Cerebrovascular Trauma: Penetrating and nonpenetrating traumatic injuries to an extracranial or intracranial blood vessel that supplies the brain. This includes the CAROTID ARTERIES; VERTEBRAL ARTERIES; MENINGEAL ARTERIES; CEREBRAL ARTERIES; veins, and venous sinuses.Trauma Centers: Specialized hospital facilities which provide diagnostic and therapeutic services for trauma patients.In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence: A type of IN SITU HYBRIDIZATION in which target sequences are stained with fluorescent dye so their location and size can be determined using fluorescence microscopy. This staining is sufficiently distinct that the hybridization signal can be seen both in metaphase spreads and in interphase nuclei.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic: Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Polymorphism, Genetic: The regular and simultaneous occurrence in a single interbreeding population of two or more discontinuous genotypes. The concept includes differences in genotypes ranging in size from a single nucleotide site (POLYMORPHISM, SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE) to large nucleotide sequences visible at a chromosomal level.Cerebral Small Vessel Diseases: Pathological processes or diseases where cerebral MICROVESSELS show abnormalities. They are often associated with aging, hypertension and risk factors for lacunar infarcts (see LACUNAR INFARCTION); LEUKOARAIOSIS; and CEREBRAL HEMORRHAGE.Leukoaraiosis: Non-specific white matter changes in the BRAIN, often seen after age 65. Changes include loss of AXONS; MYELIN pallor, GLIOSIS, loss of ependymal cells, and enlarged perivascular spaces. Leukoaraiosis is a risk factor for DEMENTIA and CEREBROVASCULAR DISORDERS.Vertebral Artery: The first branch of the SUBCLAVIAN ARTERY with distribution to muscles of the NECK; VERTEBRAE; SPINAL CORD; CEREBELLUM; and interior of the CEREBRUM.Brain Infarction: Tissue NECROSIS in any area of the brain, including the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES, the CEREBELLUM, and the BRAIN STEM. Brain infarction is the result of a cascade of events initiated by inadequate blood flow through the brain that is followed by HYPOXIA and HYPOGLYCEMIA in brain tissue. Damage may be temporary, permanent, selective or pan-necrosis.Head Injuries, Closed: Traumatic injuries to the cranium where the integrity of the skull is not compromised and no bone fragments or other objects penetrate the skull and dura mater. This frequently results in mechanical injury being transmitted to intracranial structures which may produce traumatic brain injuries, hemorrhage, or cranial nerve injury. (From Rowland, Merritt's Textbook of Neurology, 9th ed, p417)Stroke, Lacunar: Stroke caused by lacunar infarction or other small vessel diseases of the brain. It features hemiparesis (see PARESIS), hemisensory, or hemisensory motor loss.Wounds, Nonpenetrating: Injuries caused by impact with a blunt object where there is no penetration of the skin.Skull Fracture, Basilar: Fractures which extend through the base of the SKULL, usually involving the PETROUS BONE. Battle's sign (characterized by skin discoloration due to extravasation of blood into the subcutaneous tissue behind the ear and over the mastoid process), CRANIAL NEUROPATHIES, TRAUMATIC; CAROTID-CAVERNOUS SINUS FISTULA; and CEREBROSPINAL FLUID OTORRHEA are relatively frequent sequelae of this condition. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p876)Brain Ischemia: Localized reduction of blood flow to brain tissue due to arterial obstruction or systemic hypoperfusion. This frequently occurs in conjunction with brain hypoxia (HYPOXIA, BRAIN). Prolonged ischemia is associated with BRAIN INFARCTION.Sclerostomy: Surgical formation of an external opening in the sclera, primarily in the treatment of glaucoma.Nervous System Diseases: Diseases of the central and peripheral nervous system. This includes disorders of the brain, spinal cord, cranial nerves, peripheral nerves, nerve roots, autonomic nervous system, neuromuscular junction, and muscle.Stroke: A group of pathological conditions characterized by sudden, non-convulsive loss of neurological function due to BRAIN ISCHEMIA or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Stroke is classified by the type of tissue NECROSIS, such as the anatomic location, vasculature involved, etiology, age of the affected individual, and hemorrhagic vs. non-hemorrhagic nature. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp777-810)Hippocampus: A curved elevation of GRAY MATTER extending the entire length of the floor of the TEMPORAL HORN of the LATERAL VENTRICLE (see also TEMPORAL LOBE). The hippocampus proper, subiculum, and DENTATE GYRUS constitute the hippocampal formation. Sometimes authors include the ENTORHINAL CORTEX in the hippocampal formation.Cerebral Arteries: The arterial blood vessels supplying the CEREBRUM.Infarction, Middle Cerebral Artery: NECROSIS occurring in the MIDDLE CEREBRAL ARTERY distribution system which brings blood to the entire lateral aspects of each CEREBRAL HEMISPHERE. Clinical signs include impaired cognition; APHASIA; AGRAPHIA; weak and numbness in the face and arms, contralaterally or bilaterally depending on the infarction.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Abducens Nerve Injury: Traumatic injury to the abducens, or sixth, cranial nerve. Injury to this nerve results in lateral rectus muscle weakness or paralysis. The nerve may be damaged by closed or penetrating CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA or by facial trauma involving the orbit.Abducens Nerve: The 6th cranial nerve which originates in the ABDUCENS NUCLEUS of the PONS and sends motor fibers to the lateral rectus muscles of the EYE. Damage to the nerve or its nucleus disrupts horizontal eye movement control.Sphenoid Sinusitis: Inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA in the SPHENOID SINUS. Isolated sphenoid sinusitis is uncommon. It usually occurs in conjunction with other paranasal sinusitis.Abducens Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the sixth cranial (abducens) nerve or its nucleus in the pons. The nerve may be injured along its course in the pons, intracranially as it travels along the base of the brain, in the cavernous sinus, or at the level of superior orbital fissure or orbit. Dysfunction of the nerve causes lateral rectus muscle weakness, resulting in horizontal diplopia that is maximal when the affected eye is abducted and ESOTROPIA. Common conditions associated with nerve injury include INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; ISCHEMIA; and INFRATENTORIAL NEOPLASMS.Horner Syndrome: A syndrome associated with defective sympathetic innervation to one side of the face, including the eye. Clinical features include MIOSIS; mild BLEPHAROPTOSIS; and hemifacial ANHIDROSIS (decreased sweating)(see HYPOHIDROSIS). Lesions of the BRAIN STEM; cervical SPINAL CORD; first thoracic nerve root; apex of the LUNG; CAROTID ARTERY; CAVERNOUS SINUS; and apex of the ORBIT may cause this condition. (From Miller et al., Clinical Neuro-Ophthalmology, 4th ed, pp500-11)Peripheral Nerve Injuries: Injuries to the PERIPHERAL NERVES.Diplopia: A visual symptom in which a single object is perceived by the visual cortex as two objects rather than one. Disorders associated with this condition include REFRACTIVE ERRORS; STRABISMUS; OCULOMOTOR NERVE DISEASES; TROCHLEAR NERVE DISEASES; ABDUCENS NERVE DISEASES; and diseases of the BRAIN STEM and OCCIPITAL LOBE.Sodium: A member of the alkali group of metals. It has the atomic symbol Na, atomic number 11, and atomic weight 23.Sodium Channels: Ion channels that specifically allow the passage of SODIUM ions. A variety of specific sodium channel subtypes are involved in serving specialized functions such as neuronal signaling, CARDIAC MUSCLE contraction, and KIDNEY function.Health Personnel: Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)United States Food and Drug Administration: An agency of the PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to maintaining standards of quality of foods, drugs, therapeutic devices, etc.Pharmacology: The study of the origin, nature, properties, and actions of drugs and their effects on living organisms.Sodium, Dietary: Sodium or sodium compounds used in foods or as a food. The most frequently used compounds are sodium chloride or sodium glutamate.Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions: Disorders that result from the intended use of PHARMACEUTICAL PREPARATIONS. Included in this heading are a broad variety of chemically-induced adverse conditions due to toxicity, DRUG INTERACTIONS, and metabolic effects of pharmaceuticals.Ultrasonography, Doppler, Transcranial: A non-invasive technique using ultrasound for the measurement of cerebrovascular hemodynamics, particularly cerebral blood flow velocity and cerebral collateral flow. With a high-intensity, low-frequency pulse probe, the intracranial arteries may be studied transtemporally, transorbitally, or from below the foramen magnum.Blood Flow Velocity: A value equal to the total volume flow divided by the cross-sectional area of the vascular bed.Carotid Stenosis: Narrowing or stricture of any part of the CAROTID ARTERIES, most often due to atherosclerotic plaque formation. Ulcerations may form in atherosclerotic plaques and induce THROMBUS formation. Platelet or cholesterol emboli may arise from stenotic carotid lesions and induce a TRANSIENT ISCHEMIC ATTACK; CEREBROVASCULAR ACCIDENT; or temporary blindness (AMAUROSIS FUGAX). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp 822-3)Middle Cerebral Artery: The largest of the cerebral arteries. It trifurcates into temporal, frontal, and parietal branches supplying blood to most of the parenchyma of these lobes in the CEREBRAL CORTEX. These are the areas involved in motor, sensory, and speech activities.Cerebrovascular Circulation: The circulation of blood through the BLOOD VESSELS of the BRAIN.Ultrasonography, Doppler, Color: Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect, with the superposition of flow information as colors on a gray scale in a real-time image. This type of ultrasonography is well-suited to identifying the location of high-velocity flow (such as in a stenosis) or of mapping the extent of flow in a certain region.Ultrasonography, Doppler, Duplex: Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect combined with real-time imaging. The real-time image is created by rapid movement of the ultrasound beam. A powerful advantage of this technique is the ability to estimate the velocity of flow from the Doppler shift frequency.Peer Group: Group composed of associates of same species, approximately the same age, and usually of similar rank or social status.Video Games: A form of interactive entertainment in which the player controls electronically generated images that appear on a video display screen. This includes video games played in the home on special machines or home computers, and those played in arcades.Videotape Recording: Recording of visual and sometimes sound signals on magnetic tape.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Journal Impact Factor: A quantitative measure of the frequency on average with which articles in a journal have been cited in a given period of time.Peer Review, Research: The evaluation by experts of the quality and pertinence of research or research proposals of other experts in the same field. Peer review is used by editors in deciding which submissions warrant publication, by granting agencies to determine which proposals should be funded, and by academic institutions in tenure decisions.Peer Review: An organized procedure carried out by a select committee of professionals in evaluating the performance of other professionals in meeting the standards of their specialty. Review by peers is used by editors in the evaluation of articles and other papers submitted for publication. Peer review is used also in the evaluation of grant applications. It is applied also in evaluating the quality of health care provided to patients.

Traumatic basal subarachnoid hemorrhage due to rupture of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery--case report. (1/13)

A 20-year-old male presented with traumatic basal subarachnoid hemorrhage after being involved in a fight. Antemortem clinical examinations could not exclude the possibility of rupture of abnormal blood vessels because of the absence of external injuries. Careful postmortem examination of the head and neck regions and histological examination of the intracranial arteries demonstrated traumatic rupture of the left posterior inferior cerebellar artery due to a fist blow to the jaw. This case indicates the need for careful autopsy examination for the differentiation of traumatic and non-traumatic basal subarachnoid hemorrhages.  (+info)

Treatment-related outcomes from blunt cerebrovascular injuries: importance of routine follow-up arteriography. (2/13)

OBJECTIVE: To assess the impact of routine follow-up arteriography on the management and outcome of patients with acute blunt cerebrovascular injuries (BCVI). SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: During the past 5 years there has been increasing recognition of BCVI, but the management of these lesions remains controversial. The authors previously proposed a grading system for BCVI, with grade-specific management guidelines. The authors have noted that a significant number of injuries evolve within 7 to 10 days, warranting alterations in therapy. METHODS: A prospective database of a regional trauma center's experience with BCVI has been maintained since 1990. A policy of arteriographic screening for BCVI based on injury mechanism (e.g., cervical hyperextension) and injury patterns (e.g., cervical and facial fractures) was instituted in 1996. A grading system was devised to develop management protocols: I = intimal irregularity; II = dissection/flap/thrombus; III = pseudoaneurysm; IV = occlusion; V = transection. RESULTS: From June 1990 to October 2001, 171 patients (115 male, age 36 +/- 1 years) were diagnosed with BCVI. Mean injury severity score was 28 +/- 1; associated injuries included brain (57%), spine (44%), chest (43%), and face (34%). Mechanism was motor vehicle crash in 50%, fall in 11%, pedestrian struck in 11%, and other in 29%. One hundred fourteen patients had 157 carotid artery injuries (43 bilateral), and 79 patients had 97 vertebral artery injuries (18 bilateral). The breakdown of injury grades was 137 grade I, 52 grade II, 32 grade III, 25 grade IV, and 8 grade V. One hundred fourteen (73%) carotid and 65 (67%) vertebral arteries were restudied with arteriography 7 to 10 days after the injury. Eight-two percent of grade IV and 93% of grade III injuries were unchanged. However, grade I and II lesions changed frequently. Fifty-seven percent of grade I and 8% of grade II injuries healed, allowing cessation of therapy, whereas 8% of grade I and 43% of grade II lesions progressed to pseudoaneurysm formation, prompting interventional treatment. There was no significant difference in healing or in progression of injuries whether treated with heparin or antiplatelet therapy or untreated. However, heparin may improve the neurologic outcome in patients with ischemic deficits and may prevent stroke in asymptomatic patients. CONCLUSIONS: Routine follow-up arteriography is warranted in patients with grade I and II BCVIs because most of these patients (61% in this series) will require a change in management. A prospective randomized trial will be necessary to identify the optimal treatment of BCVI.  (+info)

Periprocedural morbidity and mortality associated with endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysms. (3/13)

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Despite experience and technological improvements, endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysms still has inherent risks. We evaluated cerebral complications associated with this treatment. METHODS: From October 1998 to October 2002, 180 consecutive patients underwent 131 procedures for 118 ruptured aneurysms and 79 procedures for 72 unruptured aneurysms. We retrospectively reviewed their records and images to evaluate their morbidity and mortality. RESULTS: Thirty-seven (17.6%) procedure-related complications occurred: 27 and six with initial embolization of ruptured and unruptured aneurysms, respectively, and four with re-treatment. Complications included 22 cerebral thromboembolisms, nine intraprocedural aneurysm perforations, two coil migrations, two parent vessel injuries, one postprocedural aneurysm rupture, and one cranial nerve palsy. Fourteen complications had no neurologic consequence. Three caused transient neurologic morbidity; 10, persistent neurologic morbidity; and 10, death. Procedure-related neurologic morbidity and mortality rates, respectively, were as follows: overall, 4.8% and 4.8%; ruptured aneurysms, 5.9% and 7.6%; unruptured aneurysms, 1.4% and 1.4%; and re-treated aneurysms, 10% and 0%. Combined procedure-related morbidity and mortality rates for ruptured, unruptured, and re-treated aneurysms were 13.5%, 2.8%, and 10%, respectively. Nonprocedural complications attributable to subarachnoid hemorrhage in 118 patients with ruptured aneurysm were early rebleeding before coil placement (0.9%), symptomatic vasospasm (5.9%), and shunt-dependent hydrocephalus (5.9%); mortality from complications of subarachnoid hemorrhage itself was 11.9%. CONCLUSION: Procedural morbidity and mortality rates were highest in ruptured aneurysms and lowest in unruptured aneurysms. Morbidity rates were highest in re-treated aneurysms and lowest in unruptured aneurysms. No procedural mortality occurred with re-treated aneurysms. The main cause of morbidity and mortality was thromboembolism.  (+info)

Reperfusion activates metalloproteinases that contribute to neurovascular injury. (4/13)

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Influence of early antioxidant supplements on clinical evolution and organ function in critically ill cardiac surgery, major trauma, and subarachnoid hemorrhage patients. (5/13)

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Association of MRI markers of vascular brain injury with incident stroke, mild cognitive impairment, dementia, and mortality: the Framingham Offspring Study. (6/13)

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Chronic systemic infection exacerbates ischemic brain damage via a CCL5 (regulated on activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted)-mediated proinflammatory response in mice. (7/13)

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National Institute on Aging-Alzheimer's Association guidelines for the neuropathologic assessment of Alzheimer's disease: a practical approach. (8/13)

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*List of MeSH codes (C10)

... cerebrovascular trauma MeSH C10.228.140.300.350.500 --- carotid artery injuries MeSH C10.228.140.300.350.500.300 --- carotid ... cerebrovascular disorders MeSH C10.228.140.300.100 --- basal ganglia cerebrovascular disease MeSH C10.228.140.300.100.200 --- ... basal ganglia cerebrovascular disease MeSH C10.228.140.079.127.500 --- basal ganglia hemorrhage MeSH C10.228.140.079.127.500. ... cerebrovascular accident MeSH C10.228.140.300.301.200 --- brain infarction MeSH C10.228.140.300.301.200.100 --- brain stem ...

*List of MeSH codes (C21)

... cerebrovascular trauma MeSH C21.866.915.200.200 --- carotid artery injuries MeSH C21.866.915.200.200.500 --- carotid artery, ... cumulative trauma disorders MeSH C21.866.844.150.206 --- carpal tunnel syndrome MeSH C21.866.844.150.957 --- ulnar nerve ... craniocerebral trauma MeSH C21.866.915.300.200 --- brain injuries MeSH C21.866.915.300.200.150 --- brain concussion MeSH ...

*List of MeSH codes (C14)

... cerebrovascular trauma MeSH C14.907.253.535.500 --- carotid artery injuries MeSH C14.907.253.535.500.300 --- carotid artery, ... basal ganglia cerebrovascular disease MeSH C14.907.253.061.200 --- basal ganglia hemorrhage MeSH C14.907.253.061.200.500 --- ... cerebrovascular accident MeSH C14.907.253.480.200 --- brain infarction MeSH C14.907.253.480.200.100 --- brain stem infarctions ...

*Amnesia

The damage is usually caused by head trauma, cerebrovascular accident, stroke, tumor, hypoxia, encephalitis, or chronic ... cerebrovascular events, anoxia or other trauma. The two brain regions related with this condition are medial temporal lobe and ... Mild trauma, such as a car accident that results in no more than mild whiplash, might cause the occupant of a car to have no ... Head trauma is a very broad range as it deals with any kind of injury or active action toward the brain which might cause ...

*Compensatory hyperhidrosis

It is encountered in patients with myelopathy, thoracic disease, cerebrovascular disease, nerve trauma or after surgeries. The ... Excessive sweating due to nervousness, anger, previous trauma or fear is called hyperhidrosis. Compensatory hyperhidrosis is ...

*1994 expanded World Health Organization AIDS case definition

... trauma, or cerebrovascular accident). candidiasis of the oesophagus (which may be presumptively diagnosed based on the presence ...

*Frontal lobe disorder

Cerebrovascular disease may cause a stroke in the frontal lobe. Tumours such as meningiomas may present with a frontal lobe ... Frontal lobe disorder is an impairment of the frontal lobe that occurs due to disease or head trauma. The frontal lobe of the ... Frontal impairment due to head injuries, tumours or cerebrovascular disease will also be apparent on brain imaging. In terms of ... A frontal lobe syndrome can be caused by a range of conditions including head trauma, tumours, degenerative diseases, ...

*Dysprosody

Marie described the case of a Frenchman who started speaking in an Alsatian accent after suffering from a cerebrovascular ... Dysprosody is usually attributed to neurological damage, such as brain tumors, brain trauma, brain vascular damage, stroke and ... It was found that the majority developed dysprosody after a cerebrovascular accident, while another 6 cases developed after a ... head trauma. In that same study, 16 of the patients were female, while 9 were male. However, there has been no conclusive ...

*Cerebrovascular disease

Arterial dissections are tears of the internal lining of arteries, often associated with trauma. Dissections within the carotid ... The incidence of cerebrovascular disease increases as an individual ages. Causes of acquired cerebrovascular disease include ... Other symptoms of cerebrovascular disease include migraines, seizures, epilepsy, or cognitive decline. However, cerebrovascular ... Cerebrovascular disease includes a variety of medical conditions that affect the blood vessels of the brain and the cerebral ...

*Epileptic seizure

In older adults, cerebrovascular disease is a very common cause. Other causes are CNS tumors, head trauma, and other ... Seizures can also occur in people who do not have epilepsy for various reasons including brain trauma, drug use, elevated body ... During adulthood, the likely causes are alcohol related, strokes, trauma, CNS infections, and brain tumors. ... trauma, congenital CNS abnormalities, and metabolic disorders. The most frequent cause of seizures in children is febrile ...

*Pediatric neuropsychology

... specific nutrient deficiencies affecting brain function Trauma related to Abuse & Neglect Acquired Traumatic Brain Injuries ... Cerebrovascular disease (ischemia, thrombosis, embolism, infarct, arteriovenous malformation) Neurological conditions of ...

*Spasmodic torticollis

... cerebral injury Kernicterus Cerebrovascular diseases Drug induced Central nervous system tumor Peripheral or central trauma ...

*Dynasplint Systems

Neurological disorder patients may have sustained trauma to the brain or a disease such as Multiple sclerosis, Cerebrovascular ... In most orthopaedic cases, a trauma, surgery or condition paired with immobilization that has resulted in a loss of range of ...

*July effect

A 2009 study published in the Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases found no evidence of the July effect for patients ... January 2010). "Complications and death at the start of the new academic year: is there a July phenomenon?". J Trauma. 68 (1): ... A 2010 study published in the Journal of Trauma found an increased risk of errors that resulted in preventable complications ... Schroeppel TJ, Fischer PE, Magnotti LJ, Croce MA, Fabian TC (September 2009). "The "July phenomenon": is trauma the exception ...

*Spastic gait

Brain tumor Brain abscess Sturge-Weber syndrome Cerebral palsy Cerebrovascular accident Multiple sclerosis severe combined ... J Head Trauma Rehabil. 19 (2): 109-18. doi:10.1097/00001199-200403000-00004. PMID 15247822. Medline Plus About Physical Therapy ...

*Scissor gait

Arthrogryposis Spastic diplegia Pernicious anemia Cerebrovascular accident Cervical spondylosis with myelopathy (a problem with ... the vertebrae in the neck) Liver failure Multiple sclerosis Spinal cord trauma Spinal cord tumor Syphilitic meningomyelitis ...

*Brodmann area 8

This finding occurs during the first few hours of an acute event such as cerebrovascular infarct (stroke) or hemorrhage ( ... trauma or infection, causes tonic deviation of the eyes towards the side of the injury. ...

*Lubeluzole

Cerebrovascular Diseases. 1998 Sep-Oct;8(5):247-54. PMID 9712921 Gandolfo C, Sandercock P, Conti M. Lubeluzole for acute ... N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonists for stroke and head trauma. Expert Opinion on Investigational Drugs. 1997 Apr;6(4):389-97. ...

*Facial muscles

The parotid gland can also be damaged permanently by surgery or temporarily by trauma. These situations of paralysis not only ... This damage can occur with a stroke (cerebrovascular accident or CVA), Bell palsy, or parotid salivary gland cancer (malignant ...

*Philip Stieg

His research has focused on the mechanisms of injury in the central nervous system after trauma and the mechanisms of cell- ... cerebrovascular surgery, and surgery of the skull base. ...

*Porencephaly

... loss of neuron structure and function Maternal cardiac arrest Trauma during pregnancy Abdominal trauma Pathogenic infection ... loss of blood outside of the circulatory system Brain contusion or injury Multifocal cerebrovascular insufficiency Placental ...

*Cerebral perfusion pressure

22: Head and Facial Trauma". Mosby's Paramedic Textbook (2nd revised ed.). Mosby. Walters, FJM (1998). "Intracranial Pressure ... Increased ICP compresses cerebral arteries, causing increased cerebrovascular resistance (CVR). FLOW Ranging from 20ml 100g-1 ... CVR is cerebrovascular resistance An alternative definition of CPP is: C P P = M A P − I C P {\displaystyle CPP=MAP-ICP} where ... a fall in cerebrovascular resistance and a rise in cerebral-blood volume (CBV), and therefore CBF will return to baseline value ...

*Hyperbaric medicine

China and Russia treat more than 80 maladies, conditions and trauma with HBOT. The University of Birmingham's 2012 guidance to ... The clinical experience and results so far published has promoted the use of HBO therapy in patients with cerebrovascular ... Tentative evidence shows a possible benefit in cerebrovascular diseases. ... The Journal of Trauma. 41 (2): 333-9. doi:10.1097/00005373-199608000-00023. PMID 8760546. Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical ...

*Anosognosia

Orfei, M.D.; Caltagirone, C.; Spalletta, G. (2009). "The Evaluation of Anosognosia in Stroke Patients". Cerebrovascular ... Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation. 20 (1): 19-29. doi:10.1097/00001199-200501000-00004. PMID 15668568. McEvoy J (1998). " ... "Anosognosia in patients with cerebrovascular lesions. A study of causative factors". Stroke. 23 (10): 1446-53. doi:10.1161/01. ...

*Westchester Medical Center

Trauma and Burn Center: As the New York State Department of Health-designated Burn Center for the Hudson Valley region, the ... a comprehensive epilepsy program and a Cerebrovascular Center. Behavioral Health Center: The Behavioral Health Center at ... With more than 900 physicians practicing a wide range of specialties from Cardiology to Trauma, Westchester Medical Center ... Westchester Medical Center University Hospital (WMC), formerly Grasslands Hospital, is a 895-bed Regional Trauma Center ...

*Brain ischemia

... (a.k.a. cerebral ischemia, cerebrovascular ischemia) is a condition in which there is insufficient blood flow to ... Other causes associated with brain hypoxia include drowning, strangling, choking, cardiac arrest, head trauma, and ... Moyamoya disease is an extremely rare cerebrovascular condition that limits blood circulation to the brain, consequently ...
In the absence of external stimuli or task demands, correlations in spontaneous brain activity (functional connectivity) reflect patterns of anatomical connectivity. Hence, resting-state functional connectivity has been used as a proxy measure for structural connectivity and as a biomarker for brain changes in disease. To relate changes in functional connectivity to physiological changes in the brain, it is important to understand how correlations in functional connectivity depend on the physical integrity of brain tissue. The causal nature of this relationship has been called into question by patient data suggesting that decreased structural connectivity does not necessarily lead to decreased functional connectivity. Here we provide evidence for a causal but complex relationship between structural connectivity and functional connectivity: we tested interhemispheric functional connectivity before and after corpus callosum section in rhesus monkeys. We found that forebrain commissurotomy severely reduced
Vascular brain injury from conditions such as high blood pressure and stroke are greater risk factors for cognitive impairment among non-demented older people than is the deposition of the amyloid plaques in the brain that long have been implicated in conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease, a study by researchers at the Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center at UC Davis has found.  
Cerebrovascular trauma, also known as blunt cerebrovascular injury (BCVI) is a non-penetrating injury to the carotid and/or vertebral artery that may cause stroke in trauma patients. Discover the latest research on cerebrovascular trauma here. ...
In the attention network, disruption of interhemispheric FC was significantly correlated with abnormal detection of visual stimuli (Pearson r with field effect = −0.624, p = 0.002). In the somatomotor network, disruption of interhemispheric FC was significantly correlated with upper extremity impairment (Pearson r with contralesional Action Research Arm Test = 0.527, p = 0.036). In contrast, intrahemispheric FC within the normal or damaged hemispheres was not correlated with performance in either network. Quantitative lesion analysis demonstrated that our results could not be explained by structural damage alone. ...
CASE SUMMARY A 29-year-old man presented with a three-week history of slurred speech, poor coordination, and imbalance while walking. He did not have a famil...
To better detect blunt cerebrovascular injuries (BCVI) in patients admitted to hospital emergency departments after experiencing high-energy trauma, computed...
When it comes to vascular brain injury, the dementia field has been mired in uncertainty. What is it, exactly? How can scientists measure and treat it? How does it relate to Alzheimers pathology or contribute to cognitive decline? Answers to these old questions are still lacking, but two recent studies published online February 11 and 18 in JAMA Neurology suggest that vascular damage and amyloid plaques occur independently in early stages of AD. William Jagust, University of California, Berkeley, and colleagues find that the pathologies are separate, and that only vascular injury tracks with cognitive decline. Likewise, scientists led by Adam Brickman, Columbia University, New York, report that white matter hyperintensities and amyloid are independent risk factors for Alzheimers disease (AD). These findings add to a growing body of literature suggesting that vascular causes of decline are distinct from amyloid pathology, and that they deserve their own spot at the dementia table.. "Vascular ...
Beginning in midlife, heart disease leads to subtle blood-flow problems in the brain that develop insidiously, gradually damaging neurons and contributing to cognitive decline. Knowledge of clinically silent blood-flow problems in the brain has led to the “healthy heart, healthy mind” hypothesis that preventing or treating heart disease also may help prevent age-associated cognitive decline.
In clinical practice, dentists are faced with the dilemma of whether to treat, maintain, or extract a tooth. Of primary importance are the patient s desires and the restorability and periodontal condition of the tooth/teeth in question. Too often, clinicians extract teeth when endodontic therapy, crown-lengthening surgery, forced orthodontic eruption, or regenerative therapy can be used with predictable results. In addition, many clinicians do not consider the use of questionable teeth as provisional or transitional abutments. The aim of this article is to present a novel decision tree approach that will address the clinical deductive reasoning, based on the scientific literature and exemplified by selective case presentations, that may help clinicians make the right decision. Innovative decision tree algorithms will be proposed that consider endodontic, restorative, and periodontal assessments to improve and possibly eliminate erroneous decision making. Decision-based algorithms are dynamic and ...
Cerebrovascular trauma, also known as blunt cerebrovascular injury (BCVI) is a non-penetrating injury to the carotid and/or vertebral artery that may cause stroke in trauma patients. Discover the latest research on cerebrovascular trauma here. ...
Blunt carotid and vertebral artery injury, collectively termed blunt cerebrovascular injury, are rare but potentially devastating events. In the past, blunt carotid injury was associated with mortality rates ranging from 23 to 28 percent, with 48 to
A novel decision making for intelligent agent using quantum-inspired approach is proposed. A formal, generalized solution to the problem is given. Mathematically, the proposed model is capable of modeling higher dimensional decision problems than previous researches. Four experiments are conducted, and both empirical experiments results and proposed models experiment results are given for each experiment. Experiments showed that the results of proposed model agree with empirical results perfectly. The proposed model provides a new direction for researcher to resolve cognitive basis in designing intelligent agent.
Toxic leukoencephalopathy or toxic spongiform leukoencephalopathy is a rare condition that is characterized by progressive damage (-pathy) to white matter (-leuko-) in the brain (-encephalo-), particularly myelin, due to causes such as exposure to drugs of abuse, environmental toxins, or chemotherapeutic drugs. The prevalence of this disease is infrequent and often goes unreported, especially in cases resulting from drug abuse. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a popular method to study and diagnose the disease. However, even with technological advances, the exact mechanism and underlying pathophysiology of toxic leukoencephalopathy remains unknown and is thought to vary between sources of toxicity. The clinical severity of toxic leukoencephalopathy also varies among patients, exposure time, and concentration and purity of the toxic agent. Some reversibility of the condition has been seen in many cases when the toxic agent is removed. Various pharmacological agents have been known to cause ...
A novel decision aid to assist patients and physicians with shared decision-making (SDM) in the setting of symptomatic aortic stenosis was linked to improved patient knowledge and satisfaction in a new pilot study, but the physicians using it werent particularly enamored with the formalized tool.. Interventional cardiologists and surgeons on the structural heart team didnt believe that the quality of their clinical encounters with patients was improving and felt that patients had a poor grasp of the decision aid, say investigators. "As a result, clinicians attitudes towards SDM and decision aids underwent little transformation, and implementation is unlikely," Megan Coylewright, MD, MPH (Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, NH), and colleagues write in their paper published January 29, 2020, in JAMA Cardiology. "This is a critical finding, challenging the simplistic framing that once fully developed tools are available, sustained use of a decision aid will occur, leading to ...
The Australian Academy of Science has recognised University of Queensland environmental researcher Professor Kerrie Wilson at its annual Science at the Shine Dome event in Canberra.. Professor Wilson, who is an ARC Future Fellow at UQ and Director of the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions, has been awarded the 2017 Nancy Millis Medal for Women in Science.. The Academys citation stated that she had "made significant discoveries in the environmental sciences that resulted in more effective conservation practices".. "Professor Wilson identified how significant funds for conservation can be saved, and investments could be more equitable, through incorporating socio-economic principles into setting priorities for conservation investments," the citation said.. "This has resulted in new theory and novel decision support tools to inform how limited conservation funds should be allocated to achieve multiple objectives, further enhancing the legacy and impact of ...
The clinical diagnosis of vascular dementia (VaD) is based on imaging criteria, and specific biochemical markers are not available. Here, we investigated the potential of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) lipocalin 2 (LCN2), a secreted glycoprotein that has been suggested as mediating neuronal damage in vascular brain injuries. The study included four independent cohorts with a total n = 472 samples. LCN2 was significantly elevated in VaD compared to controls, Alzheimers disease (AD), other neurodegenerative dementias, and cognitively unimpaired patients with cerebrovascular disease. LCN2 discriminated VaD from AD without coexisting VaD with high accuracy. The main findings were consistent over all cohorts. Neuropathology disclosed a high percentage of macrophages linked to subacute infarcts, reactive astrocytes, and damaged blood vessels in multi-infarct dementia when compared to AD. We conclude that CSF LCN2 is a promising candidate biochemical marker in the differential diagnosis of VaD and ...
The pathophysiology of extracranial traumatic aneurysm formation has not been fully elucidated. Intraarterial optical coherence tomography (OCT), an imaging modality capable of micrometer cross-sectional resolution, was used to evaluate patients presenting with saccular traumatic aneurysms of the internal carotid artery (ICA). Two consecutive trauma patients diagnosed with saccular traumatic aneurysms of the cervical ICA, per the institutional screening protocol for traumatic cerebrovascular injury, underwent digital subtraction angiography (DSA) with OCT. Optical coherence tomography demonstrated disruption of the intima with preservation and stretching of the more peripheral layers. In 1 patient the traumatic aneurysm was associated with thrombus formation and a separate, more proximal dissection not visible on CT angiography (CTA) or DSA. Imaging with OCT indicates that saccular traumatic aneurysms may develop from disruption of the intima with at least partial preservation of the media and ...
Harrison, Paula A.; Dunford-Brown, Rob.; Barton, David N.; Kelemen, Eszter; Martín-López, Berta; Norton, Lisa; Termansen, Mette; Saarikoski, Heli; Hendriks, Kees; Gómez-Baggethun, Erik; Czúcz, Bálint; García-Llorente, Marina; Howard, David; Jacobs, Sander; Karlsen, Martin; Kopperoinen, Leena; Madsen, Andes; Rusch, Graciela; van Eupen, Michiel; Verweij, Peter; Smith, Ron; Tuomasjukka, Diana; Zulian, Grazia. 2017 Selecting methods for ecosystem service assessment: a decision tree approach. Ecosystem Services. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecoser.2017.09.016 Dick, Jan; Turkelboom, Francis; Woods, Helen; Iniesta-Arandia, Irene; Primmer, Eeva; Saarela, Sanna-Riikka; Bezák, Peter; Mederly, Peter; Leone, Michael; Verheyden, Wim; Kelemen, Eszter; Hauck, Jennifer; Andrews, Chris; Antunes, Paula; Aszalós, Réka; Baró, Francesc; Barton, David N.; Berry, Pam; Bugter, Rob; Carvalho, Laurence; Czúcz, Bálint; Dunford-Brown, Rob; Garcia Blanco, Gemma; Geamănă, Nicoleta; Giucă, Relu; Grizzetti, Bruna; ...
Our findings support the published association, albeit small in absolute terms, between the diagnosis of AVM and the subsequent development of ALS, with additional associations noted between ALS and prior non-SAH-related strokes (both ischaemic and haemorrhagic), and TIAs. By considering vascular disease more generally we have previously demonstrated that there is no positive association between ALS and prior ischaemic heart disease.6. Only three of the seven AVM cases in the Valavanis et al series actually presented with cerebral haemorrhage and no patient was said to have had sustained haemorrhage as a result of the procedure. Instead, the feature identified as common to all cases was "a rare AVM architecture characterised by significant perinidal angiogenesis", and the authors speculated that the embolisation procedure might be a significant provoking factor. They linked this to a non-significant (p=0.11) reduction in serum of the putatively neuroprotective vascular endothelial growth factor ...
Return to Run orthotic rehab initiative successfully returns. High-energy lower-extremity trauma (HELET) is common in modern warfare, often resulting in severe tissue damage, chronic pain, neurovascular injury and significant muscle loss, according to the new research presented today at the 2013 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS).. The Return to Run (RTR) program is an integrated orthotic and rehabilitation initiative designed to return high-level function to wounded warriors. It includes use of the new Intrepid Dynamic Exoskeletal Orthosis (IDEO), a custom-fit device made from carbon and fiberglass that supports the foot and ankle allowing for greater mobility and vigorous rehabilitation.. In the study, researchers reviewed RTR records of 14 Special Operations Command (SOCOM) personnel - 10 Army Special Forces, three Navy Sea Air Land (SEALs), and one Air Force Pararescue Jumper (PJ) - who sustained HELET injuries and completed the RTR program. Records were ...
Megan Ishibashi, B.S., Toby Ishizuka, B.A. ABSTRACT Osteotomies that require a large incision site and are performed with a high-energy instrument may result in neurovascular injury and postoperative wound complications. The Gigli saw technique is a minimally invasive alternative to open dissection osteotomies. This technique uses a flexible stainless steel cable with attached handles in…
A recent study indicates that type 1 diabetes mellitus is associated with vascular brain lesions that affect cognition and might represent a target for preventive measures. This commentary discusses methods to ascertain vascular contributions to cerebral dysfunction in diabetes mellitus and indicates that we might only be seeing the tip ... read more of the iceberg. show less ...
Read "Dietary Protein and Preservation of Physical Functioning Among Middle-Aged and Older Adults in the Framingham Offspring Study, American Journal of Epidemiology" on DeepDyve, the largest online rental service for scholarly research with thousands of academic publications available at your fingertips.
Thank you for your interest in spreading the word on Circulation.. NOTE: We only request your email address so that the person you are recommending the page to knows that you wanted them to see it, and that it is not junk mail. We do not capture any email address. ...
A 75-year-old man is seen for routine follow-up for very severe COPD. He has constant dyspnea and air hunger and spends most of the day in a chair. He has had no change in baseline cough and sputum production. He has had multiple COPD exacerbations that required ICU admission and intubation. He has not benefited from pulmonary rehabilitation in the past. What is the most appropriate management?
Cerebrovascular injuries, whether from trauma, surgery or internal chronic conditions, are all too often the cause of permanent disability, if not fatal outcomes. It is perhaps because of the very severity and hopelessness of these cases that they constitute some of the most frustrating and at the same time most rewarding work a homeopath can engage in. ...
Advanced temperature modulation techniques now allow for the elimination of fever as well as controlled hypothermia. However, as demonstrated in this study, shivering is frequently encountered (64%), and the severity of shivering as measured by the BSAS is strongly associated with graded increases in systemic metabolism. The application of therapeutic normothermia or hypothermia has not been shown to improve outcome after cerebrovascular injury, and the metabolic consequences of shivering may prove to be a limiting step in demonstrating the benefits of therapeutic temperature modulation. A scale that can simply and reliably detect and quantify shivering can be used as an end point for antishivering interventions and may play an important role in minimizing the day-to-day complications of cerebrovascular patients undergoing therapeutic temperature modulation in the intensive care unit.. Previous reports have considered shivering to be a binary event;8-10 however, the metabolic impact of shivering ...
A 64-year-old woman with a significant medical history sees her cardiologist for a routine follow-up after a second MI. How do you minimize her risk for future ASCVD events?
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Full clinical assessment is required, including evaluation of the soft tissues to determine whether a compartment syndrome is present and whether the patient has sustained a neurovascular injury. Gent... more
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Irina Victorovna Gannushkina had a lifelong interest in experimental neurology. Her fundamental studies of collateral blood circulation in the brain, individual susceptibility to cerebral ischaemia, and cerebrovascular biomechanics opened new perspectives for neurology and neurosurgery clinics. She also studied neuroimmunology and demonstrated the role of autoimmune factor in the pathogenesis of stroke, traumatic brain injury, and other nervous diseases. She wrote Collateral Cerebral Blood Circulation (1973) and Immunological Aspects of Traumatic and Vascular Brain Lesions (1974) and coauthored Hypertonic Encephalopathy (1987) and Immunopathology of Traumatic Brain Injury (1996).. Irina Gannushkina was born in Moscow in 1929 into a medical family (her father was a neurologist and her mother a nurse). As a student in the paediatric faculty of the Stalin Moscow State Medical Institute N2, she became interested in pathology and spent four years at the students society of the chair of pathology (in ...
Piotr Sosnik is Former Vice Chair-Supervisory at Przedsiebiorstwo Farmaceutyczne Jelfa SA. See Piotr Sosniks compensation, career history, education, & memberships.
So, after almost 17 months of twitching, I have now had my second EMG (the first one was early on in after about 6 weeks of twitching). This time they did my most active leg - my right leg. The doctor heard a few twitches in the EMG, but he said they were totally benign. Everything about how my muscles were acting when tensed and then relaxed were normal. For the most part my muscles were very quiet when relaxed. I have been doing a bit better in the last week - my anxiety is down a bit and I think I am starting to deal better with this (I hope entering into a remission phase like I did last winter. He and the nurse both confirmed that worrying, stress and anxiety make twitches so much worse. He finished the exam with, Well, I am sorry to say that you are going to be around for a long time. See you in 6 months for a routine follow-up ...

Cerebrovascular Blunt TraumaCerebrovascular Blunt Trauma

This pathway provides guidance for cerebrovascular imaging of blunt trauma patients who are at increased risk of ... Blunt cerebrovascular injury practice management guidelines: the Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma. J Trauma. 2010; ... for cerebrovascular imaging of blunt trauma patients who are at increased risk of cerebrovascular injury following their trauma ... Blunt Cerebrovascular Injury (BCVI). *Incidence ranges between 0.18% - 1.63% of blunt trauma admissions, and is reportedly as ...
more infohttp://www.imagingpathways.health.wa.gov.au/index.php/imaging-pathways/musculoskeletal-trauma/trauma/blunt-cerebrovascular-injury

Cerebrovascular Blunt TraumaCerebrovascular Blunt Trauma

This pathway provides guidance for cerebrovascular imaging of blunt trauma patients who are at increased risk of ... Blunt cerebrovascular injury practice management guidelines: the Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma. J Trauma. 2010; ... for cerebrovascular imaging of blunt trauma patients who are at increased risk of cerebrovascular injury following their trauma ... Blunt Cerebrovascular Injury (BCVI). *Incidence ranges between 0.18% - 1.63% of blunt trauma admissions, and is reportedly as ...
more infohttp://imagingpathways.health.wa.gov.au/index.php/imaging-pathways/musculoskeletal-trauma/trauma/blunt-cerebrovascular-injury?tab=bcv

Cerebrovascular Blunt TraumaCerebrovascular Blunt Trauma

This pathway provides guidance for cerebrovascular imaging of blunt trauma patients who are at increased risk of ... Blunt cerebrovascular injury practice management guidelines: the Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma. J Trauma. 2010; ... for cerebrovascular imaging of blunt trauma patients who are at increased risk of cerebrovascular injury following their trauma ... Blunt Cerebrovascular Injury (BCVI). *Incidence ranges between 0.18% - 1.63% of blunt trauma admissions, and is reportedly as ...
more infohttp://imagingpathways.health.wa.gov.au/index.php/imaging-pathways/musculoskeletal-trauma/trauma/blunt-cerebrovascular-injury?tab=Treatment

Health information and publications in Africa African Index Medicus DatabaseHealth information and publications in Africa African Index Medicus Database

1 result(s) search for keyword(s) Cerebrovascular Trauma Add the result to your basket Refine your search Generate the RSS ... Vascular Diseases Cerebrovascular Trauma Peripheral Arterial Disease Ethiopia - Addis Ababa. Abstract: BACKGROUND: Vascular ... Vascular Diseases Cerebrovascular Trauma Peripheral Arterial Disease Ethiopia - Addis Ababa. Abstract: BACKGROUND: Vascular ... trauma patients, 8(10.2%) Chemodectomas, 8(10.2%) aneurysms, 6(7.7%) hemangiomas, 4(5.1%) varicose vein and 2(2.6%) AV fistula ...
more infohttp://indexmedicus.afro.who.int/aim/opac_css/index.php?lvl=more_results&mode=keyword&user_query=Cerebrovascular+Trauma&tags=ok

Changes in Cerebral Blood Flow With Spinal Manipulative Therapy vs. Voluntary Motion - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.govChanges in Cerebral Blood Flow With Spinal Manipulative Therapy vs. Voluntary Motion - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov

Vertebral Artery Dissection Cerebrovascular Accident Cerebrovascular Stroke Other: head positions and spinal manipulation ... Subjects will have had no prior history of head trauma or prior history of surgery to the neck region. ... Cerebrovascular Disorders. Brain Diseases. Central Nervous System Diseases. Nervous System Diseases. Vascular Diseases. ... The goal is to further investigate the cerebrovascular hemodynamic consequences of cervical spine positions, including rotation ...
more infohttps://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01205490?recr=Open&cond=%22Aneurysm%2C+Dissecting%22&rank=4

Gentry LR[au] - PubMed - NCBIGentry LR[au] - PubMed - NCBI

Cerebrovascular trauma.. Nace SR, Gentry LR.. Neuroimaging Clin N Am. 2014 Aug;24(3):487-511, viii. doi: 10.1016/j.nic.2014.03. ... Clinical criteria for obtaining maxillofacial computed tomographic scans in trauma patients.. Sitzman TJ, Hanson SE, Alsheik NH ... Validation of Clinical Criteria for Obtaining Maxillofacial Computed Tomography in Patients With Trauma. ...
more infohttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?cmd=search&term=Gentry+LR%5Bau%5D&dispmax=50

Cerebral Small Vessel Diseases | MetaCerebral Small Vessel Diseases | Meta

Cerebrovascular Trauma. Cerebrovascular trauma, also known as blunt cerebrovascular injury (BCVI) is a non-penetrating injury ... Basal Ganglia Cerebrovascular Disease. Basal ganglia cerebrovascular disease is a condition where the blood vessels in the ... This feed focuses on the role of this protein in cerebrovasculature and cerebrovascular dysfunction. ... to the carotid and/or vertebral artery that may cause stroke in trauma patients. Discover the latest research on ...
more infohttps://www.meta.org/feed-previews/cerebral-small-vessel-diseases/f04af9b3-71b8-4dc2-9929-41669791a89e

Brain Ischemia | MetaBrain Ischemia | Meta

Cerebrovascular Trauma. Cerebrovascular trauma, also known as blunt cerebrovascular injury (BCVI) is a non-penetrating injury ... Basal Ganglia Cerebrovascular Disease. Basal ganglia cerebrovascular disease is a condition where the blood vessels in the ... This feed focuses on the role of this protein in cerebrovasculature and cerebrovascular dysfunction. ... to the carotid and/or vertebral artery that may cause stroke in trauma patients. Discover the latest research on ...
more infohttps://www.meta.org/feed-previews/brain-ischemia/22929623-e624-4184-b2c6-c8f84e319a98

Abstract 89: Penn State Hershey: 4-Year Experience in Mild Therapeutic Hypothermia Program---Lessons Learned | CirculationAbstract 89: Penn State Hershey: 4-Year Experience in Mild Therapeutic Hypothermia Program---Lessons Learned | Circulation

Indications were expanded to include pts presenting with cerebrovascular trauma (CVT) and stroke in addition to SCA-ROSC. ...
more infohttp://circ.ahajournals.org/content/124/Suppl_21/A89

Ionizing radiation-induced immune and inflammatory reactions in the brain<...Ionizing radiation-induced immune and inflammatory reactions in the brain<...

TY - JOUR. T1 - Ionizing radiation-induced immune and inflammatory reactions in the brain. AU - Lumniczky, Katalin. AU - Szatmári, Tünde. AU - Sáfrány, G.. PY - 2017/5/5. Y1 - 2017/5/5. N2 - Radiation-induced late brain injury consisting of vascular abnormalities, demyelination, white matter necrosis, and cognitive impairment has been described in patients subjected to cranial radiotherapy for brain tumors. Accumulating evidence suggests that various degrees of cognitive deficit can develop after much lower doses of ionizing radiation, as well. The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying these alterations are not elucidated so far. A permanent deficit in neurogenesis, chronic microvascular alterations, and blood-brain barrier dysfunctionality are considered among the main causative factors. Chronic neuroinflammation and altered immune reactions in the brain, which are inherent complications of brain irradiation, have also been directly implicated in the development of cognitive decline ...
more infohttps://hungary.pure.elsevier.com/en/publications/ionizing-radiation-induced-immune-and-inflammatory-reactions-in-t

Plus itPlus it

8A,B). The contralateral cerebrovascular trauma induction did not affect the inter-event intervals (before: 2.17 ± 0.3 s, after ... The hippocampal formation is one of the most sensitive brain areas to cerebrovascular trauma, but to date there are no reliable ... before and during the induction of cerebrovascular trauma. The 5- or 15-min-long laser illumination was started 6 min after ... the long-term effects of an acute cerebrovascular trauma on brain excitability (e.g., epileptogenesis) providing new ...
more infohttp://www.jneurosci.org/content/31/3/851

Peptic Ulcer Disease | Peptic Ulcer | StomachPeptic Ulcer Disease | Peptic Ulcer | Stomach

... major trauma or cerebrovascular accidents( c ) • As a result of extreme hyperacidity (Zollinger-Ellison syndrome). . ...
more infohttps://www.scribd.com/presentation/259255215/Peptic-Ulcer-Disease

Development of a novel animal model to differentiate radiation necrosis from tumor recurrence<...Development of a novel animal model to differentiate radiation necrosis from tumor recurrence<...

TY - JOUR. T1 - Development of a novel animal model to differentiate radiation necrosis from tumor recurrence. AU - Kumar, Sanath. AU - Arbab, Ali Syed. AU - Jain, Rajan. AU - Kim, Jinkoo. AU - DeCarvalho, Ana C.. AU - Shankar, Adarsh. AU - Mikkelsen, Tom. AU - Brown, Stephen L.. PY - 2012/1/1. Y1 - 2012/1/1. N2 - Distinguishing tumor progression from radiation necrosis after treatment in patients with brain tumors presents a clinical dilemma. A well-characterized, orthotopic rodent model of radiation-induced brain necrosis including a tumor is not currently available The objective of the study was to create focal radiation necrosis in rat brain bearing human glioblastoma (GBM) using stereotactic radiosurgery and confirm it by immuno-histological analysis. Nude rats implanted with primary GBM cells were irradiated using a stereotactic setup (n = 3) or received no radiation (n = 3). Ten weeks after the implantation, growth of the tumor was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). For each ...
more infohttps://augusta.pure.elsevier.com/en/publications/development-of-a-novel-animal-model-to-differentiate-radiation-ne

Advanced Imaging Research Center - Publications
     - Oregon Health & Science UniversityAdvanced Imaging Research Center - Publications - Oregon Health & Science University

Leach, M. O., Morgan, B., Tofts, P. S., Buckley, D. L., Huang, W., Horsfield, M. A., Chenevert, T. L., Collins, D. J., Jackson, A., Lomas, D., Whitcher, B., Clarke, L., Plummer, R., Judson, I., Jones, R., Alonzi, R., Brunner, T., Koh, D. M., Murphy, P., Waterton, J. C. & 9 others, Parker, G., Graves, M. J., Scheenen, T. W. J., Redpath, T. W., Orton, M., Karczmar, G., Huisman, H., Barentsz, J. & Padhani, A., Jul 2012, In : European Radiology. 22, 7, p. 1451-1464 14 p.. Research output: Contribution to journal › Article ...
more infohttps://ohsu.pure.elsevier.com/en/organisations/advanced-imaging-research-center/publications/?type=%2Fdk%2Fatira%2Fpure%2Fresearchoutput%2Fresearchoutputtypes%2Fcontributiontojournal%2Farticle&page=3

AANS:  HomeAANS: Home

Cerebrovascular Trauma. *Pediatric Spinal Dysraphism. *Spinal Orthoses: Considerations and Controversies. *Infectious Disease ... Trauma Sessions: 2018 AANS Annual Scientific Meeting. Contains 34 Component(s), Includes Credits Earn up to 5.5 trauma CME ... Pediatric Trauma. Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits This presentation provides an overview of pediatric head trauma ... Cerebrovascular Surgery: The Future is Not What it Used To Be. *Training the Next Generation of Cerebrovascular Surgeons: State ...
more infohttps://education.aans.org/

Find Research Projects
             - University of Miamis Research ProfilesFind Research Projects - University of Miami's Research Profiles

Cerebrovascular Trauma Combined Inhibition of Vasculogenic Mimicry and Angiogenesis in Ovarian Cancer using Antibody Fusion ...
more infohttps://miami.pure.elsevier.com/en/projects/

Find Research Outputs
             - Bond University Research PortalFind Research Outputs - Bond University Research Portal

Cerebrovascular Trauma Systematic review of the effects of exercise and nutrition interventions on body composition in women ... Stress Less - Laugh More - Its the L.A.W. (Laughter At Work) - Using Laughter to Cope with Vicarious Trauma. Curran, J., Feb ...
more infohttps://research.bond.edu.au/en/publications/?format=&page=9

Seconal Sodium - FDA prescribing information, side effects and usesSeconal Sodium - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses

Differential diagnosis should include hypoglycemia, head trauma, cerebrovascular accidents, convulsive states, and diabetic ... Consideration should be given to the possibility of barbiturate intoxication even in situations that appear to involve trauma. ...
more infohttps://www.drugs.com/pro/seconal-sodium.html

NEET 67-70NEET 67-70

Chest trauma c. Blunt trauma abdomend) Penetrating abdominal injuryQ68) Which score is associated with spinal cord injury-a. ... a. Blunt cerebrovascular trauma. b. Chest trauma. c. Blunt trauma abdomen. d) Penetrating abdominal injury ...
more infohttps://www.mcqsurgery.com/general-surgery/neet-67-70/

Blended Introduction to Carotid Duplex/Color Flow Imaging & Transcranial Doppler UltrasoundBlended Introduction to Carotid Duplex/Color Flow Imaging & Transcranial Doppler Ultrasound

AVM, Cerebrovascular Reactivity, Trauma. *Brain Death, Emboli, Cerebrovascular Disease. *Intracranial Stenosis, Intracranial ... Apply knowledge of the anatomy/physiology of the cerebrovascular system into the Carotid Duplex examination. ...
more infohttps://gcus.com/courses/about/3550/blended-introduction-to-carotid-duplex-transcranial-doppler-ultrasound

Towards Control of Streptococcus iniae - Volume 15, Number 12-December 2009 - Emerging Infectious Diseases journal - CDCTowards Control of Streptococcus iniae - Volume 15, Number 12-December 2009 - Emerging Infectious Diseases journal - CDC

The cytotoxic properties of SLS toward fish cells and the likely promotion of cerebrovascular trauma represent a major ...
more infohttp://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/15/12/09-0232_article

Pentobarbital Sodium Injection, USPPentobarbital Sodium Injection, USP

Differential diagnosis should include hypoglycemia, head trauma, cerebrovascular accidents, convulsive states, and diabetic ... Consideration should be given to the possibility of barbiturate intoxication even in situations that appear to involve trauma. ...
more infohttps://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailymed/fda/fdaDrugXsl.cfm?setid=d375b92a-baa1-4d63-9ad1-1467dcfde7d5&type=display
  • Additionally, because most human cord injuries occur as the result of blunt, non-penetrating trauma (e.g. motor vehicle accident, sporting injury) where the spinal cord is violently struck by displaced bone or soft tissues, the majority of SCI researchers are of the opinion that the most clinically relevant injury models are those in which the spinal cord is rapidly contused. (jove.com)
  • Earn up to 5.5 trauma CME credits and receive access to the recorded trauma-related sessions from the 2018 AANS Annual Scientific Meeting, including named lectures, abstract presentations and discussions. (aans.org)
  • The goal is to further investigate the cerebrovascular hemodynamic consequences of cervical spine positions, including rotation and manipulation in-vivo under clinically relevant circumstances using two advanced forms of MRI technology on the VA and posterior cerebral vessels. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • According to the knowledge of the investigators, a study utilizing MRI and functional blood oxygen level dependent (fBOLD) imaging to examine blood flow and perfusion, turbulence and evidence of micro-trauma within these vessels has yet to be conducted. (clinicaltrials.gov)