The circulation of blood through the BLOOD VESSELS of the BRAIN.
The movement of the BLOOD as it is pumped through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.
Diversion of blood flow through a circuit located outside the body but continuous with the bodily circulation.
The circulation of the BLOOD through the LUNGS.
Localized reduction of blood flow to brain tissue due to arterial obstruction or systemic hypoperfusion. This frequently occurs in conjunction with brain hypoxia (HYPOXIA, BRAIN). Prolonged ischemia is associated with BRAIN INFARCTION.
A hypoperfusion of the BLOOD through an organ or tissue caused by a PATHOLOGIC CONSTRICTION or obstruction of its BLOOD VESSELS, or an absence of BLOOD CIRCULATION.
Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)
A disease characterized by chronic hemolytic anemia, episodic painful crises, and pathologic involvement of many organs. It is the clinical expression of homozygosity for hemoglobin S.
Loss of the ability to maintain awareness of self and environment combined with markedly reduced responsiveness to environmental stimuli. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp344-5)
A disorder of cardiac function caused by insufficient blood flow to the muscle tissue of the heart. The decreased blood flow may be due to narrowing of the coronary arteries (CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE), to obstruction by a thrombus (CORONARY THROMBOSIS), or less commonly, to diffuse narrowing of arterioles and other small vessels within the heart. Severe interruption of the blood supply to the myocardial tissue may result in necrosis of cardiac muscle (MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION).
Pathological processes of the ear, the nose, and the throat, also known as the ENT diseases.

The functional anatomy of the normal human auditory system: responses to 0.5 and 4.0 kHz tones at varied intensities. (1/8163)

Most functional imaging studies of the auditory system have employed complex stimuli. We used positron emission tomography to map neural responses to 0.5 and 4.0 kHz sine-wave tones presented to the right ear at 30, 50, 70 and 90 dB HL and found activation in a complex neural network of elements traditionally associated with the auditory system as well as non-traditional sites such as the posterior cingulate cortex. Cingulate activity was maximal at low stimulus intensities, suggesting that it may function as a gain control center. In the right temporal lobe, the location of the maximal response varied with the intensity, but not with the frequency of the stimuli. In the left temporal lobe, there was evidence for tonotopic organization: a site lateral to the left primary auditory cortex was activated equally by both tones while a second site in primary auditory cortex was more responsive to the higher frequency. Infratentorial activations were contralateral to the stimulated ear and included the lateral cerebellum, the lateral pontine tegmentum, the midbrain and the medial geniculate. Contrary to predictions based on cochlear membrane mechanics, at each intensity, 4.0 kHz stimuli were more potent activators of the brain than the 0.5 kHz stimuli.  (+info)

Loss of endothelium and receptor-mediated dilation in pial arterioles of rats fed a short-term high salt diet. (2/8163)

A high salt diet often is regarded as an accessory risk factor in hypertension, coincidental to the deleterious effect of high blood pressure on vasodilator function. The aim of this study was to determine whether short-term ingestion of a high salt diet per se impairs vasodilator function in the cerebral circulation independent of blood pressure changes. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a normal salt (0.8%) or high salt (4%) diet for 3 days. Mean arterial pressures were similar in the normal and high salt groups (123+/-2 and 125+/-2 mm Hg, respectively). Subsequently, the responses of the in situ pial arterioles to acetylcholine, iloprost, and sodium nitroprusside were determined in cranial windows using intravital videomicroscopy. Pial arterioles of rats fed normal and high salt diets showed similar resting diameters of 69+/-2 and 72+/-3 microm, respectively, but their reactivity patterns to vasodilator stimuli were markedly different. Arterioles of rats fed a normal salt diet dilated progressively up to 17+/-3% in response to the endothelium-dependent agent acetylcholine (10(-9) to 10(-6) mol/L) and dilated by 22+/-2% in response to the prostaglandin I2 receptor agonist iloprost (3x10(-11) mol/L). In contrast, pial arterioles of rats fed a high salt diet constricted by 4+/-3% and 8+/-2% in response to acetylcholine and iloprost, respectively. Sodium nitroprusside (10(-6) mol/L), a nitric oxide donor, dilated pial arterioles of rats fed low and high salt diets by a similar amount (19+/-3% and 16+/-2%, respectively), suggesting that signaling mechanisms for dilation distal to the vascular smooth muscle membrane were intact after high salt intake. These results provide the first evidence that the short-term ingestion of a high salt diet may severely impair the vasodilator function of the in situ cerebral microcirculation independent of blood pressure elevation.  (+info)

Parametric mapping of cerebral blood flow deficits in Alzheimer's disease: a SPECT study using HMPAO and image standardization technique. (3/8163)

This study assessed the accuracy and reliability of Automated Image Registration (AIR) for standardization of brain SPECT images of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Standardized cerebral blood flow (CBF) images of patients with AD and control subjects were then used for group comparison and covariance analyses. METHODS: Thirteen patients with AD at an early stage (age 69.8+/-7.1 y, Clinical Dementia Rating Score 0.5-1.0, Mini-Mental State Examination score 19-23) and 20 age-matched normal subjects (age 69.5+/-8.3 y) participated in this study. 99mTc-hexamethyl propylenamine oxime (HMPAO) brain SPECT and CT scans were acquired for each subject. SPECT images were transformed to a standard size and shape with the help of AIR. Accuracy of AIR for spatial normalization was evaluated by an index calculated on SPECT images. Anatomical variability of standardized target images was evaluated by measurements on corresponding CT scans, spatially normalized using transformations established by the SPECT images. Realigned brain SPECT images of patients and controls were used for group comparison with the help of statistical parameter mapping. Significant differences were displayed on the respective voxel to generate three-dimensional Z maps. CT scans of individual subjects were evaluated by a computer program for brain atrophy. Voxel-based covariance analysis was performed on standardized images with ages and atrophy indices as independent variables. RESULTS: Inaccuracy assessed by functional data was 2.3%. The maximum anatomical variability was 4.9 mm after standardization. Z maps showed significantly decreased regional CBF (rCBF) in the frontal, parietal and temporal regions in the patient group (P < 0.001). Covariance analysis revealed that the effects of aging on rCBF were more pronounced compared with atrophy, especially in intact cortical areas at an early stage of AD. Decrease in rCBF was partly due to senility and atrophy, however these two factors cannot explain all the deficits. CONCLUSION: AIR can transform SPECT images of AD patients with acceptable accuracy without any need for corresponding structural images. The frontal regions of the brain, in addition to parietal and temporal lobes, may show reduced CBF in patients with AD even at an early stage of dementia. The reduced rCBF in the cortical regions cannot be explained entirely by advanced atrophy and fast aging process.  (+info)

Nitric oxide modulates endothelin 1-induced Ca2+ mobilization and cytoskeletal F-actin filaments in human cerebromicrovascular endothelial cells. (4/8163)

A functional interrelation between nitric oxide (NO), the endothelial-derived vasodilating factor, and endothelin 1 (ET-1), the potent vasoconstrictive peptide, was investigated in microvascular endothelium of human brain. Nor-1 dose-dependently decreased the ET-1-stimulated mobilization of Ca2+. This response was mimicked with cGMP and abrogated by inhibitors of guanylyl cyclase or cGMP-dependent protein kinase G. These findings indicate that NO and ET-1 interactions involved in modulation of intracellular Ca2+ are mediated by cGMP/protein kinase G. In addition, Nor-1-mediated effects were associated with rearrangements of cytoskeleton F-actin filaments. The results suggest mechanisms by which NO-ET-1 interactions may contribute to regulation of microvascular function.  (+info)

Expression of neuropeptide Y receptors mRNA and protein in human brain vessels and cerebromicrovascular cells in culture. (5/8163)

Neuropeptide Y (NPY) has been suggested as an important regulator of CBF. However, except for the presence of Y1 receptors in large cerebral arteries, little is known about its possible sites of action on brain vessels. In this study, we sought to identify the NPY receptors present in the human cerebrovascular bed. Specific Y1 receptor binding sites, localized on the smooth muscle of human pial vessels and potently competed by NPY, polypeptide YY (PYY), and the selective Y1 receptor antagonist BIBP 3226, were identified by quantitative radioautography of the Y1 radioligand [125I]-[Leu31, Pro34]-PYY. In contrast, no specific binding of the Y2-([125I]-PYY3-36) and Y4/Y5-(125I-human pancreatic polypeptide [hPP]) radioligands could be detected. By in situ hybridization, expression of Y1 receptor mRNA was restricted to the smooth muscle layer of pial vessels, whereas no specific signals were detected for either Y2, Y4, or Y5 receptors. Similarly, using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), mRNA for Y1 but not Y2, Y4, or Y5 receptors was consistently detected in isolated human pial vessels, intracortical microvessels, and capillaries. In human brain microvascular cells in culture, PCR products for the Y1 receptors were exclusively found in the smooth muscle cells. In cultures of human brain astrocytes, a cell type that associates intimately with brain microvessels, PCR products for Y1, Y2, and Y4 but not Y5 receptors were identified. Finally, NPY significantly inhibited the forskolin-induced cAMP production in smooth muscle but not in endothelial cell cultures. We conclude that smooth muscle Y1 receptors are the primary if not exclusive NPY receptors associated with human brain extraparenchymal and intraparenchymal blood vessels, where they most likely mediate cerebral vasoconstriction.  (+info)

Disrupted temporal lobe connections in semantic dementia. (6/8163)

Semantic dementia refers to the variant of frontotemporal dementia in which there is progressive semantic deterioration and anomia in the face of relative preservation of other language and cognitive functions. Structural imaging and SPECT studies of such patients have suggested that the site of damage, and by inference the region critical to semantic processing, is the anterolateral temporal lobe, especially on the left. Recent functional imaging studies of normal participants have revealed a network of areas involved in semantic tasks. The present study used PET to examine the consequences of focal damage to the anterolateral temporal cortex for the operation of this semantic network. We measured PET activation associated with a semantic decision task relative to a visual decision task in four patients with semantic dementia compared with six age-matched normal controls. Normals activated a network of regions consistent with previous studies. The patients activated some areas consistently with the normals, including some regions of significant atrophy, but showed substantially reduced activity particularly in the left posterior inferior temporal gyrus (iTG) (Brodmann area 37/19). Voxel-based morphometry, used to identify the regions of structural deficit, revealed significant anterolateral temporal atrophy (especially on the left), but no significant structural damage to the posterior inferior temporal lobe. Other evidence suggests that the left posterior iTG is critically involved in lexical-phonological retrieval: the lack of activation here is consistent with the observation that these patients are all anomic. We conclude that changes in activity in regions distant from the patients' structural damage support the argument that their prominent anomia is due to disrupted temporal lobe connections.  (+info)

The cerebral haemodynamics of music perception. A transcranial Doppler sonography study. (7/8163)

The perception of music has been investigated by several neurophysiological and neuroimaging methods. Results from these studies suggest a right hemisphere dominance for non-musicians and a possible left hemisphere dominance for musicians. However, inconsistent results have been obtained, and not all variables have been controlled by the different methods. We performed a study with functional transcranial Doppler sonography (fTCD) of the middle cerebral artery to evaluate changes in cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) during different periods of music perception. Twenty-four healthy right-handed subjects were enrolled and examined during rest and during listening to periods of music with predominant language, rhythm and harmony content. The gender, musical experience and mode of listening of the subjects were chosen as independent factors; the type of music was included as the variable in repeated measurements. We observed a significant increase of CBFV in the right hemisphere in non-musicians during harmony perception but not during rhythm perception; this effect was more pronounced in females. Language perception was lateralized to the left hemisphere in all subject groups. Musicians showed increased CBFV values in the left hemisphere which were independent of the type of stimulus, and background listeners showed increased CBFV values during harmony perception in the right hemisphere which were independent of their musical experience. The time taken to reach the peak of CBFV was significantly longer in non-musicians when compared with musicians during rhythm and harmony perception. Pulse rates were significantly decreased in non-musicians during harmony perception, probably due to a specific relaxation effect in this subgroup. The resistance index did not show any significant differences, suggesting only regional changes of small resistance vessels but not of large arteries. Our fTCD study confirms previous findings of right hemisphere lateralization for harmony perception in non-musicians. In addition, we showed that this effect is more pronounced in female subjects and in background listeners and that the lateralization is delayed in non-musicians compared with musicians for the perception of rhythm and harmony stimuli. Our data suggest that musicians and non-musicians have different strategies to lateralize musical stimuli, with a delayed but marked right hemisphere lateralization during harmony perception in non-musicians and an attentive mode of listening contributing to a left hemisphere lateralization in musicians.  (+info)

Correlation of regional cerebral blood flow and change of plasma sodium concentration during genesis and satiation of thirst. (8/8163)

Positron emission tomography studies were conducted during genesis of moderate thirst by rapid i.v. infusion of hypertonic saline (0.51 M) and after satiation of thirst by drinking water. The correlation of regional cerebral blood flow with the change in the plasma Na concentration showed a significant group of cerebral activations in the anterior cingulate region and also a site in the middle temporal gyrus and in the periaqueductal gray. Strongest deactivations occurred in the parahippocampal and frontal gyri. The data are consistent with an important role of the anterior cingulate in the genesis of thirst.  (+info)

Cerebrovascular circulation refers to the network of blood vessels that supply oxygenated blood and nutrients to the brain tissue, and remove waste products. It includes the internal carotid arteries, vertebral arteries, circle of Willis, and the intracranial arteries that branch off from them.

The internal carotid arteries and vertebral arteries merge to form the circle of Willis, a polygonal network of vessels located at the base of the brain. The anterior cerebral artery, middle cerebral artery, posterior cerebral artery, and communicating arteries are the major vessels that branch off from the circle of Willis and supply blood to different regions of the brain.

Interruptions or abnormalities in the cerebrovascular circulation can lead to various neurological conditions such as stroke, transient ischemic attack (TIA), and vascular dementia.

Blood circulation, also known as cardiovascular circulation, refers to the process by which blood is pumped by the heart and circulated throughout the body through a network of blood vessels, including arteries, veins, and capillaries. This process ensures that oxygen and nutrients are delivered to cells and tissues, while waste products and carbon dioxide are removed.

The circulation of blood can be divided into two main parts: the pulmonary circulation and the systemic circulation. The pulmonary circulation involves the movement of blood between the heart and the lungs, where it picks up oxygen and releases carbon dioxide. The systemic circulation refers to the movement of blood between the heart and the rest of the body, delivering oxygen and nutrients to cells and tissues while picking up waste products for removal.

The heart plays a central role in blood circulation, acting as a pump that contracts and relaxes to move blood through the body. The contraction of the heart's left ventricle pushes oxygenated blood into the aorta, which then branches off into smaller arteries that carry blood throughout the body. The blood then flows through capillaries, where it exchanges oxygen and nutrients for waste products and carbon dioxide with surrounding cells and tissues. The deoxygenated blood is then collected in veins, which merge together to form larger vessels that eventually return the blood back to the heart's right atrium. From there, the blood is pumped into the lungs to pick up oxygen and release carbon dioxide, completing the cycle of blood circulation.

Extracorporeal circulation (ECC) is a term used in medicine to describe the process of temporarily taking over the functions of the heart and lungs by using a machine. This allows the surgeon to perform certain types of surgery, such as open-heart surgery, on a still and bloodless operating field.

During ECC, the patient's blood is circulated outside the body through a pump and oxygenator. The pump helps to maintain blood flow and pressure, while the oxygenator adds oxygen to the blood and removes carbon dioxide. This allows the surgeon to stop the heart and arrest its motion, making it easier to perform delicate procedures on the heart and surrounding structures.

Extracorporeal circulation is a complex and high-risk procedure that requires careful monitoring and management by a team of healthcare professionals. It carries risks such as bleeding, infection, and injury to blood vessels or organs. However, when performed correctly, it can be a life-saving measure for patients undergoing certain types of surgery.

Pulmonary circulation refers to the process of blood flow through the lungs, where blood picks up oxygen and releases carbon dioxide. This is a vital part of the overall circulatory system, which delivers nutrients and oxygen to the body's cells while removing waste products like carbon dioxide.

In pulmonary circulation, deoxygenated blood from the systemic circulation returns to the right atrium of the heart via the superior and inferior vena cava. The blood then moves into the right ventricle through the tricuspid valve and gets pumped into the pulmonary artery when the right ventricle contracts.

The pulmonary artery divides into smaller vessels called arterioles, which further branch into a vast network of tiny capillaries in the lungs. Here, oxygen from the alveoli diffuses into the blood, binding to hemoglobin in red blood cells, while carbon dioxide leaves the blood and is exhaled through the nose or mouth.

The now oxygenated blood collects in venules, which merge to form pulmonary veins. These veins transport the oxygen-rich blood back to the left atrium of the heart, where it enters the systemic circulation once again. This continuous cycle enables the body's cells to receive the necessary oxygen and nutrients for proper functioning while disposing of waste products.

Brain ischemia is the medical term used to describe a reduction or interruption of blood flow to the brain, leading to a lack of oxygen and glucose delivery to brain tissue. This can result in brain damage or death of brain cells, known as infarction. Brain ischemia can be caused by various conditions such as thrombosis (blood clot formation), embolism (obstruction of a blood vessel by a foreign material), or hypoperfusion (reduced blood flow). The severity and duration of the ischemia determine the extent of brain damage. Symptoms can range from mild, such as transient ischemic attacks (TIAs or "mini-strokes"), to severe, including paralysis, speech difficulties, loss of consciousness, and even death. Immediate medical attention is required for proper diagnosis and treatment to prevent further damage and potential long-term complications.

Ischemia is the medical term used to describe a lack of blood flow to a part of the body, often due to blocked or narrowed blood vessels. This can lead to a shortage of oxygen and nutrients in the tissues, which can cause them to become damaged or die. Ischemia can affect many different parts of the body, including the heart, brain, legs, and intestines. Symptoms of ischemia depend on the location and severity of the blockage, but they may include pain, cramping, numbness, weakness, or coldness in the affected area. In severe cases, ischemia can lead to tissue death (gangrene) or organ failure. Treatment for ischemia typically involves addressing the underlying cause of the blocked blood flow, such as through medication, surgery, or lifestyle changes.

An encyclopedia is a comprehensive reference work containing articles on various topics, usually arranged in alphabetical order. In the context of medicine, a medical encyclopedia is a collection of articles that provide information about a wide range of medical topics, including diseases and conditions, treatments, tests, procedures, and anatomy and physiology. Medical encyclopedias may be published in print or electronic formats and are often used as a starting point for researching medical topics. They can provide reliable and accurate information on medical subjects, making them useful resources for healthcare professionals, students, and patients alike. Some well-known examples of medical encyclopedias include the Merck Manual and the Stedman's Medical Dictionary.

Sickle cell anemia is a genetic disorder that affects the hemoglobin in red blood cells. Hemoglobin is responsible for carrying oxygen throughout the body. In sickle cell anemia, the hemoglobin is abnormal and causes the red blood cells to take on a sickle shape, rather than the normal disc shape. These sickled cells are stiff and sticky, and they can block blood vessels, causing tissue damage and pain. They also die more quickly than normal red blood cells, leading to anemia.

People with sickle cell anemia often experience fatigue, chronic pain, and jaundice. They may also have a higher risk of infections and complications such as stroke, acute chest syndrome, and priapism. The disease is inherited from both parents, who must both be carriers of the sickle cell gene. It primarily affects people of African descent, but it can also affect people from other ethnic backgrounds.

There is no cure for sickle cell anemia, but treatments such as blood transfusions, medications to manage pain and prevent complications, and bone marrow transplantation can help improve quality of life for affected individuals. Regular medical care and monitoring are essential for managing the disease effectively.

Unconsciousness is a state of complete awareness where a person is not responsive to stimuli and cannot be awakened. It is often caused by severe trauma, illness, or lack of oxygen supply to the brain. In medical terms, it is defined as a lack of response to verbal commands, pain, or other stimuli, indicating that the person's brain is not functioning at a level necessary to maintain wakefulness and awareness.

Unconsciousness can be described as having different levels, ranging from drowsiness to deep coma. The causes of unconsciousness can vary widely, including head injury, seizure, stroke, infection, drug overdose, or lack of oxygen supply to the brain. Depending on the cause and severity, unconsciousness may last for a few seconds or continue for an extended period, requiring medical intervention and treatment.

Myocardial ischemia is a condition in which the blood supply to the heart muscle (myocardium) is reduced or blocked, leading to insufficient oxygen delivery and potential damage to the heart tissue. This reduction in blood flow typically results from the buildup of fatty deposits, called plaques, in the coronary arteries that supply the heart with oxygen-rich blood. The plaques can rupture or become unstable, causing the formation of blood clots that obstruct the artery and limit blood flow.

Myocardial ischemia may manifest as chest pain (angina pectoris), shortness of breath, fatigue, or irregular heartbeats (arrhythmias). In severe cases, it can lead to myocardial infarction (heart attack) if the oxygen supply is significantly reduced or cut off completely, causing permanent damage or death of the heart muscle. Early diagnosis and treatment of myocardial ischemia are crucial for preventing further complications and improving patient outcomes.

Otorhinolaryngologic diseases, also known as ear, nose, and throat (ENT) diseases, refer to a group of medical conditions that affect the ears, nose, and/or throat. These specialized areas are closely related both anatomically and functionally, and disorders in one area can often have impacts on the others.

Here are some examples of otorhinolaryngologic diseases categorized by the affected area:

1. Otologic diseases - affecting the ear:
* Otitis media (ear infection)
* Otitis externa (swimmer's ear)
* Tinnitus (ringing in the ears)
* Hearing loss
* Meniere's disease (inner ear disorder causing vertigo, tinnitus, and hearing loss)
* Acoustic neuroma (noncancerous tumor on the vestibular nerve)
2. Rhinologic diseases - affecting the nose:
* Allergic rhinitis (hay fever)
* Non-allergic rhinitis
* Sinusitis (sinus infection)
* Deviated septum
* Nasal polyps
* Epistaxis (nosebleed)
3. Laryngologic diseases - affecting the throat and voice box:
* Laryngitis (inflammation of the larynx, causing hoarseness or voice loss)
* Vocal cord nodules or polyps
* Reflux laryngitis (acid reflux irritating the throat)
* Subglottic stenosis (narrowing of the airway below the vocal cords)
* Laryngeal cancer
4. Common otorhinolaryngologic diseases:
* Tonsillitis (inflammation of the tonsils, often causing sore throat and difficulty swallowing)
* Adenoiditis (inflammation of the adenoids, commonly seen in children)
* Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA, a disorder characterized by pauses in breathing during sleep)
* Pharyngitis (inflammation of the pharynx or throat)

Otorhinolaryngologists, also known as ENT specialists, diagnose and treat these conditions. They may use various methods such as physical examination, imaging studies, endoscopy, and laboratory tests to determine the best course of treatment for each individual patient.

"The cerebral circulation and cerebrovascular disease I: Anatomy". Brain Circulation. 3 (2): 45-56. doi:10.4103/bc.bc_10_17. PMC ... The following description is based on idealized human cerebral circulation. The pattern of circulation and its nomenclature ... The anterior cerebral circulation is the blood supply to the anterior portion of the brain including eyes. It is supplied by ... Cerebral circulation is the movement of blood through a network of cerebral arteries and veins supplying the brain. The rate of ...
... gaseous messengers in cerebrovascular circulation". J. Appl. Physiol. 100 (3): 1065-76. doi:10.1152/japplphysiol.00793.2005. ...
"Computer Modeling of Anterior Circulation Stroke: Proof of Concept in Cerebrovascular Occlusion". Frontiers in Neurology. 5: ... Leptomeningeal circulation has been observed in mice and rats during experiments to assess changes associated with disease and ... The leptomeningeal collateral circulation (also known as leptomeningeal anastomoses or pial collaterals) is a network of small ... There is anatomical variation in collateral circulation from person to person, and as we age, collateral vessels decrease in ...
Moyamoya disease is an extremely rare cerebrovascular condition that limits blood circulation to the brain, consequently ... If sufficient circulation is restored within a short period of time, symptoms may be transient. However, if a significant ...
San Francisco is a collective of faculty and staff investigating matters related to cerebral circulation, particularly ... The Center for Cerebrovascular Research was established at the University of California San Francisco in 2000.[citation needed ... The Center for Cerebrovascular Research at the University of California, ... cerebrovascular disease resulting from narrowing of major blood vessels in the brain and vascular malformation of the brain. ...
... blood circulation MeSH G09.330.582.163.159 - cerebrovascular circulation MeSH G09.330.582.163.248 - collateral circulation MeSH ... pulmonary circulation MeSH G09.330.582.163.780 - regional blood flow MeSH G09.330.582.163.812 - renal circulation MeSH G09.330. ... splanchnic circulation MeSH G09.330.582.163.881.552 - liver circulation MeSH G09.330.582.400 - hemodynamic processes MeSH ... pulmonary circulation MeSH G09.772.770.755 - respiration MeSH G09.772.770.755.700 - respiratory mechanics MeSH G09.772.770.755. ...
Frijns CJ, Kappelle LJ (Aug 2002). "Inflammatory cell adhesion molecules in ischemic cerebrovascular disease". Stroke: A ... Journal of Cerebral Circulation. 33 (8): 2115-22. doi:10.1161/01.STR.0000021902.33129.69. PMID 12154274. Annels NE, Mansfield D ...
... cerebrovascular, and respiratory diseases: a meta-analysis". Circulation. 126 (18): 2177-83. doi:10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA. ... cerebrovascular, and respiratory diseases, and that "More comprehensive laws were associated with larger changes in risk." The ...
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Newer methods allow development of cerebrovascular organoids, and micro pumps to provide circulation through them are being ...
A Journal of Cerebral Circulation. 31 (11): 2648-52. doi:10.1161/01.STR.31.11.2648. PMID 11062289. Dragon-Durey MA, Rougier N, ... "Frequencies of certain complement protein alleles and serum levels of anti-heat-shock protein antibodies in cerebrovascular ...
... disease includes a variety of medical conditions that affect the blood vessels of the brain and the cerebral circulation. ... The incidence of cerebrovascular disease increases as an individual ages. Causes of acquired cerebrovascular disease include ... Other symptoms of cerebrovascular disease include migraines, seizures, epilepsy, or cognitive decline. However, cerebrovascular ... Cerebrovascular diseases can also present less commonly with headache or seizures. Any of these diseases can result in vascular ...
... system 747.81 Congenital anomalies of cerebrovascular system 747.82 Spinal vessel anomaly 747.83 Persistent fetal circulation ...
Posterior Circulation: Large Artery Occlusive Disease and Embolism", Primer on Cerebrovascular Diseases (Second Edition), San ...
It can also be used when there are cases of acute and chronic ischemic brain blood circulation disorders, reduced working ... capacity, physical and psycho-emotional overload as well as during the recovery period after cerebrovascular disorders, head ... ocular ischemic syndrome and other ocular disease caused by disturbed arterial circulation and may also have some effect on ...
Her main research interests are cryptogenic stroke, heart-brain interactions (cerebrovascular disease), and precision medicine ... Circulation, Neurology, European Journal of Neurology, Journal of the Neurological Sciences, Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ... Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases, European Neurology, International Journal of Stroke Research, JAMA Neurology, ...
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Lassen, N. A. (June 1984). "Cerebral Blood Flow and Blood Volume Tomography by SPECT in Cerebrovascular Disease". Clinical ... thereby predicting cerebral circulation. Leenders, K. L.; Perani, D.; Lammertsma, A. A.; Heather, J. D.; Buckingham, P.; Jones ... It is a new method for studying hemodynamic changes in brain pathophysiology, including clinical studies of cerebrovascular ... Both cerebral blood volume and cerebral blood flow depend on several important parameters, including cerebrovascular resistance ...
An intracranial aneurysm, also known as a cerebral aneurysm, is a cerebrovascular disorder in which weakness in the wall of a ... These cells initially invade the subarachnoid space from the circulation in order to phagocytose the hemorrhaged red blood ... Aneurysms in the posterior circulation (basilar artery, vertebral arteries and posterior communicating artery) have a higher ... and passed through blood vessels into the cerebral circulation and the aneurysm. Coils are pushed into the aneurysm, or ...
To image the anterior cerebral circulation such as internal and external carotid arteries and its branches, AP, Towne's and ... Some risk factors of complications are if the subject is having subarachnoid haemorrhage, atherosclerotic cerebrovascular ... To image the posterior circulation, such as vertebral and basilar arteries, AP, Towne's view, lateral projections near the back ... Ross IB, Luzardo GD (February 2006). "Direct access to the carotid circulation by cut down for endovascular neuro-interventions ...
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2 (3). Streeten, D.H.P. (1987). Orthostatic Disorders of the Circulation. New York: Plenum Medical. p. 116. ISBN 978-1-4684- ... Increased occurrence of silent cerebrovascular ischemia Systolic orthostatic hypertension increases stroke risk. Orthostatic ... Circulation Journal. 73 (6): 1002-1007. doi:10.1253/circj.cj-09-0286. PMID 19430163. Yatsuya H, Folsom AR, Alonso A, Gottesman ... Japanese Circulation Journal. 52 (12): 1408-1414. doi:10.1253/jcj.52.1408. PMID 2977192. Takada Y, Shimizu H, Kazatani Y, ...
Circulation. 118 (25): 2852-2859. doi:10.1161/circulationaha.108.191175. PMID 19106407. Watanabe, J; Ogata, T; Hamada, O; ... Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases. 23 (6): 1332-6. doi:10.1016/j.jstrokecerebrovasdis.2013.11.004. PMID 24462461. ... carotid artery occlusion The person has a previous complete hemispheric stroke on the ipsilateral and complete cerebrovascular ...
Circulation. 74 (6): 1399-1495. doi:10.1161/01.cir.74.6.1399. PMID 3536154. Lorenz MW, Markus HS, Bots ML, Rosvall M, Sitzer M ... Cerebrovascular Diseases. 34 (4): 290-296. doi:10.1159/000343145. ISSN 1421-9786. PMC 3760791. PMID 23128470. Dalla Pozza, ... Circulation Journal. 69 (8): 903-907. doi:10.1253/circj.69.903. ISSN 1346-9843. PMID 16041157. Touboul, P.-J.; Hennerici, M. G ... Circulation. 115 (4): 459-67. doi:10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.106.628875. PMID 17242284. Costanzo P, Perrone-Filardi P, Vassallo E, ...
Differences in mean blood pressure drive the flow of blood around the circulation. The rate of mean blood flow depends on both ... May 2010). "Long-term blood pressure fluctuation and cerebrovascular disease in an elderly cohort". Archives of Neurology. 67 ( ... Mean blood pressure drops over the whole circulation, although most of the fall occurs along the small arteries and arterioles ... Blood pressure generally refers to the arterial pressure in the systemic circulation. However, measurement of pressures in the ...
... is a cerebrovascular neurosurgeon and the director of the Division of Cerebrovascular Neurosurgery [3], the field created by ... In 1913 and 1914, Dandy and Kenneth D. Blackfan published two landmark papers on the production, circulation, and absorption of ... which marked the birth of cerebrovascular neurosurgery. During his 40-year medical career, Dandy published five books and more ... including the description of the circulation of cerebrospinal fluid in the brain, surgical treatment of hydrocephalus, the ...
In this way, the same flow through the coronary circulation is maintained over a range of pressures. This part of coronary ... Paulson, O. B.; S. Strandgaard; L. Edvinsson (1990). "Cerebral autoregulation". Cerebrovascular and Brain Metabolism Reviews. 2 ... If a sufficient flow of oxygen is met and the resistance in the coronary circulation rises (perhaps due to vasoconstriction), ... Sarnoff SJ, Mitchell JH, Gilmore JP, Remensnyder JP (1960). "Homeometric autoregulation in the heart" (PDF). Circulation ...
Circulation Journal. 82 (2): 561-571. doi:10.1253/circj.CJ-17-0552. PMID 28931784. Cosset, Jean Marc (2002). "ESTRO Breur Gold ... Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases. 25 (6): 1473-1481. doi:10.1016/j.jstrokecerebrovasdis.2015.12.033. ISSN 1532- ... Circulation Research. 122 (8): 1069-1083. doi:10.1161/CIRCRESAHA.117.311648. PMID 29475983. Uchida, Hiroki; Niizuma, Kuniyasu; ... Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases. 25 (6): 1473-81. doi:10.1016/j.jstrokecerebrovasdis.2015.12.033. PMID 27019988 ...
Spastic paralysis in conditions such as cerebrovascular disease Spastic spinal paralysis Cervical spondylosis Postoperative ... improvement of circulation, and suppression of the pain reflex. The drug inhibits the vicious circle of myotonia by decreasing ... and facilitating muscle movement Eperisone also improves dizziness and tinnitus associated with cerebrovascular disorders or ...
Zimmet JM, Hare JM (October 2006). "Nitroso-redox interactions in the cardiovascular system". Circulation. 114 (14): 1531-44. ... "The potential for xanthine oxidase inhibition in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease". ...
African Americans have impaired blood flow regulation in the brain that could contribute to a greater risk of cerebrovascular ... Impaired brain circulation in African Americans can increase risk of cerebrovascular disease. *Download PDF Copy ... A similar dysfunction in brain circulation could explain the increased risk of cerebrovascular diseases. ... Tags: Blood, Blood Gas, Blood Vessel, Blood Vessels, Brain, Cerebrovascular Disease, Dementia, Exercise, Genes, Physiology, ...
To best manage patients, prognostic factors are needed to inform MT triaging after posterior circulation stroke. Methods: A ... A Meta-Analysis of Prognostic Factors in Patients with Posterior Circulation Stroke after Mechanical Thrombectomy ... Studies included those with posterior circulation stroke cases that underwent MT. The primary outcome measure in this study was ... Background: Posterior circulation stroke is characterized by poor prognosis because its optimal thrombolysis "time window" is ...
Cerebrovascular Circulation / drug effects* * Drug Combinations * GABA Agonists / pharmacology * GABA Modulators / pharmacology ... Neuroprotective and cerebrovascular effects of GABA mimetics] Eksp Klin Farmakol. 2003 Mar-Apr;66(2):53-6. ... Data available in the literature and the results of original investigations are summarized to assess the cerebrovascular and ... Particular attention is given to the neutroprotector and cerebrovascular activity of a new drug composition GABA-mimetic ...
The results strongly suggest that surgical revascularization potentially improves cerebral circulation and decreases ... Cerebrovascular Circulation * Female * Hemodynamics * Humans * Intracranial Aneurysm / diagnostic imaging * Intracranial ... Conclusion: The results strongly suggest that surgical revascularization potentially improves cerebral circulation and ...
"The cerebral circulation and cerebrovascular disease I: Anatomy". Brain Circulation. 3 (2): 45-56. doi:10.4103/bc.bc_10_17. PMC ... The following description is based on idealized human cerebral circulation. The pattern of circulation and its nomenclature ... The anterior cerebral circulation is the blood supply to the anterior portion of the brain including eyes. It is supplied by ... Cerebral circulation is the movement of blood through a network of cerebral arteries and veins supplying the brain. The rate of ...
Cerebrovascular Circulation. Johnson LA, Zuloaga KL, Kugelman TL, Mader KS, Morré JT, Zuloaga DG, Weber S, Marzulla T, Mulford ...
Cerebrovascular Circulation. Johnson LA, Zuloaga KL, Kugelman TL, Mader KS, Morré JT, Zuloaga DG, Weber S, Marzulla T, Mulford ...
... may suggest vasculitis involving the cerebrovascular circulation. ... flow diverter stent in selected ischemic cerebrovascular ... In contrast to atherothrombotic disease of the vertebrobasilar circulation, VAD occurs in a much younger population. The ...
Moyamoya disease is an extremely rare cerebrovascular condition that limits blood circulation to the brain, consequently ... If sufficient circulation is restored within a short period of time, symptoms may be transient. However, if a significant ...
Cerebrovascular Circulation 47% * Pediatrics 41% * Prolonged and intense neuroinflammation after severe traumatic brain injury ...
Cerebrovascular geometry in the anterior circulation: an analysis of diameter, length and the vessel taper ... Cerebrovascular geometry in the anterior circulation: an analysis of diameter, length and the vessel taper ... 11 in the coronary circulation, we sought to identify the presence of any ISA within the intracranial circulation in patients ... The EN has been linked by a number of case reports to a delayed migration phenomenon in the posterior circulation, which ...
Cerebrovascular geometry in the anterior circulation: an analysis of diameter, length and the vessel taper ... Cerebrovascular geometry in the anterior circulation: an analysis of diameter, length and the vessel taper ... 11 in the coronary circulation, we sought to identify the presence of any ISA within the intracranial circulation in patients ... The EN has been linked by a number of case reports to a delayed migration phenomenon in the posterior circulation, which ...
... of Betahistine Hydrochloride Combined with Atorvastatin on Procalcitonin and C-Reactive Protein Levels in Acute Cerebrovascular ... Acute cerebrovascular diseases are a group of common clinical diseases characterized by abnormal cerebrovascular circulation. ... Cerebrovascular diseases have become the second leading cause of death in the world. Cerebrovascular disease is characterized ... of all acute cerebrovascular diseases in incidence rate[5,6]. Clinical treatment of cerebrovascular diseases usually involves ...
In some patients, cerebrovascular involvement caused by carotid or posterior circulation involvement results in strokes. ... but the axillary artery is reconstituted by extensive collateral circulation. ...
The presence of high levels of lactate within the cerebrovascular circulation can result in localized vasodilation, ... Continuous monitoring of cerebrovascular pressure-reactivity in head injury. Acta Neurochir Suppl (1998) 71:74-7. ... Cerebrovascular PRx was calculated as a moving Pearson correlation coefficient between 30 consecutive, 10-s averaged values of ... Continuous monitoring of cerebrovascular pressure reactivity after traumatic brain injury in children. Pediatrics (2009) 124(6 ...
Endothelial progenitor cells during cerebrovascular disease. Stroke; A Journal of Cerebral Circulation. 2005;36(1):151-3.. ... Circulating CD34-positive cells provide an index of cerebrovascular function. Circulation. 2004;109(24):2972-5.. ... Circulation Journal: Official Journal of the Japanese Circulation Society. 2010;74(5):1006-13.. ... Circulation Research. 2002;90(10):E89-93.. *61. Feng Y, Gordts SC, Chen F, Hu Y, Van Craeyveld E, Jacobs F, et al. Topical HDL ...
This may be helpful for the diagnosis and prevention of cerebrovascular accidents in the posterior circulation. ... Material and methods : Thirteen cases of cerebrovascular disease undergoing Interventional treatment were subjected to TCD ... in patients with cardioembolic stroke without acute severe brain swelling might be an indicator of good collateral circulation. ... the effectiveness of TCD monitoring for detection of distal embolism just after Interventional treatment for cerebrovascular ...
Cerebrovascular Disease see Stroke * Chest Pain * CHF see Heart Failure * Childhood Leukemia ...
In this review, the role of cerebrovascular reactivity to L-arginine (CVR-L-Arg) for assessment of cerebral endothelial ... Statin use restored the cerebral circulation reactivity, while there was little change in the systemic circulation measured by ... "Cerebrovascular reactivity to l-arginine in the anterior and posterior cerebral circulation in migraine patients," Acta ... "Differences between cerebrovascular reactivity to L-arginine in the anterior and posterior cerebral circulation," ...
... as it can improve cognitive functions in cerebrovascular diseases and peripheral blood circulation [123,124]. The substances ... Interestingly, some drugs conjugated with glucuronic acid undergo an enterohepatic circulation that ensures a longer presence ... Roberts, M.S.; Magnusson, B.M.; Burczynski, F.J.; Weiss, M. Enterohepatic Circulation: Physiological, Pharmacokinetic and ...
Read full-text medical journal articles from Medscapes Stroke/Cerebrovascular Disease Journal Articles. ... Medical Management vs EVT for LVO Anterior Circulation Stroke Is EVT plus medical treatment in acute stroke patients with LVO ... of the anterior circulation with mild symptoms beneficial compared with medical treatment alone?. Stroke, September 13, 2023 ...
Diseases of the heart and circulation - cardiovascular and cerebrovascular - such as heart attacks and stroke, kill more people ...
... or other disturbances of cerebrovascular circulation EXCLUSION CRITERIA: An individual who meets any of the following criteria ... Evaluation, Pathogenesis, and Treatment of Patients with or at Risk for Cerebrovascular Disease (A Natural History/Disease ... It will 1) establish a registry of patients with cerebrovascular disease (stroke); 2) characterize the natural history of acute ...
The initial validation of the brief inhalation method to measure cerebral oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) with positron emission tomography (PET) was performed in non-human primates with predominantly normal cerebral oxygen metabolism (CMRO2). Sensitivity analysis by computer simulation, however, indicated that this method may be subject to increasing error as CMRO2 decreases. Accuracy of the method under pathologic conditions of reduced CMRO2 has not been determined. Since reduced CMRO2 values are observed frequently in newborn infants and in regions of ischemia and infarction in adults, we determined the accuracy of the brief inhalation method in non-human primates by comparing OEF measured with PET to OEF measured by arteriovenous oxygen difference (A-VO2) under pathologic conditions of reduced CMRO2 (0.27-2.68 ml 100g-1 min-1). A regression equation of OEF (PET) = 1.07 x OEF (A-VO2) + 0.017 (r = 0.99, n = 12) was obtained. The absolute error in oxygen extraction measured with PET was small ...
Circulation; 2012;126(18):2177-83.. *Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Smokefree Policies Improve Health. [accessed ... Association between smoke-free legislation and hospitalizations for cardiac, cerebrovascular, and respiratory diseases: a meta- ...
... and also by you arent heart-related and cerebrovascular (circulation dysfunction impacting your brain) disease. Patients which ...
Cerebrovascular Circulation 19% * A new tool to assess Clinical Diversity In Meta-analyses (CDIM) of interventions. ...
Posterior circulation cerebrovascular events comprise approximately 20% of ischemic events in the brain. Symptoms range from ... Treatment is similar to other ischemic cerebrovascular accidents, including aspirin and high-intensity statin therapy, as well ...
... but the reactivity of the cerebrovascular circulation to carbon dioxide was preserved at normal levels. Infusions of ... The results suggest that prostaglandins are involved in the maintenance of cerebrovascular tone but not in the mechanism of ...
  • Cerebral pressure reactivity is a fundamental component of cerebral autoregulation, whereby cerebrovascular resistance is altered in response to changes in cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) ( 8 ). (frontiersin.org)
  • In this review, the role of cerebrovascular reactivity to L-arginine (CVR-L-Arg) for assessment of cerebral endothelial function is discussed. (hindawi.com)
  • In the past few years cerebrovascular reactivity to L-arginine by means of TCD has emerged as a parameter for evaluation of cerebral endothelial function [ 3 - 7 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Indomethacin was found to result in a reduction in resting CBF of about 25% but the reactivity of the cerebrovascular circulation to carbon dioxide was preserved at normal levels. (bmj.com)
  • Can Alterations in Cerebrovascular CO 2 Reactivity Be Identified Using Transfer Function Analysis without the Requirement for Carbon Dioxide Inhalation? (elsevierpure.com)
  • Since anything that impairs cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) will necessarily result in NVU, regardless of its effect more proximally along the NCC, we can consider mapping of CVR as a surrogate marker of NVU potential. (johnshopkins.edu)
  • Age-related impairments in cerebral blood flow and cerebrovascular reactivity to carbon dioxide (CVRCO2) are established risk factors for stroke that respond favorably to aerobic training. (southwales.ac.uk)
  • Researchers at The University of Texas have found that compared to Caucasian Americans, African Americans have impaired blood flow regulation in the brain that could contribute to a greater risk of cerebrovascular diseases such as stroke, transient ischaemic attack ('mini stroke'), subarachnoid haemorrhage or vascular dementia. (news-medical.net)
  • This could indicate a fundamental difference between the groups or an early change in function, which later in life may link to cerebrovascular diseases like stroke. (news-medical.net)
  • Given the higher prevalence of cerebrovascular disease including stroke among African Americans, this topic deserves more research to identify mechanisms of impairment and determine effective interventions to improve health outcomes in this population. (news-medical.net)
  • Posterior circulation stroke is characterized by poor prognosis because its optimal thrombolysis "time window" is always missed. (karger.com)
  • To best manage patients, prognostic factors are needed to inform MT triaging after posterior circulation stroke. (karger.com)
  • Studies included those with posterior circulation stroke cases that underwent MT. The primary outcome measure in this study was the modified Rankin Scale on day 90. (karger.com)
  • Cerebral infarction is an ischemic stroke, accounting for 70 % of all acute cerebrovascular diseases in incidence rate[ 5 , 6 ]. (ijpsonline.com)
  • Medical Management vs EVT for LVO Anterior Circulation Stroke Is EVT plus medical treatment in acute stroke patients with LVO of the anterior circulation with mild symptoms beneficial compared with medical treatment alone? (medscape.com)
  • Diseases of the heart and circulation - cardiovascular and cerebrovascular - such as heart attacks and stroke, kill more people than any others, accounting for over 15 million deaths, or about 30% of the global total, every year. (nationmaster.com)
  • Complications of DM seen through the prism of coronary artery disease (CAD) involve vascular problems (macro- or microvascular complications), impaired cerebrovascular circulation that develops into ischaemic or haemorrhagic stroke, peripheral arterial disease, and nephropathy (although most kidney disease in diabetic patients is microangiopathic, major vessels that supply the kidney can also develop atheroma, known as diabetic renovascular disease). (escardio.org)
  • This syndrome is most often due to vertebral artery occlusion or, Jun 15, 2020 Patients with lateral medullary stroke (Wallenberg's syndrome) present Available at: https://www.uptodate.com/contents/posterior-circulation- Jun 19, 2016 WHAT IS IT? (netlify.app)
  • Wallenberg syndrome (lateral medullary syndrome/stroke) refers to a cerebrovascular occlusion that occurs in either the vertebral Aug 10, 2020 It is also commonly known as Wallenberg's syndrome or posterior inferior cerebellar artery syndrome (PICA). (netlify.app)
  • The most common cause of mortality worldwide is cerebrovascular disease (CVD), which includes coronary heart disease (CHD), congestive heart failure, CVD and stroke, peripheral artery diseases, carotid artery diseases, and aortoiliac disease. (medscape.com)
  • Periodontal disease has been shown in some studies to be an associated factor in coronary artery disease (CAD) and cerebrovascular disease/ischemic stroke. (medscape.com)
  • Middle cerebral artery blood velocity (MCAv, transcranial Doppler ultrasound), mean arterial pressure (MAP, finger photoplethysmography), and end-tidal partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PETCO2, capnography) were recorded during normocapnia and 3 mins of iso-oxic hypercapnea (5% CO2).Cerebrovascular resistance/conductance indices (CVRi/CVCi) were calculated asMAP/MCAv and MCAv/MAP, respectively, and CVRCO2 as the percentage increase inMCAv from baseline per millimeter of mercury (mm Hg) increase in PETCO2. (southwales.ac.uk)
  • Cerebrovascular diseases can result from reduced blood flow in affected areas of the brain. (news-medical.net)
  • A similar dysfunction in brain circulation could explain the increased risk of cerebrovascular diseases. (news-medical.net)
  • Acute cerebrovascular diseases are a group of common clinical diseases characterized by abnormal cerebrovascular circulation. (ijpsonline.com)
  • In addition to central injury in acute cerebrovascular diseases, which can lead to poor prognosis in patients, fluctuations in the properties and functions of local and circulating immune mediators can also trigger the body to enter an immune imbalance state, leading to poor prognosis in some patients after receiving systematic symptomatic support treatment. (ijpsonline.com)
  • Cerebrovascular diseases have become the second leading cause of death in the world. (ijpsonline.com)
  • With the aging population and significant improvement of living standards in China, the incidence of cerebrovascular diseases has increased at an average annual rate of 8.3 %, ranking first among the causes of death among Chinese residents and being the main cause of illness and death in patients with the nervous system[ 2 ]. (ijpsonline.com)
  • The incidence of acute severe cerebrovascular disease is also increasing year by year with the increasing incidence of cerebrovascular diseases, which is the focus of attention in the medical community. (ijpsonline.com)
  • Middle aged and elderly people are the people with high incidence of acute cerebrovascular diseases. (ijpsonline.com)
  • Clinical treatment of cerebrovascular diseases usually involves controlling the condition through thrombolysis, anticoagulation and repair of damaged nerves, but there is still a lack of specific drugs and related treatment plans. (ijpsonline.com)
  • The coupling mechanism between neuronal firing and cerebrovascular dilatation can be significantly compromised in cerebral diseases, making it difficult to identify eloquent cortical areas near or within resectable lesions by using Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) fMRI. (johnshopkins.edu)
  • In addition, betahistine hydrochloride also has a diuretic effect, which can promote blood circulation, increase organ blood perfusion, reduce myocardial oxygen consumption, improve patient blood pressure levels and ultimately improve symptoms of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular ischemia and hypoxia. (ijpsonline.com)
  • 8 - 10 Because this finding may be associated with adverse clinical events such as late stent thrombosis 10 , 11 in the coronary circulation, we sought to identify the presence of any ISA within the intracranial circulation in patients undergoing stent-mediated coiling by using the self-expanding intracranial EN (Cordis, Miami Lakes, Florida). (ajnr.org)
  • The volume of blood in circulation is called the cerebral blood flow. (wikipedia.org)
  • In case one of the supply arteries is occluded, the Circle of Willis provides interconnections between the anterior and the posterior cerebral circulation along the floor of the cerebral vault, providing blood to tissues that would otherwise become ischemic. (wikipedia.org)
  • Middle cerebral artery (MCA) The posterior cerebral circulation is the blood supply to the posterior portion of the brain, including the occipital lobes, cerebellum and brainstem. (wikipedia.org)
  • The FDA also warned that Contrave can raise hypertension and pulse rate and must stop used in patients with uncontrolled high blood pressure level, and also by you aren't heart-related and cerebrovascular (circulation dysfunction impacting your brain) disease. (maroon5.com)
  • In an analysis of the neuroprotector activity of GABA-mimetics, both their involvement in the maintenance of a balance between exciting and inhibiting processes and participation of the GABAergic mechanisms in regulation of the cerebrovascular tone are considered because proper blood supply is an important factor in the successful therapy of patients with ischemic brain injuries. (nih.gov)
  • Postprocedural 3T-MRA was performed in a cohort of 39 patients undergoing EN stent-assisted intracranial aneurysm coiling. (ajnr.org)
  • In this study, ISA was detectable by 3T-MRA in a significant proportion of patients undergoing EN stent-assisted coiling of ICA aneurysms in a vessel geometry− and stent-deployment location−dependent manner. (ajnr.org)
  • An additional 6 patients who underwent prospective 3T-MRA imaging within 3 days of EN deployment between June 2007 and September 2008, as part of a pilot study on the utility of 3T-MRA in randomly selected patients following stent-coiling, were also included in the study. (ajnr.org)
  • In this article, we review the progress in the treatment of acute cerebrovascular disease patients using betahistine hydrochloride combined with atorvastatin. (ijpsonline.com)
  • In some patients, cerebrovascular involvement caused by carotid or posterior circulation involvement results in strokes. (hcplive.com)
  • Introduction: Various clinical and radiologic variables impact the neurologic prognosis of patients with ischemic cerebrovascular accidents. (bvsalud.org)
  • After mechanical thrombectomy (MT), the recanalization rate of posterior circulation obstruction is significantly increased, but prognosis remains poor. (karger.com)
  • The results strongly suggest that surgical revascularization potentially improves cerebral circulation and decreases hemodynamic stress on collateral vessels, obliterating peripheral artery aneurysms. (nih.gov)
  • Alternatively or concurrently, there is also compelling evidence derived from human clinical studies suggesting that flavonoids can positively affect peripheral and cerebrovascular blood flow, which may be an indirect effective mechanism by which dietary flavonoids can impact on brain health and cognition. (birmingham.ac.uk)
  • The results suggest that prostaglandins are involved in the maintenance of cerebrovascular tone but not in the mechanism of cerebral vasodilation accompanying hypercapnia. (bmj.com)
  • As is the case for the more common cerebrovascular accident affecting cerebral circulation, an acute onset is a clue to the diagnosis. (medscape.com)
  • Therefore, this article mainly reviews the treatment of acute cerebrovascular disease with betahistine hydrochloride combined with atorvastatin, providing scientific reference for clinical treatment of acute cerebrovascular disease. (ijpsonline.com)
  • This topic will review the major clinical syndromes associated with posterior circulation ischemia related to stenosis or occlusion of the large aortic arch, neck, and intracranial arteries. (netlify.app)
  • Although NVU results from a disruption of one or more components of a complex cellular and chemical neurovascular coupling cascade (NCC) MR imaging is only able to evaluate the final step in this NCC involving the ultimate cerebrovascular response. (johnshopkins.edu)
  • These data substantiate the role of MMP proteolytic fragment generation in the lung, its release into the circulation and the reactive bioactivity of that peptidomic response. (cdc.gov)
  • Sudden intense accelerations change the gravitational forces perceived by bodies and can severely impair cerebral circulation and normal functions to the point of becoming serious life-threatening conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Data available in the literature and the results of original investigations are summarized to assess the cerebrovascular and neuroprotector properties of GABA, as well as agonists and modulators of GABA receptors (muscimol, picamilon, phelbamate, clomethiazole, etc. (nih.gov)
  • Analysis of biofluids from these animals revealed that upwards of 85% of the MWCNT-induced peptidomic signal released into the circulation was returned to control levels with MMP blockade. (cdc.gov)
  • The circulation to the spinal cord has unique features related to the rich anastomotic anatomy of the cord that result in relative rarity of spinal cord infarction in comparison to cerebral infarction, as described in the images below. (medscape.com)
  • Cerebrovascular disease is characterized by high incidence rate, high recurrence rate, high disability rate and high mortality[ 1 ]. (ijpsonline.com)
  • The anterior cerebral circulation is the blood supply to the anterior portion of the brain including eyes. (wikipedia.org)
  • The anterior spinal artery is a single long anastomotic channel that lies at the mouth of the anterior central sulcus and supplies the circulation to the anterior two thirds of the spinal cord, shown below. (medscape.com)