.

Cesium is a chemical element with the symbol "Cs" and atomic number 55. It is a soft, silvery-golden alkali metal that is highly reactive. Cesium is never found in its free state in nature due to its high reactivity. Instead, it is found in minerals such as pollucite.

In the medical field, cesium-137 is a radioactive isotope of cesium that has been used in certain medical treatments and diagnostic procedures. For example, it has been used in the treatment of cancer, particularly in cases where other forms of radiation therapy have not been effective. It can also be used as a source of radiation in brachytherapy, a type of cancer treatment that involves placing radioactive material directly into or near tumors.

However, exposure to high levels of cesium-137 can be harmful and may increase the risk of cancer and other health problems. Therefore, its use in medical treatments is closely regulated and monitored to ensure safety.

Isotopes are variants of a chemical element that have the same number of protons in their atomic nucleus, but a different number of neutrons. This means they have different atomic masses, but share similar chemical properties. Some isotopes are stable and do not decay naturally, while others are unstable and radioactive, undergoing radioactive decay and emitting radiation in the process. These radioisotopes are often used in medical imaging and treatment procedures.

Cesium radioisotopes are different forms of the element cesium that have unstable nuclei and emit radiation. Some commonly used medical cesium radioisotopes include Cs-134 and Cs-137, which are produced from nuclear reactions in nuclear reactors or during nuclear weapons testing.

In medicine, cesium radioisotopes have been used in cancer treatment for the brachytherapy of certain types of tumors. Brachytherapy involves placing a small amount of radioactive material directly into or near the tumor to deliver a high dose of radiation to the cancer cells while minimizing exposure to healthy tissues.

Cesium-137, for example, has been used in the treatment of cervical, endometrial, and prostate cancers. However, due to concerns about potential long-term risks associated with the use of cesium radioisotopes, their use in cancer therapy is becoming less common.

It's important to note that handling and using radioactive materials requires specialized training and equipment to ensure safety and prevent radiation exposure.

Isotope labeling is a scientific technique used in the field of medicine, particularly in molecular biology, chemistry, and pharmacology. It involves replacing one or more atoms in a molecule with a radioactive or stable isotope of the same element. This modified molecule can then be traced and analyzed to study its structure, function, metabolism, or interaction with other molecules within biological systems.

Radioisotope labeling uses unstable radioactive isotopes that emit radiation, allowing for detection and quantification of the labeled molecule using various imaging techniques, such as positron emission tomography (PET) or single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). This approach is particularly useful in tracking the distribution and metabolism of drugs, hormones, or other biomolecules in living organisms.

Stable isotope labeling, on the other hand, employs non-radioactive isotopes that do not emit radiation. These isotopes have different atomic masses compared to their natural counterparts and can be detected using mass spectrometry. Stable isotope labeling is often used in metabolic studies, protein turnover analysis, or for identifying the origin of specific molecules within complex biological samples.

In summary, isotope labeling is a versatile tool in medical research that enables researchers to investigate various aspects of molecular behavior and interactions within biological systems.

Nitrogen isotopes are different forms of the nitrogen element (N), which have varying numbers of neutrons in their atomic nuclei. The most common nitrogen isotope is N-14, which contains 7 protons and 7 neutrons in its nucleus. However, there are also heavier stable isotopes such as N-15, which contains one extra neutron.

In medical terms, nitrogen isotopes can be used in research and diagnostic procedures to study various biological processes. For example, N-15 can be used in a technique called "nitrogen-15 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy" to investigate the metabolism of nitrogen-containing compounds in the body. Additionally, stable isotope labeling with nitrogen-15 has been used in clinical trials and research studies to track the fate of drugs and nutrients in the body.

In some cases, radioactive nitrogen isotopes such as N-13 or N-16 may also be used in medical imaging techniques like positron emission tomography (PET) scans to visualize and diagnose various diseases and conditions. However, these applications are less common than the use of stable nitrogen isotopes.

Carbon isotopes are variants of the chemical element carbon that have different numbers of neutrons in their atomic nuclei. The most common and stable isotope of carbon is carbon-12 (^{12}C), which contains six protons and six neutrons. However, carbon can also come in other forms, known as isotopes, which contain different numbers of neutrons.

Carbon-13 (^{13}C) is a stable isotope of carbon that contains seven neutrons in its nucleus. It makes up about 1.1% of all carbon found on Earth and is used in various scientific applications, such as in tracing the metabolic pathways of organisms or in studying the age of fossilized materials.

Carbon-14 (^{14}C), also known as radiocarbon, is a radioactive isotope of carbon that contains eight neutrons in its nucleus. It is produced naturally in the atmosphere through the interaction of cosmic rays with nitrogen gas. Carbon-14 has a half-life of about 5,730 years, which makes it useful for dating organic materials, such as archaeological artifacts or fossils, up to around 60,000 years old.

Carbon isotopes are important in many scientific fields, including geology, biology, and medicine, and are used in a variety of applications, from studying the Earth's climate history to diagnosing medical conditions.

Oxygen isotopes are different forms or varieties of the element oxygen that have the same number of protons in their atomic nuclei, which is 8, but a different number of neutrons. The most common oxygen isotopes are oxygen-16 (^{16}O), which contains 8 protons and 8 neutrons, and oxygen-18 (^{18}O), which contains 8 protons and 10 neutrons.

The ratio of these oxygen isotopes can vary in different substances, such as water molecules, and can provide valuable information about the origins and history of those substances. For example, scientists can use the ratio of oxygen-18 to oxygen-16 in ancient ice cores or fossilized bones to learn about past climate conditions or the diets of ancient organisms.

In medical contexts, oxygen isotopes may be used in diagnostic tests or treatments, such as positron emission tomography (PET) scans, where a radioactive isotope of oxygen (such as oxygen-15) is introduced into the body and emits positrons that can be detected by specialized equipment to create detailed images of internal structures.

A stomach ulcer, also known as a gastric ulcer, is a sore that forms in the lining of the stomach. It's caused by a breakdown in the mucous layer that protects the stomach from digestive juices, allowing acid to come into contact with the stomach lining and cause an ulcer. The most common causes are bacterial infection (usually by Helicobacter pylori) and long-term use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Stomach ulcers may cause symptoms such as abdominal pain, bloating, heartburn, and nausea. If left untreated, they can lead to more serious complications like internal bleeding, perforation, or obstruction.

A duodenal ulcer is a type of peptic ulcer that develops in the lining of the first part of the small intestine, called the duodenum. It is characterized by a break in the mucosal layer of the duodinal wall, leading to tissue damage and inflammation. Duodenal ulcers are often caused by an imbalance between digestive acid and mucus production, which can be exacerbated by factors such as bacterial infection (commonly with Helicobacter pylori), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use, smoking, and stress. Symptoms may include gnawing or burning abdominal pain, often occurring a few hours after meals or during the night, bloating, nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, and weight loss. Complications can be severe, including bleeding, perforation, and obstruction of the duodenum. Diagnosis typically involves endoscopy, and treatment may include antibiotics (if H. pylori infection is present), acid-suppressing medications, lifestyle modifications, and potentially surgery in severe cases.

Selenoproteins are a specific group of proteins that contain the essential micronutrient selenium in the form of selenocysteine (Sec), which is a naturally occurring amino acid. Selenocysteine is encoded by the opal codon UGA, which typically serves as a stop codon in mRNA.

There are 25 known human selenoproteins, and they play crucial roles in various physiological processes, including antioxidant defense, DNA synthesis, thyroid hormone metabolism, and immune function. Some of the well-known selenoproteins include glutathione peroxidases (GPxs), thioredoxin reductases (TrxRs), and iodothyronine deiodinases (IDIs).

The presence of selenocysteine in these proteins makes them particularly efficient at catalyzing redox reactions, which involve the gain or loss of electrons. This property is essential for their functions as antioxidants and regulators of cellular signaling pathways.

Deficiencies in selenium can lead to impaired function of selenoproteins, potentially resulting in various health issues, such as increased oxidative stress, weakened immune response, and disrupted thyroid hormone metabolism.

A pressure ulcer, also known as a pressure injury or bedsore, is defined by the National Pressure Injury Advisory Panel (NPIAP) as "localized damage to the skin and/or underlying soft tissue usually over a bony prominence or related to a medical or other device." The damage can be caused by intense and/or prolonged pressure or shear forces, or a combination of both. Pressure ulcers are staged based on their severity, ranging from an initial reddening of the skin (Stage 1) to full-thickness tissue loss that extends down to muscle and bone (Stage 4). Unstageable pressure ulcers are those in which the base of the wound is covered by yellow, tan, green or brown tissue and the extent of tissue damage is not visible. Suspected deep tissue injury (Suspected DTI) describes intact skin or non-blanchable redness of a localized area usually over a bony prominence due to pressure and/or shear. The area may be preceded by tissue that is painful, firm, mushy, boggy, warmer or cooler as compared to adjacent tissue.

Ionizing radiation is a type of radiation that carries enough energy to ionize atoms or molecules, which means it can knock electrons out of their orbits and create ions. These charged particles can cause damage to living tissue and DNA, making ionizing radiation dangerous to human health. Examples of ionizing radiation include X-rays, gamma rays, and some forms of subatomic particles such as alpha and beta particles. The amount and duration of exposure to ionizing radiation are important factors in determining the potential health effects, which can range from mild skin irritation to an increased risk of cancer and other diseases.

A leg ulcer is a chronic wound that occurs on the lower extremities, typically on the inner or outer ankle. It's often caused by poor circulation, venous insufficiency, or diabetes. Leg ulcers can also result from injury, infection, or inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis or lupus. These ulcers can be painful, and they may take a long time to heal, making them prone to infection. Proper diagnosis, treatment, and wound care are essential for healing leg ulcers and preventing complications.

A peptic ulcer is a sore or erosion in the lining of your stomach and the first part of your small intestine (duodenum). The most common causes of peptic ulcers are bacterial infection and long-term use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as aspirin, ibuprofen, or naproxen.

The symptoms of a peptic ulcer include abdominal pain, often in the upper middle part of your abdomen, which can be dull, sharp, or burning and may come and go for several days or weeks. Other symptoms can include bloating, burping, heartburn, nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, and weight loss. Severe ulcers can cause bleeding in the digestive tract, which can lead to anemia, black stools, or vomit that looks like coffee grounds.

If left untreated, peptic ulcers can result in serious complications such as perforation (a hole through the wall of the stomach or duodenum), obstruction (blockage of the digestive tract), and bleeding. Treatment for peptic ulcers typically involves medications to reduce acid production, neutralize stomach acid, and kill the bacteria causing the infection. In severe cases, surgery may be required.

Caesium-133 is the only stable isotope of caesium. The SI base unit of time, the second, is defined by a specific caesium-133 ... Caesium (55Cs) has 40 known isotopes, making it, along with barium and mercury, one of the elements with the most isotopes. The ... Caesium-135 is a mildly radioactive isotope of caesium with a half-life of 2.3 million years. It decays via emission of a low- ... The other isotopes have half-lives from a few days to fractions of a second. Almost all caesium produced from nuclear fission ...
Smith, Gail P. (1941). "Radioactive Isotopes of Barium from Cesium". Physical Review. 60 (7): 480-482. Bibcode:1941PhRv...60.. ... Rutledge, W. C.; Stoddard, A. E.; Branyan, C. E.; Leblanc, J. M. (1950). "Radioactivity from Enriched Isotopes of Cadmium". ... Lawson, J. L.; -- (1937). "The Radioactive Isotopes of Indium". Physical Review. 52 (6): 531-535. Bibcode:1937PhRv...52..531L. ... Kraus, J.; -- (1937). "Radioactive Isotopes of Palladium and Silver from Palladium". Physical Review. 52 (8): 763-768. Bibcode: ...
It has only one stable isotope, caesium-133. Caesium is mined mostly from pollucite. Caesium-137, a fission product, is ... The high density of the caesium ion makes solutions of caesium chloride, caesium sulfate, and caesium trifluoroacetate (Cs(O ... "Isotope Tracers Project - Resources on Isotopes - Cesium". National Research Program - U.S. Geological Survey. Retrieved 25 ... Caesium-134, and to a lesser extent caesium-135, have also been used in hydrology to measure the caesium output by the nuclear ...
8.7 MBq/liter of tritium and 2.35 GBq/liter of cesium was measured. The NRA was concerned that leaks from the pit could release ... I. (eds.). Distribution, Biological Effects, and Migration of Radioactive Isotopes. Translation Series. United States Atomic ... For comparison, the LD50 of Caesium-137 in mice (through acute radiation syndrome) has been reported at 245 μg/kg body weight ... On 27 July TEPCO announced that extremely high levels of tritium and cesium were found in a pit containing about 5000 cubic ...
Moskalev YI (1961). "Biological Effects of Cesium-137". In Lebedinskiĭ AV, Moskalev YI (eds.). Distribution, Biological Effects ... and Migration of Radioactive Isotopes. Translation Series. United States Atomic Energy Commission (published April 1974). p. ...
... : Caesium-137, a radioactive isotope. Boeing C-137 Stratoliner, a plane. Dimension C-137, a setting in the Rick and Morty ...
Cesium_137 is named after a radioactive isotope of caesium. It continues a tradition in industrial music of incorporating a ... "Cesium_137 V:4.0 - News". Archived from the original on 2008-07-09. Retrieved 2008-10-08. Official Cesium_137 website Cesium_ ... military and was no longer available as a member of Cesium_137. Cesium_137 had a hiatus of three years before their next ... Cesium_137's style was much mellower and synthpop inspired and less angst-ridden on these releases than on Advanced/Decay. In ...
After diffusing into these voids, it decays to caesium isotopes. Because of the thermal gradient which exists in the fuel ... The caesium was found in the leaf veins, in the stem and in the apical leaves. It was found that 12% of the caesium entered the ... This isotope then undergoes natural radioactive decay to yield Pu-239, which, like U-235, is a fissile isotope. The atoms of U- ... there is a layer of fuel which has a higher caesium to uranium ratio than most of the fuel. This is because xenon isotopes are ...
2015-02-01). "Role of mesoscale eddies in transport of Fukushima-derived cesium isotopes in the ocean". Deep Sea Research Part ... This has been shown for surface drifters, radioactive isotope markers, plankton, jellyfish, heat and salt. Sub-mesoscale ...
... ) is a national isotope-based medical company and the sole producer of Cesium brachytherapy sources, which are expanding ... The brachytherapy isotopes are sold under the brandname Blu. The company went public in 2005. Isoray's corporate headquarters ... ". "Cesium Blu by Isoray - Treating Prostate Cancer with Brachytherapy". "Investor FAQ". (Articles with short description, ...
Caesium-137, a radioactive fallout isotope, is present in the lake. Yue, TianXiang; Nixdorf, Erik; Zhou, Chengzi; Xu, Bing; ...
Here the xenon can decay to the long lived caesium isotope. These fission yields were calculated for 235U assuming thermal ... and hence as a result the two caesium isotopes can be found at different parts of a fuel pin. It is clear that the volatile ... of this xenon isotope. The 133Xe is a long-lived radioactive isotope which can diffuse slowly out of the pellet before being ... The caesium concentration is slightly higher at two points where xenon bubbles are present. Much of the xenon is present in ...
The caesium isotopes in the fallout have had an effect on farming. [2] A large amount of caesium was released during the ... An important part of the Chernobyl release was the caesium-137, this isotope is responsible for much of the long term (at least ... The caesium was found in the leaf veins, in the stem and in the apical leaves. It was found that 12% of the caesium entered the ... Cosmogenic isotopes (or cosmogenic nuclides) are rare isotopes created when a high-energy cosmic ray interacts with the nucleus ...
Cesium (Cs-137) is the primary isotope released from the Fukushima Daiichi facility. Cs-137 has a long half-life, meaning it ... Due to Japan's topography and the local weather patterns, cesium deposits as well as other isotopes reside in top layer of ... Isotopes settling on the top soil layer can remain there for many years, due to their slow decay (long half-life). The long- ... Isotopes released during a meltdown or related event are typically dispersed into the atmosphere and then settle on the surface ...
Nearly one-quarter of the entire territory of Belarus was seriously contaminated with isotopes of Cesium. The authorities were ... As to Cesium-137, this nuclide demonstrates lower migration potential in Chernobyl soils and aquifers. Its mobility is hampered ... Heavy isotopes of Plutonium and Americium have even lower transportation capacity both in and outside the exclusion zone. ... aquifers were damaged in first place due to massive surface contamination with radioactive isotopes Strontium-90 and Cesium-137 ...
This was in the form of several isotopes with Caesium-137 being the most prominent. Their report concluded that Nomadic ...
... caesium-137 (137Cs), with a half-life of 30 years, is generated by nuclear fission. Such isotopes are used in a variety of ... If the definition refers only to one isotope (as that of the dalton does) or to a specific isotope ratio, e.g. Vienna Standard ... Thus, the element's natural isotopic abundance is dominated by one isotope that is either stable or very long-lived. There are ... Of the 26 monoisotopic elements that, by definition, have only one stable isotope, seven are not considered mononuclidic, due ...
Against cancer we have the same problem with isotopes as with the x-ray and radium- minimizing the damage to good cells while ... "Cesium 'gun' - Byproduct used in new cancer weapon (1954) - on Newspapers.com". Newspapers.com. Retrieved 2016-11-12. "3 to ... "Cesium-137 soon to fight cancer (1955) - on Newspapers.com". Newspapers.com. Retrieved 2016-11-13. "Tennessee Doctor Says ... That year he also announced the intention to produce cesium-137 for radiotherapy by 1957. Brucer told a conference that the use ...
... the Atomic Energy Organization announced the production of Caesium-137 by Iranian scientists. The radioactive isotope of cesium ...
Principal isotopes produced: fluorine-18, chlorine-36, bromine-80, bromine-82, iodine-131, sodium-24, lanthanum-140, cesium- ... research Food preservation research Hot storage Manipulator practice The reactor was used to produce several isotopes. Iodine- ...
Fungi are very efficient at absorbing radioactive isotopes of caesium from the soil and naturally have trace amounts of the ... Fruiting bodies of C. caperatus have been found to bioaccumulate mercury and radioactive isotopes of caesium. The mushroom was ... Caesium may take the place of potassium, which exists in high concentrations in mushrooms. C. caperatus bioaccumulates ... radioactive caesium 137Cs-a product of nuclear testing-much more than many other mushroom species. Levels dramatically rose ...
... and purple indicates cesium-137, which causes birth defects. He then remarks about the foolish futility of color-coding such ... that the different colors of the clouds billowing across the rubbish-strewn landscape signify different radioactive isotopes. ...
Caesium was released in aerosol form; caesium-137, along with isotopes of strontium, are the two primary elements preventing ... such as some of the isotopes of iodine, caesium and strontium. Iodine-131 was and caesium-137 remains the two most responsible ... Scientists report this is due to radioactive caesium-137 isotopes being taken up by fungi such as Cortinarius caperatus which ... The four most harmful radionuclides spread from Chernobyl were iodine-131, caesium-134, caesium-137 and strontium-90, with half ...
High levels of caesium-134 were found in local fish, despite the isotope's comparatively shorter half-life. Meanwhile, ... Some groundwater samples contained 310 Bp/L of cesium-134 and 650 Bp/L of cesium-137, exceeding WHO's maximum guideline of 10 ... caesium-134, caesium-137, and strontium-90. Over 500,000 tonnes of untreated wastewater (including 10,000 tonnes released to ... The sediments may provide a long-term source of caesium-137 in the seawater. According to Buesseler, the release of strontium- ...
The Chernobyl accident released a large amount of caesium isotopes which were dispersed over a wide area. 137Cs is an isotope ... is caesium-137. Iodine-129 is a major radioactive isotope released from reprocessing plants. In nuclear reactors both caesium- ... For fission of uranium-235, the predominant radioactive fission products include isotopes of iodine, caesium, strontium, xenon ... Many of the fission products decay through very short-lived isotopes to form stable isotopes, but a considerable number of the ...
The source is typically the radioactive isotope caesium-137, with a half-life of about 30 years. A key advantage for this ...
The caesium isotope produced is unstable and decays to 123I. The isotope is usually supplied as the iodide and hypoiodate in ... Isotopes of a chemical element differ only in the mass number. For example, the isotopes of hydrogen can be written as 1H, 2H ... When the atomic nucleus of an isotope is unstable, compounds containing this isotope are radioactive. Tritium is an example of ... Both isotopes are useful for labeling nucleotides and other species that contain a phosphate group. 35S is made by neutron ...
The spread of radioactive xenon gas, iodine-131, and caesium-137 could be detected on different continents many miles away. ... radioactive isotopes that get released into the air can be collected by plane. These radionuclides include americium-241, ... iodine-131, caesium-137, krypton-85, strontium-90, plutonium-239, tritium and xenon. Sending planes over or near an area can ...
"Radioactive sources: isotopes and availability". Retrieved 22 March 2016. "NIST Guide to the SI, Chapter 5 (paragraph 5.2)". ... The Tammiku radioactive material theft involved the accidental theft of caesium-137 material in Tammiku, Estonia, in 1994. ... Common beta emitters Commonly used gamma-emitting isotopes Geiger counter Ionizing radiation Neutron source "C-188 Cobalt-60 ...
Radioactive isotopes like iodine-131, strontium-90 and caesium-137 are concentrated in the milk of grazing cows; cow milk is ...
Caesium-133 is the only stable isotope of caesium. The SI base unit of time, the second, is defined by a specific caesium-133 ... Caesium (55Cs) has 40 known isotopes, making it, along with barium and mercury, one of the elements with the most isotopes. The ... Caesium-135 is a mildly radioactive isotope of caesium with a half-life of 2.3 million years. It decays via emission of a low- ... The other isotopes have half-lives from a few days to fractions of a second. Almost all caesium produced from nuclear fission ...
Detailed decay information for the isotope cesium-142 including decay chains and daughter products. ... Cesium Pictures Page. Al. Si. P. S. Cl. Ar. K. Ca. Cesium Technical Data. Sc. Ti. V. Cr. Mn. Fe. Co. Ni. Cu. Zn. Ga. Ge. As. Se ... Isotopes of Cesium (click to see decay chain):. 112Cs 113Cs 114Cs 115Cs 116Cs 117Cs 118Cs 119Cs 120Cs 121Cs 122Cs 123Cs 124Cs ... Click any isotope in diagram to see its data.. Decay chain image generated by Mathematicas GraphPlot and IsotopeData functions ...
Detailed decay information for the isotope cesium-151 including decay chains and daughter products. ... Cesium Pictures Page. Al. Si. P. S. Cl. Ar. K. Ca. Cesium Technical Data. Sc. Ti. V. Cr. Mn. Fe. Co. Ni. Cu. Zn. Ga. Ge. As. Se ... Isotopes of Cesium (click to see decay chain):. 112Cs 113Cs 114Cs 115Cs 116Cs 117Cs 118Cs 119Cs 120Cs 121Cs 122Cs 123Cs 124Cs ... Click any isotope in diagram to see its data.. Decay chain image generated by Mathematicas GraphPlot and IsotopeData functions ...
Why Isotopes Matter! by Peter Mahaffy, Brian Martin, and Rob Macdonald, Professors, Ashley Elgersma, Shawn Ritter, Rachel ... Reston Stable Isotopes Laboratory Director, Lauren Tarbox, Jacqueline Benefield, US Geological Survey ; Norman Holden, ...
To see the isotopes that exist in the ScientificConstants package for a particular element, use the GetIsotopes function with ... Home : Support : Online Help : Science and Engineering : Scientific Constants : Initial Elements and Isotopes ...
Isotopesplus icon *Americium-241 (Am-241). *Cesium-137 (Cs-137)plus icon *Radioisotope Brief ... www.epa.gov/radiation/radionuclide-basics-cesium-137. ...
Both isotopes decay into non-radioactive elements. ,sup>134,/sup>Cs and ,sup>137,/sup>Cs generate beta particles as they decay ... Naturally occurring cesium is not radioactive and is referred to as stable cesium. There is only one stable form of cesium ... Nuclear explosions or the breakdown of uranium in fuel elements can produce two radioactive forms of cesium, ,sup>134,/sup>Cs ... Cesium is a naturally occurring element found combined with other elements in rocks, soil, and dust in low amounts. ...
Plants soak up cesium-137 and other dangerous isotopes; the atoll is strewn with radioactive coconuts, and Bikini produce is ...
Isotope Disk set, 5 disk Our 5 disk radioisotope set contains a wide of alpha, beta and gamma emissions making it a popular ... Cesium137. 0.1uCi. 0.1uCi. 1 uCi. 1 uCi. 5 uCi ... Isotope Disk set, 5 disk. Our 5 disk radioisotope set contains ... Radioactive Isotopes* Radiation Signs etc.* Trinitite* Misc. Nuclear Items* X-Ray Components* Radiation Detection* Radiation ...
Information and facts about cesium: Beneficial effects on health, effectiveness for cancer, side effects of cesium & caution. ... Cesium has 11 main radioactive isotopes.. *Out of the above mentioned isotopes, the main ones of concern are cesium-134, cesium ... Cesium For Cancer. Before understanding how cesium helps to treat prostate cancer, it is important to look at how cesium and ... Healthy Diet Plans >> Dietary Supplements >> Cesium. Cesium Supplement. Cesium is a silvery, soft metal that is found in nature ...
Many radioactive isotopes are used, such as iodine-125, gold-198, and cesium-137. Needles filled with radioactive seeds, ...
The samples are then analyzed for cesium isotopes, whose signature allows scientists to identify radionuclides released from ... A result of the loss of electricity, overheating at the power plant led to significant releases of iodine, cesium and other ...
... along with fission products such as cesium isotopes, are among the components of nuclear waste. ... The trouble is, U-235 is a relatively rare isotope; natural uranium consists of about one part U-235 to 142 parts U-238, which ... Existing reactors generate energy through a chain reaction that begins when a free neutron hits an atom of U-235, an isotope of ... and others are absorbed by atoms of another uranium isotope, U-238, to form plutonium-239 and other transuranic elements (those ...
Cesium-137 is good for you, didnt you know? And so is radioactive uranium and plutonium. After all, California is home to some ... why not add radioactive isotopes to their list, too?. Even if you could build nuclear power plants on the West Coast that were ...
The capsule contains a radioactive isotope of cesium called cesium-137. "It does emit a reasonable amount of radiation," Andrew ...
Examples include strontium-90 and cesium-137.. Fissionable isotope Fissionable isotope: An isotope whose nuclei can undergo ... Isotope Isotope: Any two or more forms of an element having identical or very closely related chemical properties and the same ... Fissile isotope Isotopes capable of undergoing fission by absorbing neutrons at any energy, including low energies (also ... Plutonium-239, a fissile isotope, is the most suitable isotope for use in nuclear weapons. ...
However, mercury, arsenic, and radioactive cesium may reach hazardous concentrations in edible tissues of fishes and ... shellfishes; additionally, in shellfishes, cadmium, lead, and other metal isotopes may exceed levels safe for human consumption ...
These products contained up to five times the allowed level of certain radioactive cesium isotopes. Though reports at the time ...
Cesium and Strontium. Cesium-137 and Strontium-90 are the major radiotoxic fission product isotopes present in high-level ... P. Y. Chen, "The assessment of removing strontium and cesium cations from aqueous solutions based on the combined methods of ... P. Y. Chen and C. L. Hussey, "Electrodeposition of cesium at mercury electrodes in the tri-1-butylmethylammonium bis(( ... Deposition/stripping was conducted at mercury film electrode with recovery of 97% of loaded cesium. ...
Even very dangerous isotopes like Cesium 137 have a half life of 30 years. This may not seem like much but 30 years later after ... 1986, today in fact, there is still half the Cesium 137 at Chernobyl. 30 years from now it will be a quarter, but it is just as ...
Another isotope, cesium-137, decays very slowly with a half-life of 30 years. Though traces of cesium-137 have been detected in ... One of the radioactive isotopes that is formed during a nuclear accident is cesium-134. With a short half-life of two years, ... All of the cesium-134 was concentrated in the upper 325 feet (100 m) of the ocean, he said. They are awaiting results from a ... there are many reactors on coasts and rivers and if we cant predict within a factor of 10 what cesium or some other isotope is ...
For right now I am only providing figures for two Isotopes Cesium-137 (137Cs) and Plutonium-241 (241Pu). These Isotopes where ... As I said before Im hoping to add more Isotopes as I find the figures from both accidents on them. The links below are for the ... So lets see how much weight of each isotope was released from each accident. 137Cs: Chernobyl- (85x10^15) x (37x10^-10) = ... As you say, those may very well be the correct numbers from the initial atmospheric release of the two isotopes mentioned. ...
"For example, they do not only release cesium-137, but also cesium-135, a cesium isotope with a much longer half-life." ... Cesium-137 is the key radioactive isotope measured in these samples. It has a half-life of around 30 years - meaning that after ... The ratio of these two types of cesium varies depending on the nuclear event. A breakthrough in measuring cesium-135 (much ... The cesium migrates downwards through the soil very slowly, sometimes only about one millimetre per year.. Professor Georg ...
Dr Sawada is not as clear about how long a cold shutdown could take, and said the problem will be the effects from caesium-137 ... and plutonium isotopes. These are referred to as hot particles. ... the effects from caesium-137 that remains in the soil and the ... Dr Sawada is not as clear about how long a cold shutdown could take, and said the problem will be the effects from caesium-137 ... According to Gundersen, the exposed reactors and fuel cores are continuing to release microns of caesium, strontium, and ...
Body distribution of cesium, iodine, chlormerodrin, as determined by sequential observations using the Spintharicon. A ... Stable isotope (N, C, Hg) study of methylmercury sources and trophic transfer in the northern gulf of Mexico. Environ Sci ... Mercury isotope study of sources and exposure pathways of methylmercury in estuarine food webs in the Northeastern U.S. Environ ... "Mercury Isotopes" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicines controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject ...
In addition to radioactive iodine, the body may also be exposed to a radioactive isotope of caesium known as Cesium-137. This ... It also neutralizes exposure from radio-isotopes. Studies show that the X-irradiation that can damage the body s Kupffer and ... Potassium orotates can prevent the accumulation of Cesium-137. In fact, getting enough potassium from food such as bananas is a ... where it was used to absorb radioactive strontium and cesium 137 from walls and floors. Similarly, the United States nuclear ...
... isotopes, forms, costs, and other information for each element. ... Isotopes. Cesium has more isotopes than any element--32--with ... Cesium, gallium, and mercury are the only three metals that are liquid at room temperature. Cesium reacts explosively with cold ... Cesium, an alkali metal, occurs in lepidolite, pollucte (a hydrated silicate of aluminum and cesium), and in other sources. One ... Very pure, gas-free cesium can be prepared by thermal decomposition of cesium azide. ...
  • The samples are then analyzed for cesium isotopes, whose signature allows scientists to identify radionuclides released from Fukushima. (nsf.gov)
  • According to Buesseler, based on those models, initial traces of radioactive isotopes from Fukushima should be detectable along the Pacific coast of the United States in April. (barbrastreisand.com)
  • Approximately 800 trillion becquerel of Cesium-137 is expected to reach the West Coast of North America by 2016, according to Michio Aoyama, a professor at Japan's Fukushima University Institute of Environmental Radioactivity. (unknowncountry.com)
  • The Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute has detected the presence of Cesium-134 off of the coast of California, of which can only have come from the Fukushima site in Japan, due to it's half-life of only two years. (unknowncountry.com)
  • Ocean simulations showed that the plume of radioactive cesium-137 released by the Fukushima disaster in 2011 could begin flowing into U.S. coastal waters starting in early 2014 and peak in 2016. (southernfriedscience.com)
  • Pacific bluefin tuna migrating last year from coastal Japan to the waters off Southern California contained radioactive cesium isotopes from the Fukushima nuclear disaster, scientists reported Monday. (giantrobot.com)
  • According to health experts, KI has no effect in reducing harm from radioactive materials in any other part of the body, nor does it protect against harm from other radioactive isotopes, such as cesium, which is also being released from the damaged Fukushima plant in Japan. (time.com)
  • Only one isotope, 133Cs, is stable. (wikipedia.org)
  • Caesium-133 is the only stable isotope of caesium. (wikipedia.org)
  • Caesium-134 is not produced via beta decay of other fission product nuclides of mass 134 since beta decay stops at stable 134Xe. (wikipedia.org)
  • It decays via emission of a low-energy beta particle into the stable isotope barium-135. (wikipedia.org)
  • Compared to the other stable alkali metals, cesium has the lowest boiling point and melting point, highest vapor pressure, highest density, and lowest ionization potential. (cdc.gov)
  • Naturally occurring cesium is not radioactive and is referred to as stable cesium. (cdc.gov)
  • There is only one stable form of cesium naturally present in the environment, 133 Cs (read as cesium one-thirty-three). (cdc.gov)
  • Cesium chloride is a more stable and nonradioactive form of cesium. (diethealthclub.com)
  • Hg-196, 198-201, and 204 are stable mercury isotopes. (harvard.edu)
  • Selenium and stable mercury isotopes provide new insights into mercury toxicokinetics in pilot whales. (harvard.edu)
  • Mercury Stable Isotopes Reveal Influence of Foraging Depth on Mercury Concentrations and Growth in Pacific Bluefin Tuna. (harvard.edu)
  • Environmental Origins of Methylmercury Accumulated in Subarctic Estuarine Fish Indicated by Mercury Stable Isotopes. (harvard.edu)
  • Assessing sources of human methylmercury exposure using stable mercury isotopes. (harvard.edu)
  • Stable isotope (N, C, Hg) study of methylmercury sources and trophic transfer in the northern gulf of Mexico. (harvard.edu)
  • The habitation and environment are affected by the stable isotopes of caesium (Cs) and strontium (Sr), as well as by their radioactive isotopes. (bvsalud.org)
  • The current work gives insight on Alstonia scholaris' capacity to phytoextract stable caesium (Cs) and strontium (Sr), as well as the plant's ability to protect against the toxicity of both elements. (bvsalud.org)
  • The submarine's reactor, loaded with nuclear fuel, is a source of other radioactive isotopes like cesium 137 and strontium 90. (bellona.org)
  • If any of the 6 nuclear reactors in Ukraine's nuclear plant are hit, radioactive isotopes: cesium-137, iodine-131, strontium-90, and plutonium-239 will be released into our air and water. (change.org)
  • Beta particles are high-energy electrons that are emitted from the nuclei of unstable atoms (eg, cesium-137, iodine-131). (msdmanuals.com)
  • Used to define the second Fission product Theoretically capable of spontaneous fission Caesium-131, introduced in 2004 for brachytherapy by Isoray, has a half-life of 9.7 days and 30.4 keV energy. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is known as Cesium-131 brachytherapy. (diethealthclub.com)
  • Cesium-131 brachytherapy or internal radiation treatment has demonstrated significantly positive results for prostate cancer. (healthguideinfo.com)
  • Cesium-131 is essentially an advanced brachytherapy isotope, commonly known as a radioactive seed that is implanted directly into the tumor cavity. (healthguideinfo.com)
  • The short half-life of Cesium-131 helps to cut down the severity and duration of these symptoms commonly associated with brachytherapy. (healthguideinfo.com)
  • The low decay energy, lack of gamma radiation, and long half-life of 135Cs make this isotope much less hazardous than 137Cs or 134Cs. (wikipedia.org)
  • The radioactive isotopes 137Cs and 134Cs are significant fission products because of their high fission yield, and their relatively long half-lives. (cdc.gov)
  • For right now I am only providing figures for two Isotopes Cesium-137 (137Cs) and Plutonium-241 (241Pu). (abovetopsecret.com)
  • Cesium supplements are available in the market and are promoted as cesium chloride pills. (diethealthclub.com)
  • Some experts are of the opinion that cesium chloride could be beneficial in treating various types of cancers. (diethealthclub.com)
  • Cesium chloride helps to create an oxygen rich environment for the cancer cells. (diethealthclub.com)
  • large amounts of cesium chloride can make you lose consciousness. (diethealthclub.com)
  • Taking large amounts of cesium chloride could also result in diarrhea. (diethealthclub.com)
  • This is yet another dangerous side effect that could occur after taking large amounts of cesium chloride. (diethealthclub.com)
  • Beginning in 1945 with the commencement of nuclear testing, caesium radioisotopes were released into the atmosphere where caesium is absorbed readily into solution and is returned to the surface of the Earth as a component of radioactive fallout. (wikipedia.org)
  • A result of the loss of electricity, overheating at the power plant led to significant releases of iodine, cesium and other radioisotopes to the environment. (nsf.gov)
  • Cesium-131 is one of the latest and most advanced radioisotopes, which is helping to achieve more successful breakthroughs in cancer radiation treatment. (healthguideinfo.com)
  • This is where the effectiveness of cesium comes in. (diethealthclub.com)
  • Trials for the use of this therapy were carried out on mice to see the effectiveness of cesium in treating cancer. (diethealthclub.com)
  • Once caesium enters the ground water, it is deposited on soil surfaces and removed from the landscape primarily by particle transport. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cesium is a naturally occurring element found combined with other elements in rocks, soil, and dust in low amounts. (cdc.gov)
  • Cesium is present naturally in the soil and also as isotope 133. (diethealthclub.com)
  • Radiation exposure to food typically declines faster, since the cesium has travelled far since Chernobyl - washed out by rainwater , or driven down into the soil, so it stops being absorbed by plants and animals in the same initial quantities. (euronews.com)
  • The cesium migrates downwards through the soil very slowly, sometimes only about one millimetre per year. (euronews.com)
  • Nearly 30 years ago the explosion sent radioactive caesium-137 particles into the atmosphere, eventually drifting into Norway where they landed and absorbed into the soil. (barentsobserver.com)
  • The mushroom acts as a sponge for leaching caesium-137 out of the soil and scientists are certain it's the cause of the spike this year. (barentsobserver.com)
  • Quantification, nature and bioavailability of bound 14C-pesticide residues in soil, plants and food : proceedings of the Final Research Co-ordination Meeting on Isotopic Tracer-Aided Studies of Unextractable or Bound Pesticide Residues in Soil, Plants and Food / organized by the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Isotope and Radiation Applications of Atomic Energy for Food and Agricultural Development and held in Gainesville, Florida, from 25 to 29 March 1985. (who.int)
  • The jump this year was significant: this September the reading was 8,200 becquerel of caesium-137 per kilo versus September 2012 when the reindeer were averaging 1,500 becquerel of caesium-137 per kilo. (barentsobserver.com)
  • The atomic masses of these isotopes range from 112 to 151. (wikipedia.org)
  • The symbol of Cesium is Cs and the atomic number is 55. (diethealthclub.com)
  • Cesium is used in atomic clocks, which are accurate to 5 s in 300 years. (lanl.gov)
  • Also in the 1960's the (former) US Atomic Energy Commission subjected sections of El Yunque to Gamma Rays emitted by radioactive isotopes such as Cesium 134 for 92 days in a row. (thepetitionsite.com)
  • Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Isotope and Radiation Applications of Atomic Energy for Food and Agricultural Development. (who.int)
  • Pure cesium reacts violently with water to form cesium hydroxide, the strongest base known, as well as hydrogen gas. (cdc.gov)
  • Cesium hydroxide, the strongest base known, attacks glass. (lanl.gov)
  • These properties make cesium far more reactive than the other members of the alkali metal group. (cdc.gov)
  • An alkali metal that melts at 28°C (82 °F), the physical properties of cesium are similar to that of potassium and rubidium. (diethealthclub.com)
  • Cesium, an alkali metal, occurs in lepidolite, pollucte (a hydrated silicate of aluminum and cesium), and in other sources. (lanl.gov)
  • But like cobalt and cesium, its name is unfairly tarnished by a few bad isotopes: Ordinary strontium is not radioactive, nor is it especially toxic. (theodoregray.com)
  • Before understanding how cesium helps to treat prostate cancer, it is important to look at how cesium and cancer are connected. (diethealthclub.com)
  • Prostate cancer may be treated with cesium. (diethealthclub.com)
  • Cesium-131 was approved by the FDA in 2003 for treatment of prostate cancer and other malignant tumors. (healthguideinfo.com)
  • Another key benefit of Cesium-131 is that in comparison to other radioactive seeds used to treat prostate cancer, it has the shortest half-life of only about 10 days. (healthguideinfo.com)
  • Cesium-131 also ensures relatively rapid resolution of common side effects of prostate cancer. (healthguideinfo.com)
  • Cesium-131 has been in use for the treatment of prostate cancer with very successful results. (healthguideinfo.com)
  • Caesium-134 has a half-life of 2.0652 years. (wikipedia.org)
  • Caesium-135 is a mildly radioactive isotope of caesium with a half-life of 2.3 million years. (wikipedia.org)
  • Another isotope, cesium-137, decays very slowly with a half-life of 30 years. (barbrastreisand.com)
  • For example, they do not only release cesium-137, but also cesium-135, a cesium isotope with a much longer half-life. (euronews.com)
  • One is that you are unable to slaughter [the reindeer] now - you have to wait until November because the caesium has a half-life in the animal. (barentsobserver.com)
  • The caesium-137 particles are set to reach their "half-life" expectancy in 2016 - a milestone that renders them half as radioactive as when they first landed in 1986 - but "it will take a very long time before the last part of it goes," says Eikelmann. (barentsobserver.com)
  • FOREVER STORAGE (not zero carbon) Due to its highly radioactive garbage in our backyards in 48 states because of man-made, radioactive isotope, plutonium-239 with a half life of 24,100 YEARS. (change.org)
  • With a 30-year half-life, cesium isotopes can present a long-lasting threat if not properly disposed of at a storage facility. (tmia.com)
  • Caesium (55Cs) has 40 known isotopes, making it, along with barium and mercury, one of the elements with the most isotopes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Caesium-135 is one of the seven long-lived fission products and the only alkaline one. (wikipedia.org)
  • In most types of nuclear reprocessing, it stays with the medium-lived fission products (including 137 Cs which can only be separated from Cs-135 via isotope separation) rather than with other long-lived fission products. (wikipedia.org)
  • Different primary-ion sources (cesium and oxygen) allow the choice of conditions for the best analytical sensitivity across the periodic table, down to parts per billion for many elements. (nrel.gov)
  • Mercury Isotopes" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicine's controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) . (harvard.edu)
  • This graph shows the total number of publications written about "Mercury Isotopes" by people in Harvard Catalyst Profiles by year, and whether "Mercury Isotopes" was a major or minor topic of these publication. (harvard.edu)
  • Below are the most recent publications written about "Mercury Isotopes" by people in Profiles. (harvard.edu)
  • Elevated Mercury Concentrations and Isotope Signatures (N, C, Hg) in Yellowfin Tuna (Thunnus albacares) from the Galápagos Marine Reserve and Waters off Ecuador. (harvard.edu)
  • Mercury isotope study of sources and exposure pathways of methylmercury in estuarine food webs in the Northeastern U.S. Environ Sci Technol. (harvard.edu)
  • Cesium, gallium , and mercury are the only three metals that are liquid at room temperature. (lanl.gov)
  • The nausea occurs because cesium is a highly alkaline mineral and reacts with anything acidic. (diethealthclub.com)
  • Cesium reacts explosively with cold water, and reacts with ice at temperatures above -116C. (lanl.gov)
  • Since 1967, the official definition of a second is: The second, symbol s, is defined by taking the fixed numerical value of the caesium frequency, ΔνCs, the unperturbed ground-state hyperfine transition frequency of the caesium-133 atom, to be 9192631770 when expressed in the unit Hz, which is equal to s−1. (wikipedia.org)
  • Caesium-137 is a radioactive isotope - or charged atom - that is a byproduct of a nuclear chain reaction. (barentsobserver.com)
  • Compared to other common radioactive seeds, Cesium-131 has a strong energy level. (healthguideinfo.com)
  • Cesium is a silvery white, soft, ductile metal with only one oxidation state (+1). (cdc.gov)
  • Cesium is a silvery, soft metal that is found in nature. (diethealthclub.com)
  • Caesium-134 undergoes beta decay (β−), producing 134Ba directly and emitting on average 2.23 gamma ray photons (mean energy 0.698 MeV). (wikipedia.org)
  • Both isotopes decay into non-radioactive elements. (cdc.gov)
  • The manufacturer of Cesium-131 internal radiation therapy seeds, IsoRay, Inc. has recently announced a multi-institutional study of the isotope for its effectiveness to treat Non Small Cell Lung Cancers (NSCLC). (healthguideinfo.com)
  • The manufacturer IsoRay expects that Cesium-131 will be available for wide usage to treat a number of cancers in the coming years. (healthguideinfo.com)
  • Cesium salts and most cesium compounds are generally very water soluble, with the exception of cesium alkyl and aryl compounds, which have low water solubility. (cdc.gov)
  • There are many cesium side effects that can occur after undergoing this kind of radiation treatment. (diethealthclub.com)
  • Monitors along the Pacific U.S. coast have yet to detect any traces of cesium-134, said Ken Buesseler, a chemical oceanographer at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), speaking on a panel at the meeting of the American Geophysical Union's Ocean Sciences. (barbrastreisand.com)
  • Though traces of cesium-137 have been detected in the world's oceans, their source may be attributed to previous nuclear-weapons tests. (barbrastreisand.com)
  • Nonetheless, traces of the radioactive isotopes pop up every summer in the plant life - particularly the gypsy mushroom, a delicacy for both humans and reindeer. (barentsobserver.com)
  • One of the world's richest sources of cesium is located at Bernic Lake, Manitoba. (lanl.gov)
  • The burning cesium can ignite the liberated hydrogen gas and produce an explosion. (cdc.gov)
  • Termes sources en cas d' accident de réacteur nucléaire : rapport d'un Groupe d' experts de l' AEN, mars 1986. (who.int)
  • The results showed that while a total of about 90 per cent of the cesium-137 in Central Europe comes from Chernobyl, the proportion in the wild boar samples is much lower. (euronews.com)
  • WHOI's recent readings for the longer-lived Cesium-137 isotope have been found to be 6.9 Bq per cubic meter. (unknowncountry.com)
  • Identifies all elements or isotopes present in a material, from hydrogen to uranium. (nrel.gov)
  • However, in functional experiments ex vivo the HCN inhibitors ivabradine, ZD7288, and cesium failed to lower contraction frequency: conversely, all three antagonists induced a positive chronotropic effect with concurrent negative inotropic action, though these effects first occurred at concentrations regarded as supramaximal for HCN inhibition. (bvsalud.org)
  • Cesium is also found as a contaminant in places that process used nuclear fuel as well as in nuclear reactors. (diethealthclub.com)
  • Individuals have recently spread alarm about the presence of radioactive isotopes already found along the Pacific coast, although those concerns were debunked. (barbrastreisand.com)
  • A " State of the Environment " report, released by the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority this week, found elevated caesium-137 levels in wild reindeer living in the Våga reinlag AS in central Jotunheimen National Park. (barentsobserver.com)
  • Both the tailing impoundment sites and so-called 'orphan' sources, which could contain reactor-produced isotopes,[1] might present security risks if left unmonitored. (nti.org)
  • Potassium orotates can prevent the accumulation of Cesium-137. (lewrockwell.com)
  • In fact, getting enough potassium from food such as bananas is a good first step at preventing radioactive cesium 137 retention. (lewrockwell.com)
  • Cesium (Cs) in the environment is primarily absorbed by a potassium (K) transporter. (bvsalud.org)
  • In of ion competition experiments, indicating that potassium, rubid- particular, the cryogenic temperatures used in all recent crys- ium, and cesium ions bind to the minor groove with similarly weak tallographic work may drastically shift the enthalpy-entropy affinity as sodium ions, whereas ammonium ion binding is some- balance of ion-water substitution. (lu.se)
  • The use of cesium along with other drugs like diuretics may result in hypokalemia. (diethealthclub.com)
  • Information regarding the physical and chemical properties of cesium is located in Table 4-2. (cdc.gov)
  • This is possible because different sources of radioactive isotopes have different physical fingerprints," explains Dr Bin Feng, who conducts his research at the Institute of Inorganic Chemistry at Leibniz Universität Hannover and the TRIGA Center Atominstitut at TU Wien. (euronews.com)
  • Cesium was discovered spectroscopically in 1860 by Bunsen and Kirchhoff in mineral water from Durkheim. (lanl.gov)
  • Nuclear explosions or the breakdown of uranium in fuel elements can produce two radioactive forms of cesium, 134 Cs and 137 Cs. (cdc.gov)
  • We have two different ways of getting rid of the caesium from the food system. (barentsobserver.com)
  • https://japanfocus.org/-Kodama-Tatsuhiko/3587 ) Zeroing in on the critical dangers to pregnant women and infants, he shows the extremely high risk of cancer in areas of radiation concentration in the form of Iodine and Cesium isotopes. (truthout.org)
  • processed, packed into plastic vessels, and placed for one hour in a $200,000 germanium semiconductor detector to test for the presence of radioactive isotopes iodine, Cesium-137 and 134. (cbsnews.com)
  • The SI base unit of time, the second, is defined by a specific caesium-133 transition. (wikipedia.org)
  • Studies have revealed that Cesium-131 also offers a superior "Biologically Effective Dose" (BED) across a broad range of tumors, compared to other isotopes. (healthguideinfo.com)
  • As a result, the input function of these isotopes can be estimated as a function of time. (wikipedia.org)
  • And the radioactive cesium accumulates in these subterranean mushrooms with a long time delay. (euronews.com)
  • In other words, it can complete the treatment in a substantially shorter time than alternative isotopes. (healthguideinfo.com)