An epoxydodecadienamide isolated from several species, including ACREMONIUM, Acrocylindrum, and Helicoceras. It inhibits the biosynthesis of several lipids by interfering with enzyme function.
Compounds that interfere with FATTY ACID SYNTHASE resulting in a reduction of FATTY ACIDS. This is a target mechanism in humans of some ANTINEOPLASTIC AGENTS and ANTI-OBESITY AGENTS and of some ANTI-INFECTIVE AGENTS which interfere with CELL WALL and CELL MEMBRANE formation.
Enzymes that catalyze the synthesis of FATTY ACIDS from acetyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA derivatives.
An alkylating sulfhydryl reagent. Its actions are similar to those of iodoacetate.
An enzyme of long-chain fatty acid synthesis, that adds a two-carbon unit from malonyl-(acyl carrier protein) to another molecule of fatty acyl-(acyl carrier protein), giving a beta-ketoacyl-(acyl carrier protein) with the release of carbon dioxide. EC 2.3.1.41.
Substances that destroy fungi by suppressing their ability to grow or reproduce. They differ from FUNGICIDES, INDUSTRIAL because they defend against fungi present in human or animal tissues.
Animal form of fatty acid synthase which is encoded by a single gene and consists of seven catalytic domains and is functional as a homodimer. It is overexpressed in some NEOPLASMS and is a target in humans of some ANTINEOPLASTIC AGENTS and some ANTI-OBESITY AGENTS.
Organic, monobasic acids derived from hydrocarbons by the equivalent of oxidation of a methyl group to an alcohol, aldehyde, and then acid. Fatty acids are saturated and unsaturated (FATTY ACIDS, UNSATURATED). (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
The addition of an organic acid radical into a molecule.
Ribosome inactivating proteins consisting of two polypeptide chains, the toxic A subunit and a lectin B subunit, linked by disulfide bridges. The lectin portion binds to cell surfaces and facilitates transport into the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM.
A mitosporic fungal genus with many reported ascomycetous teleomorphs. Cephalosporin antibiotics are derived from this genus.

Structure of the complex between the antibiotic cerulenin and its target, beta-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase. (1/220)

In the biosynthesis of fatty acids, the beta-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) synthases catalyze chain elongation by the addition of two-carbon units derived from malonyl-ACP to an acyl group bound to either ACP or CoA. The enzyme is a possible drug target for treatment of certain cancers and for tuberculosis. The crystal structure of the complex of the enzyme from Escherichia coli, and the fungal mycotoxin cerulenin reveals that the inhibitor is bound in a hydrophobic pocket formed at the dimer interface. Cerulenin is covalently attached to the active site cysteine through its C2 carbon atom. The fit of the inhibitor to the active site is not optimal, and there is thus room for improvement through structure based design.  (+info)

Monounsaturated but not polyunsaturated fatty acids are required for growth of the deep-sea bacterium Photobacterium profundum SS9 at high pressure and low temperature. (2/220)

There is considerable evidence correlating the production of increased proportions of membrane unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) with bacterial growth at low temperatures or high pressures. In order to assess the importance of UFAs to microbial growth under these conditions, the effects of conditions altering UFA levels in the psychrotolerant piezophilic deep-sea bacterium Photobacterium profundum SS9 were investigated. The fatty acids produced by P. profundum SS9 grown at various temperatures and pressures were characterized, and differences in fatty acid composition as a function of phase growth, and between inner and outer membranes, were noted. P. profundum SS9 was found to exhibit enhanced proportions of both monounsaturated (MUFAs) and polyunsaturated (PUFAs) fatty acids when grown at a decreased temperature or elevated pressure. Treatment of cells with cerulenin inhibited MUFA but not PUFA synthesis and led to a decreased growth rate and yield at low temperature and high pressure. In addition, oleic acid-auxotrophic mutants were isolated. One of these mutants, strain EA3, was deficient in the production of MUFAs and was both low-temperature sensitive and high-pressure sensitive in the absence of exogenous 18:1 fatty acid. Another mutant, strain EA2, produced little MUFA but elevated levels of the PUFA species eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 20:5n-3). This mutant grew slowly but was not low-temperature sensitive or high-pressure sensitive. Finally, reverse genetics was employed to construct a mutant unable to produce EPA. This mutant, strain EA10, was also not low-temperature sensitive or high-pressure sensitive. The significance of these results to the understanding of the role of UFAs in growth under low-temperature or high-pressure conditions is discussed.  (+info)

Acylation stabilizes a protease-resistant conformation of protoporphyrinogen oxidase, the molecular target of diphenyl ether-type herbicides. (3/220)

Protein acylation is an important way in which a number of proteins with a variety of functions are modified. The physiological role of the acylation of cellular proteins is still poorly understood. Covalent binding of fatty acids to nonintegral membrane proteins is thought to produce transient or permanent enhancement of the association of the polypeptide chains with biological membranes. In this paper, we investigate the functional role for the palmitoylation of an atypical membrane-bound protein, yeast protoporphyrinogen oxidase, which is the molecular target of diphenyl ether-type herbicides. Palmitoylation stabilizes an active heat- and protease-resistant conformation of the protein. Palmitoylation of protoporphyrinogen oxidase has been demonstrated to occur in vivo both in yeast cells and in a heterologous bacterial expression system, where it may be inhibited by cerulenin leading to the accumulation of degradation products of the protein. The thiol ester linking palmitoleic acid to the polypeptide chain was shown to be sensitive to hydrolysis by hydroxylamine and also by the widely used serine-protease inhibitor phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride.  (+info)

Biosynthesis and elongation of short- and medium-chain-length fatty acids. (4/220)

Short- and medium-chain-length fatty acids (FAs) are important constituents of a wide array of natural products. Branched and straight short-chain-length FAs originate from branched chain amino acid metabolism, and serve as primers for elongation in FA synthase-like reactions. However, a recent model proposes that the one-carbon extension reactions that utilize 2-oxo-3-methylbutyric acid in leucine biosynthesis also catalyze a repetitive one-carbon elongation of short-chain primers to medium-chain-length FAs. The existence of such a mechanism would require a novel form of regulation to control carbon flux between amino acid and FA biosynthesis. A critical re-analysis of the data used to support this pathway fails to support the hypothesis for FA elongation by one-carbon extension cycles of alpha-ketoacids. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis experimentally using criteria that distinguish between one- and two-carbon elongation mechanisms: (a) isotopomer patterns in terminal carbon atom pairs of branched and straight FAs resulting from differential labeling with [(13)C]acetate; (b)(13)C]threonine labeling patterns in odd- and even chain length FAs; and (c) differential sensitivity of elongation reactions to inhibition by cerulenin. All three criteria indicated that biosynthesis of medium-chain length FAs is mediated primarily by FA synthase-like reactions.  (+info)

Activity of the phosphatidylcholine biosynthetic pathway modulates the distribution of fatty acids into glycerolipids in proliferating cells. (5/220)

PtdCho accumulation is a periodic, S phase-specific event that is modulated in part by cell cycle-dependent fluctuations in CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase (CCT) activity. A supply of fatty acids is essential to generate the diacylglycerol (DG) precursors for phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) biosynthesis but it is not known whether the DG supply is also coupled to the cell cycle. Although the rate of fatty acid synthesis in a macrophage cell line was dramatically stimulated in response to the growth factor, CSF-1, it was not regulated by the cell cycle. Increased fatty acid synthesis correlated with elevated acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and fatty acid synthase (FAS) steady-state mRNA levels. Cellular fatty acid synthesis was essential for membrane PL synthesis. Cerulenin inhibition of endogenous fatty acid synthesis also inhibited PtdCho synthesis, which was not relieved by exogenous fatty acids. Inhibition of CCT activity by the addition of lysophosphatidylcholine (lysoPtdCho) or temperature-shift of a conditionally defective CCT diverted newly synthesized DG to the TG pool where it accumulated. Enforced expression of CCT stimulated PtdCho biosynthesis and reduced TG synthesis. Thus, the cellular DG supply did not regulate PtdCho biosynthesis and CCT activity governs the partitioning of DG into either the PL or TG pools, thereby controlling both PtdCho and TG biosynthesis.  (+info)

Malonyl-coenzyme-A is a potential mediator of cytotoxicity induced by fatty-acid synthase inhibition in human breast cancer cells and xenografts. (6/220)

A biologically aggressive subset of human breast cancers and other malignancies is characterized by elevated fatty-acid synthase (FAS) enzyme expression, elevated fatty acid (FA) synthesis, and selective sensitivity to pharmacological inhibition of FAS activity by cerulenin or the novel compound C75. In this study, inhibition of FA synthesis at the physiologically regulated step of carboxylation of acetyl-CoA to malonyl-CoA by 5-(tetradecyloxy)-2-furoic acid (TOFA) was not cytotoxic to breast cancer cells in clonogenic assays. FAS inhibitors induced a rapid increase in intracellular malonyl-CoA to several fold above control levels, whereas TOFA reduced intracellular malonyl-CoA by 60%. Simultaneous exposure of breast cancer cells to TOFA and an FAS inhibitor resulted in significantly reduced cytotoxicity and apoptosis. Subcutaneous xenografts of MCF7 breast cancer cells in nude mice treated with C75 showed FA synthesis inhibition, apoptosis, and inhibition of tumor growth to less than 1/8 of control volumes, without comparable toxicity in normal tissues. The data suggest that differences in intermediary metabolism render tumor cells susceptible to toxic fluxes in malonyl-CoA, both in vitro and in vivo.  (+info)

Specialized fatty acid synthesis in African trypanosomes: myristate for GPI anchors. (7/220)

African trypanosomes, the cause of sleeping sickness, need massive amounts of myristate to remodel glycosyl phosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors on their surface glycoproteins. However, it has been believed that the parasite is unable to synthesize any fatty acids, and myristate is not abundant in the hosts' bloodstreams. Thus, it has been unclear how trypanosomes meet their myristate requirement. Here we found that they could indeed synthesize fatty acids. The synthetic pathway was unique in that the major product, myristate, was preferentially incorporated into GPIs and not into other lipids. The antibiotic thiolactomycin inhibited myristate synthesis and killed the parasite, making this pathway a potential chemotherapeutic target.  (+info)

Structural modeling and site-directed mutagenesis of the actinorhodin beta-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase. (8/220)

A three-dimensional model of the Streptomyces coelicolor actinorhodin beta-ketoacyl synthase (Act KS) was constructed based on the X-ray crystal structure of the related Escherichia coli fatty acid synthase condensing enzyme beta-ketoacyl synthase II, revealing a similar catalytic active site organization in these two enzymes. The model was assessed by site-directed mutagenesis of five conserved amino acid residues in Act KS that are in close proximity to the Cys169 active site. Three substitutions completely abrogated polyketide biosynthesis, while two replacements resulted in significant reduction in polyketide production. (3)H-cerulenin labeling of the various Act KS mutant proteins demonstrated that none of the amino acid replacements affected the formation of the active site nucleophile.  (+info)

Cerulenin is a fungal metabolite that inhibits the enzyme delta-9-desaturase, which is involved in fatty acid synthesis. This compound is often used in research to study the biology and function of fatty acid synthase and lipid metabolism. It has been investigated for its potential as an anti-cancer agent, but its clinical use is not approved due to its limited specificity and potential toxicity.

Fatty acid synthesis inhibitors are a class of drugs that block the production of fatty acids in the body. Fatty acids are necessary for the normal functioning of the body, but an overproduction of certain types of fatty acids can contribute to the development of various medical conditions, such as obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease.

Fatty acid synthesis inhibitors work by targeting enzymes involved in the synthesis of fatty acids, particularly fatty acid synthase (FAS). FAS is an enzyme that plays a key role in the production of palmitate, a saturated fatty acid that is a building block for other fatty acids. By inhibiting FAS, these drugs can reduce the amount of palmitate and other fatty acids produced in the body.

There are several types of fatty acid synthesis inhibitors, including:

1. Orlistat (Xenical, Alli): This drug works by blocking the action of lipases, enzymes that break down dietary fats in the gut. By preventing the absorption of dietary fats, orlistat can help reduce calorie intake and promote weight loss.
2. Tebufelone: This is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that has been shown to inhibit FAS and reduce the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. It has been studied as a potential treatment for various inflammatory conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis and psoriasis.
3. Cerulenin: This is a natural product that inhibits FAS and has been used in research to study the role of fatty acid synthesis in various biological processes.
4. C75: This is a synthetic compound that inhibits FAS and has been studied as a potential anti-cancer agent, as cancer cells often have increased rates of fatty acid synthesis.

It's important to note that while fatty acid synthesis inhibitors can be effective in reducing the production of certain types of fatty acids, they may also have side effects and potential risks. Therefore, it is essential to use these drugs under the supervision of a healthcare provider and to follow their instructions carefully.

Fatty acid synthases (FAS) are a group of enzymes that are responsible for the synthesis of fatty acids in the body. They catalyze a series of reactions that convert acetyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA into longer chain fatty acids, which are then used for various purposes such as energy storage or membrane formation.

The human genome encodes two types of FAS: type I and type II. Type I FAS is a large multifunctional enzyme complex found in the cytoplasm of cells, while type II FAS consists of individual enzymes located in the mitochondria. Both types of FAS play important roles in lipid metabolism, but their regulation and expression differ depending on the tissue and physiological conditions.

Inhibition of FAS has been explored as a potential therapeutic strategy for various diseases, including cancer, obesity, and metabolic disorders. However, more research is needed to fully understand the complex mechanisms regulating FAS activity and its role in human health and disease.

Iodoacetamide is not typically defined in a medical context, but it is a chemical compound with the formula CH3C(=NH)COI. It is used in laboratory settings as a reagent for various chemical reactions. In a biochemical context, iodoacetamide is an alkylating agent that can react with cysteine residues in proteins, modifying their structure and function. This property has made it useful in research applications such as the study of protein function and enzyme kinetics.

However, it's important to note that iodoacetamide is not used as a therapeutic agent in medicine due to its potential toxicity and reactivity with various biological molecules. Therefore, there is no medical definition for this compound.

Antifungal agents are a type of medication used to treat and prevent fungal infections. These agents work by targeting and disrupting the growth of fungi, which include yeasts, molds, and other types of fungi that can cause illness in humans.

There are several different classes of antifungal agents, including:

1. Azoles: These agents work by inhibiting the synthesis of ergosterol, a key component of fungal cell membranes. Examples of azole antifungals include fluconazole, itraconazole, and voriconazole.
2. Echinocandins: These agents target the fungal cell wall, disrupting its synthesis and leading to fungal cell death. Examples of echinocandins include caspofungin, micafungin, and anidulafungin.
3. Polyenes: These agents bind to ergosterol in the fungal cell membrane, creating pores that lead to fungal cell death. Examples of polyene antifungals include amphotericin B and nystatin.
4. Allylamines: These agents inhibit squalene epoxidase, a key enzyme in ergosterol synthesis. Examples of allylamine antifungals include terbinafine and naftifine.
5. Griseofulvin: This agent disrupts fungal cell division by binding to tubulin, a protein involved in fungal cell mitosis.

Antifungal agents can be administered topically, orally, or intravenously, depending on the severity and location of the infection. It is important to use antifungal agents only as directed by a healthcare professional, as misuse or overuse can lead to resistance and make treatment more difficult.

Fatty acid synthase (FAS) is a multi-enzyme complex that plays a crucial role in the synthesis of long-chain fatty acids in the body. There are two main types of FAS: type I and type II.

Type I fatty acid synthase, also known as FASN, is found primarily in the cytoplasm of cells in tissues such as the liver, adipose tissue, and lactating mammary glands. It is a large protein made up of several distinct enzymatic domains that work together to synthesize long-chain fatty acids from acetyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA.

The process of fatty acid synthesis involves a series of reactions, starting with the condensation of acetyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA to form acetoacetyl-CoA. This reaction is followed by a series of reductions, dehydrations, and another reduction to form a saturated fatty acid molecule with 16 carbons (palmitate).

Type I FAS is often upregulated in conditions associated with increased lipogenesis, such as obesity, metabolic syndrome, and certain types of cancer. Inhibiting FAS has been explored as a potential therapeutic strategy for treating these conditions.

Fatty acids are carboxylic acids with a long aliphatic chain, which are important components of lipids and are widely distributed in living organisms. They can be classified based on the length of their carbon chain, saturation level (presence or absence of double bonds), and other structural features.

The two main types of fatty acids are:

1. Saturated fatty acids: These have no double bonds in their carbon chain and are typically solid at room temperature. Examples include palmitic acid (C16:0) and stearic acid (C18:0).
2. Unsaturated fatty acids: These contain one or more double bonds in their carbon chain and can be further classified into monounsaturated (one double bond) and polyunsaturated (two or more double bonds) fatty acids. Examples of unsaturated fatty acids include oleic acid (C18:1, monounsaturated), linoleic acid (C18:2, polyunsaturated), and alpha-linolenic acid (C18:3, polyunsaturated).

Fatty acids play crucial roles in various biological processes, such as energy storage, membrane structure, and cell signaling. Some essential fatty acids cannot be synthesized by the human body and must be obtained through dietary sources.

Acylation is a medical and biological term that refers to the process of introducing an acyl group (-CO-) into a molecule. This process can occur naturally or it can be induced through chemical reactions. In the context of medicine and biology, acylation often occurs during post-translational modifications of proteins, where an acyl group is added to specific amino acid residues, altering the protein's function, stability, or localization.

An example of acylation in medicine is the administration of neuraminidase inhibitors, such as oseltamivir (Tamiflu), for the treatment and prevention of influenza. These drugs work by inhibiting the activity of the viral neuraminidase enzyme, which is essential for the release of newly formed virus particles from infected cells. Oseltamivir is administered orally as an ethyl ester prodrug, which is then hydrolyzed in the body to form the active acylated metabolite that inhibits the viral neuraminidase.

In summary, acylation is a vital process in medicine and biology, with implications for drug design, protein function, and post-translational modifications.

Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are a class of toxic proteins that inhibit protein synthesis in cells by modifying ribosomal RNA. They can be found in various plants, animals, and bacteria. Type 2 RIPs are characterized by their structure, which consists of two separate polypeptide chains: an A chain with N-glycosidase activity that removes an adenine residue from a specific site on the 28S rRNA, and a B chain that facilitates the binding of the A chain to the ribosome. The B chain is a lectin domain that allows for specific recognition and binding to glycoconjugates on the cell surface, leading to internalization of the RIP into the cell. Type 2 RIPs are known for their ability to inhibit protein synthesis in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, making them potential candidates for use in cancer therapy and other medical applications.

"Acremonium" is a genus of filamentous fungi that are commonly found in soil, decaying vegetation, and water. Some species of Acremonium can cause infections in humans, particularly in individuals with weakened immune systems. These infections can affect various organs and tissues, including the skin, nails, lungs, and eyes.

The medical definition of "Acremonium" is therefore a type of fungus that can cause a variety of infectious diseases, particularly in immunocompromised individuals. It's important to note that Acremonium infections are relatively rare, but they can be serious and require prompt medical treatment.

In sterol synthesis, cerulenin inhibits HMG-CoA synthetase activity. It was also reported that cerulenin specifically inhibited ... But in general conclusion, cerulenin has inhibitory effects on sterol synthesis.[citation needed] Cerulenin causes a dose- ... Cerulenin is an antifungal antibiotic that inhibits fatty acid and steroid biosynthesis. It was the first natural product ... Huang P, Zhu S, Lu S, Dai Z, Jin Y (April 2000). "[An experimental study on cerulenin induced apoptosis of human colonic cancer ...
Cerulenin, Andrastin A, Herbimycin, and Neoxaline Koji Nakanishi Tohru Fukuyama Kitasato Shibasaburō List of Japanese Nobel ... a fatty acid biosynthesis inhibitor named cerulenin; Furthermore, compounds having a unique structure and biological activity ...
"Inhibition of beta-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthases by thiolactomycin and cerulenin. Structure and mechanism". J. Biol. ...
At least two of the existing drugs for tuberculosis were originally derived from microbes; cerulenin from the fungus ...
Cerulenin, a molecule that appears to inhibit by mimicking the "condensation transition state" can only inhibit B or F, but not ... "Inhibition of β-Ketoacyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Synthases by Thiolactomycin and Cerulenin STRUCTURE AND MECHANISM". Journal of ...
Cerulenin is known to inhibit synthase I in Carthamus tinctorius, Spinacia oleracea, Brassica napus, Allium ampeloprasu, ... For example, cerulenin inhibits synthase II in Spinacia oleracea, Allium ampelprasum, Escherichia coli, and Streptoccoccus ... A number of inhibitors include cerulenin in Sinapis alba, Daucus carota, and Phaseolus vulgaris, apigenin in Secale cereale and ...
In axenic culture, S. oryzae produces 0.3-0.627 micrograms of helvolic acid and 0.9-4.8 micrograms of cerulenin per milliliter ... For forty years prior to 2005, the industrial strain used to manufacture the antibiotic cerulenin was known under the invalidly ... Bills GF; Platas G; Gams W (November 2004). "Conspecificity of the cerulenin and helvolic acid producing 'Cephalosporium ...
Subsequent discoveries included alamethicin, aphidicolin, brefeldin A, cephalosporin, cerulenin, citromycin, eupenifeldin, ...
Cerulenin, Aphidicolin Experimental drugs and drug precursors: Parthenolide, Puromycin, Rapamycin, Anisomycin, Thapsigargin, ...
The molecular formula C12H17NO3 may refer to: Anhalidine Anhalinine Anhalonidine Bucetin Bufexamac Cerulenin Etamivan MEDA ...
... x Cerulenin Cetrimonium bromide (Cetrimide) - C19H42BrN Chelerythrine Chromomycin A3 Chaparonin Chitin α-Chloralose Chlorophyll ...
In sterol synthesis, cerulenin inhibits HMG-CoA synthetase activity. It was also reported that cerulenin specifically inhibited ... But in general conclusion, cerulenin has inhibitory effects on sterol synthesis.[citation needed] Cerulenin causes a dose- ... Cerulenin is an antifungal antibiotic that inhibits fatty acid and steroid biosynthesis. It was the first natural product ... Huang P, Zhu S, Lu S, Dai Z, Jin Y (April 2000). "[An experimental study on cerulenin induced apoptosis of human colonic cancer ...
Cerulenin also inhibited augmentation of insulin release by alpha-ketoisocaproate, a mitochondrial fuel. Furthermore, cerulenin ... Glucose oxidation, ATP content in islets, and palmitate oxidation were not affected by cerulenin. In conclusion, cerulenin ... using cerulenin, an inhibitor of protein acylation. In isolated rat pancreatic islets, cerulenin inhibited the glucose ... H Yajima, M Komatsu, S Yamada, S G Straub, T Kaneko, Y Sato, K Yamauchi, K Hashizume, G W Sharp, T Aizawa; Cerulenin, an ...
Explore the 1 paper that mention a possible interaction between Cerulenin and Lauric Acid. ... cerulenin to the medium increased the proportion of DHA and saturated fatty acids, including C12:0 , C14:0 and C16:0, at the ...
Inhibition of β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthases by thiolactomycin and cerulenin. Structure and mechanism. J. Biol. Chem ...
B) Normalized growth of cultures treated with 100 µg/mL cerulenin which inhibits fatty acid biosynthesis. Graphs are displayed ...
... cerulenin analogues 15a-b. A fourth class of cerulenin analogues was synthesized with the aromatic analogues 17a-e. This ... Cerulenin was chosen as the lead structure, being a substrate of the efflux pumps in Candida albicans on one hand and therefore ... On the other hand, cerulenin is a known inhibitor of the FAS system but inhibition is unselective in type I and II FAS. ... The first cerulenin derivatives were prepared by coupling 2,3-dihydrofuran to the before synthesized 1-octaniodide, followed by ...
Further experiments showed that NPD6433 and cerulenin, another fatty acid synthase inhibitor, were able to kill numerous yeast ...
Saleh, Faraydoon A.K. (1984) Effect of cerulenin on the production of alpha-lysin by Staphylococcus aureus Wood 46. PhD thesis ...
Martín J. F., McDaniel L. E. 1975b; Specific inhibition of candicidin biosynthesis by the lipo-genic inhibitor cerulenin. ...
Blocking of lipogenesis with siRNA or FAS-specific inhibitors cerulenin and C75 attenuates the cell senescence. However, fatty ...
Yajima H, Komatsu M, Yamada S, Straub SG, Kaneko T, Sato Y, Yamauchi K, Hashizume K, Sharp GW, Aizawa T: Cerulenin, an ...
3. G. DeJesus and O. Bizzozero "Effect of 2-Fluoropalmitate, Cerulenin and Tunicamycin on the Palmitoylation and Intracellular ...
Fatty Acid Synthase Inhibitor Cerulenin Suppresses Colorectal Cancer in Combination with Oxaliplatin. Authors: Soichiro Murata ...
Cerulenin is an antifungal antibiotic discovered in the culture filtrate of Cephalosporium caerulens (Matsumae A et al., J ... Cerulenin. Many bioactive lipids containing a fatty acid linked to an amine-containing compound are found in animal organisms ... The inhibition of the fatty acid synthase by cerulenin leads to cytotoxicity and apoptosis in human cancer cell lines, effect ...
Cerulenin 69.96997 68.64001 cFMS Receptor 105.362 152.1544 Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor TABLE S1-4 Drug WT KO Chetomin 4.207858 ...
Cerulenin is a chemical compound that has been used in the medical field as an antibiotic. It is a blue-green pigment that is ... Cerulenin is a bacterial antibiotic that inhibits fatty acid synthesis and is used in research to study the role of fatty acids ... Cerulenin works by inhibiting the production of fatty acids in bacteria, which are essential for the growth and survival of ... Cerulenin has also been studied for its potential use in treating other conditions, such as cancer and inflammatory diseases. ...
Cerulenin is an antifungal antibiotic discovered in the culture filtrate of Cephalosporium caerulens (Matsumae A et al., J ... Cerulenin. Many bioactive lipids containing a fatty acid linked to an amine-containing compound are found in animal organisms ... The inhibition of the fatty acid synthase by cerulenin leads to cytotoxicity and apoptosis in human cancer cell lines, effect ...
Cerulenin Starting at Please inquire Add to Wish List Add to Compare ...
Cerulenin. 17397-89-6. C12H17NO3. Chaetocin. 28097-03-2. C30H28N6O6S4. Chaetomin. 1403-36-7. C31H30N6O6S4. ...
72] Sano Y, Nomura S, Kamio Y, Omura S, Hata T. Studies on cerulenin. 3. Isolation and physicochemical properties of cerulenin ... 71] and cerulenin (Fig. 6-36) from Cephalosporium caeruleus [72], inhibited melanin biosynthesis, a very important process for ...
Dive into the research topics where Sandra Adams is active. These topic labels come from the works of this person. Together they form a unique fingerprint ...
In this study, we used the FASN specific inhibitor cerulenin. Various concentrations of cerulenin have been applied in in vitro ... For inhibition studies, cerulenin (1 μg/ml, Sigma-Aldrich) and SB525334 (1 μM and 5 μM) that inhibits the FASN and TGF-β1 ... The test group mice (n=7) were i.p. injected with cerulenin (15 mg/kg) and the control group mice (n=7) were injected with ... The test group mice (n=7) were i.p. injected with cerulenin (15 mg/kg) and the control group mice (n=7) were injected with ...
Remaining appressoria decreased with increasing concentrations of cerulenin, an inhibitor of lipid synthesis, but ...
5A, B). Moreover, inhibition of lipid synthesis with the FAS inhibitors cerulenin and C75 [34,35] also attenuated GSK3 ... Omura S. The antibiotic cerulenin, a novel tool for biochemistry as an inhibitor of fatty acid synthesis. Bacteriol Rev. 1976; ... C) Chang cells were pretreated with the indicated concentrations of cerulenin (Cer; Sigma C2389) and C75 (Sigma 5490) for 24 ... Finally, blocking lipogenesis with fatty acid synthase inhibitors (cerulenin and C75) and siRNA-mediated silencing of SREBP1 ...
Optimization of lipid production by the oleaginous yeast Lipomyces starkeyi by random mutagenesis coupled to cerulenin ...
The effects of the fatty acid synthase inhibitor cerulenin on chiloglottone production were tested. Patterns of selection and ...
ENHANCED PRODUCTION OF CERULENIN BY A NEW FUNGAL SPECIES OF PHOMA FOLLOWING IMPROVED FERMENTATION CONDITIONS. V. Gonzalez- ...
Yeast - mutant cell line 0101 (cerulenin-resistant). (Sample preparation). *Yeast incubation (YPD, 30°C, approx. 24 hours) ...
... mg/mg cinnamic acid in the presence of cerulenin, which is 83.9% ± 1.17 of the theoretical yield. This is the highest reported ... in the absence of cerulenin. By adjusting the expression strategy, the optimized engineered strain produced pinosylvin at 153.7 ... The temperature was 30 °C and no cerulenin was added. C Effect of cerulenin on the synthesis of pinosylvin. The temperature was ... 4B). The addition of cerulenin had a positive effect on the supplementation of malonyl-CoA [39]. When 60 μM cerulenin was added ...
Cerulenin disrupted the assembly of the TonEBP/NF-κB/AP-1/p300 complex and suppressed the LPS-induced microglial activation and ... Cerulenin is an effective blocker of the TonEBP actions. ... Cerulenin was used to block the NF-κB cofactor function of ... V, vehicle, C, cerulenin. c HT22 cells grown on chamber slides were treated as in a: pretreatment with vehicle or cerulenin ... Cerulenin inhibits LPS-induced inflammation in BV2 cells. a The cells were pretreated for 1 h with 10 μM cerulenin (solid bars ...

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